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Adapted by John B. Davidson Based on the fairy tale by Charles Perrault Directed by
Adapted by John B. Davidson Based on the fairy tale by Charles Perrault Directed by

Adapted by John B. Davidson Based on the fairy tale by Charles Perrault Directed by Peter C. Brosius Choreography by Brian Sostek Music Direction, Composition and Orchestration by Victor Zupanc

November 19 – December 20

Music Direction, Composition and Orchestration by Victor Zupanc November 19 – December 20 10:30am Student Matinee

10:30am Student Matinee

Welcome Teachers, Educators, and Parents:

We are so excited that you’re here for our 2013- 2014 season, Imagine That. It’s a season filled with unlikely friendships, travels to space, uproarious pantomime, black light puppetry, fairy tales of epic proportions, and much more.

This production has truly been a collaboration between great talents: Eduardo Sicangco’s set and costume design, Paul Whitaker’s lighting, new and original choreography by Brian Sostek and the music direction, compositions and sound designs of Victor Zupanc’s impeccably calibrated score and pop song rearrangements. The experience as an audience member is one of total immersion in this fantastic and spectacular world.

CTC’s Cinderella is inspired by the wild and wonderful theatrical form of panto, an incredibly popular holiday theatrical tradition throughout the United Kingdom. There is hardly an English theatre that doesn’t delight its audiences with this mad mix of spectacle, dance and slapstick comedy. It is a form as enduring as the tale of Cinderella.

As you know, research has shown that the early years in a child’s life—when the human brain is forming—represent a critically important window of opportunity to develop a child’s full potential and shape key academic, social, and cognitive skills that determine a child’s success in school and in life. The Arts are a crucial tool for teaching empathy, expanding imagination and introducing ideas that challenge our thinking.

Cinderella, as with all the plays on our stage this season, is a product of the imagination and hard work of every actor, director, playwright, and artist at CTC. We hope you, your students, and your family will be transported to the worlds we have created. We hope our plays spark dialogue between friends, classmates and family members and that everyone shares in the power of active imagination.

See you at the theatre!

Warmly,

Nina Stultz

Nina Stultz Student Matinee Coordinator

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Inside the Study Guide

WELCOME LETTER

2. Hello from CTC!

3. 2013-2014 Season at a Glance

SHOW PREPARATION

4. Before, During, and After the Show

5. Theatre Vocabulary

PLAY/STORY PREPARATION

4. Life Lessons and Themes

5. Cast of Main Characters

6. Fairy Tales: A Brief Description

AUTHOR STUDY

6.

Cinderella: The Story’s Origin and History

6.

Charles Perrault

7.

Cinderella: Variations from Around the World

PLAY/STORY CONNECTIONS

8.

About the Music from CTC’s Musical Director

8.

A Little Bit About Pantomime

8.

Adaptation Explanation

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES 9-10. Grades PreK-2 My Favorite Fairy Tale Character “If I had a Fairy Godmother …”

11-13. Grades 3-5+ An Interview with Cinderella A Cinderella Catastrophe Happily Ever After: No More Bullying

14. Grades 6-8+ Fairy Tale or Reality: Changing the Cycle of Bullying

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Online Resources Academic Standards

6-8+ Fairy Tale or Reality: Changing the Cycle of Bullying ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Online Resources Academic Standards
Photo by: Pixel Dust Photography Reserve Your Tickets Now! To reserve tickets to any of

Photo by: Pixel Dust Photography

Reserve Your Tickets Now!

To reserve tickets to any of our 2013- 2014 Student Matinees please visit our website, childrenstheatre.org. Our school trips and tickets section contains all the information you need including order forms, performance run dates, price charts, and subsidy applications.

Questions? Contact Nina Stultz at 612.872.5166 or nstultz@ childrenstheatre.org for more information.

