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Chapter

7

Timber Design and General Analysis

The timber design and general analysis modules can be used to design timber members, calculate section properties, wind pressures on buildings and evaluate drainage systems of building roofs.

wind pressures on buildings and evaluate drainage systems of building roofs. Timber Design and General Analysis

Timber Design and General Analysis

7-1

wind pressures on buildings and evaluate drainage systems of building roofs. Timber Design and General Analysis

Quick Reference

General PROKON Analysis Tools

7-3

Timber Member Design

7-5

Section Properties Calculation

7-19

Wind Pressure Analysis

7-29

Gutter Design

7-35

Calculation 7-19 Wind Pressure Analysis 7-29 Gutter Design 7-35 7-2 Timber Design and General Analysis

7-2

Timber Design and General Analysis

General PROKON Analysis Tools

The PROKON suite includes a number of simple analysis tools to simplify your life. These include:

Timber Member Design: A module that designs timber members for combined axial and bending stresses by post-processing Plane Frame Analysis results

Section Properties Calculation: For the calculation of bending and torsional properties of any generalised section.

Wind Pressure Analysis: For determining the free stream velocity pressure on a building.

Gutter Design: Use this module to design a drainage system for a roof by sizing a gutter, outlet and downpipe.

General PROKON Analysis Tools

7-3

module to design a drainage system for a roof by sizing a gutter, outlet and downpipe.
7-4 General PROKON Analysis Tools

7-4

General PROKON Analysis Tools

Timber Member Design

The Timber Member Design module, Timsec is used for designing timber members subjected to a combination of axial and bending stresses. It acts as a post-processor for the Plane Frame Analysis module.

of axial and bending stresses. It acts as a post-processor for the Plane Frame Analysis module.

Timber Member Design

7-5

Theory and application

A brief background is given below regarding the application of the design principles.

Design scope

The program can design rectangular timber members subjected to axial force and uni-axial bending moment. The output from the Plane Frame Analysis module can be read and members sizes evaluated and optimised. Members can also be designed interactively without a prior frame analysis.

Design codes

Timsec designs timber uses the allowable stress design procedures given in SABS 0163 - 1980.

Symbols

Where possible, the same symbols are used as in the design codes:

possible, the same symbols are used as in the design codes: Geometry and design parameters B

Geometry and design parameters

B

: Section width (mm).

D

: Section depth (mm).

k

2 : Stress modification factor for load sharing.

k

3 : Stress modification factor for the type of structure.

k

4 : Stress modification factor for quality of fabrication.

k

5 : Stress modification factor for moisture content.

L ex factor : Effective length factor for buckling about the x-x axis of the member.

L ey factor : Effective length factor for buckling about the y-y axis of the member.

L e factor : Effective length factor for lateral torsional buckling.

L / r : Slenderness ratio of the element, given by the highest ratio of effective length divided by the radius of gyration, for the x-x and y-y axes.

Note: The program has been developed for fast design of fully triangulated or braced trusses. The effective lengths for buckling about the x-x axis and lateral torsional buckling is therefore automatically calculated using the relevant individual member length, i.e. the length between neighbouring nodes. In contrast with this, the effective length for buckling about the y-y axis is based on the laterally unsupported length.

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Timber Member Design

Forces and stresses

F : Axial force (kN).

f c : Axial stress in member (MPa).

f b : Bending stress in member (MPa).

M : Bending moment about the x-x axis (kNm).

p c : Allowable axial stress (MPa).

p b : Allowable bending stress (MPa).

Design parameters

Different design parameters can be set for each group of elements designed:

Effective length factors

The effective length factors depend on the type of restraint to be expected at each end of compression members. Guidelines are given in the code:

Effective lengths for compression members: See clause 6.4.3.

Effective lateral torsional lengths for members in bending: Refer to clause 6.2.3.2 b.

Considering a truss, the equivalent length L xx relates to in-plane buckling. For struts where rotational fixety is provided by the connection, e.g. two or more fasteners or a welded connection, a value between 0.70 and 0.85 is usually appropriate. Where rotation at the joints are possible, e.g. single bolted connection, a value of 1.0 would often be acceptable.

The L yy factor relates to buckling in the vertical plane. This phenomenon can often govern the design of the top and bottom flanges of a truss that can buckle in a snakelike 'S' pattern, giving an effective length equal to unrestrained length. Lateral restraints are normally provided to reduce this effective length. For example, with braced purlins connected to the top flange of the truss, the effective length could be taken equal to the purlin spacing.

The L e factor relates to lateral torsional buckling about the weak axis. Where a beam has lateral supports that prevent rotation and lateral movement at its ends and at intermediate points, the effective laterally unsupported length can be taken as the distance between successive lateral supports.

taken as the distance between successive lateral supports. Slenderness limits When launching the program, the

Slenderness limits

When launching the program, the slenderness limits defaults to the value given by the design code, i.e. 180. You may however change the maximum slenderness ratio for each individual load case or combination. For example, in the case where wind load is dominant, the maximum slenderness ratio may be increased to 250 (clause 6.4.4).

