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digital

video

toolS and tEchniquES for thE crEativE PlanEt

• Shoot

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November 2013

• PoSt • StorE • ProducE • diStributE November 2013 crEativEPlanEtnEtwork.com/dv Pushing D Documentary

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• diStributE November 2013 crEativEPlanEtnEtwork.com/dv Pushing D Documentary Limit Pro uction to
• diStributE November 2013 crEativEPlanEtnEtwork.com/dv Pushing D Documentary Limit Pro uction to

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D Documentary Limit Pro uction to the Shooting in ExtrEmE ConditionS for ViCE pro meDia
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Shooting in ExtrEmE

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X Tech Focus: Zacuto EVF Flip, K-Tek Nautilus, Digital Bolex D16

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digital

video

 
 

vol. 21 | no. 11

11.2013

editorial

 

editorial director Cristina Clapp cclapp@nbmedia.com managing editor Katie Makal kmakal@nbmedia.com tecHnical editor Jay Holben jayholben@gmail.com Web editor Sarv Taghavian, staghavian@nbmedia.com contributing editors Jay Ankeney, Chuck Gloman, David Heuring, John Merli, Carl Mrozek, Oliver Peters, Geoff Poister, Dick Reizner, Stefan Sargent, Jon Silberg, Ned Soltz, Jennifer Wolfe, Joy Zaccaria

 

advertiSing

 

east coast sales manager Susan Shores sshores@nbmedia.com 212. 378. 0400 Ext. 528 West/central sales manager Jeff Victor jeffvictor@comcast.net 224. 436. 8044 europe sales director Sharifa Marshall sharifa.marshall@intentmedia.co.uk +44 20 7354 6000 digital video expo sales Contact your Digital Video representative classified ad sales Susan Shores sshores@nbmedia.com 212. 378. 0400 Ext. 528

 

art & production

 

senior art director Nicole Cobban

associate art director Walter Makarucha, Jr. production manager Davis White

 

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852. 4615 dwhite@nbmedia.com

 

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circulation

 

group director, audience development Meg Estevez circulation manager Kwentin Keenan circulation customer service Michele Fonville

 

SubScriptionS

 

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editor’s view
editor’s view

Full Schedule

I ’d like to invite you to join me at our next Pro Media Conference, which takes place during Government Video Expo in Washington, D.C., December 4 and 5.

Government Video Expo in Washington, D.C., December 4 and 5. (You can learn more about the

(You can learn more about the entire Government Video Expo event—there is a lot happening at the show—starting on page 51.) The Pro Media Conference offers the latest information

and techniques targeted to those working in government- related media operations. Our lineup of presentations includes discussions of new technologies, as well as a focus on issues related to creating, managing and delivering content for government agencies. Developed with both government-operated and private production organizations in mind, the Pro Media Conference will explore the media needs of government agencies and demonstrate ways to fulfill those needs. Launching at this year’s conference is Government Video in the Cloud (GVITC), a track that offers two presentations and four case studies highlighting the latest in cloud-based solutions that are revolutionizing government video. Panels for GVITC include:

• Update on Cloud Video Services Adoption in the Public Sector

• Considerations for Cloud Dissemination of Government Video

• Security & Reliability Concerns Unique to Government Video in the Cloud Case studies for GVITC include:

• Cloud-Based Management of Government Video Assets

• Distribution of Government-Owned Video from the Cloud

• Analysis of Aggregated Government Video Content

View the full Pro Media Conference schedule at www.gvexpo.com/pro-media-conference. You may register for Government Video Expo events at www.gvexpo.com. (If you’d like a special Digital Video reader discount code, just e-mail me and I’d be happy to send you one.) I hope to see you there!

Video Edge Live @ Government Video Expo The Video Edge Live program is designed for

Video Edge Live @ Government Video Expo

The Video Edge Live program is designed for professionals who produce and deliver online video for media and entertainment, enterprise, education and government applications. This one-day interactive event consists of four panel discussions, each featuring a mix of industry experts, end users and manufacturers. Our next Video Edge Live summit will be held December 4 in Washington, D.C., during Government Video Expo. It’s free to attend, but advance registration is required. Details are available at www.gvexpo.com/ videoedge-live.

Editorial Director

Digital Video magazine

creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv

p: 310-429-8484

e: cclapp@nbmedia.com

Twitter: @DigitalVideomag

Pinterest: pinterest.com/digitalvideomag

Twitter: @DigitalVideomag Pinterest: pinterest.com/digitalvideomag creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv | 11.2013 3

11.2013 | vol. 21 | no. 11

contents 20
contents
20

feature

16 Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight Integrating Contemporary and Archival Footage for the HBO Movie

departments

3

Editor’s View

6

Update

56

Company Index

57

Classifieds

57

Advertiser Index

22
22

LOOK

20

Suspenseful Storytelling Christopher Rouse Recounts the Planning and Pacing on Captain Phillips

22

The Creative Minds of MOCAtv Producing the Contemporary Art YouTube Channel

26

Extreme Documentary Production On Location with the HBO Series VICE

30

Drinking Buddies Ben Richardson Considers Collaborative Filmmaking

LUST

34

38

40

42

Spiral Symmetry, Superior Sound Recording with K-Tek’s Nautilus

Mic Suspension Mount

Effects for Editors Pixelmator Team’s Tool Enhances Your Timeline

38
38

Better Manage Your Media Work and Workflow with Red Giant Software BulletProof

New Perspectives Zacuto EVF Flip Adds Flexibility to Viewing and Reviewing

48
48

LEARN

44

Icon, Inspiration, Innovation Digital Bolex’s D16 Camera Becomes A Reality

48

Tablet-Based Teleprompters User-Friendly, Energy-Efficient Options for Production