For more information about any of our 10:30

AM Student Matinees or to reserve tickets please go to childrenstheatre.org/index.php/ education/school-trips-and-tickets or call

612.872.5166

2013- 2014 Student Matinee Season at a Glance

Charlotte’s Web September 25 - October 24, 2013 ASL/AD date October 2nd Reading Level: Grades K+ UnitedHealth Group Stage

The Wong Kids in The Secret of the Space Chupacabra Go! October 23 - November 14, 2013 ASL/AD date October 23rd Reading Level: Grades 3+ Cargill Stage

Cinderella November 19 - December 20, 2013 ASL/AD date December 4th Reading Level: All Ages UnitedHealth Group Stage

The Very Hungry Caterpillar and other Eric Carle Favorites January 16 - February 20, 2014 ASL/AD date January 29th Reading Level: Preschool+ UnitedHealth Group Stage

The Scarecrow and His Servant March 19 - April 3, 2014 ASL/AD date March 26th Reading Level: Grades 3+ UnitedHealth Group Stage

Balloonacy March 25 – May 2, 2014 Reading Level: Preschool+ Cargill Stage

Shrek the Musical April 29 - May 29, 2014 ASL/AD date May 7th Reading Level: All Ages UnitedHealth Group Stage

Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat May 27 - June 5, 2014 Reading Level: Grades Pre-K+ Cargill Stage

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Group Stage Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat May 27 - June 5, 2014 Reading

Before, During and After the Show

Check out these quick and easy ideas to help your students learn how to integrate the arts into their classroom and beyond!

Before Preparing your students

• Read the book Cinderella.

• Compare illustrations in different versions of the story. How do they capture the mood? Do they add to the story by showing details or action not mentioned in the text?

On a map of the world, find the countries or geographic areas where the Cinderella stories the class has read are based.

• Make a chart of the differences and similarities in versions of the Cinderella stories. Let the class select a favorite version and act out the story.

• Review the Cast of Main Characters and Vocabulary (found on page 5).

• Discuss good audience behavior (look, listen, sit quietly but laugh when it’s funny!), applaud at the end.

During Engaging your students

Encourage your students to…

• Listen for vocabulary words and themes discussed before seeing the play.

• Choose one character to follow throughout the play.

• Pay attention to life lessons and themes in the play.

After Reflecting with your Students

Questions to ask your students:

• How is the play the same/different from the book?

• If you were Cinderella, what would you have done at the end of the story?

• How did the play compare to other versions we read?

• What do you think was the lesson of the story?

Life Lessons and Themes

Discover your own ideas about the themes of Cinderella. Here are some to get you started:

• Beauty is a treasure, but graciousness is priceless. Without it, nothing is possible; with it, one can do anything.

• Cinderella explores the themes of selflessness, perseverance and forgiveness.

• Cinderella explores the themes of selflessness, perseverance and forgiveness. Photo by: Dan Norman PAGE 4

Photo by: Dan Norman

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• Cinderella explores the themes of selflessness, perseverance and forgiveness. Photo by: Dan Norman PAGE 4

Theatre Vocabulary

Actor: A person who performs a role in the play.

Audience: The group of people that watch and respond to the play.

Backstage: The area of the stage that cannot be seen by the audience.

Blocking: The planned way actors move on stage.

Cast: The group of actors who portray the roles in the play.

Character: The role, or personality, the actor portrays.

Costume: The clothes worn by the actors on stage.

Design: The creative process of developing and implementing how the play will look and feel. Costumes, lighting, sets, and make-up are all designed.

Director: The person who oversees the entire process of bringing the play to life on stage.

Dress Rehearsal: The final practice performances when the play is done in full costume and with all of the technical elements (light, sound, effects) in place.

House: The area where the audience sits.

Performance: The live event shared by the cast and the audience.

Play: A story written for the stage.

Playwright: A person who writes stories for the stage.

Prop: Any item on the stage used (carried, moved, manipulated) by the actors.

Scene: A section of a play, also called an act.

Set: The physical environment that creates the time, place, and mood of the play.

Stage Manager: The person who coordinates all aspects of the play during production and performance.

Cast of Characters

Cinderella

Stepmother

Dorcas – Cinderella’s stepsister

Pearl – Cinderella’s stepsister

Beggar Woman

Fairy Godmother

Lord High Chamberlain

Prince Eric

Host/Father – Storyteller/narrator at the holiday party in the play

– Storyteller/narrator at the holiday party in the play Photo by: Dan Norman “ Fairy Godmother:

Photo by: Dan Norman

Fairy Godmother: My dear, I see a tear in your eye.