For tensile forces, the program always uses a maximum allowable slenderness ratio of 250.

Timber Member Design

7-7

Member design

You can use the program to post-process the results of the Plane Frame Analysis module. Alternatively, you can do an independent interactive design of one or more members.

Post-processing frame analysis results

one or more members. Post-processing frame analysis results On entering the program, the frame last analysed

On entering the program, the frame last analysed by the Plane Frame Analysis is loaded automatically. The frame design procedure can be broken up into the following steps:

Selecting members to be designed.

Setting the design parameters.

Choosing a design approach.

Selecting load cases and slenderness limits.

Evaluating the design results.

Re-analysis of the frame.

Evaluating the design results. Re-analysis of the frame. Selecting members for design Use manageable group of
Evaluating the design results. Re-analysis of the frame. Selecting members for design Use manageable group of

Selecting members for design

Use

manageable group of members to be designed:

F2 (Select all elements): All elements of the frame are selected and a lateral support taken at each node.

of

elements): The list of elements

Frame

Analysis is displayed. Use Up and Down arrow keys to move between groups and press Enter to select a group. Lateral supports are assumed at each node.

F4 (Laterally unsupported ele- ments): In the case where some intermediate nodes are not laterally supported, you can specify the support conditions. Use the same convention for entering the elements as in

a

F2,

F3

or

F4

to

select

F3

(Select

in

a

group

defined

Plane

7-8

Timber Member Design

Plane Frame Analysis. The first and last nodes entered are taken as supported while the intermediate nodes are assumed to be unsupported. If you enter '1–2– –7', for example, the element '1–2–3–4–5–6–7' is considered with only nodes 1 and 7 laterally supported.

Note: If you use F4 to indicate nodes with lateral support, L yy is based on the cumulative length between supported nodes. However, L xx and L vv remain a function of the individual element lengths between adjacent nodes.

Setting the design parameters

Press F6 to select the grade of timber to design and use F7 to change the design parameters as required.

Refer to the clause 5.3 of the code for guidance on values to be used for the permissible stress modification factors.

After designing a group of members, you can select another group of members and then use a different set of parameters.

group of members and then use a different set of parameters. Choosing a design approach Depending

Choosing a design approach

Depending on what you would like to achieve, e.g. preliminary sizing or final design checks, you can choose between the following design approaches:

Optimising sections: Elements are optimised if you one or both the section dimensions, B and D, to 'Auto'.

Evaluate specific sections: Select values for the section dimensions of you want to evaluate a specific section size.

dimensions of you want to evaluate a specific section size. Selecting load cases and slenderness limits

Selecting load cases and slenderness limits

When loading the last frame analysis results, the program automatically displays a list of all load cases and combinations that can be designed and also the default slenderness limit for struts. You can manipulate the load case information as follows:

If you would like to exclude a particular load case or combination from the design, merely delete the relevant line in the table by pressing D.

delete the relevant line in the table by pressing D . Tip: The frame analysis modules

Tip: The frame analysis modules allow you to analyse load combination only. The analysis output will then be more compact due to the omission of individual load case results.

You are free to modify the slenderness limit for each individual load case or combination as required. In the case where uplift due to wind is dominant, for example, for example, you may be able to set a higher slenderness limit.

Note: The entered slenderness limits apply to struts only. For elements with tensile forces, the slenderness ratio is automatically limited to 250.

Timber Member Design

7-9

Evaluating the design results

Press F9 to design the selected members. All specified load cases and combinations are considered for each member designed. Unless a very large number of elements and load cases are involved, the design procedure will normally by completed almost instantaneously.

The following criteria are used in the design:

The sum of the ratios of the axial and bending stress to the respective allowable stresses may not exceed unity. In calculating the allowable stress, the program takes account of the member slenderness.

The slenderness ratio may not exceed the maximum allowable slenderness ratio. Different limits are set for compression and tension members.

Press Alt-L to list the design results on the screen. The results of each new design are appended to the bottom of the existing output.

Tip: To display the results for the last design, press Ctrl-PgDn to jump to the bottom of the output.

Re-analysis of the frame

Having evaluated the various member sizes, you may find it necessary to return to the original frame analysis and make some changes to section sizes. After re-analysing the frame, you should be in a position to do a final evaluation of the chosen sections.

Tip: In the frame analysis modules it may be easiest to use densities to model the self-weight of members. That way, the self-weight of the frame is updated automatically when changing section sizes.

frame is updated automatically when changing section sizes. Interactive design of members As an alternative to

Interactive design of members

As an alternative to the above procedure, individual members can be designed without the need of a complete frame analysis. You can safely ignore any visible frame analysis output during interactive element design.

The design procedure can be broken up into the following steps:

Setting the design parameters.

Choosing a design approach.

Setting a slenderness limit.

Entering member lengths and forces.

Evaluating the design results.

Press F5 to enable the interactive design mode.

