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Samuel Barbers Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 14:


Creating a New Arrangement for Flute
Nicole Frankel
University of Florida








Author Note
Nicole Frankel, School of Music, College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Dr. Kristen Stoner, School of Music, College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
This thesis was prepared for MUS 4905, Projects and Problems in Music
In partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduating with High or Highest Honors
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Abstract 3

Introduction 3

Methods 6

Results 13

Bibliography 15

Flute Concerto: Score 16

Flute Concerto: Solo Part 40











BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 3

Samuel Barbers Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 14: Creating a New Arrangement
for Flute

Abstract
Samuel Barber was one of the most respected American composers of the twentieth
century. His music is tonal and often romantic in style, and his Concerto for Violin and
Orchestra is no exception. Composed in 1939, this piece has become one of the most widely
performed standards of the violin repertoire. The first movement, which is in sonata-allegro
form, is celebrated for its lush character and memorable themes. Such qualities translate well for
performance on the flute. This thesis describes the various methods and creative process
involved in arranging the first movement of Barbers Violin Concerto for flute, as well as the
challenges I encountered along the way and how I met these challenges. I considered issues of
range, technical facility, color, balance, blend, extended techniques, and breathing. For the
score, I used my arrangement of the solo part as well as the piano reduction from Barbers own
revision. The flute part can be successfully performed with either piano accompaniment or
orchestra. The end result of this project is an idiomatic flute part that is at times both lyrical and
brilliant, bringing new colors and a fresh perspective to a standard work while still maintaining
its original integrity.

Introduction
Samuel Osborne Barber II was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania on March 9, 1910.
He was the only son to Roy and Daisy Barber, who afforded both Samuel and his sister Sara
music lessons from an early age. Samuel Barber began playing piano at six years and was
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 4

writing his first compositions by the following year. At age nine, he left a note for his mother
proclaiming that he was meant to be a composer:
Dear Mother: I have written this to tell you my worrying secret. Now dont cry when you
read it because it is neither yours nor my fault. I suppose I will have to tell it now
without any nonsense. To begin with I was not meant to be an athlete. I was meant to be
a composer, and will be Im sure.
1

Barber entered the Curtis Institute of Music at age fourteen, by which time he had already
composed pieces for piano, organ, violin, and his first opera.
2
He thrived at the Curtis Institute
and his compositional output grew considerably. In 1933, Barber left Curtis. He continued
studies in the U.S. and throughout Europe. By the time Barber received his first major
commission to write the Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, he had already published such
works as the Overture to The School for Scandal, Dover Beach, Music for a Scene from Shelley,
Essay for Orchestra, and, of course, the famed Adagio for Strings, which was premiered by
Arturo Toscanini in 1938.
3

The Violin Concerto was commissioned in the spring of 1939 by the wealthy industrialist
Samuel Fels for his adopted son, the violin prodigy Iso Briselli. Barber composed the first two
movements that summer and sent them to Briselli, who was not pleased. Although he thought
them beautiful, Briselli said these movements were too simple and not brilliant enough for a
concerto.
4
However, when Barber sent Briselli the third and final movement of the concerto,
the violinist proclaimed that it was too difficult. The controversy over the third movement grew
when Barber asked another violinist, Omar Shumsky, to perform the movement for Fels, proving

1
Barbara Heyman, Samuel Barber: the composer and his music (New York: Oxford University Press,
1992), 7.
2
Heyman, Samuel Barber, 25.
3
Nathan Broder, Samuel Barber (New York: G. Schirmer, 1954), 34.
4
Heyman, Samuel Barber, 192-193.
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 5