53

Tips to Clip

58

Production Diary: Mistakes I’ve Made A Few A Lot

Digital Video (ISSN 1541-0943) is published monthly by NewBay Media L.L.C. at 28 E 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY, 10016. Telephone: 212-378-0400. Periodicals post- age paid at NewYork, NewYork, and at additional mailing offices. U.S. subscription rate is $29.97 for one year; Mexico and Canada are $39.97 (including GST); foreign airmail is $79.97; back issues $7. Prepayment is required on all foreign subscriptions in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. All rates are one year only. Digital Video, Videography, Digital Content Producer, Millimeter, Digital Cinematography, Cinematographer, 2-pop, Reel Exchange and Creative Planet Network are trademarks of NewBay Media L.L.C. All material published in Digital Video is copyrighted © 2013 by NewBay Media L.L.C. All rights reserved. postmaster: Send address changes to Digital Video, Subscription Services, P.O. Box 221, Lowell, MA 01853. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Bleuchip International, P.O. Box 255542, London, ON N6C 6B2. Digital Video makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all information published in the magazine; however, it assumes no responsibility for damages due to errors or omissions. Printed in the USA.

no responsibility for damages due to errors or omissions. Printed in the USA. 4 creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv |

DIE IN NEW ORLEANS - A music video Artist: Richard Julian Director/Cinematographer: Rick Kaplan

Artist: Richard Julian Director/Cinematographer: Rick Kaplan EXPERIENCE THE CANON EOS C300 CINEMA CAMERA GO WHEREVER THE

EXPERIENCE THE CANON EOS C300 CINEMA CAMERA

GO WHEREVER THE STORY TAKES YOU.

Cinematographer Rick Kaplan used the EOS C300 to shoot Die in New Orleans on location. You can watch the full music video and see how he shot it on our website. Made for easy mobility, the EOS C300 delivers outstanding cinema quality with multiple recording formats, a 50 Mbps 4:2:2 codec and full compatibility with either EF or PL-mount lenses. Designed to meet the demands of any production, the EOS C300 is ideal for everything from short movies to TV commercials. With it, the world truly is your stage.

CONTACT US: 1.855.CINE.EOS - CINEMAEOS.USA.CANON.COM/C300

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© 2013 Canon U.S.A., Inc. All rights reserved. Canon and EOS are registered trademarks of Canon Inc. in the United States and may also be registered trademarks or trademarks in other countries.

update photos by universal pictures Rush Races ThRough PosT wiTh DaVinci ResolVe C ompany 3

update

photos by universal pictures
photos by universal pictures
update photos by universal pictures Rush Races ThRough PosT wiTh DaVinci ResolVe C ompany 3 in

Rush Races ThRough PosT wiTh DaVinci ResolVe

C ompany 3 in London used Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci

Resolve to color grade Ron Howard’s F1 racing film, Rush. Tracing the true story of drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda (played by Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Brühl) and their pivotal competition throughout the 1976 F1 World Championship, Rush was shot using a variety of digital formats by cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle, ASC, BSC, DFF. The filmmakers “also wanted to

incorporate original race footage from 1976 shot on 16mm and 35mm film,” recalls Patrick Malone, director of digital film services at Company 3 London. “They felt this would help to re-create the thrilling race sequences and give Rush some real F1 production value.” The overall goal during the grade was to create a look that would unify digital and archived film material, giving Rush a seamless look. “Our brief was to give the film

a ’70s period feel with a modern

slant,” Malone says. “Inspiration for

the color palette came from a lot of the archived 8mm, 16mm and 35mm footage of the 1976 F1 World Championship. “While the traditional look associated with the period is one

of desaturated, almost sepia colors,

Anthony wanted to push color into the cars so they looked more bold and striking,” Malone says. “In addition, he wanted each of the

grand prix races given their own unique feel to reflect the drama and dynamics of the ’76 championship.”

reflect the drama and dynamics of the ’76 championship.” online Read more about Rush at

online

online Read more about Rush at creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/Nov2013

Read more about Rush at

creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/Nov2013

Now it’s easy to add broadcast accurate waveform monitoring to your studio! Add accurate and
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Add accurate and professional rack mount waveform monitoring to your studio! SmartScope Duo includes dual independent screens so is two video and waveform monitors in one! You get seven different types of scope for measuring all aspects of a broadcast video signal including waveform, vectorscope, RGB parade, YUV parade, histogram, audio phase display, 16 channel audio level meters plus picture view! With SmartScope Duo you always get the technical accuracy broadcast engineers demand!

get the technical accuracy broadcast engineers demand! Eliminate Technical Errors Only professional waveform

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Only professional waveform monitoring allows you to keep track of your video and audio quality at all times and is the only way to ensure your production meets all international standards. SmartScope Duo can be installed in racks for general technical monitoring and quality control, as well as installed into desks for use during editing, mastering and color correction.

for use during editing, mastering and color correction. Choose your Scope! SmartScope Duo features two independent

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SmartScope Duo features two independent 8” LCD screens in a compact 3 rack unit size that you can instantly select between waveform, vectorscope, RGB parade, component parade, histogram, audio phase display, audio level meters or regular picture view! You can set each SmartScope Duo screen to any combination of video monitor or waveform view and change between them at any time!

or waveform view and change between them at any time! Broadcast Accurate You get a wide

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You get a wide range of the most popular waveform displays available. The waveform display shows you the luminance brightness in your video, the vectorscope shows you a color plot of the various colors in your video, the RGB parade shows color balance and illegal video levels, the histogram shows the distribution of pixel brightness in your video and clipping and the audio scope lets you check audio phase and levels!