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Timber Member Design

Setting the design parameters

You may change the design parameters for the group of members, e.g. effective length factors, as required. After designing a group of members, you can use a different set of parameters for another group of members.

a different set of parameters for another group of members. Choosing a design approach Depending on

Choosing a design approach

Depending on what you would like to achieve, e.g. preliminary sizing or final design checks, you can choose between the following design approaches:

Optimising sections: Elements are optimised if you one or both the section dimensions, B and D, to 'Auto'.

Evaluate specific sections: Select values for the section dimensions of you want to evaluate a specific section size.

dimensions of you want to evaluate a specific section size. Setting a slenderness limit Press F8

Setting a slenderness limit

Press F8 and enter an appropriate maximum allowable slenderness ratio on the first line. If the results of an earlier frame analysis are displayed, merely edit the slenderness ratio for the first load case or combination. All other slenderness ratio values will be ignored.

Note: The slenderness limits apply to struts only. For elements with tensile forces, the program limits the slenderness ratio to 250.

Timber Member Design

7-11

Entering member lengths and forces

Press F5 to open the interactive member design window. Use as many lines as necessary to enter member lengths, axial forces and bending moments.

Evaluating the design results

The design results are displayed immediately as you enter member data, facilitating interactive member design. Press F9 to add the displayed results to the output file.

The following criteria are used in the design:

The total of the ratios of the axial and bending stress to the respective allowable stresses may not exceed unity.

The slenderness ratio may not exceed the maximum allowable slenderness ratio.

Press Alt-L to list the design results on the screen. The results of each new interactive design procedure are appended to the bottom of the output.

Tip: To display the results for the last design, press Ctrl-PgDn to jump to the bottom of the output.

display the results for the last design, press Ctrl-PgDn to jump to the bottom of the

7-12

Timber Member Design

Output

The design results are saved in an output file called TEMP. The results of each consecutive design are appended to the end of the output.

Note: On exiting and re-entering the program, the design output is cleared automatically.

Viewing output

Press Alt-L to view the output file in the PROKON Text Editor. You can page through the output tables, delete unwanted information and even add your own comments. Press Esc to exit the editor. Refer to Chapter 2 for detail on using the editor functions.

Tip: Design results are always appended to the bottom of the output file. To display the results for the last design, press Ctrl-PgDn to jump to the bottom of the output.

Printing output

Press Alt-P to print the design output file. In the Print Manager, you can press F5 to view or edit the output file before printing.

Timber Member Design

7-13

In the Print Manager , you can press F5 to view or edit the output file

Customising

You can edit the default section sizes and add new grades of timber by editing the Timsec configuration file. The configuration is saved in the PROKON program directory in a file called TIMSEC.CFG. Use any text editor to edit the grades and sections tables:

Adding a new grade of timber

Up to twenty timber grades can be defined. To add a new grade by entering its name and properties in a new row of the first table:

Using the PROKON Text Editor, you can position the cursor on the last line, i.e. 'Stocklam' and the press Alt-L to mark the line.

Press Alt-C to copy the line and Alt-U to remove the highlight.

Finally replace the information on the new line with the appropriate values.

In the Sizes column, enter the section range number defined in the next table.

enter the section range number defined in the next table. GRADE Compression E-modulus Sizes Bending Tension

GRADE

Compression E-modulus Sizes

Bending

Tension

SA Pine Grade 4

SA Pine Grade 5

SA Pine Grade 6

SA Pine Grade 7

SA Pine Grade 8

10500

SA Pine Grade 10 10.5

10.8

12000

SA Pine Grade 12 12.4

12.7

14250

SA Pine Grade 14 14.6

14.2

16000

SA Pine D2/A Lam

 

SA Pine D2/A1 Lam

10.0

SA Pine D1/A Lam

10.0

SA Pine D1/A1 Lam 10.1

11.0

10000

Saligna Lam

12.4

13100

New Timber Grade

 

12.0

15000

Adding a new grade of timber

By default, the sections listed for the first three size ranges are based on the nominal rough-sawn dimension given on Appendix C of SABS 0163 - 1980. You may change these sizes as required and also add a fourth range of sizes. A maximum of fifty sections per range can be entered.

To enter new section sizes:

Using the PROKON Text Editor, you can ensure that blank spaces are overwritten without the table lines being moved. Press Ins to toggle between insert and overwrite mode.

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Timber Member Design

If more rows are required in the table, copy an existing row as many times as required using Alt-L and Alt-C.

Enter the section dimensions for the relevant range.

Standard Sizes (mm)

B

1

x

D

B

2

x

D

B

3

x

D

B

4

x

D

195

228

152

100

195

198

150

111

228

100

149

261

150

225

295

150

328

198

 

361

231

111

395

297

149

261

152

225

295

198

328

231

111

361

264

149

395

297

225

428

396

461 102

198

495 102

297

295 102

396

328 102

495

361 127

297

395 127

396

428 127

495

461 127

594

495 142

297

528 142

396

561 142

495

595 142

594

Timber Member Design

7-15

594 495 142 297 528 142 396 561 142 495 595 142 594 Timber Member Design

Example

In the preceding text, images are shown pertaining to the design of a timber truss. A sample analysis input and design output file is given below:

TITLE: Timber Truss Example

X

Y

Unit: m

No

NODES

No-of Inc

X-inc

Y-inc

ELEMENTS

Element Definition

SUPPORTS

No

SecNo Fcode No-of Inc

1

1

2

2

2

11

11

11

1

1

1

1

1-2--7

1-8-9--12-7

2-8-3

10-4

4-11-5

XYR

Prescr.Displacements(m)

Spring Constants(kN/m)

X-Disp Y-Disp R-Disp X-sprng Y-sprng R-sprng No-of Inc

R-Disp X-sprng Y-sprng R-sprng No-of Inc SECTION PROPERTIES No Designation 8.10E-3 34.2E-6

SECTION PROPERTIES

No Designation

8.10E-3 34.2E-6 10.5E6

1.30E-3 0.14E-6 10.5E6 NODAL LOADS

Unit: kN/m

L

Exp.Coef

(kN/m3)

A(m2)

I(m4)

E(kPa)

Density ÎT(¯C)

6.5

6.5

No-of Inc

4

4

4

1

1

1

36x225

1

2

1

2

3

36x36

C

C

Node

8

8

8

Px(kN)

Py(kN)

-0.3

-1.5

1.2

M(kNm)

ELEMENT LOADS

L

Element Definition

Direc W-begin W-end

No-of Inc

7-16

Timber Member Design

LOAD COMBINATIONS

No

OPTIONS Second order analysis Analyse load combinations only

C2

C1

Load Case ULS Factor SLS Factor

1

2

1

3

1.0

1.0

0.7

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

N

Y

Design output:

INPUT FILE: Timber Truss Example Design Code: SABS 0163 - 1980

Comment: Initial check of main members for 36x225. óóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóó Design parameters: Grade=SA Pine Grade 4

k2=1.15 k3=1 k4=1.05 k5=1 Lex=0.85 Ley=1 Le=1.92 B= 36 D=225
k2=1.15
k3=1
k4=1.05
k5=1
Lex=0.85 Ley=1
Le=1.92
B= 36
D=225
Load cases considered: 1 2 Maximum L/R ratios 180 180 L.C. : Element Length F(kN)
Load cases considered:
1
2
Maximum L/R ratios
180 180
L.C.
:
Element
Length
F(kN)
M(kNm)
L/R
Section
fc/pc
fb/pb
Total
1-
2
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
96
36x225
0.54
0.50
1.04
2-
3
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
96
36x225
0.54
0.50
1.04

11- 12 7- 12

1.044

1.044

C1

C1

12.10

12.34

0.63

0.63

100

100

36x225

36x225

0.61

0.63

0.46

0.46

1.08

1.09

Comment: Second check of main for 48x225. óóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóó Design parameters: Grade=SA Pine Grade 4

Design parameters: Grade=SA Pine Grade 4 k2=1.15 k3=1 k4=1.05 k5=1 Lex=0.85 Ley=1 Le=1.92 B= 48
k2=1.15 k3=1 k4=1.05 k5=1 Lex=0.85 Ley=1 Le=1.92 B= 48 D=Auto Sel.
k2=1.15
k3=1
k4=1.05
k5=1
Lex=0.85 Ley=1
Le=1.92
B= 48
D=Auto Sel.
Load cases considered: 1 2 Maximum L/R ratios 180 180 L.C. : Element Length F(kN)
Load cases considered:
1
2
Maximum L/R ratios
180 180
L.C.
:
Element
Length
F(kN)
M(kNm)
L/R
Section
fc/pc
fb/pb
Total
1-
2
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
72
48x225
0.41
0.36
0.76
2-
3
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
72
48x225
0.41
0.36
0.76
11- 12
1.044
C1
12.10
0.63
75
48x225
0.28
0.33
0.61
7- 12
1.044
C1
12.34
0.63
75
48x225
0.28
0.33
0.61

Timber Member Design

7-17

Comment: Check of bottom chords with lateral supports at middle only. óóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóó Laterally supported elements Design parameters: Grade=SA Pine Grade 4

k2=1.15 k3=1 k4=1.05 k5=1 Lex=0.85 Ley=1 Le=1.92 B=Auto Sel. D=Auto Sel.
k2=1.15
k3=1
k4=1.05
k5=1
Lex=0.85 Ley=1
Le=1.92
B=Auto Sel. D=Auto Sel.
Load cases considered: 1 2 Maximum L/R ratios : 180 180 Element Total Length L.C.
Load cases considered:
1
2
Maximum L/R ratios
:
180 180
Element
Total
Length
L.C.
F(kN)
M(kNm)
L/R
Section
fc/pc
fb/pb
1-
2
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
216
48x225
0.41
0.36
0.76
2-
3
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
216
48x225
0.41
0.36
0.76
3-
4
1.000
C2
5.47
0.14
142
73x111
0.54
0.19
0.73
4-
5
1.000
C2
5.47
0.14
142
73x111
0.54
0.19
0.73
5-
6
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
216
48x225
0.41
0.36
0.76
6-
7
1.000
C1
-11.64
0.68
216
48x225
0.41
0.36
0.76