that it was not impossible to play. A compromise was reached when Barber returned half of his
commission and Briselli released his right to the first public performances of the work. The
Concerto was instead premiered in 1941 by Albert Spalding with the Philadelphia orchestra,
under the baton of Eugene Ormandy.
5
It has since become a much beloved standard of the violin
repertoire.
Barber won two Pulitzer Prizes in his lifetime and was one of the most celebrated
composers of the 20
th
century. Despite having composed forty-eight pieces with opus numbers
and upwards of one hundred unpublished works, though, Barbers writing for the flute is
extremely sparse. Therefore, I have arranged the first movement of his Violin Concerto for flute.
I selected this concerto because I found the music to be undeniably beautiful and I believed that
it would translate well to flute, especially the first movement. Barber was a melodist, and the
themes that he used in the first movement of this concerto are very lyrical, traditional in shape,
yet fresh in character. The piece is extremely tonal, oscillating between major and minor modes,
and the melodic structure is governed by this tonality.
6
Barber is often regarded as a neo-
Romantic composer, and this concerto is certainly romantic in style, with moments of both
intimacy and grandeur.
Furthermore, I chose to arrange for flute from a violin piece due to certain similarities
between the instruments. Although the range of the violin is slightly more expansive than that of
the flute (G
3
to C
8
for the former versus B
3
to F
7
for the latter)
7
, the majority of the range is
shared between the instruments. This allowed me to make only subtle changes to the melodic
shaping of the original work, preserving the integrity of the line and the majority of the specific
pitches Barber wrote.

5
Broder, Samuel Barber, 35-36.
6
Broder, Samuel Barber, 47-48.
7
Samuel Adler, The Study of Orchestration (New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2002), 52.
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 6

Both the flute and the violin are lead soprano instruments which traditionally play the
main melodic material in both small chamber ensembles and larger groups. They are both
popular solo instruments, as well. The violin and flute are extremely flexible and agile in nature,
capable of both singing out and playing extremely technical passages. Thus, with an enhanced
potential for virtuosic playing, both instruments are popular for performing concertos.

Methods
Barbers Concerto for Violin and Orchestra features a moderately-sized accompanying
orchestra, with two each of the flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons, three horns, and three
trumpets in the wind section, a typical string section, plus timpani and piano parts.
8
Whereas a
solo violin would have very little trouble being heard over such a group, the flute is not capable
of reaching quite the same volume, especially in the lower limits of its register. This presented
one of the biggest challenges in arranging this work for flute, especially since many of the main
themes are written in a comfortable, warmer, low range. Throughout the arranging process, I
had to constantly adjust dynamic levels, as well as registral placement of the solo part. I also had
to adjust for range, especially when the violin part would have fast ascending flourishes into the
upper extremes of the instrument. Other issues I adjusted for include balance, blend, technical
facility, color, articulation, form, double-stops, and creating points at which to breathe (a matter
which is absolutely necessary for winds but does not need to be taken into account when writing
for strings).
Although the solo flute part was arranged with orchestral accompaniment in mind,
I have included the score for flute and piano in my project (page 16). As a student performer, I
know that there are limited opportunities to perform a concerto with an actual orchestra, and

8
Samuel Barber, Concerto for violin and orchestra, op. 14 (New York: G. Schirmer, 1949), 1.
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 7

more often, flute concertos are instead performed with a piano reduction. I used Barbers own
piano reduction from his revised score for violin and piano, making only minor adjustments to
the part for balance. The arranged flute part can therefore be successfully performed either with
the standard orchestral accompaniment or with the piano part, which I have included.
Another critical aspect of the arranging process involved keeping careful documentation
of all the changes I made to the original score. These changes were carried out using the
notation software Sibelius 7 and are detailed chronologically below.
Unlike many other concertos of the time, Barbers Concerto for Violin and Orchestra
opens with solo violin and orchestra playing simultaneously, rather than an orchestral
introduction. The principal theme is stated immediately in the violin. Since this theme occurs in
a relatively low range of the flute, it does not project as well as it would if it were written in a
higher octave. Therefore, I have written in an optional 8
va
over the first twelve measures of the
flute part. This gives the performer the option to play the opening theme in either the original
octave or in a more brilliant register, depending on the circumstances. For instance, the high
octave would most likely be necessary for performance with an orchestra, whereas either version
will work well with piano accompaniment. The notion of raising material up an octave is
standard performance practice when playing the opening of the Khachaturian Violin Concerto on
flute; although the published version of this arrangement features the opening material in the
original register, most flutists opt to perform the first page an octave higher than written. For my
arrangement of Barbers Concerto, I have chosen to include this note in the score. I reverted
back to the original octave on beat four of the twelfth measure because the written octave
displacement on the E provides a subtle transition. The 8
va
marking cannot be continued
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 8

