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Distributed Trunking (LAG) Cookbook

Revision 0.99

HP Networking STC

Originated by: Adolfo Duarte adolfo.duarte@hp.com

HP Networking Copyright 2012 Hewlett Packard 1

Table 1 Document Revision History Revision Date (mdy)


0.1 May 15 First extremely rough proposal Minor chages to switch to server, added switch to switch example 0.2 May 30 Adolfo Duarte

Change Description

Author
Adolfo Duarte

0.9

June 7

Added Scenarios 3-5. Still need to add Cisco VSS configuration.

Adolfo Duarte

HP Networking Copyright 2012 Hewlett Packard 2

Contents
Feature Terminology and Commands........................................................................................................... 4 Scenarios: ...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Scenario -1: Simple Distributed Trunking ................................................................................................ 4 Scenario-2: Switch to Switch Distributed Trunking .................................................................................. 7 Scenario 3: Distributed Trunking to IRF (HP-5820) ................................................................................. 10 Scenario 4: Distributed Trunking to HPNs 3800 Stack: ......................................................................... 18 Scenario 5: Distributed Trunking to Cisco VSS ........................................................................................ 21

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Feature Terminology and Commands Scenarios:


Scenario -1: Simple Distributed Trunking
Server-A 192.168.1.10 47 Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp Vlan 1 ip address 192.168.1.1

SW-A
21 22

L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 3

Trk2 Trk20

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22 3

ISC
Kpalv Vlan 2 Trk10 Trk1

DT-SW1
1 11 Trunk 11 trk10 dt-lacp

DT-SW2
1 12 Trunk 12 trk10 dt-lacp

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP)

11

12

Trunk 11,12 trk1 lacp Vlan 1 ip address 192.168.1.2 47

SW-B

Server- B 192.168.2.11

Fig 1.1 shows the physical connections for Scenario 1. For thr purpose of this discussion here we will use the word trunk and LAG interchangably. LAG = Link Aggregation Group = Trunk. SW-A and SW-B are unaware that their respective LACP trunks/LAGs, Trk12 and Trk11, are terminated on two physically different switches, DT-SW1 and DT-SW2. Also note that SW-A and SW-B could easily be replaced by servers which support LACP on their NICs, or what is comonly called NIC teaming. DT-SW1 and DT-SW2 create a Distributed Trunking peering group. This peering group looks to SW-A and SW-B as a single virtual switch. We will call this virtual switch DT-SW1SW2.

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The LAGs (trunks) at DT-SW1SW2 have been labeled Trk10 and Trk20. These LAGs in turn connect to the LAGs labeled Trk1 and Trk2 in SW-B and SW-A respectibely. We have labeled the LAGs diffrently to show that the configurations of SW-A, DT-SW1SW2, and SW-B are indpendent of each other. The LAG labels do *not* have to match between these three entities. They *do* have to match in the configuration of DT-SW1 and DT-SW2 which make up DT-SW1SW2; but there is no dependency between the LAG label of SW-A and DT-SW1SW2 or between SW-B and DT-SW1SW2. The only real switches which must MATCH the LAG labels are DT-SW1 and DT-SW2. Fig 1.2, show what SW-A and SW-B are actually seeing from their perspective. SW-A and SW-B have no knwoledge of the Distributed Trunking (Distributed LAG) setup of DT-SW1 and DT-SW2. As far as they can tell they are connected to a single entity throught their LACP LAGs: Trk2 and Trk1.
Server-A 192.168.1.10

47 Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp Vlan 1 ip address 192.168.1.1

SW-A
21 22

L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 3 Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22

ISC Kpalv Vlan 2

DT-SW1
1 11 Trunk 11 trk10 dt-lacp 1

DT-SW2
12 Trunk 12 trk10 dt-lacp

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP)

11

12

Trunk 11,12 trk1 lacp Vlan 1 ip address 192.168.1.2 47

SW-B

Server- B 192.168.2.11

Fig 1.2 Logical L2 topology as seen from perspective of SW-A and SW-B The ISC link and the keepaliave vlan allow DT-SW1 and DT-SW2 to act as a single LACP actor to the outside world. The vlan keep alive is not strictly necessary in this setup but it does allow for completeness, and better redundancy. We will show more complex scenarios where the peer-keepalive vlan and destination are necessary. For completeness and a cleaner configuration to avoid problems in the future, you should always configure it. HP Networking Copyright 2012 Hewlett Packard 5