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SmartScope is also the perfect rack mount video monitor! You can use it for general rack monitoring for broadcast, post production, live production camera monitoring, on set camera monitoring, flyaway kits, broadcast trucks and much more! SmartScope Duo includes a built in Ethernet connection so allows all controls and scope settings to be changed centrally via the SmartView Utility even from a laptop!

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Update

Update NEWs Twitter Feed 4 @banditojacob Kudos to the Cuarón family. #Gravity is a staggering vision

NEWs

Twitter Feed
Twitter Feed

4@banditojacob

Kudos to the Cuarón family. #Gravity is

a staggering vision of precise timing and

execution. Can’t wait to see the pre-viz.

4@Framestore

“If #Gravity had been rendered on one machine, we would have to have started at the dawn of Egyptian civilization.” —

goo.gl/jwk5Zh

4@4KTV

NBC’s CEO endorses 4K: “Picture quality takes your breath away.” — goo.gl/xGTeQ5

4@FastCoCreate

This 360-degree interactive wing suit footage is like your “falling” dream, but real — f-st.co/SmmP7mo

4@TheReelist

The shoot for “Captain Phillips” was hardly

a cake walk; @THR has @tomhanks and

director Paul Greengrass explain — ow.ly/pdAcI

4@nateog

J.J. Abrams apologizes for overusing lens flare: “I know it’s too much.” —

vrge.co/1701Vpe

4@melsil

“Valentine Road” director Marta Cunningham on her HBO doc — ow.ly/pCymE

4@VanityFair

Oscar-winning director Barbara Kopple recaptures the magic behind the 1939 New York World’s Fair — vnty.fr/1bn5u09

4@ThePlaylist

Watch: Alfred Hitchcock’s 10 Hidden Edits in “Rope” — dlvr.it/4634pY

online

online Digital Video’s Twitter feed is at twitter.com/ DigitalVideomag

Digital Video’s Twitter feed is at twitter.com/ DigitalVideomag

Taylor Kinney as Kelly Severide in Chicago Fire photo by elizabeth morris/nbc
Taylor Kinney as Kelly
Severide in Chicago Fire
photo by elizabeth morris/nbc

ChiCago Fire Is lIt WIth lItEpaNEls

M ost of the fire seen in the NBC series Chicago Fire is real, only occasionally

supplemented in post. To capture the inten- sity of the action in challenging lighting environ- ments, cinematographer Lisa Wiegand relies on the color adjustment capabilities of Litepanels’ Bi-Color 1x1 and the durable MiniPlus. “Shooting fire creates many specific challenges,” Wiegand says. “We need to expose for very bright

flames, while still being able to dig out details in the shadows. Because of the intense levels of smoke we deal with, we are often shooting in the fire with

a handheld ARRI Alexa camera and Angenieux

Optimo zooms very close to the actors so we can see their faces.” Wiegand says she uses Litepanels in almost every shot: the MiniPlus as handheld eyelight that follows the handheld camera, and the Bi-Color 1x1 panels for key lighting actors’ faces.

the Bi-Color 1x1 panels for key lighting actors’ faces. Whitney Presents Immersive, Panoramic Video A new

Whitney Presents Immersive, Panoramic Video

A new exhibition at the Whitney Museum in New York features a panoramic video instal-

lation, In the Air by artist T.J. Wilcox, inspired by views of New York City as seen from the artist’s studio high above Union Square. Six video pro- jections show a continuous image of the city from dawn to dusk. One by one, each projector cuts away from its role in producing the complete panorama and presents a short, poetic narrative film inspired by a view from the studio’s window. “I like my film and video work to appear as the visible record of my own journey through our saturated mediated age,” says Wilcox. “Film and video provide the page upon which I make

Wilcox. “Film and video provide the page upon which I make T.J. Wilcox, still from In

T.J. Wilcox, still from In the Air, 2013. Six-channel panoramic video installation, black-and-white and color, silent.

a collage of the ideas I hold most dear.” In the Air can be viewed in the museum’s second floor Mildred and Herbert Lee galleries through Feb.

9, 2014.

Update

Update CaNoN 5D CapturEs Cold Turkey C inematographer Lucas Lee Graham says that for the independent

CaNoN 5D CapturEs Cold Turkey

C inematographer Lucas Lee Graham says that

for the independent film Cold Turkey, he wanted

“an intimate, personal look with a really shallow depth of field and nice portraiture

so

that the visual empha-

sis

would be on the char-

that the visual empha- sis would be on the char- cinematographer lucas lee Graham 5D outputs

cinematographer lucas lee Graham

5D outputs 1080 or 720 from its HDMI port to your monitor when you’re recording, so you can check for critical focus. You don’t have to wait for playback to be sure that the shot is sharp.”

acters and what they were doing.” Graham opted to use a Canon EOS 5D Mark

III DSLR with Canon EF L

Series prime and zoom lens-

es, explaining that the cam-

era’s large sensor “gave us

the filmic look we sought.