Cinderella: It is a tear of joy, for this is to be the happiest night of my life! Thank you!”

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in your eye. Cinderella: It is a tear of joy, for this is to be the

Fairy Tales: A Brief Description

A fairy tale, or wonder tale, is a kind of folktale or fable. In these stories we meet witches and queens, giants and elves, princes, dragons, talking animals, ogres, princesses and sometimes even fairies. Marvelous and magical things happen to characters in fairy tales. A boy may become a bird. A princess may sleep for a hundred years. A seal may become a girl. Objects too can be enchanted — mirrors talk, pumpkins become carriages and a lamp may be home to a genie.

The oldest fairy tales were told and retold for generations before they were written down, but now we can read fairy tales from almost any culture. When these stories were studied together, something amazing was discovered. From countries as distant and different as Egypt and Iceland similar fairy tales are told. Both Egypt and Iceland have “Cinderella” stories, as do China, England, Korea, Siberia, France, and Vietnam; and the list doesn’t stop there.

There may be a thousand versions of the Cinderella story, each with a unique telling which carries cultural information about the time and place the story was told. One thing is for sure; people everywhere like stories in which truth prevails over deception, generosity is ultimately rewarded, hard work overcomes obstacles, and love, mercy and kindness are the greatest powers of all.

Today, some authors still like to retell and invent new fairy tales. The Cinderella story was recently re-imagined by Diane Goode in her book Cinderella: the Dog and Her Little Glass Slipper. So jump in and find out what makes these fairy tales so enduring, or try your hand at creating your own!

Cinderella : The Story’s Origin and History

Where the story of Cinderella originated is unknown but the earliest datable version of the Cinderella story occurs in a Chinese book writ- ten about 850-860 AD. The earliest European version of tale was published in Italy in 1634. In 1697 Perrault introduced the story familiar to most Americans, “Cinderella, or The Tale of the Little Glass Slipper” in his Histories or Tales of Past Times in 1697. The story has had many variations over the centuries - More than 700 variations of the tale have been collected from around the world, with it appearing in almost every language.

Charles Perrault

Charles Perrault was a French writer who lived in the second half of the XVII century. He was one of the first writers in European literature who turned his eyes to folklore. Born in 1628 in a clerical bourgeois family, Perrault received legal education and had high royal office. In the second half of the

XVII century, there was a dispute amidst

French writers about the advantage of modern writers compared to the writers of antiquity. Charles Perrault played an important role in this dispute, opposing to the genre and thematic limitations of classical literature.

In 1671, Charles Perrault was elected to

the French Academy of Sciences. In folk art, Perrault found rich stories and images to create new artistic works. He turned to folklore by collecting a number of stories

and published them in 1697 under the title

“Tales of Mother Goose.” This collection

included eight fairy tales, including “Little

Red Riding Hood”, “Puss in Boots”, “Little

Thumb” and “Cinderella.” In subsequent editions Perrault added two more stories

and a novelette.

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Thumb” and “Cinderella.” In subsequent editions Perrault added two more stories and a novelette. PAGE 6

Variations from Around the World

Variations from Around the World Abadeha: The Philippine Cinderella by Myrna J. De La Paz Before

Abadeha: The Philippine Cinderella by Myrna J. De La Paz

Abadeha: The Philippine Cinderella by Myrna J. De La Paz Before Midnight by Cameron Dokey Cendrillon

Before Midnight by Cameron Dokey

by Myrna J. De La Paz Before Midnight by Cameron Dokey Cendrillon by Robert D. San

Cendrillon by Robert D. San Souci

by Cameron Dokey Cendrillon by Robert D. San Souci Chickerella by Mary Jane and Herm Auch

Chickerella by Mary Jane and Herm Auch

Robert D. San Souci Chickerella by Mary Jane and Herm Auch Cindy Ellen by Susan Lowell

Cindy Ellen by Susan Lowell

by Mary Jane and Herm Auch Cindy Ellen by Susan Lowell Domitila: A Cinderella Tale from

Domitila: A Cinderella Tale from the Mexican Tradition by Jewell Coburn

Cinderella Tale from the Mexican Tradition by Jewell Coburn Ella’s Big Chance by Shirley Hughes Fair,