The ISC link is used as both a datapah and control path for the Distributed Trunking Protocol, so its bandwitch should always be equal or larger than the aggregate bandwith of all DT-Trunks present on the switch. LAGs themselves can be used as ISCs (switch-interconnects). Obfioulsy, only regular LAGs (LACP) can be used. For example, in this scenario we could have done something like:
DT-SW1(config)# trunk 3 trk3 lacp DT-SW1(config)# switch-interconnect trk3

But not something like:


DT-SW1(config)# trunk 4 trk4 dt-lacp DT-SW1(config)# switch-interconnect trk4 Cannot configure switch-interconnect port, DT trunk exist for the same trunk-group. DT-SW1(config)#

The following table contains the switch configurations for Scenario 1. Note that in DT-SW1 and DT-SW2 the LAG lables match: Trunk 22 Trk20 dt-lacp for DT-SW1, and trunk 21 Trk20 dt-lacp for DTSW2. Table 1: Scenario 1 Configurations:
SW-B ; J9473A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.06.0008 ; Ver #01:0d:0c hostname "SW-B" module 1 type J94aaA module 2 type J94bbA trunk 11-12 Trk1 LACP vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-10,13-48,Trk1 ip address 192.168.200.2 255.255.255.0 exit lldp admin-status 41 disable snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk1 priority 4 DT-SW1: ;J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.06.0008 ; Ver #01:0d:0c hostname "DT-SW1" module 1 type J86yyA module 2 type J86xxA switch-interconnect 3 trunk 12 Trk10 dt-lacp interface Trk10 unknown-vlans Disable exit

DT-SW2: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.06.0008 ; Ver #01:0d:0c hostname "DT-SW2" module 1 type J86yyA module 2 type J86xxA switch-interconnect 3 trunk 11 Trk10 dt-lacp interface Trk10 unknown-vlans Disable exit

trunk 22 Trk20 dt-lacp


interface Trk20 unknown-vlans Disable exit vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 2-11,13-21,23-48,Trk10,Trk20 ip address dhcp-bootp no untagged 1 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 1 ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.252 exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk10 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.168.2.2

trunk 21 Trk20 dt-lacp


interface Trk20 unknown-vlans Disable exit vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 2-10,12-20,22-48,Trk10,Trk20 ip address dhcp-bootp no untagged 1 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 1 ip address 192.168.2.2 255.255.255.252 exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk10 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.168.2.1

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SW-A ; J9472A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.06.0008 ; Ver #01:0d:0c hostname "SW-A" module 1 type J94ccA module 2 type J94ddA trunk 21-22 Trk2 LACP vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-20,23-48,Trk2 ip address 192.168.200.1 255.255.255.0 exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4

Scenario-2: Switch to Switch Distributed Trunking


Now that we have an understanding of the simplest form of Distributed Trunking, let us now move to a more complicated setup: Switch to Switch Distributed Trunking. This setup contains two pairs of DT-Peers: DT-SW1/DT-SW2 and DT-SW3/DT-SW4. The configuration independence still applis on this setup. The DT-SW1SW2 pair has no knowledge of the configuration of the DT-SW3SW4 pair and viceversa. Although the physical connection is a little more complicated, fig 2.1, the logical setup looks like fig 2.2. SW-A does not have to share any configuration information with DT-SW1SW2 which in turn does not have to share any configuration information with DT-SW3SW4 pair, which in turns does not have to share any information with SW-B.

SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 22

L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 3

Trk2 lacp Trk20 dt-lacp ISC Trk3


1 31 32 Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22 3

DT-SW1

DT-SW2
1 33 34

Kpalv Vlan 2 Trk12 dt-lacp

L2 on DT-SW3/DT-SW4 sees this as ONE link (LACP)

Trunk 31,32 trk12 dt-lacp

Trunk 31,32 trk12 dt-lacp

DT Trunk TRK12

L2 on DT-SW1/DT-SW2 sees this as ONE link (LACP)