Comment: Interactive design on secondary members. óóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóóó Design parameters: Grade=SA Pine Grade 4

k2=1.15 k3=1 k4=1.05 k5=1 Lex=0.85 Ley=1 Le=1.92 B=Auto Sel. D=Auto Sel.
k2=1.15
k3=1
k4=1.05
k5=1
Lex=0.85 Ley=1
Le=1.92
B=Auto Sel. D=Auto Sel.
Load cases considered: 1 2 Maximum L/R ratios 180 180 L.C. : Element Length F(kN)
Load cases considered:
1
2
Maximum L/R ratios
180 180
L.C.
:
Element
Length
F(kN)
M(kNm)
L/R
Section
fc/pc
fb/pb
Total
0.52
1.22
0.23
50
36x111
0.05
0.64
0.69
0.52
0.98
0.65
38
48x149
0.02
0.76
0.78
0.52
1.67
0.22
50
36x111
0.06
0.62
0.68
0.75
2.01
0.22
72
36x111
0.12
0.62
0.74
0.75
2.46
0.32
54
48x111
0.07
0.67
0.75

7-18

Timber Member Design

Section Properties Calculation

The Section Properties Calculation module, Prosec, is used to calculate the bending and torsional properties of any arbitrary section. The section can be solid or have openings.

properties of any arbitrary section. The section can be solid or have openings. Section Properties Calculation

Section Properties Calculation

7-19

Theory and application

An overview is given below regarding the theories used to calculate section properties.

Scope

Prosec can be used to calculate the properties of any arbitrary section. The section can be solid

or have openings. For bending property calculation, the program uses a simple technique of

division into sub-sections. The Prandtl membrane analogy is used to determine the torsional section properties, including the shear centre, St. Venant torsional constant and torsional warping constant.

Sign convention

A

simple Cartesian sign convention applies:

X coordinates are taken positive to the right and negative to the left.

Y coordinates are taken positive upward and negative downward.

List of symbols

Below is a list of symbols used for the bending and torsional section properties:

Bending properties

A : Area of the cross section.

I xx , I yy : Second moment of inertia about X and Y-axis.

, I y y : Second moment of inertia about X and Y-axis. I x y

I xy : Deviation moment of inertia.

I uu , I vv : Second moment of inertia about major axis and minor axis.

Ang : Anti-clockwise angle from the X-axis to the U-axis.

Z xx : Elastic section modulus in relation to the top or bottom edge.

Z yy : Elastic section modulus in relation to the left or right edge.

Z uu : Minimum section modulus in relation to the U-axis.

Z vv : Minimum section modulus in relation to the V-axis.

Z plx , Z ply : Plastic modulus about X and Y-axis.

X c : Horizontal centroid position measured from the leftmost extremity of the section.

7-20

Section Properties Calculation

Y c : Vertical centroid position measured from the bottom most extremity of the section.

r x , r y : Radius of gyration about the X or Y-axis.

r u , r v : Radius of gyration about the U or V-axis.

X pl : Horizontal distance from leftmost extremity to centre of mass.

Y pl : Horizontal distance from topmost extremity to centre of mass.

Torsional properties

t : Shear stress.

X : Horizontal position of shear centre from the leftmost extremity of the section.

Y : Vertical position of shear centre from the bottom of the section.

J : St. Venant torsional constant.

Z t : Torsional modules.

C w : Warping torsional constant.

Units of measurement

All input and output values are used without a unit of measurement. Whether you define a section using sizes for millimetres, metres, inches or feet, the output will effectively be given in the same unit of measurement.

Section Properties Calculation

7-21

inches or feet, the output will effectively be given in the same unit of measurement. Section

Input

A section is defined by entering one or more shapes in the input table. A shape may comprise straight lines and arcs or may be a circle. When more than one shape is entered, the shapes will accumulate and form one section. You can create openings by entering negative shapes that are subtracted from the section.

Note: If preferred, section input can be done graphically. Use Padds to draw a polygon to scale or import a DXF drawing from another CAD system. Then generate an input file for Prosec.

Entering a section

The Code column is used for categorise the data that follows in the next columns:

'+'

: The start of a new polygon or circle. An absolute reference coordinate must be entered in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

'–'

: Start of an opening. An absolute reference coordinate must be entered in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

'R' : Indicates a line drawn with relative coordinates.

'L' : Indicates a line drawn with absolute coordinates.

'A' : An arc that continues from the last line or arc. The arc radius and angle are entered in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns respectively. The angle is measured clockwise from the previous line or arc end point.

'C' : A circle with the radius entered in the X/Radius column.

: A circle with the radius entered in the X/Radius column. Note: If the Code column

Note: If the Code column is left blank, relative coordinates are used.

The X/Radius and Y/Angle columns are used for entering coordinates, radii and angles:

X : Absolute or relative X coordinate. Values are taken positive to the right and negative to the left.

Radius : Radius of a circle or an arc.

Y : Absolute or relative Y coordinate. Values are taken positive upward and negative downward.

Angle : Angle than an arc is extending through.