“The codec on the Canon EOS 5D Mark III camera is a

great asset,” Graham continues. “Its ‘ALL-I’ edit- friendly intra-frame compression really cleans up

the image, especially when you start transcoding

it. Also important is the fact that the Canon

transcoding it. Also important is the fact that the Canon “Everyday People” Comes to Life with

“Everyday People” Comes to Life with Shutterstock

T o announce the release of a new box set of Sly & The Family Stone’s best-known music,

Legacy Recordings (Sony Music) partnered with Shutterstock to create a modern video for the band’s song “Everyday People.” Comprising more than 130 clips from Shutterstock’s footage col-

lection and a selection of archival images of the band, the video emphasizes the message of the song by playfully depicting a day in the life of humanity, finding uplifting and surprising threads of commonality across cultures. “It’s exciting to be able to bring a new visual interpretation to a classic song,” says Shutterstock director of footage Adam Sosinsky. Adds Legacy Recordings project director Adam Farber, “Using clips of everyday people doing what they do, being who they are, and living life across cultures really drives home the essence of Sly’s lyrics.”

really drives home the essence of Sly’s lyrics.” NEWs   On the Creative Planet Network

NEWs

On the Creative Planet Network

Metallica’s lars ulrich
Metallica’s lars ulrich
 

4Hula Post Rocks on Metallica: through the Never

For Metallica: Through the Never, the band’s 3D concert film, Hula Post Production designed and built a complete offline workflow for editor Joe Hutshing and his team that included five Avid Nitris DX Media Composer 6.0.3 systems, each equipped with 3D editing software, and a Unity Media Engine shared storage device with a capacity of 40 TB.

4it’s always suNNy Mixed witH sound devices

George Flores, CAS, uses a Sound Devices 664 field production mixer to capture the comedic dialogue and performances on the FXX series It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. “While the show’s creators like to shoot structured, scripted performances, they also like to keep camera angles and setups flexible enough to try new ideas on the fly. The 664 allows us to capture audio that reflects this.”

angles and setups flexible enough to try new ideas on the fly. The 664 allows us

photo by patrick mcelhenney/fx

online

online Go online to read more and view additional images and video: creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/Nov2013

Go online to read more and view additional images and video: creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/Nov2013

photo by scott uchida

Update

photo by scott uchida Update News Trending Online (Links at creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/Nov2013) 3Red TX MiXes

News

Trending Online (Links at creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/Nov2013) 3Red TX MiXes Morrissey 25 Celebrating 25 years of the
Trending Online
(Links at creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/Nov2013)
3Red TX MiXes Morrissey 25
Celebrating 25 years of the singer’s career, the concert film Morrissey 25 was recorded live at Hollywood High School and mixed in
the U.K. by Red TX director Tim Summerhayes. “The multitrack arrived back in the U.K. as a disk drive of .wav files,” Summerhayes
recalls. “The recording had been so well done, the band was excellent, and, because it was a small venue, the sound was really
honest.”
HOAX PROduces VisuAl effecTs fOR “WORk BiTcH”
HOAX Films created visual effects for the Britney Spears music video “Work Bitch,” directed by
Ben Mor, including sky replacement shots and set extensions. “Ben’s innovative music videos work
like films, each with its own unique visual narrative,” says HOAX Films executive producer Alexis
Nelson. “We are excited to have collaborated on such a stunning music video.”
to have collaborated on such a stunning music video.” photo by pam barkentin Mel Brooks: Make
photo by pam barkentin
photo by pam barkentin

Mel Brooks: Make a Noise Completed with Bmd tools

L os Angeles post house Shapeshifter used Blackmagic Design’s Teranex 2D Processor

and DaVinci Resolve color correction software to finish the PBS documentary Mel Brooks:

Make A Noise, an episode of the public broad- caster’s American Masters series. Director Robert Trachtenburg’s 4K interview footage was edited into a 29.97 fps project and combined with archi- val footage taken from more than five decades of Mel Brooks’ work in film, television and on stage. Archival material was already 29.97 fps.

Shapeshifter colorist Randy Coonfield then converted the 29.97 fps project back to 23.98 fps, re-creating a proper link to the original footage and creating AAF files, allowing him to conform all of the 23.98 fps 4K footage in Resolve to begin color correction. After color correcting and resizing the 23.98 fps material in Resolve, the team used Blackmagic Design’s Teranex 2D Processor to perform a render process that created DNxHD media for conversion back to 29.97 fps.

Trollbäck + Company Launches Al Jazeera America

T rollbäck + Company (T+Co) created the branding package for the launch of news

network Al Jazeera America, including ani- mated logotypes, main IDs and interstitial IDs. “It was important that their branding stated ‘We are here’ in a bold but not brash way,” explains Elliott Chaffer, Trollbäck + Company creative director.

Elliott Chaffer, Trollbäck + Company creative director. The main IDs incorporate dynamic patterns of light, while

The main IDs incorporate dynamic patterns of light, while the interstitial IDs celebrate the American landscape, positioning Al Jazeera America in the center of it. For the interstitial IDs, T+Co took 360-degree panoramic shots and stitched them together to form a seamless world using a custom lens they created in Autodesk Maya.