Trunk 31,32 trk34 dt-lacp

Trunk 31,32 trk34 dt-lacp

DT Trunk TRK34

Trk34 dt-lacp
31 32 3 33 34

DT-SW3
1 11 Trunk 11 trk10 dt-lacp

ISC Trk33 Kpalv Vlan 2 Trk10 dt-lacp

DT-SW4
1 12 Trunk 12 trk10 dt-lacp

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP) Trk1 lacp


11 12

Trunk 11,12 trk1 lacp

SW-B

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Fig 2.1 Physical topology

SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 Trk2 22

Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 3

Trk20

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 3 22

ISC
DT-SW1SW2

DT-SW1
1 31 32

DT-SW2
1 33 34

Kpalv Vlan 2
Trk5

Trk6 31 32 3

ISC
DT-SW3SW4

33 3

34

DT-SW3
1 11

DT-SW4
1 12 Trunk 12 trk10 dt-lacp

Kpalv Vlan 2
Trk10

11

Trk1

12

Trunk 11,12 trk1 lacp

SW-B

Fig 2.2 Logical L2 Topology

An important point to notice in the logical topology is that it is an L2 logical topology; and, as can be seen, there are no L2 loops created. Using MSTP (spanning tree) is NOT necessary in this setup. Even if it was turned on, spanning tree BPDUs are suppressed on DT trunks. This is just as if you had configured them as edge ports. This is done implicitily when you create a DT trunk and it cannot be undone. I.e. you cannot turn on spanning tree BPDUs on DT trunks. They will always act as adminedge ports. The keepalive vlan becomes important in this setup or problem could arise. The error message returned by the switch when you try to remove the vlan peer keepalive describes it pretty well:
DT-SW1(config)# no distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan This may cause both DT switches to forward traffic on all DT ports if the ISC link goes down. Continue?(y/n) n DT-SW1(config)#

The peer-keepalive vlan and destination is only used to send messages back and forth when the ISC (siwtch-interconnect) has failed. During normal operation no interesting traffic is sent through it. Following are the configuraton for the switches in Fig 1.2. The sections highlighted in red are information DT-SW1 and DT-SW2 have to share as well as information DT-SW3 and DT-SW4.

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SW-A - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.10.0000x ; Ver #03:01.1f.ef:f2 hostname "SW-A" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 21-22 trk2 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-20,23-48,Trk2 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk2 admin-edge-port spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4 bpdu-filter DT-SW1(config)# show run Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.10.0000x ; Ver #03:01.1f.ef:f2 hostname "DT-SW1" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 3 trk3 lacp trunk 31-32 trk12 dt-lacp trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk3 interface Trk12 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 1 untagged 2,4-20,22-30,33-48,Trk3,Trk12,Trk20 ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "Kpalv" untagged 1 ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk3 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk12 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.168.2.2 DT-SW2(config)# show run Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.10.0000x ; Ver #03:01.1f.ef:f2 hostname "DT-SW2" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 3 trk3 lacp trunk 31-32 trk12 dt-lacp trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk3 interface Trk12 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 1 untagged 2,4-21,23-30,33-48,Trk3,Trk12,Trk20 ip address 192.168.1.12 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "Kpalv" untagged 1 ip address 192.168.2.2 255.255.255.0 exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk3 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk12 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.168.2.1 DT-SW2(config)# DT-SW4 - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.10.0000x ; Ver #03:01.1f.ef:f2 hostname "DT-SW4" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 12 trk10 dt-lacp trunk 3 trk33 lacp trunk 31-32 trk34 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk33 interface Trk10 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk34 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 1,48 untagged 2,4-11,13-30,33-47,Trk10,Trk33-Trk34 ip address 192.168.1.14 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "Kpalv" untagged 1 ip address 192.168.2.4 255.255.255.0

DT-SW3 - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.10.0000x ; Ver #03:01.1f.ef:f2 hostname "DT-SW3" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 11 trk10 dt-lacp trunk 3 trk33 lacp trunk 31-32 trk34 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk33 interface Trk10 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk34 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 1 untagged 2,4-10,12-30,33-48,Trk10,Trk33-Trk34 ip address 192.168.1.13 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "Kpalv" untagged 1 ip address 192.168.2.3 255.255.255.0

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exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk10 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk33 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk34 priority 4 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.168.2.4

exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk10 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk33 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk34 priority 4 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.168.2.3

SW-B - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.10.0000x ; Ver #03:01.1f.ef:f2 hostname "SW-B" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 11-12 trk1 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-10,13-48,Trk1 ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk1 priority 4