Note: If the X/Radius or Y/Angle column is left blank, a zero value is used.

7-22

Section Properties Calculation

Entering a shape

A shape has two basic components:

A reference coordinate which gives the starting point of a polygon or the centre of a circle.

One or more entries defining the polygon’s coordinates of lines and arcs or a circle’s radius.

After entering each coordinate, the image of the polygon updated.

Note: The starting point of a polygon is also used as the ending point and the polygon is closed automatically. It is therefore not necessary to re-enter the starting coordinate to close a polygon.

The reference coordinate

Every polygon has a start point and every circle has a centre point. These points are called reference points and are entered as absolute coordinates:

In the Code column, enter either a '+' or '–' to indicate the start of a new shape. Entering a '+' means that the shape will be added to the section. Likewise, a '–' means that the shape will

be subtracted, e.g. an opening.

Enter the absolute values of the reference coordinate in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

Coordinates defining the polygon

Given a reference coordinate, two or more additional coordinates are required to define the shape of a polygon. In the case of a circle, only a reference coordinate and radius is required. A coordinate may be entered using absolute or relative values:

If the Code column is left blank, the coordinate is taken relative from the last point entered.

An absolute coordinate is entered by setting the Code to 'L'.

The coordinate values are entered in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns. A negative X or

Y coordinate must be preceded by a minus sign. The plus sign before a positive X or Y

coordinate is optional.

A circular arc is defined by setting the Code to 'A' and entering the radius in the X/Radius column. The arc is then taken to extend from the end point of the last line or arc, starting at the angle that the previous line or arc ended and extending through the angle specified in the Y/Angle column.

Define a circle by setting the Code to 'C' and entering the coordinate for the centre point. On the next line, enter the radius in the X/Radius column.

On the next line, enter the radius in the X/Radius column. Note: You can rotate the

Note: You can rotate the section by pressing F6.

Section Properties Calculation

7-23

Procedures for entering shapes

Step-by-step procedures for entering typical section Codes are given below:

Entering a polygon comprising straight lines

A polygon is defined by entering a start point followed by a few lines of additional coordinates.

The polygon can be defined using relative or absolute coordinates or both.

Using relative coordinates:

Define the start position of the polygon by setting the Code to + and entering the absolute coordinate in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

Next, leaving the Code column blank, enter the consecutive corner points of the polygon in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns. By leaving the Code column blank, the entered coordinates are set to relative coordinates.

Using absolute coordinates:

Define the start position of the polygon by setting the Code to + and entering the absolute coordinate in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

For each following coordinate, enter an L in the Code column and enter the absolute coordinate values in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

Entering a polygon comprising lines and arcs

A

polygon with one or more arcs is defined in a similar way as a normal polygon:

Define the start position of the polygon by setting the Code to + and entering the absolute coordinate in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

Define straight lines by entering the consecutive corner points using relative or absolute coordinates.

corner points using relative or absolute coordinates. For an arc, set the Code to A and

For an arc, set the Code to A and enter its radius and angle in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns. The arc will be taken to extend from the previous line/arc through the specified angle. A positive angle is taken as a clockwise rotation and a negative angle as an anti- clockwise rotation.

Tip: If an arc is to start at a certain angle, simply precede it with a short line at that angle.

Entering a circle

A

circle is defined by entering the centre point followed by its radius in the next line:

Define the centre point of the circle by setting the Code to + and entering the absolute X and Y coordinates. If you leave either of the coordinates blank, a value of zero is used.

On the next line, set the Code to C and enter the radius of the circle in the X/Radius column.

7-24

Section Properties Calculation

Note: A circle should be considered as a complete shape. If a circle has to be incorporated in another shape, a polygon with arcs should be used.

Entering an opening

An opening is defined exactly like any other shape, with the exception that it is entered as a negative shape:

Define the start position of the polygon by setting the Code to – and entering the absolute coordinate in the X/Radius and Y/Angle columns.

Define lines, arcs or a circle by entering the relevant points as described in the examples above.

Section Properties Calculation

7-25

arcs or a circle by entering the relevant points as described in the examples above. Section

Analysis

Two separate analysis procedures are used to calculate the bending and torsional section properties. The bending analysis is completed almost instantaneously. However, the torsional analysis procedure uses a sophisticated finite difference analysis technique and therefore takes longer to complete.

Analysis settings

Press F8 to adjust the analysis settings applicable to the torsional analysis:

Poisson ratio: This value influences the shear stress distributions during torsional analysis. It therefore also has an effect on the position of the shear centre and warping torsion constant. Typical values given in the table alongside.

Number of equations: For determination of the torsional section properties, the finite difference mesh is sized to yield approximately the specified number of equations. More equations will take longer to solve, but may yield better accuracy, especially when analysing thin-walled sections.