Ella’s Big Chance by Shirley Hughes

by Jewell Coburn Ella’s Big Chance by Shirley Hughes Fair, Brown, and Trembling: An Irish Cinderella

Fair, Brown, and Trembling: An Irish Cinderella Story by Jude Daly

and Trembling: An Irish Cinderella Story by Jude Daly The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo Just

The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo

by Jude Daly The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo Just Ella by Margaret Peterson Haddix PAGE

Just Ella by Margaret Peterson Haddix

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Shirley Climo Just Ella by Margaret Peterson Haddix PAGE 7 Cinderella Skeleton by Robert D. San

Cinderella Skeleton by Robert D. San Souci

Haddix PAGE 7 Cinderella Skeleton by Robert D. San Souci Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine

Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine

by Robert D. San Souci Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine Little Gold Star: A Spanish-American

Little Gold Star: A Spanish-American Cinderella Tale by Robert D. San Souci

Souci Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine Little Gold Star: A Spanish-American Cinderella Tale by Robert

Adaptation Explanation

What is an Adaptation?

Cinderella started out as an oral story. It’s such

a well-loved story that it has been adapted

into film and stage plays. What does it mean to “adapt” something? Well, it means to change

it or shift it so that it works in another format or another way. For example, in order to adapt Cinderella from an oral story into a play for the stage, the playwright would need to use a couple of different tools.

Dialogue: When one or more characters are speaking aloud to each other.

Monologue: When one character is talking to themselves or to the audience.

Stage Directions: These are silent text in the script that assists the actors and directors set the scene. Stage Directions can tell the actors and directors what the stage is supposed to look like, or how a character looks and feels and more.

Narrator: A playwright can also use a narrator, or a storyteller to help communicate parts of the original story that the playwright wants to use.

Song: Sometimes playwrights use music and song to help tell the story.

About Pantomime

One of the trademarks of the traditional panto (or pantomime) is to take a well- known fairy tale and turn it on its ear. The history of the panto can be traced back to Greek theatre, but it is considered to be distinctly British. Panto uses song and dance, slapstick comedy and elaborate costuming and exaggerated make-up to tell strong stories of good battling evil.

About the Music of Cinderella

“Working on the music for Cinderella was a very special treat for me. This production at CTC is in the traditional, British panto style, which essentially means that anything goes. The panto style encourages scenes of wild, outrageous, slapstick humor interspersed with scenes of absolute beauty and deep emotion. It’s a wonderful and challenging mix. The music that I have arranged and composed for this production covers that wide range and everything in between. You will hear parodies of famous pop songs old and new. It was extremely important to me that we include tunes that are familiar to six year olds and others that will make the parents and grandparents smile.

Another common aspect of traditional pantos is The Olios. These are short “entertainments’ that happen in between scenes of the play. The curtain closes and the audience is entertained by singers, musicians and dancers. These might be related to the play but often are not. They are, quite simply, and opportunity to show off in front of the curtain while scenery is being changed behind it. For our production, we have chosen to feature several carols from around the world-very interesting and beautiful carols from Ireland and England and Germany and The Czech Republic.”

-Victor Zupanc, Music Director and Composer

and England and Germany and The Czech Republic.” -Victor Zupanc, Music Director and Composer Photo by:

Photo by: Dan Norman

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and England and Germany and The Czech Republic.” -Victor Zupanc, Music Director and Composer Photo by:

My Favorite Fairy Tale Character (PreK-2)

Name

Date

Think about your favorite character from the story Cinderella. Write their name on the line below then decorate the face to look like your character. Fill in the bubbles with statements the character might say or something you heard them say in the play.

I like I can I am I want
I like
I can
I am
I want

Academic Standards: K: Writing Benchmark -Production and Distribution of Writing: 0.6.5.5 Grade 1: Writing Benchmark -Production and Distribution of Writing: 1.6.5.5 Grade 2: Writing Benchmark -Production and Distribution of Writing: 2.6.5.5

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and Distribution of Writing: 1.6.5.5 Grade 2: Writing Benchmark -Production and Distribution of Writing: 2.6.5.5 PAGE

Name

If I Had a Fairy Godmother

Date

(PreK-2)

Think about what life would be like if you have a Fairy Godmother. What would you ask for? Where would you go? What would you do?