beyond this point because the melodic line builds higher and higher, until mm. 25-27 would be
beyond of the practical range of the flute.
In the fifth measure, I removed the slur into the upbeat of beat three to give the flutist a
chance to breathe. This also separates the pick-up notes and matches the articulation pattern of
the previous measure.
Measure 18 goes beyond the extremes of the low range on the flute. However, since the
accompaniment is resting during this measure, I had slightly more freedom to alter the line. I
kept the leaps of a 7
th
in the pick-ups and on the first beat in order to preserve the feeling of the
original shape, but then shifted the octaves every other note beginning with the D on beat two
for improved facility.
I again shifted a slur in measure 24 until after the E so that the flutist can breathe before
the long, technically challenging run into rehearsal number two. This actually matches the
articulation written when the same material occurs in a different key later on in the piece, going
into rehearsal fourteen. Also, on the downbeat of rehearsal two, I changed the dynamic marking
from pp to p. This is a much more realistic dynamic for the flute, since it is more difficult to
play a stable, sustained high note on flute than it is on violin.
The material occurring in mm. 50-60 can be thought of as a transitional passage leading
to the development. I increased the dynamic of this section from p to mf so it can be better
heard. Much of this sections articulations are written as a slur over a staccato. This holds a
different meaning for strings and winds. A violinist would play a slurred staccato as a separation
of a series of short notes on one bow,
9
while a flutist would interpret this marking as light
tonguing with little to no separation. To remedy this inconsistency, I changed the articulation on
beat four of measures 50 and 51 to a slur-two tongue-two pattern, changed the slurred staccatos

9
Adler, Study of Orchestration, 24.
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 9

in measures 52 and 53 to regular staccato markings, and interpreted the rest of this section as
tongued rather than slurred. This creates more definition between the notes and minimizes
hearing small imperfections between them. The performer can also sneak breaths more easily
when playing in a shorter style. The staccatos in Barbers piano part suggest the same
articulation, as well as the staccatos in the accompanying clarinet part in the orchestral score. I
applied these same articulations at rehearsal number sixteen, as well, when the same material
appears up a third in the violin and piano parts.
One additional alteration that I made to this section of music is that on the last sixteenth
notes of beat one of m. 56 and beat four of m. 57, I bracketed two noteheads in order to provide
the performer with an optional place to breathe. Again, I followed this pattern with the similar
material at rehearsal sixteen, bracketing the corresponding noteheads in mm. 181 and 182.
In measures 58-59, there is an ascending flourish that leads up to an E
7
. Although this
note is possible on flute, it is in the extreme highest range of the instrument and is not at all
practical in this context. Therefore, instead of stepwise motion leading up to this note, as
written, I reversed the direction of the line for the last three notes of m. 59, leading down to the
E one octave lower. Essentially, the pitches changed from A, B, C, D, E to A, B, G, F#,
E. This note is still high enough that it should be easily heard over the orchestra, but since this
is such a climactic moment in the piece (the beginning of the development section), I increased
the dynamic on this note from ff to fff.
There is a very long, sustained high Bb that occurs in the solo voice in mm. 81-85.
However, the violin part leaves no place for a wind player to breathe prior to this held note.
Therefore, I changed the articulation leading up to this note and added a slight ritard so the flutist
can stock up on air before sustaining the pitch. Since the accompaniment is extremely sparse at
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 10