Material

Poisson ratio

Aluminium

0.16

Concrete

0.20

Steel

0.30

Aluminium 0.16 Concrete 0.20 Steel 0.30 Calculating bending section properties Press F4 to

Calculating bending section properties

Steel 0.30 Calculating bending section properties Press F4 to calculate the section's bending

Press F4 to calculate the section's bending properties. The section properties are calculated using a simple method of division into sub-sections:

Circles and arcs are first converted to polygons with approximately the same shapes. The program uses lines at 30° angle increments for this purpose.

uses lines at 30° angle increments for this purpose. The section is then sub- divided into

The

section

is

then sub-

divided

into

a

series

of

trapeziums and the properties

are

each

trapezium.

The global section properties are finally calculated through summation of the values obtained for each trapezium.

calculated

for

7-26

Section Properties Calculation

Calculating torsional section properties

To calculate the torsional section properties, press F5. A sophisticated finite different analysis method is used for calculating the torsional section properties.

The Prandtl membrane analogy is used for determining the Y and X shear stresses and J, the St. Venant torsional constant. The membrane is modelled using a finite difference mesh.

The shear stress distributions in the Y and X directions are determined for a unit load applied in the Y direction. The shear centre is then calculated by considering the moment of shear stresses about the centre of mass.

The torsional constant, J, is taken as twice the volume below the membrane. The maximum slope of the membrane then gives the torsional modulus. The maximum torsional shear stress can be obtained by dividing the torsional moment with the torsional modulus Z t .

Warping torsion is evaluated by using the relationship between shear and axial deformation from classical elastic theory. The shear deformation is obtained from the pure torsion analysis. The warping constant, Cw, is then determined from the longitudinal displacements.

Cw, is then determined from the longitudinal displacements. Note: Press Prtsc to send a screen image

Note: Press Prtsc to send a screen image to the printer. When using the program through the Windows version of PROKON, pressing Prtsc will send the screen image to Calcpad instead.

Section Properties Calculation

7-27

version of PROKON , pressing Prtsc will send the screen image to Calcpad instead. Section Properties

Example

Below is the complete input for the concrete bridge deck example shown in the preceding text:

concrete bridge deck example shown in the preceding text: TITLE: Bridge Deck Code X/Rad. 2.9 1.0

TITLE: Bridge Deck

Code X/Rad.

2.9 1.0 9.0 1.0 2.9 0.86 0.5 0.5 2.34 0.5 -1.0 -2.0 -0.86 -0.5 -0.5 -2.34 -0.5 1.0 2.0

Y/Angle

0

-0.23

-0.35

-3.0

3.0

0.35

0.23

-0.58

-2.6

-0.2

0.2

2.6

0.35

-0.58

-2.6

-0.2

0.2

2.6

0.35

+

0

-

3.5

13.3

-

Settings Poisson's ratio 0.20 No of equations 1000 Rotation angle 0.00

7-28

Section Properties Calculation

Wind Pressure Analysis

The Wind Pressure Analysis module is a simple utility for the calculation free stream velocity pressure on a building.

module is a simple utility for the calculation free stream velocity pressure on a building. Wind

Wind Pressure Analysis

7-29

Theory and Application

A brief summary is given below with respect to the supported design codes and symbols used.

Design codes

The following codes of practice are supported:

CP3 - 1972.

SABS 0160 - 1989.

List of symbols

The code symbols are used as far as possible:

k : Pressure coefficient that depends on altitude.

Q z : Free stream velocity pressure (kPa).

V : Regional wind speed (m/s).

v z : Characteristic wind speed at a height z (m/s)

z g : Gradient height that depends on the terrain category and class of structure (m).

a : Height exponent that depends on the terrain category and class of structure.

(m). a : Height exponent that depends on the terrain category and class of structure. 7-30

7-30

Wind Pressure Analysis

Input

Use the input table to define the structural and environmental parameters:

Height of building: The total structural height over which the wind pressure should be evaluated.

Height above sea level: Altitude to use for calculating the design wind speed.

Wind speed: Regional design wind speed for a fifty year return period. Refer to the relevant design code for regional values.

Terrain category: This value indicates the likely exposure of the structure to wind loading. A higher value denotes increased shielding and lower wind pressures:

 

Terrain Category

Description

 

1

Open terrain

2

Outskirts of towns

3

Built-up and residential areas

4

City centres

Class: The class of structure quantifies the importance of the analysis:

Class

Description

A

Structural component

B

Structure as a whole

C

For checking structural stability

Wind Pressure Analysis

7-31

Structural component B Structure as a whole C For checking structural stability Wind Pressure Analysis 7-31

Return period: Enter a return period to indicate the importance of the structure:

Return Period

Description

100

High risk buildings, e.g. hospitals and communication centres

25

Low risk structures, e.g. farm outbuildings

5

Temporary structures

50

Most other structures

e.g. farm outbuildings 5 Temporary structures 50 Most other structures 7-32 Wind Pressure Analysis

7-32

Wind Pressure Analysis

Analysis

Press Alt-A to calculate the wind pressure distribution. The program displays the pressure distribution for the specified building height. The peak pressure value at the top of the building is also listed.

pressure value at the top of the building is also listed. Note: Press Prtsc to print

Note:

Press

Prtsc

to

print

the

analysis

results.

When

using

the

program

through

the Windows

version

of

PROKON,

pressing

Prtsc

will

send

the

screen

image

to

Calcpad instead.