Update

Update News Q & A Spotlight: GreG “Freddy” Camalier, direCtor riChard lowe, editor Camalier Muscle Shoals

News

Q & A Spotlight: GreG “Freddy” Camalier, direCtor riChard lowe, editor Camalier Muscle Shoals JoN
Q & A
Spotlight:
GreG “Freddy” Camalier, direCtor
riChard lowe, editor
Camalier
Muscle Shoals
JoN SILBeRG

G reg “Freddy” Camalier worked in real estate when he passed through Muscle Shoals, Ala., and became fascinated by the rich musical history

that came out of the tiny town on the Tennessee River, the site of two compet- ing recording studios that produced enormous hits and new sounds for an extensive roster of musicians, including Gregg Allman, Aretha Franklin, the Rolling Stones, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Paul Simon and many more. We spoke with Camalier and the film’s editor, Richard Lowe, about cutting Muscle Shoals, a process that started with a short sizzle reel and developed as shooting progressed until they finished the feature-length film one year ago.

There are so many different threads in the film: Rick Hall starting a studio out of nothing, the bands, the rivalry with record executives, the history of the region. Did you have a sense of the structure when you started editing? Richard Lowe: We struggled with that. What seemed so unique and outstanding about Muscle Shoals was cumulative: the fact that all these things had happened there within a certain period of time. Getting any one image or sequence to crystallize that was difficult. I hope that’s what the movie does overall. Greg “Freddy” Camalier: We put a fair amount of thought into this before going into the editing room. I think if you just shoot without any planning and then go into the edit—I’d hope you could put a good movie together, but I sure wouldn’t want to be in that position.

You also had a lot of archival material. Did you start editing with that in mind or did you look for things as the story developed? Lowe: Both. The two key elements we had early on, the first was a film made by Swedish filmmakers in 1969, where they went to one of the recording studios and shot a half-hour film in high-quality 16mm black and white. We used some of that for the sizzle reel. The other main source was the Rolling Stones’ Gimme Shelter [directed by Albert and David Maysles], which was the backbone of the Rolling Stones archival sequence.

You worked on this on and off for over two years from different cities. Did you work remotely? Lowe: He lives in Boulder, Colo., and I live in New York. When we did the

in Boulder, Colo., and I live in New York. When we did the Rick Hall and

Rick Hall and Clarence Carter in Muscle Shoals

sizzle reel, he came to New York for three weeks. For the major part of the editing, we tried to communicate by sending cuts back and forth. What we found, which was no great revelation, was that if we were in the room together, we could communicate things instantly that otherwise would take days to get across. So I said I’d come to Boulder. And we put together a cutting room in Boulder and I basically lived there for a year.

The film did very well on the festival circuit and has gotten some great reviews. That must be nice for your directorial debut. Camalier: It is! It’s great! But it’s not what I expected. When I started the process, I had this idea the end point would be to finish it and send it off. That was nowhere near close to the end point. When we were done, I nearly keeled over from exhaustion, but then there were the festivals and selling it and promoting and marketing. There were the openings and all that travel. It’s been quite a learning experience. dv

openings and all that travel. It’s been quite a learning experience. dv 14 creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv | 11.2013
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While actors portray most characters in the film, Muhammad Ali appears only via archival material.

the film, Muhammad Ali appears only via archival material. MuhaMMad ali’s Greatest FiGht Integrating Contemporary and

MuhaMMad ali’s Greatest FiGht

only via archival material. MuhaMMad ali’s Greatest FiGht Integrating Contemporary and Archival Footage for the HBO

Integrating Contemporary and Archival Footage for the HBO Movie

by John Merli

photo by jojo whilden/hbo

(From left) Christopher Plummer (as John Harlan II), Fritz Weaver (Hugo Black), Peter Gerety (William Brennan Jr.), Harris Yulin (William O. Douglas), Frank Langella (Chief Justice Warren E. Burger) and Danny Glover (Thurgood Marshall)

I n 1967, when Muhammad Ali was still Cassius Clay and the United States was embroiled in an unpopular war in Southeast Asia, the heavyweight champion of the world found his toughest match taking

place outside the boxing ring. After joining the Nation of Islam and adopt- ing the name Muhammad Ali, he was widely denounced for refusing to be drafted into U.S. military service based on his religious opposition to the Vietnam War. He was arrested, found guilty of draft evasion and stripped of his boxing title. In 1971, his appeal reached the United States Supreme Court. HBO captures the dramatic legal repercussions of Clay’s refusal to serve in Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight, which began airing in October and will receive VOD and Blu-ray distribution. Directed by Stephen Frears and based on a book of the same name by Howard Bingham and Max Wallace, the film focuses on the high court’s legal proceedings over a few months in 1971, already a period of social and political upheaval in America. An exceptional cast tapped to portray the nine justices includes Frank Langella (as Chief Justice Warren E. Burger), Fritz Weaver (Hugo Black), Harris Yulin (William O. Douglas), Christopher Plummer (John Harlan II), Peter Gerety (William Brennan Jr.), Barry Levinson (Potter Stewart), John Bedford Lloyd (Byron “Whizzer” White), Danny Glover (Thurgood Marshall) and Ed Begley Jr. (Harry Blackmun). The script, by Shawn Slovo, called for archival footage to portray Ali. Frears and the other filmmakers agreed with the decision to not cast an actor for the scenes showing the inimitable boxer, who was as bold