Scenario 3: Distributed Trunking to IRF (HP-5820)


Now that we have a clearer understanding of how Distributed Trunking works, we can interoperate this technology with another HPN technology which provides similar capabilities, Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF).
HPNs Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF) is an advanced technology that allows one to aggregate 2 or more switches into a single switching and routing system also known as a virtual switch. IRF is available on many of the HPN A-Series switches. In both cases, Distributd Trunking and IRF, a logical virtual switch is created. We refer to the logical creation as a virtual switch because any other devices connected to this logical entity through one

of its LAGs (trunks) sees it as a single switch. The connecting devices do not know and dont need to know the details of the configuration which creates the virtual switch. The importance of this concept cant be understated. Devices externally connected to the virtual switch through its LAGs do not know or need to know the details of the configuration which creates the virtual switch. An IRF virtual switch looks like a single switch. A Distributed Trunking virtual switch looks like a single switch. This concept is very important to understand because it means there is no special setup when we want to connect these two technologies to each other. As far as each of the created virtual switches is concerned, the other end is just another switch. In other words, if we connect the physical topology as follows:

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SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 22

Trk2 (lacp) L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 Trk9 9-10

Trk20 (dt-lacp) ISC Trk9 Kpalv Vlan 2 Trk25 dt-lacp

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22 Trk9 9-10

DT-SW1
12 26 25

DT-SW2
12 25 26

L2 on IRF DOMAIN (IRF5/IRF-6) sees this as ONE link (LACP)

DT Trunk TRK25
Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp

Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp

L2 on DT-SW1/DT-SW2 sees this as ONE link (LACP)


5/0/26 5/0/25 5/0/12

Link Aggregation group 1


Interface bridge-aggregaion 1

5/0/25

5/0/26

IRF-5
5/0/27

IRF link IRF DOMAIN

6/0/12

IRF-6
6/0/28

Interface bridge-aggregaion 2

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP) Trk27 (lacp)


27 28

trunk 27,28 trk27 lacp

SW-B

Fig 3.1 Physical Topology

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From the perspective of the IRF domain the connection looks like so:
SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 22

Trk2 (lacp) L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21

Trk20 (dt-lacp)

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22

Distributed Trunking Virtual Switch


26 25 25 26

L2 on IRF DOMAIN (IRF5/IRF-6) sees this as ONE link (LACP)

DT Trunk TRK25
Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp

L2 on DT-SW1/DT-SW2 sees this as ONE link (LACP)


5/0/26 5/0/25 5/0/12

Link Aggregation group 1


Interface bridge-aggregaion 1

5/0/25

5/0/26

IRF-5
5/0/27

IRF link IRF DOMAIN

6/0/12

IRF-6
6/0/28

Interface bridge-aggregaion 2

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP) Trk27 (lacp)


27 28

trunk 27,28 trk27 lacp

SW-B

Fig 3.2: L2 Topology as seen fromt eh perspective of IRF domain. From the Distributed Trunking peer group perspective it looks like so:

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SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 22

Trk2 (lacp) L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 Trk9 9-10

Trk20 (dt-lacp)

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22

ISC Kpalv Vlan 2

Trk9 9-10

DT-SW1
12 26 25 12

DT-SW2
25 26

L2 on IRF DOMAIN (IRF5/IRF-6) sees this as ONE link (LACP)

DT Trunk TRK25
Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp

L2 on DT-SW1/DT-SW2 sees this as ONE link (LACP)


5/0/26 5/0/25

Link Aggregation group 1


Interface bridge-aggregaion 1

5/0/25

5/0/26

IRF DOMAIN Virtual Switch


5/0/27 6/0/28

Interface bridge-aggregaion 2

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP) Trk27 (lacp)


27 28

trunk 27,28 trk27 lacp

SW-B

Fig 3.3: L2 Topology as seen from the perspective of Distributed Trunking peer group DT-SW1SW2 We put those two perspectives together and we can see that from the perspective of SW-A and SW-B the L2 topology looks like this:

SW-A

DT-Virtual Switch

IRF-Virtual Switch

SW-B

LACP Trunk

LACP Trunk

LACP Trunk

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Fig 3.4: L2 topology as seen from the perspective of SW-A and SW-B

It is clear that to connect these two technologies together we simply have to configure each one of them independently and then connect the correct physical ports to each other. There is no interdependency between the two technology configurations. The IRF configuration is independent of the Distributed Trunking configuration and the Distributed Trunking configuration is independent of the IRF configuration. The only requirement is that they both present a single lacp actor to the outside world. An actor is the local interface in an LACP exchange. A partner is the remote interface in an LACP exchange.These two actors, one from the DT and one from IRF are then connected to each other to complete the connection. The lacp actor from the DT virtual switch becomes the lacp partner of the IRF virtual switch and the viceversa. Below, once again, is the physical topology diagram followed by the configuration of each switch.