Wind Pressure Analysis

7-33

, pressing Prtsc will send the screen image to Calcpad instead. Wind Pressure Analysis 7-33
7-34 Wind Pressure Analysis

7-34

Wind Pressure Analysis

Gutter Design

The Gutter Design Module is used to design gutters and down pipes to drain roofs of typical building structures.

Design Module is used to design gutters and down pipes to drain roofs of typical building

Gutter Design

7-35

Theory and application

Below is a brief summary of the application of the theory.

Scope

The program can evaluate roof drainage systems subjected to intense short duration rains. It takes into account the shape of the gutter, the outlet into which the gutter discharges and the pipework that conveys the flow to below.

Design code

The program is based on the requirements of BS 6367 - 1983.

Assumptions

The same assumptions used in the code are applicable. These include:

The gutter slope does not exceed 1:350.

The gutter has a uniform cross-sectional shape.

Reference should be made to the code for guidance on the positioning and sizing of gutter outlets and other requirements.

made to the code for guidance on the positioning and sizing of gutter outlets and other

7-36

Gutter Design

Input

Use the input table to define the drainage system and storm to be drained.

Storm characteristics

The following parameters should be entered to define the storm:

Return period (years): This parameter is used as a measure of the security of an acceptable degree of damage. A return period of between five and fifty years is normally used for typical situations. For higher risk scenarios, a value of one and a half times the expected life of the building and higher should be used. Refer to the code for detail.

and higher should be used. Refer to the code for detail. Two minute M5 rainfall (mm):

Two minute M5 rainfall (mm): This quantity is defined as the expected rainfall in a two minute period during a one in five year storm. Press F4 to display regional data for the United Kingdom and South Africa. Refer to the code or other relevant hydrological data for regions not listed.

Design duration (1 to 10 minutes): Adjust the default two minute design duration if necessary. The M5 rainfall is then adjusted in accordance with Table 10 of the code.

Effective drainage area: Roof area to be drained, taking into account any adverse effect of wind on sloping roofs and vertical surfaces and other factors.

Note: Gutters and downpipes may normally be omitted for roofs with area of 6 m 2 or less.

Gutter geometry

for roofs with area of 6 m 2 or less. Gutter geometry Rectangular and trapezium shaped

Rectangular and trapezium shaped gutters can be defined:

Top width (mm): Width at the top of the gutter.

Base width (mm): The bottom width of the gutter. Set the base width equal to the top width for rectangular gutters.

Sloping depth (mm): For a trapezium shaped gutter, enter the depth in which the gutter slopes outward from the base.

Note: You are not required to enter the total depth of the gutter. The program calculates the depth required for proper draining.

Gutter Design

7-37

Outlet and downpipe parameters

The type of outlet influences the flow collected from the gutter. The following types of outlets can be specified:

Type 1: Outlet with sharp corners.

Type 2: Outlet with rounded corners.

Type 3: Outlet with tapered edges not exceeding 45° with the vertical.

The downpipe dimensions are defined using the following values:

Aspect ratio: The ratio of the larger to smaller downpipe dimensions. Use a unity value for square and circular downpipes.

Larger dimension: Enter the larger dimension of the downpipe. Use the diameter in the case of a circular downpipe.

Enter the larger dimension of the downpipe. Use the diameter in the case of a circular

7-38

Gutter Design

Analysis

Press Alt-A to analyse the gutter system. The program evaluates the following three components of the drainage system:

The gutter or channel that collects the flow from the roof.

The outlet into which the flow from the gutter discharges.

The pipework that conveys the flow from the outlet to a lower drainage system.

The three parts of the system can be designed separately if the outlet and downpipe is made large enough for flow to freely discharge from the gutter. The actual downpipe and outlet may however be smaller than that required for this method, prompting the program to perform a more detailed analysis.

Free-flow design

In the phase of the analysis, the gutter and downpipe sizes for free flow are determined:

Flow in the gutter is evaluated to establish whether free flow is possible.

The upstream and downstream free flow depths are determined and the required gutter depth calculated.

The flow through the outlet is check to see if orifice or weir-type flow is present.

The required free-flow sizes are determined for circular and rectangular downpipes.

is present. The required free-flow sizes are determined for circular and rectangular downpipes. Gutter Design 7-39

Gutter Design

7-39

Evaluation of the entered system

The second phase of the analysis involves the evaluation of the entered downpipe and gutter sizes:

The specified downpipe and outlet is evaluated to determine its flow capacity.

If the downpipe is smaller than that required for free flow in the gutter, the restricted flow characteristics of the gutter is determined and a gutter depth suggested.

The checking procedure is performed for both rectangular and circular downpipes.

Finally the design flow volume is calculated.

Note:

Press

Prtsc

to

print

the

analysis

results.

When

using

the

program

through

the Windows

version

of

PROKON,

pressing

Prtsc

will

send

the

screen

image

to

Calcpad instead

of PROKON , pressing Prtsc will send the screen image to Calcpad instead 7-40 Gutter Design

7-40

Gutter Design