In 1964, Cassius Clay’s knockout victory over Sonny Liston earned him the title of heavyweight
In 1964, Cassius Clay’s knockout victory over Sonny Liston
earned him the title of heavyweight champion of world.
In 1971, while his case was being appealed, Ali was pitted against Joe Frazier in
In 1971, while his case was being appealed, Ali was pitted against Joe Frazier in
In 1971, while his case was being
appealed, Ali was pitted against Joe
Frazier in the “Fight of the Century”
at Madison Square Garden. After 15
rounds, Frazier won a unanimous
decision, handing Ali his first
professional loss.
decision, handing Ali his first professional loss. and outspoken outside the ring as he was inside.
decision, handing Ali his first professional loss. and outspoken outside the ring as he was inside.
decision, handing Ali his first professional loss. and outspoken outside the ring as he was inside.

and outspoken outside the ring as he was inside. According to producer Scott Ferguson, “Stephen [Frears] thought it would be much better and more exciting to go with the real Muhammad Ali.” (Frears had taken a similar archival-mix approach in 2006’s critically acclaimed The Queen.) “We shot on the ARRI Alexa. We looked at both 35 [film] and the Alexa, and we liked the ability to see images live on set on the HD monitors. Then we worked with a colorist in the lab. So we shot Alexa, but with more of a film paradigm where the color correcting was being done at night, like with dailies, as opposed to being done live on the set,” says Ferguson, whose previous producer credits include The Firm, Temple Grandin and Brokeback Mountain. Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight was shot in New York City, with additional locations in New York State, and the production team went to great lengths to evoke Washington, D.C., in the 1970s.

After extensive behind-the-scenes tours of the Supreme Court, the production built a meticulously detailed central courtroom on a stage at JC Studios in Brooklyn, in addition to filming elsewhere in New York City for scenes of the justices’ chambers and clerks’ offices. Seasoned costume designer Molly Maginnis came on board to re-create the fashions of the early ’70s, working with robe manufacturer Bentley & Simon, which has outfitted many of the Supreme Court justices since 1918. “For our exteriors, after searching sites in Richmond, Pittsburgh and Baltimore, the crew chose to shoot several locations in Manhattan, with all that grand architecture available,” says Ferguson. “And although we did shoot some brief scenes on the steps of the actual U.S. Supreme Court building in D.C., we used Albany, New York, as a [stand-in] for Washington. We also found a little neighborhood in Schenectady, New York, that was a great substitute for Georgetown.

“It was a hodgepodge of sorts because it was almost a one-location movie—the Supreme Court itself—but we shot at several different locations all designed to replicate Washington,” Ferguson adds. (The choice of New York locales was also prompted by generous film rebates administered by the Empire State, he says.) “On a day-to-day basis, especially working with Stephen and a great crew, this was one of the most enjoyable shooting experiences I’ve ever had,” adds Ferguson. Prior to the film’s HBO premiere, Frears said of the film, “Ali is a man who, at the height of his powers and fame and boxing achievement, made the decision to stand by what his conscience and his religion told him was right. He took the consequences, forfeited his heavyweight championship title, lost millions in fees, but never backed down. He is still a hero to millions, not only in America, but all over the world.” dv

Look

Look Captain phillips Jon SIlBERG suspenseful storytelling Christopher Rouse Recounts the Planning and Pacing on Captain
Captain phillips

Captain phillips

Jon SIlBERG

suspenseful storytelling

Christopher Rouse Recounts the Planning and Pacing on Captain Phillips

S ome of the critics who’ve been praising the relentless suspense in the Tom Hanks fea- ture Captain Phillips might be surprised

to know about the semi-improvisational meth- ods used by director Paul Greengrass. The former documentarian allows actors to break free of the prepared blocking and encourages operators to compose based on their response to what’s hap- pening rather than on a pre-staged set of moves. For editor Christopher Rouse, ACE, Greengrass’ frequent collaborator, the challenge and the exhilaration come from shaping that material into a tight, engaging drama. Rouse explains that Greengrass is equally trusting and encouraging when it comes to cutting, though he stresses that this creative freedom from Greengrass should not be confused with a lack of direction. In fact, he says, the director spends more time than most relaying his vision before the cutting process actually begins. “Paul invites me in with the writers and we have long discussions about how we can tell each character’s story,” the editor says. “Before he’s started shooting, we’ve gone through the story piece by piece and we know how the story develops, how each moment relates to the whole and where all the thematic underpinnings are.” In this case, the story, based on true events, concerns the titular captain (Tom Hanks), whose ship is boarded by a band of Somali pirates led by a particularly aggressive young man called Muse (Barkhad Abdi). “Paul always saw the piece as being about ‘two captains,’” Rouse explains. “It would have been quite easy to portray the pirates as cookie-cutter characters, but Paul wanted to balance the presentation of both of those characters and, beyond that, include the needs and wants of the rest of the characters. That was very much part of the planning process, so by the time I started cutting, I was really anchored in Paul’s vision.”

by the time I started cutting, I was really anchored in Paul’s vision.” 20 creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv |

photo by hopper stone, smpsp

Barkhad Adbi as the Somali pirate Muse in Captain Phillips

(Below) Tom Hanks as Captain Phillips

in Captain Phillips (Below) Tom Hanks as Captain Phillips The main unit trotted the globe, shooting