Write your story below or create an illustration on the back of this page.

If I had a Fairy Godmother

Academic Standards: K: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 0.1.7.7, 0.1.9.9 Grade 1: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 1.1.7.7, 1.1.9.9 Grade 2:

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 2.1.9.9

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Grade 1: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 1.1.7.7, 1.1.9.9 Grade 2: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

An Interview with Cinderella (3-5+)

Name

Date

Have you ever wondered “What happened AFTER the “Happily Ever After”?” In this writing activity you will be given the opportunity to find out!

Interview #1

Interviewer: Ask Cinderella the questions below and record her answers on a separate sheet of paper. Cinderella: Think critically and creatively about what happened after the story ends.

Interviewer:

Cinderella:

1. What do you do all day to stay busy now that you do not have to clean all the time?

2. Now that you are a Princess, did you punish your stepsisters?

3. Do you ever see your Fairy Godmother?

4. Whatever happened to your glass slippers?

Interview #2

Interviewer: Now think of your OWN questions to ask a DIFFERENT character.

Character Name:

Write your questions below:

1.

2.

3.

Academic Standards: Grade 3: Comprehension and Collaboration: 3.8.1.1; 3.8.2.2 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas: 3.8.4.4 Grade 4: Comprehension and Collaboration: 4.8.1.1; 4.8.2.2 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas: 4.8.4.4 Grade 5: Comprehension and Collaboration:

5.8.1.1; 5.8.2.2 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas: 5.8.4.4

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4.8.4.4 Grade 5: Comprehension and Collaboration: 5.8.1.1; 5.8.2.2 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas: 5.8.4.4 PAGE 11

A Cinderella Catastrophe (3-5+)

Name

Date

Oh NO! Something terrible has happened and Cinderella needs your help. Imagine that there was a catastrophe in the Cinderella story.

Write your own story telling what would happen if

• The Fairy Godmother lost her wand

• The glass slipper broke

• One of the coach horses ran away

The slipper also fit one of Cinderella’s stepsisters

Circle the event from above you will write about or create your own below.

You may use the back of this paper or a separate piece of paper if you need more space.

Happily Ever After: No More Bullying (3-5+)

Name

Date

In the story of Cinderella, Cinderella is bullied by her stepsisters and stepmother.

Bullying: Using superior strength or influence to intimidate someone, typically to force him or her to do what you want.

My Definition:

1. WRITE ALL ABOUT IT Below there is a chart with different fairytales. Each fairytale encounters the topic of bullying.

Fairytale

Examples from the Story

How can we address the behavior?

Cinderella

1.

 

2.

3.

Little Red

1.

 

Riding Hood

2.

3.

 

1.

 

Rapunzel

2.

3.

 

1.

 

Jack and the Beanstalk

2.

3.

2. ACT IT OUT

Now that you’ve created some examples, choose one story and present a skit to illustrate strategies for addressing bullying behavior. Remember these details for your story and rehearsal process:

who are the characters, what issues will you try to solve, and how you can solve it?

As a class you can compose a class pledge against bullying and sign the pledge.

Academic Standards: Academic Standards: Grade 3: Language Arts, 3.2.4.4., 3.6.4.4., 3.8.1.1.a. , 3.8.1.1.b., 3.8.1.1.c., 3.8.1.1.d., 3.10.4.4.a., 3.10.6.6. Grade 4: Language Arts, 4.2.4.4., 4.6.2.2.b., 4.6.4.4., 4.8.1.1.a., 4.8.1.1.b., 4.8.1.1.c., 4.8.6.6., 4.10.3.3.c., 4.10.6.6., Arts Education, 4.1.2.4.1., Grade 5: Language Arts, 5.1.1.1., 5.2.4.4., 5.6.2.2.b., 5.6.4.4., 5.8.1.1.a., 5.8.1.1.b., 5.8.1.1.c, 5.10.6.6.

