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Ramsey 1 Doss Ramsey Dr.

Orr ENGL 268 11 November 2013 Annotated Bibliography

As the creative authority in his films, Quentin Tarantino can manipulate gender roles and depict patriarchy in Kill Bill Vol. 2 without inhibition and the result is a portrayal equally subject to violence, even if implied, as the rest of his plot twists. Michael Rennett in his article Quentin Tarantino and the Director as DJ claims that as the director, Tarantino has carte blanche as to the inclusion of graphic or gender-biased content in his films, and fellow scholars Cynthia Carter and C. Kay Weaver agree in their book Violence and the Media that it is precisely Tarantinos eroticism of violence and depiction of women that has made him so successful. Tarantinos film Kill Bill Vol. 2 has created a lot of buzz in regard to the incorporation of violence and the depiction of horrific acts on screen, but less has been written about the inclusion of patriarchy and traditional gender roles in his films. Kathleen Barbara in her 2006 masters thesis discussed how Tarantino has complicated views of the female body in cinema, and Theresa Duncan, writing for Artforum International in 2004, claims that Kill Bill Vol. 2s girl-on-girl violence has actually created for the first time in cinema a female genre.

Ramsey 2

Checklist

I.

Primary Sources Kill Bill Vol. 2. Dir. Tarantino, Quentin. Prod. Lawrence Bender. Perf. Uma Thurman, David Carradine and Michael Parks. Film. A Band Apart, 2004.

Tarantino, Quentin. Kill Bill Vol. 2. Revised Final Script. Internet Movie Script Database. 10 November 2013. www.imsdb.com/scripts/Kill-BillVolume-1-&-2.html

II.

Secondary Sources

Barbara, Kathleen. "The Post-Modern Body in Cinema." Masters Wichita State University, 2006. Print. Wichita, Kansas.

Carter, Cynthia, and C. Kay Weaver. "Serial Killers and Designer Violence." Violence and the Media. Philadelphia: Open University Press, 2003. 65. Print.

Duncan, Theresa. "Theresa Duncan on Women and the Man in Two Recent Films." Artforum International February 2004: 45. Print.

Ramsey 3 O'Sullivan, Charlotte. "Driven to Destruction: Kill Bill Vol. 2." The Independent. 04/23/2004. 2004. Print.

Ramsey 4 Annotations 2003


#1

Carter, Cynthia, and C. Kay Weaver. "Serial Killers and Designer Violence." Violence and the Media. Philadelphia: Open University Press, 2003. 65. Print.

Cynthia Carter is a Senior Lecturer in the Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University as well as co-editor of the journal Feminist Media Studies. Carters book seeks to analyze the nexus between violence and media, and as a scholar of feminist theory, Carters bias may reflect this interaction as well. This resource does a good job of looking specifically at Tarantinos work; however, there is a gap concerning Kill Bill Vol. 2 because the publication of this book happened prior to Kill Bill Vol. 2s cinematic release. 2004
#2

Kill Bill Vol. 2. Dir. Tarantino, Quentin. Prod. Lawrence Bender. Perf. Uma Thurman, David Carradine and Michael Parks. Film. A Band Apart, 2004.

As the primary source for the coming paper, Kill Bill Vol. 2 will provide most of the subject matter for my analysis. As a director, Tarantino has received multiple Oscars for his screenwriting abilities, and his prowess as a director is not in doubt. As a piece of artwork, Kill Bill Vol. 2 sought to push the envelope of film and Tarantino will no doubt be biased towards the

Ramsey 5 excellence of his film. I chose this film because I have always been interested in the filmmaking style of Quentin Tarantino. This film in particular is rich in controversy and minutiae that add depth to what on the surface may appear to be just another kung fu movie.
#3

Tarantino, Quentin. Kill Bill Vol. 2. Revised Final Script. Internet Movie Script Database. 10 November 2013. www.imsdb.com/scripts/Kill-BillVolume-1-&-2.html

As the second primary source for the coming paper, Kill Bill Vol. 2s script will provide support to the majority subject matter for my analysis. Ibid. #4 Duncan, Theresa. "Theresa Duncan on Women and the Man in Two Recent Films." Artforum International February 2004: 45. Print. Theresa Duncan was a filmmaker, game designer and critic of films. She died in 2007. Her article in Artforum International in February 2004 sought to c ontrast, surprisingly, the films Lost in Translation and Kill Bill Vol. 2. There is little information to be gathered regarding Duncans biases, but given the tone of the article I would assume that she was a fan of Tarantinos and was arguing in support of his unique style. Although the article looked at more than Tarantinos films, and did try to draw lines of similarity between the films that were contrasted, I dont think this will be a very good source for me. There simply wasnt the deep level of analysis or evaluation that I hoped for.

Ramsey 6 #5 O'Sullivan, Charlotte. "Driven to Destruction: Kill Bill Vol. 2." The Independent. 04/23/2004. 2004. Print. Charlotte OSullivan is a British journalist and film critic who has worked for The Independent and The Evening Standard, both in London. This article is a surprising review of Tarantinos film Kill Bill Vol. 2, but despite OSullivans admissions that she is not a fan of the ketchup chaos that can be found in most Tarantino films, the review is largely positive and provides some unique approaches to the ideas toyed with by Tarantino. Specifically, there is great detail paid to the male- and female- gender driven motivations in the movie, and I believe OSullivans dissection of these notions will be useful in my paper. #6 Barbara, Kathleen. "The Post-Modern Body in Cinema." Masters Abstracts

International. Wichita State University, 2006. Print. Wichita, Kansas. Kathleen Barbara is a scholar, critic and director based out of Wichita, Kansas, and her masters thesis examined gender-related issues, specifically the post-modern body in seven films, including Tarantinos Kill Bill Vol. 2. There is very little information regarding Barbara outside of the abstract for her thesis, and despite the promise that lies in her work, the credibility of the author is probably not sufficient to base significant portions of my paper upon her work. The work does do a fine job of showing how the post-modern body transforms certain expectations in modern films, but this is not as relevant to my papers topic as I would like.