The main unit trotted the globe, shooting in locations including Massachusetts, Malta, stages in London, and off the coasts of both Virginia and Morocco; second unit shot additional material off the coast of San Diego. Rouse and frequent collaborator Mark Fitzgerald, who is credited on the film as “additional editor” and who oversees the technical layout of Rouse’s cutting rooms, set up shop on the Sony lot, ready to start editing as soon as the first dailies were available. Cinematographer Barry Ackroyd, BSC, shot on 35 and 16mm film, as well as ARRI Alexa and GoPro HERO 2 cameras. Material came into the editing room over a secure PIX connection, where it was transcoded to DNxHD 36 format (for offline editing) and edited in Avid Media Composer 5.5.3 on 12-core Mac Pros with workstations connected via Avid Unity (updated during the process to Isis). Rouse would begin cutting immediately and send H.264 versions of cut material back to the set over an Aspera connection so Greengrass and the department heads could see how scenes were coming together. Greengrass would cover most scenes with two and sometimes three cameras. Rouse explains, “Paul’s B-camera might be covering

something wildly different from the A-camera. It might be grabbing a reaction from someone who isn’t one of the main characters in the scene. And the blocking might change from take to take. I really want to see everything I’ve got and then break the dailies down into discrete sequences. Then I’ll often break the shots down beat by beat and string them together and pick out some additional pieces that you could use anywhere in the scene. Then I’ll find pieces that just feel like they belong in the movie. “The process allows me to soak up the material and start cutting in my head as I go,” he continues, “and then as I make changes, it’s easier to find certain pieces when I need them. Paul gives me a lot of freedom when it comes to how to shape the material, and he isn’t nearly so concerned about things like continuity as he is about finding the emotional moments that tell the story. But I know what he wants because of all the preparation we’ve already done. “I don’t know why more productions don’t avail themselves of their editors earlier in the process,” he wonders, noting that this sea-bound feature presented little opportunity to go back and reshoot scenes. “It is a little more costly, but that cost is negligible compared to the money you could save down the line.” dv

look

look MOCA tv JOn SILBERG

MOCAtv

JOn SILBERG

The CreATive Minds Of MOCA tv

Producing the Contemporary Art YouTube Channel

MOCAtv’sThe Artist’s Studio: “Rocket Blast Off for Cai Guo-Qiang's Mystery Circle”
MOCAtv’sThe Artist’s Studio: “Rocket Blast Off for Cai Guo-Qiang's Mystery Circle”

T he people responsible for MOCAtv, the YouTube channel of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, have

been very busy in the year since the endeavor went live. As YouTube’s first original channel dedicated to fine art, MOCAtv has commissioned music vid- eos from indie rock band io echo and Björk as well as short films by Shepard Fairey, Gary Baseman and other artists. While YouTube parent Google has funded much

of the work to date, the plan going forward is that MOCAtv will take a more active role in securing financing and YouTube’s financial support will recede. We spoke with John Toba, head of production for MOCAtv, who shares responsibility for running the channel with creative director Emma Reeves. Toba discusses how MOCAtv maneuvers in the rapidly changing environment of streaming channels and where fine art fits in.

How did MOCAtv come about? John Toba: It’s funny to talk about starting MOCAtv in the past because we’ve only been around since October 1, 2012, and it was just about a year before that when Google announced they were going to fund these original channels. At the time there was almost this feeling of a land grab! It was quite competitive about who was going to stake out this territory. There were about 100 or so channels awarded initial funding and given this opportunity

MOCAtv’s Art + Music presents Björk “Mutual Core”
MOCAtv’s Art + Music presents Björk “Mutual Core”
MOCAtv’s Art + Music presents Björk “Mutual Core” MOCAtv’s Art + Music presents Gary Baseman x
MOCAtv’s Art + Music presents Gary Baseman x Die Antwoord “BuckinghamWarrior”
MOCAtv’s Art + Music presents Gary Baseman x Die Antwoord “BuckinghamWarrior”

to be part of the launch of original premium channels, and we were the only art institution included. As a non-profit educational institution, the idea was for MOCAtv to be a repository of contemporary art where people could go for all things that fall into that category.

Google’s financial backing is limited, so what are the plans to continue to commission work and do the rest of what MOCAtv does without that funding? That’s what we’re actively trying to figure out right now. We’re deciding how this is going to function in the commercial world, the art world and the non-profit world. This is what we’re up against at the moment.

Are you gravitating toward a particular business structure? Seeking funding from the non-profit world, for example, or a more commercial approach such as an advertising model? That’s the interesting moment we’re at now. We’re beginning to have initial conversations with brands and seeing if there’s a way for us to proceed with some kind of commercial relationship or marketing relationship while retaining the integrity of the channel. So far the conversations are going well, and my guess is that we’ll end up with a combination of traditional non-profit

MOCAtv’s Art in the Streets: “Global Street Art - Tokyo” MOCAtv’s Art + Music: “The
MOCAtv’s Art in the Streets: “Global Street Art - Tokyo” MOCAtv’s Art + Music: “The
MOCAtv’s Art in the Streets: “Global Street Art - Tokyo”
MOCAtv’s Art in the Streets: “Global Street Art - Tokyo”
MOCAtv’s Art + Music: “The Art of Punk - Black Flag”
MOCAtv’s Art + Music: “The Art of Punk - Black Flag”

support from foundations and grants combined with marketing partnerships.