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Grade 5: Language Arts, 5.1.1.1., 5.2.4.4., 5.6.2.2.b., 5.6.4.4., 5.8.1.1.a., 5.8.1.1.b., 5.8.1.1.c, 5.10.6.6. PAGE 13
Grade 5: Language Arts, 5.1.1.1., 5.2.4.4., 5.6.2.2.b., 5.6.4.4., 5.8.1.1.a., 5.8.1.1.b., 5.8.1.1.c, 5.10.6.6. PAGE 13

Fairy Tale or Reality: Changing the Cycle of Bullying (6-8+)

Name

Date

In this activity you will learn about the different roles people take in the cycle of bullying. You will then, as a group, dig deeper into this issue within the story of Cinderella and compare and share these examples to your own life.

Keep this question in mind: What can I do to help stop the cycle of bullying?

1. Read and reflect on the vocabulary below:

Bullying: Repeated negative behavior with a desire to harm someone with less power (size, strength, or other perceived imbalance of power); the aggressor appears to enjoy the interaction, and the victim feels oppressed.

Bully: A person who habitually acts with the intention of threatening, intimidating, or harming others, particularly people who appear weaker.

2. Discuss examples of bullying in Cinderella (Use these questions during your discussion)

1. Why do bullies pick on a certain person repeatedly?

2. How does the victim act?

3. How do people who observe bullying react?

4. Does bullying behavior ever happen in front of teachers/adults?

5. Does bullying behavior ever happen when no one is watching?

3. List some things that a bystander can do to help stop the cycle of bullying:

1.

2.

3.

4. Create a plan as a group you could potentially put into action to prevent bullying in your community.

5. Present your ideas to the class.

Academic Standards: Grade 6: Language Arts, 6.5.1.1., 6.5.2.2. , 6.5.3.3., 6.5.4.4., 6.5.5.5., 6.5.7.7., 6.9.1.1.a., 6.9.1.1.b., 6.9.1.1.c., 6.9.1.1.d., 6.11.6.6.Social Studies, VII.A4.3, 6.12.1.1., 6.12.2.2., 6.12.4.4., 6.12.9.9., 6.14.1.1.b.,6.14.9.9. Grade 7: Language Arts, 7.5.1.1., 7.5.2.2., 7.5.3.3., 7.5.4.4., 7.9.1.1.a., 7.9.1.1.b., 7.9.1.1.c., 7.9.1.1.d., 7.11.6.6. Social Studies, VII.A4.3., 6.12.4.4. Grade 8: Language Arts,8.5.1.1., 8.5.2.2., 8.5.4.4., 8.9.1.1.a., 8.9.1.1.b., 8.9.1.1.c., 8.9.1.1.d., 8.11.6.6. Social Studies, VII.A1.1., VII.A4.3., 6.12.4.4.

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8.9.1.1.a., 8.9.1.1.b., 8.9.1.1.c., 8.9.1.1.d., 8.11.6.6. Social Studies, VII.A1.1., VII.A4.3., 6.12.4.4. PAGE 14

Online Resources

http://www.ala.org/offices/resources/multicultural An overview of multicultural variations on the Cinderella story from the American Library Association.

http://www.education.ne.gov/forlg/elementary/cinderella.pdf More variations on the Cinderella story from around the world, including a “compare and contrast” activity between the different stories.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/the-joy-of-pigs/introduction/2123/

A site dedicated to the episode of Nature entitled “The Joy of Pigs”. It features a video of the full episode and all sorts of fascinating information and pictures of pigs from all over the world.

http://www.worldwidewords.org/nl/zfhc.htm#N3

Was Cinderella’s glass slipper supposed to be fur? Read World Wide Words to learn more about this theory.

http://www.stopbullying.gov/ Government website on bullying prevention resources and information.

http://cowbird.com/ Online storytelling community open to all, supplying tools for multimedia storytelling.

Photo by: Dan Norman
Photo by: Dan Norman

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Online storytelling community open to all, supplying tools for multimedia storytelling. Photo by: Dan Norman PAGE

Academic Standards

Academic Standards Statement

Children’s Theatre Company’s school programs provide quality learning experiences for your students. Our Teachers’ Guides provide a variety of lesson plans and educational activities which are grounded in best practices for literacy and arts education and are strategically aligned with the Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards.

The Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards identify the knowledge and skills that are to be mastered by all students by the end of a grade level and guide educators in the design of curricula. Individual Children’s Theatre Company school programs will address standards for children Kindergarten through eighth grade in the following learning areas:

Language Arts Reading Mathematics Social Studies Visual and Theater Arts

The following English Language Arts and Arts content standards can be experienced by attending any school matinee and using the Teachers’ Guide. Additional information on how specific lesson plans align with the Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards can be found within the following Learning Activities.