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SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 22

Trk2 (lacp) L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 Trk9 9-10

Trk20 (dt-lacp)

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22

ISC Kpalv Vlan 2

Trk9 9-10

DT-SW1
12 26 25 12

DT-SW2
25 26

L2 on IRF DOMAIN (IRF5/IRF-6) sees this as ONE link (LACP)

DT Trunk TRK25
Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp

L2 on DT-SW1/DT-SW2 sees this as ONE link (LACP)


5/0/26 5/0/25 5/0/12

Link Aggregation group 1


Interface bridge-aggregaion 1

5/0/25

5/0/26

IRF-5
5/0/27

IRF link IRF DOMAIN

6/0/12

IRF-6
6/0/28

Interface bridge-aggregaion 2

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP) Trk27 (lacp)


27 28

trunk 27,28 trk27 lacp

SW-B

Fig 3.5: Physical topology for scenario 3. Scenario 3 Configurations :


SW-A - Running configuration: ; J9472A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "SW-A" module 1 type j94cca module 2 type j94dda trunk 21-22 trk2 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-20,23-48,Trk2 ip address 192.168.1.10 255.255.255.0 exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk2 admin-edge-port spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4 bpdu-filter

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DT-SW1 - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "DT-SW1" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 9-10 trk9 lacp trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp trunk 25-26 trk25 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk9 interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk25 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk9 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk25 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 12 untagged 1-8,11,13-20,22-24,27-48,Trk9,Trk20,Trk25 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 12 ip address 192.2.2.1 255.255.255.0 exit distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.2.2.2

DT-SW2 - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "DT-SW2" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 9-10 trk9 lacp trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp trunk 25-26 trk25 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk9 interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk25 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk9 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk25 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 12 untagged 1-8,11,13-21,23-24,27-48,Trk9,Trk20,Trk25 ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 12 ip address 192.2.2.2 255.255.255.0 exit distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.2.2.1 IRF-56 Configuration [IRF-56] *omited unused port configuration* # version 5.20, Release 1110P05 # sysname IRF-56 # irf domain 1 irf mac-address persistent timer irf auto-update enable

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undo irf link-delay # domain default enable system # telnet server enable # vlan 1 # radius scheme system server-type extended primary authentication 127.0.0.1 1645 primary accounting 127.0.0.1 1646 user-name-format without-domain # domain system access-limit disable state active idle-cut disable self-service-url disable # user-group system # interface Bridge-Aggregation1 # interface Bridge-Aggregation2 # interface NULL0 # interface Vlan-interface1 ip address 192.168.1.56 255.255.255.0 # interface GigabitEthernet5/0/25 port link-aggregation group 1 # interface GigabitEthernet5/0/26 port link-aggregation group 1 # interface GigabitEthernet5/0/27 port link-aggregation group 2 # interface GigabitEthernet5/0/28 # interface GigabitEthernet6/0/25 port link-aggregation group 1 # interface GigabitEthernet6/0/26 port link-aggregation group 1 # interface GigabitEthernet6/0/28 port link-aggregation group 2 # load xml-configuration # user-interface aux 4 5 user-interface vty 0 15 # irf-port 5/1 port group interface Ten-GigabitEthernet5/0/12 mode enhanced # irf-port 6/2 port group interface Ten-GigabitEthernet6/0/12 mode enhanced # return [IRF-56] SW-B - Running configuration: ; J9473A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "SW-B" module 1 type j94aaa module 2 type j94bba trunk 27-28 trk27 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk27 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-26,29-48,Trk27 ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0 exit SW-B(config)#

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Scenario 4: Distributed Trunking to HPNs 3800 Stack:


As we saw from our previous discussion about Distributed Trunking and IRF, it is quite easy to connect a Distributed Trunking virtual switch to any other network technology which uses link aggregation groups with LACP. The next example we will look at is interconnecting Distributed Trunking with a Stack of HPNs 3800 switches. The process is actually quite simple, we dont have to change the configuration of the Distributed Trunking peer group in our previous example , the one connected to IRF. All we have to do is replace the IRF domain (virutal switch) with our stack of 3800s. Then we simply configure the stack with the appropriate LAGs (lacp trunks). Our physical topology becomes:

SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 22

Trk2 (lacp) L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 Trk9 9-10

Trk20 (dt-lacp)

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22

ISC Kpalv Vlan 2

Trk9 9-10

DT-SW1
12 26 25 12

DT-SW2
25 26

L2 on IRF DOMAIN (IRF5/IRF-6) sees this as ONE link (LACP)

DT Trunk TRK25
Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp

L2 on DT-SW1/DT-SW2 sees this as ONE link (LACP)


1/16 1/25

LAG Trk52
LACP trunk (lag) Trk52 lacp

2/25

2/26

380-STACK
Commander.
1/17 Proprietary link

Standby
1/18

L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP)

LACP trunk (lag) Trk72

Trk27 (lacp)
27 28

trunk 27,28 trk27 lacp

SW-B

Fig 4.1: Scenario 4 physical topology We took the cables and simply plugged them in the appropriate place in the 3800 stack. The logical L2 topologies once again looks like so:

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SW-A

DT-Virtual Switch

3800 Stack

SW-B

Fig 4.2: Scenario 4 logical L2 topology Obviously we have to configure the 3800 stack but we have to make no changes to the Distributed Trunking setup. As a matter of fact we could just have created another set of dt-lacp trunks on the Distributed Trunking peer group and connect those to the 3800 stack; but in order to keep the diagrams simple and the configurations less confusing we take the easy route. Following is the configuration for all the switches in the figure above. Note that nothing has changed for SW-A, DT-SW1, DT-SW2, or SW-B. The only new information is the configuration for the 3800 stack. Scenario 4 Configurations:
SW-A(config)# show run Running configuration: ; J9472A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "SW-A" module 1 type j94cca module 2 type j94dda trunk 21-22 trk2 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted snmp-server host 201.0.0.10 community "public" spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-20,23-48,Trk2 ip address 192.168.1.10 255.255.255.0 exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk2 admin-edge-port spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4 bpdu-filter

DT-SW1 - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "DT-SW1" module 1 type j86yya

LACP Trunk

LACP Trunk

LACP Trunk

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module 2 type j86xxa trunk 9-10 trk9 lacp trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp trunk 25-26 trk25 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk9 interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk25 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk9 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk25 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 12 untagged 1-8,11,13-20,22-24,27-48,Trk9,Trk20,Trk25 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 12 ip address 192.2.2.1 255.255.255.0 exit distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.2.2.2 DT-SW2 - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "DT-SW2" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 9-10 trk9 lacp trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp trunk 25-26 trk25 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk9 interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk25 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk9 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk25 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 12 untagged 1-8,11,13-21,23-24,27-48,Trk9,Trk20,Trk25 ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 12 ip address 192.2.2.2 255.255.255.0 exit distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.2.2.1 3800-STACK - Running configuration: ; hpStack Configuration Editor; Created on release #KA.15.03.3016 ; Ver #01:00:01 hostname "3800-STACK" stacking member 1 type "J9576A" mac-address 1cc1de-4d0f40 member 2 type "J9575A" mac-address 1cc1de-4dec80 exit trunk 1/15-1/16,2/15-2/16 Trk52 LACP trunk 1/17,2/18 Trk72 LACP vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1/1-1/14,1/18-1/52,2/1-2/14,2/17,2/19-2/26,Trk52,Trk72 ip address 192.168.1.56 255.255.255.0 exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk52 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk72 priority 4

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oobm member 1 ip address dhcp-bootp exit member 2 ip address dhcp-bootp exit ip address dhcp-bootp exit 3800-STACK(config)# SW-B - Running configuration: ; J9473A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "SW-B" module 1 type j94aaa module 2 type j94bba trunk 27-28 trk27 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk27 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-26,29-48,Trk27 ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0 exit

