Sei sulla pagina 1di 40

Hum II - Take Home Quiz

Cheska Mafaye R. Tablang

2011-01290

IMPRESSIONISM

IMPRESSIONISM

Impressionism is the name given to a colorful style of painting in

France at the end of the 19th century.

The Impressionists searched for a more exact analysis of the effects of color and light in nature.

capture the atmosphere of a particular time of day or the effects of

different weather conditions.

They often worked outdoors and applied their paint in small

brightly colored strokes which meant sacrificing much of the outline

and detail of their subject.

Impressionism abandoned the conventional idea that the shadow

of an object was made up from its color with some brown or black

added. Instead, the Impressionists enriched their colors with the

idea that a shadow is broken up with dashes of its complementary

color.

Claude Monet

(1840-1926)

Rouen Cathedral in

Full Sunlight,

1893/4

(oil on

canvas)

Claude Monet (1840-1926) Rouen Cathedral in Full Sunlight , 1893/4 (oil on canvas)

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette (Bal du moulin de la Galette), Musée d'Orsay, 1876

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette (Bal du moulin de la Galette) ,

Camille Pissarro, Boulevard Montmartre, 1897, the Hermitage, Saint Petersburg

Camille Pissarro, Boulevard Montmartre, 1897, the Hermitage, Saint Petersburg

POST IMPRESSIONISM

POST IMPRESSIONISM

Post Impressionism was not a particular style of painting.

collective title given to the works of a few independent artists at the end of the 19th century.

The Post Impressionists rebelled against the limitations of Impressionism to develop a range of personal styles that influenced the development of art in the 20th century.

Major artists: Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent Van Gogh and Georges Seurat.

Cézanne was an important influence on Picasso and Braque

in their development of Cubism.

Van Gogh's vigorous and vibrant painting technique was

one of the touchstones of both Fauvism and Expressionism.

VINCENT VAN GOGH (1853-

90)

Café Terrace at

Night, 1888 (oil

on canvas)

VINCENT VAN GOGH (1853- 90) Café Terrace at Night , 1888 (oil on canvas)

Henri Rousseau, Le centanaire de I’independance, 1892, oil on canvas, 57 cm x 110 cm, Getty Museum in LA

Henri Rousseau, Le centanaire de I’independance , 1892, oil on canvas, 57 cm x 110 cm,

FAUVISM

FAUVISM

Fauvism was a joyful style of painting that delighted in using outrageously bold colors.

It was developed in France at the beginning of the 20th century by Henri Matisse and André Derain.

The artists who painted in this style were known as 'Les Fauves' (the wild beasts), a title that came from a sarcastic remark in a review by the art critic Louis Vauxcelles.

'Les Fauves' believed that color should be used at its

highest pitch to express the artist's feelings about a subject,

rather than simply to describe what it looks like.

Fauvist paintings have two main characteristics: extremely

simplified drawing and intensely exaggerated color.

HENRI MATISSE

(1869-1954)

The Open Window,

Collioure, 1905

(oil on canvas)

HENRI MATISSE (1869-1954) The Open Window, Collioure , 1905 (oil on canvas)

André Derain, Charing Cross Bridge, London, 1906, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

André Derain, Charing Cross Bridge, London, 1906, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

Henri Matisse, Luxe, Calme et Volupté, 1904, oil on canvas, 98 x 118.5 cm, Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France

Henri Matisse, Luxe, Calme et Volupté , 1904, oil on canvas, 98 x 118.5 cm, Musée

EXPRESSIONISM

EXPRESSIONISM

ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER

(1880-1938)

The Red Tower

at Halle, 1915

(oil on canvas)

ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER (1880-1938) The Red Tower at Halle , 1915 (oil on canvas)

The

Scream by Edvard

Munch (1893)

The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893)

Franz Marc, Fighting Forms, 1914.

Franz Marc, Fighting Forms , 1914.