Language Arts

Reading Benchmarks: Literature K-5 Key Ideas and Details: 0.1.1.1; 1.1.1.1; 2.1.1.1; 0.1.2.2; 1.1.2.2; 2.1.2.2; 0.1.3.3; 1.1.3.3; 2.1.3.3; 3.1.2.2; 4.1.2.2; 5.1.2.2; 3.1.3.3; 4.1.3.3; 5.1.3.3 Craft and Structure: 0.1.6.6; 1.1.6.6; 2.1.6.6; 3.1.5.5; 4.1.5.5; 5.1.5.5; 3.1.6.6; 4.1.6.6; 5.1.6.6 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 0.1.7.7; 1.1.7.7; 2.1.7.7; 0.1.9.9; 1.1.9.9; 2.1.9.9; 3.1.7.7; 4.1.7.7; 5.1.7.7

Reading Benchmarks: Foundational Skills K-5 Phonics and Word Recognition: 0.3.0.3; 1.3.0.3; 2.3.03; 3.3.0.3; 4.3.0.3; 5.3.0.3

Writing Benchmarks K-5 Text Types and Purposes: 0.6.3.3; 1.6.3.3; 2.6.3.3; 3.6.3.3; 4.6.3.3; 5.6.3.3 Production and Distribution of Writing: 0.6.5.5; 1.6.5.5; 2.6.5.5; 3.6.4.4; 4.6.4.4; 5.6.4.4; 3.6.5.5; 4.6.5.5 Research to Build and Present Knowledge: 0.6.7.7; 1.6.7.7; 2.6.7.7; 0.6.8.8; 1.6.8.8; 2.6.8.8; 3.6.7.7; 4.6.7.7; 5.6.7.7; 4.6.9.9; 5.6.9.9

Speaking, Viewing, Listening, and Media Literacy Benchmarks K-5 Comprehension and Collaboration: 0.8.1.1; 1.8.1.1; 2.8.1.1; 0.8.2.2; 1.8.2.2; 2.8.2.2; 0.8.3.3; 1.8.3.3; 2.8.3.3; 3.8.1.1; 4.8.1.1; 5.8.1.1; 3.8.2.2; 4.8.2.2; 5.8.2.2 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas: 0.8.4.4; 1.8.4.4; 2.8.4.4; 0.8.5.5; 1.8.5.5; 2.8.5.5; 3.8.4.4; 4.8.4.4; 5.8.4.4

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of Knowledge and Ideas: 0.8.4.4; 1.8.4.4; 2.8.4.4; 0.8.5.5; 1.8.5.5; 2.8.5.5; 3.8.4.4; 4.8.4.4; 5.8.4.4 PAGE 16

Arts

Theater Arts K-3 Artistic Foundations: 0.1.1.4.1 Artistic Process: Create or Make: 0.2.1.4.1; 0.2.1.4.2 Artist Process Perform and Present: 0.3.1.4.2 Artist Process Respond and Critique: 0.4.1.4.1

Visual Arts K-3 Artistic Process: Create or Make: 0.2.1.5.1

Theater Arts 4-5 Artistic Foundations: 4.1.1.4.2; 4.1.2.4.1; 4.1.3.4.2 Artistic Process: Create or Make: 4.2.1.4.1 Artist Process Perform and Present: 4.3.1.4.1 Artist Process Respond and Critique: 4.4.1.4.1;

Visual Arts 4-5 Artistic Process: Create or Make: 4.2.1.5.1

Coding System Each anchor standard has a benchmark identified by a four-digit code.

For example, in the code 5.2.8.8— The 5 refers to grade five; The 2 refers to the substrand, Reading Standards for Informational Text K-5; The first 8 refers to the eighth CCR anchor standard, Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence; The second 8 refers to the benchmark for that standard, Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).

For additional information:

http://education.state.mn.us

Don’t Miss

Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014

January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014

PAGE 17

For additional information: http://education.state.mn.us Don’t Miss January 16, 2014 - February 20, 2014 PAGE 17