this point, relaxing the tempo somewhat should have little to no effect on the pianist or the
orchestra.
In m. 94, I again shifted a slur to beat two so the flutist can breathe. Then, I raised beat
four of m. 104 and beat one of m. 105 up one octave, since these notes were previously below
the attainable range of the instrument. I applied the same changes to mm. 110 and 111. I also
raised the A that occurs on the downbeat of m. 122 one octave so it is playable.
The first double-stop that occurs in this movement takes place in m. 118. In general, I
dealt with multiphonics wherever they occurred in the piece by selecting the top note of the
double-stop for the flute part, with only a few exceptions. Therefore, in m. 118, I used the higher
octave A for the flute part, and changed the grace note leading into this downbeat to the pitch
that was previously the lower note of the double-stop, thus creating a similar effect. Choosing
the higher octave A at this moment better follows the direction of the musical line, as well,
which is leading upward into the home key of G major.
Again, I used the top notes of the double-stops in m. 124 for the flute part, which occur
on every note of this measure. This creates more idiomatic leaps for flute while still preserving
the octave and octave plus one-fourth relationships. The downbeat of the next measure marks a
huge arrival point the recapitulation, now solidly back in G major and Tempo I. However, I
chose the lower note of this double stop rather than the upper note to emphasize the resolution
back to tonic. I also raised this pitch two octaves so it will be heard over the orchestra and/or
piano.
In m. 136, I raised the first eighth note of beat four one octave and increased the dynamic
in the flute part from p to mp. At this point in the work, the flute has been resting for ten
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 11

measures, and both of these pick-up notes need to be heard. This creates a more solid solo
entrance.
In m. 144, I changed the septuplet on beat four into four sixteenth notes. The first three
beats of this bar can be seen as two independent voices due to the alternating wide leaps in the
line. Although this compound line continues into the downbeat of rehearsal number 13, I
removed the lower voice on the fourth beat of m. 144 because it goes out of range and is
impractically difficult for the flute.
In mm. 151-152, there is a figure very similar to that of mm. 25-26. However, whereas
the earlier passage is playable on the flute without any changes, this figure is up a third and
therefore extends beyond the practical range of the flute at the top of the run. To accommodate
for this issue, I lowered the arrival note one octave, giving the flutist more control and making
Barbers written dynamic more achievable at that point. To lead into the lower D, I continued
the pattern of alternating between steps and leaps of a third to reach down to the note instead of
upwards (Bb, F, G, Eb, D instead of Bb, D, Eb, C, D).
A short cadenza occurs in m. 190, just prior to the coda. Again, I elected to use all of the
top pitches in the double stops. This helps keep consistency throughout the piece, as well as
matching the pattern of pitches that occurs just before the double stops, or Db, C, Ab, G, Bb
descending in octaves. I then raised the fermata G in the middle of this cadenza one octave;
otherwise it is beneath the possible range of the flute.
From mm. 198-203, I removed the slur markings over the two-measure phrases. The
smaller slurs that group sets of two consecutive notes together indicate the re-articulation of the
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 12

repeated notes. For violin, these long slurred passages are legato markings, meaning that all the
notes are meant to be played in one bow direction.
10
Obviously, this does not apply to flute.
The whole final section of the movement, from m. 197 until the end, is in the flutes
lowest register. In fact, the movement ends on a sustained B
3
, the lowest note possible on the
flute, and only if the performer has a B-footjoint extension on their instrument. The low Bs
would not be heard over the piano, let alone an orchestra, thus rendering the ending less solid.
Therefore, I adjusted this whole section up one octave. I aimed to maintain the integrity of the
ending by shifting the entire section into a higher register, rather than changing back at some
point and altering the shape of the melodic line. This registral change will also affect the color in
a positive way, as the melody at rehearsal number eighteen (the secondary theme) will sound
brighter, livelier, and have a more shimmering quality than it would have in the low octave. This
is especially important since, although the secondary theme has appeared frequently in the other
orchestral instruments (or the piano) throughout the work, this is the first and only time it is
heard in the solo voice. Additional support for this alteration lies in the fact that when the
accompanying orchestral flute plays this theme, it is written in this same higher register in the
score.
Finally, in the last three measures of this movement, the final moving line is played
by the orchestral flute. In Barbers revised score, he places this triplet figure in the piano part.
However, since I arranged the solo violin part for flute, I found it only fitting that the final flute
line be placed in the solo voice instead, so that the same color is achieved. Therefore, instead of
continuing the held B until the very end, I changed the whole note in m. 214 to a half note,
added an eighth rest, and then inserted the exact orchestral excerpt from the accompanying flute
part into the solo line. To adjust for this in the piano reduction, I simply extended the G major