ABSTRACT ART

ABSTRACT ART

Abstract Art is a generic term that describes two different

methods of abstraction: 'semi abstraction' and 'pure

abstraction'. The word 'abstract' means to withdraw part of something in order to consider it separately. In Abstract art

that 'something' is one or more of the visual elements of a

subject: its line, shape, tone, pattern, texture, or form.

Semi-Abstraction is where the image still has one foot in representational art, (see Cubism and Futurism). It uses a type of stylisation where the artist selects, develops and

refines specific visual elements (e.g. line, color and shape)

in order to create a poetic reconstruction or simplified essence of the original subject.

Pure Abstraction is where the artist uses visual elements

independently as the actual subject of the work itself.

Pablo Picasso,

1913-14, Head

(Tête), cut and

pasted colored paper, gouache

and charcoal on

paperboard, 43.5

x 33 cm, Scottish

National Gallery

of Modern Art,

Edinburgh

pasted colored paper, gouache and charcoal on paperboard, 43.5 x 33 cm, Scottish National Gallery of

Henri Matisse, The Yellow

Curtain,

1915.

Henri Matisse, The Yellow Curtain , 1915.

Wassily

Kandinsky, On White 2,

1923

Wassily Kandinsky, On White 2 , 1923

CUBISM

CUBISM

invented around 1907 in Paris by Pablo Picasso and Georges

Braque.

first abstract style of modern art.

ignore the traditions of perspective drawing and show you

many views of a subject at one time.

The Cubists believed that the traditions of Western art had

become exhausted and to revitalize their work, they drew on the expressive energy of art from other cultures, particularly

African art.

There are two distinct phases of the Cubist style: Analytical Cubism (pre 1912) and Synthetic Cubism (post 1912).

PABLO PICASSO

(1881-1973)

Ambroise

Vollard, 1915 (oil

on canvas)

PABLO PICASSO (1881-1973) Ambroise Vollard , 1915 (oil on canvas)

Robert Delaunay,

Simultaneous

Windows on the

City, 1912, Hamburger

Kunsthalle

Robert Delaunay, Simultaneous Windows on the City , 1912, Hamburger Kunsthalle

DADAISM

DADAISM

art movement of the European avant-garde in

the early 20th century.

born out of negative reaction to the horrors

of World War I.

Dada is the groundwork to abstract art and

sound poetry, a starting point for performance

art, a prelude to postmodernism, an influence

on pop art, a celebration of antiart to be later

embraced for anarcho-political uses in the 1960s and the movement that lay the foundation

for Surrealism.”

Hannah Höch, Cut

with the Dada

Kitchen Knife

through the Last

Weimar Beer-Belly

Cultural Epoch in

Germany, 1919, collage of pasted

papers, 90×144 cm,

Nationalgalerie,

Staatliche Museen

zu Berlin

Cultural Epoch in Germany , 1919, collage of pasted papers, 90×144 cm, Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu

SURREALISM

SURREALISM

cultural movement that began in the early 1920s,

and is best known for its visual artworks and

writings.

to "resolve the previously contradictory

conditions of dream and reality."

Artists painted unnerving, illogical scenes with

photographic precision, created strange creatures

from everyday objects and developed painting techniques that allowed the unconscious to

express itself.

Salvador Dalí, The Persistence of

Memory (1931), Museum of Modern Art, Manhattan

Salvador Dalí, The Persistence of Memory (1931), Museum of Modern Art, Manhattan

Max Ernst, The

Elephant

Celebes (1921),

Tate, London

Max Ernst, The Elephant Celebes (1921), Tate, London

ART NOVEAU

ART NOVEAU

is an international philosophy and style of art,

architecture and applied artespecially

thedecorative artsthat was most popular

during 18901910.

“new art”

inspired by natural forms and structures, not only

in flowers and plants but also in curved lines.

Architects tried to harmonize with the natural environment.

Tiffany lamp,

Carnegie

Museum of

Art

Tiffany lamp, Carnegie Museum of Art

The Peacock Skirt,

by Aubrey

Beardsley,

(1892)

The Peacock Skirt, by Aubrey Beardsley, (1892)