Scenario 5: Distributed Trunking to Cisco VSS


By now we have relized that we can connect Dsistributed trunking to any technoglogy wich implements LACP LAGs. Cisco VSS does this. All we have to do to connect Distributed Trunking to a Cisco VSS, is the same thing we did to connect Distributed Trunking to HPNs 3800 Stack. We configured the VSS and plug in the appropriate ports together. We have to make noe changes to our Distributed Trunking Configuration:

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SW-A
Trunk 21,22 trk2 lacp 21 22

Trk2 (lacp) L2 on SW-A sees this as ONE link (LACP)


Trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp 21 Trk9 9-10

Trk20 (dt-lacp)

Trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp 22

ISC Kpalv Vlan 2

Trk9 9-10

DT-SW1
12 26 25 12

DT-SW2
25 26

L2 on IRF DOMAIN (IRF5/IRF-6) sees this as ONE link (LACP)

DT Trunk TRK25
Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp Trunk 25,26 trk25 dt-lacp

L2 on DT-SW1/DT-SW2 sees this as ONE link (LACP)


TBD TBD

Etherchannel ##
EtherChannel (LACP)

TBD

TBD

Cisco VSS
TBD
1/17

TBD
1/18

Etherchannel (LACP) L2 on SW-B sees this as ONE link (LACP) Trk27 (lacp)
27 28

trunk 27,28 trk27 lacp

SW-B

Fig 5.1: Scenario 4 Physial topology We wont bother to draw the L2 logical topology as it should be clear by now that it is the same as scenarios 2, 3, and 4. Here are the configurations: Scenario 5 Configurations:
SW-A(config)# show run Running configuration: ; J9472A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "SW-A" module 1 type j94cca module 2 type j94dda trunk 21-22 trk2 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted snmp-server host 201.0.0.10 community "public" spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-20,23-48,Trk2 ip address 192.168.1.10 255.255.255.0 exit spanning-tree spanning-tree Trk2 admin-edge-port spanning-tree Trk2 priority 4 bpdu-filter

DT-SW1 - Running configuration:

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; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "DT-SW1" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 9-10 trk9 lacp trunk 21 trk20 dt-lacp trunk 25-26 trk25 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk9 interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk25 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk9 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk25 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 12 untagged 1-8,11,13-20,22-24,27-48,Trk9,Trk20,Trk25 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 12 ip address 192.2.2.1 255.255.255.0 exit distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.2.2.2 DT-SW2 - Running configuration: ; J8693A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "DT-SW2" module 1 type j86yya module 2 type j86xxa trunk 9-10 trk9 lacp trunk 22 trk20 dt-lacp trunk 25-26 trk25 dt-lacp switch-interconnect trk9 interface Trk20 unknown-vlans disable exit interface Trk25 unknown-vlans disable exit snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk9 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk20 priority 4 spanning-tree Trk25 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" no untagged 12 untagged 1-8,11,13-21,23-24,27-48,Trk9,Trk20,Trk25 ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 exit vlan 2 name "VLAN2" untagged 12 ip address 192.2.2.2 255.255.255.0 exit distributed-trunking peer-keepalive vlan 2 distributed-trunking peer-keepalive destination 192.2.2.1 CISCO VSS CONFIGURATION TBD SW-B - Running configuration: ; J9473A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.15.08.0009 ; Ver #02:1b.ef:f6 hostname "SW-B" module 1 type j94aaa module 2 type j94bba trunk 27-28 trk27 lacp snmp-server community "public" unrestricted spanning-tree Trk27 priority 4 vlan 1 name "DEFAULT_VLAN" untagged 1-26,29-48,Trk27 ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0 exit

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Review Comments: I would suggest three modifications: configuration requirements, dt-checking and limitations. I mean Requirements: same firmware on dt-switches, same vlan configuration, same trk on both switches for the dt-lacp to work . DT-CHECKING: one or two commands to see everything is up and running (show distributedtrunking, show lacp distributed, show switch ). Limitations: a message as DO CHECK management guide for your firmware release to see the latest info regarding limitations with other features.

I do know most of the information I suggest is on the 5400 management and configuration guide, but it could be great to have everything you need on your cookbook. Now its necessary to have some knowledge on DT technology (although same firmware releases are used it s not explained why, so I do think a message YOU MUST USE SAME FIRMWARE would be necessary)

Thanks for your help PJ

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