10
Adler, Study of Orchestration, 18.
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 13

triad that previously occupied the first two beats of the bar through the whole measure, which is
in accordance with the final harmony occurring in the orchestral score.

Results
Through this process, I was able to arrange one of the most standard twentieth-century
violin concertos, Samuel Barbers Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, for my own instrument,
the flute. As a concerto that is likely to be chosen by a performer who wishes to display the
idiomatic lyrical attributes of the violin rather than to dazzle the audience with virtuoso
brilliance,
11
this piece was a practical choice for arrangement to flute, an instrument which
showcases these very elements. The work translated well to the flute in that the instrument
allows for such a wide range of tone colors in performance that the lyrical, wistful themes used
throughout the first movement come alive. The flute arrangement is idiomatic and rather
charming as a whole.
When I began the project, I conjectured that the most challenging aspect would be
figuring out what material to alter and how to alter it in a way that was inoffensive, still
preserving the integrity of what Barber originally wrote. Although I was correct in assuming the
difficulty of that aspect, it was not the most demanding part of the process. Rather, inputting the
music into notation software was extremely meticulous, tedious work. I chose Sibelius 7 for this
task in that it is generally more user-friendly than the popular Finale software. In spite of this
fact, though, it was still quite an undertaking to input and alter 216 measures of both flute and
piano music. I have become much more familiar with the software as a result.
As a flutist myself, I was able to play through my arrangement of the Violin Concerto as I
worked on it, and I found this to be a necessary facet of my project. I was able to check the flute

11
Heyman, Samuel Barber, 199.
BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 14

part as I went along in order to ensure its fluidity and that it captured the same lush character
throughout as the violin. Often, my pre-conception of what I thought would be idiomatic for the
flute would change after I played it, and my understanding and respect for composers, especially
those who write for other instruments, has since grown.
Due to the rights held by the Barber Foundation, my arrangement is not publishable at
this time. However, I will perform this piece on my senior recital at the end of the semester, and
it is my sincerest hope that it will become a staple for future University of Florida Flute Studio
use.















BARBERS VIOLIN CONCERTO: ARRANGING FOR FLUTE 15

Bibliography

Adler, Samuel. 2002. The Study of Orchestration. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Barber, Samuel. 1949. Concerto for violin and orchestra, op. 14. New York: G. Schirmer.

Barber, Samuel. 1949. Concerto for violin and orchestra, op. 14: revised version. New York: G.
Schirmer.

Barber, Samuel. Violin Concerto. Elmar Oliveira, Saint Louis Symphony. Conducted by Leonard
Slatkin. EMI CDC 47850, compact disc.

Broder, Nathan. 1954. Samuel Barber. New York: G. Schirmer.

Heyman, Barbara B. 1992. Samuel Barber: the composer and his music. New York: Oxford
University Press.

Peterlongo, Paolo. 1979. The violin: its physical and acoustic principles. New York: Taplinger
Pub. Co.


























16
CONCERTO
for Ilue and Orchesra
Samuel Barber
arr. Nicole Iranlel
FLLTH AND PIANO
REVISED VERSION
*ORICINALLY IOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA

*ORICINALLY IOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA


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47

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cresc. pccc o pccc


5S
cresc. pccc o pccc
56
cresc. mcltc
58

cresc. mcltc


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60

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78
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119
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179
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cresc. mcltc
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190
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56
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59

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cresc. pccc o pccc


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18S
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ollorgondc mcltc

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o ptocere

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190

o tempc, vtthcut droggtng


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198
202
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