There’s one question every channel—YouTube or otherwise—is asking: How do we compete for

or otherwise—is asking: How do we compete for eyeballs with so much content available? People will

eyeballs with so much content available? People will go to respected museums for the same reasons they always did, but why are they going to seek out fine art on YouTube? Of course that is a hugely important question that we look at all the time. We collaborate with well known talents that often lead to people coming to MOCAtv. People like Björk and other well known musicians and artists and performers as well as comedy, animation and other kinds of content— it all brings people to the channel. Once they discover the channel, they find other things that interest them too. That’s why we sometimes play with YouTube tropes.

What sort of YouTube tropes? Explosions, for example. The Chinese contemporary artist Cai Guo-Qiang’s “Rocket Blast Off,” which involves fireworks and explosions. It’s an extremely successful YouTube video. It plays into something that has a natural YouTube audience and a natural audience in the art world. The video was produced by MOCA and MOCAtv and has a significant effect on getting people to visit the channel. Provided that a project like this is authentic and done with some of the better- known names in the art world, they are perfect for bringing in audiences that might not know they’re interested in contemporary art.

How does the MOCAtv interface enhance the content discovery process? It isn’t in place yet, but we expect to have a whole new interface for that exact purpose up sometime in September. YouTube is wonderful at many things but it’s not perfect at everything. We love the way it serves video and the deep analytics it offers, but we definitely wanted to go with a more customized, more searchable interface at MOCAtv. We’ll have tag clouds and various other ways of organizing the hundreds of videos we’ve produced. It will allow viewers a much more flexible way to explore content and offer more routes to find content that relates to their specific interests. dv

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look

look Vice INTERVIEW By MAT GALLAGHER

Vice

INTERVIEW By MAT GALLAGHER

extreme Documentary ProDuction

On Location with the HBO Series VICE

photo by brendan fitzgerald
photo by brendan fitzgerald
photo by jake burghart
photo by jake burghart

(Above) Jerry Ricciotti with all the gear: three Canon EOS C300s, two XF305s, two XF105s, three EOS 5D Mk IIIs and all the stuff to make them work

(Left) The HBO series VICE is hosted by Shane Smith (at left), who founded VICE magazine in 1994. Holding the camera is cinematographer Jake Burghart.

S hooting for the HBO documentary series

VICE, cameraman Jerry Ricciotti and cin-

ematographer Jake Burghart travel the

globe to film some of the biggest conflicts in the

most hostile environments.

Where are you at the moment? Jerry Ricciotti: We’re in Benghazi, Libya, right now; we’ve been in Libya for six days. We’ve been doing a story for Vice.com and maybe for the HBO show. It was a little exciting getting over here and not knowing, with all the clashes and all the police and military, what we would see, but we’ve largely been pretty safe, so it’s been good.

Tell us a little bit about the series. Ricciotti: VICE is a newsmagazine show, focusing on a younger demographic, telling stories that are a little bit different, stories that might not get covered

on the nightly news.

What cameras do you shoot with? Ricciotti: Primarily we use the Canon C300, and we always go out with a Canon 5D, as well as a Canon XF105 and GoPros.

Why did you choose the C300? Jake Burghart: The C300 almost chose us. There really isn’t another camera in its class. With two 64 GB CF cards, I can shoot for over 300 minutes straight. I rarely shoot more than that in a day, which means I don’t wrangle cards till the end of every day. That completely eliminates a job in the field, making our crew that much smaller. I’d love to see another Super 35mm sensor camera meet those storage and battery specs while shooting at 1080 at 50 MB/s in a log gamma. Using Canon zoom lenses on the C300 means iris control is on

the handgrip, and my focal distance and focal length are on the screen. I’m changing shots and exposure without taking my eye off the screen or my hand off the grip. Ricciotti: I like how easily it can be broken down to almost a camcorder size. When you strip down to just shoot out of the viewfinder, it’s a nicely balanced camera. Of course, it’s really upgradable too. We end up adding a lot of things for shoots. Ergonomically and just practically, having all the buttons and the menu options available is just great. The weatherproofing of it is great too. I’ve been really happy being able to take it [into all sorts of environments]. Burghart: The low-light capabilities are off the charts. We shot in existing light on the Niger Delta one night. All we had was a moon, the gas flares in the distance and one red LED. The scene looks amazing and you would have killed it by lighting it.

So many times I don’t have to break a scene to add light. I can

So many times I don’t have to break a scene to add light. I can just crank the ISO and know it’s still going to look good.

How far have you pushed these cameras? Ricciotti: For as new as the camera was, we didn’t really know the durability of it, so we figured out what it could and couldn’t do from the nature of our shoots, which are in some pretty extreme terrain—a lot of outdoor work, hiking, on boats, all that sort of transit stuff. Burghart: We shot with the camera hanging out of helicopters in the freezing Russian winter and spent days in the Sahara during the middle of the summer. We suction-mounted it to trucks in West Africa, hung it out of boats in the Maldives, ran it nonstop on way too many 18-hour days in 90 percent humidity, covered the thing in oil, sand and grime, mounting extra parts anywhere that would take them. The camera stands up to just about anything.

photo by jerry ricciotti
photo by jerry ricciotti

Jake Burghart and Brendan Fitzgerald take cover on the streets of Cairo, shooting handheld with a 70-200mm.

Most of your shooting is handheld, run- and-gun style shooting? Ricciotti: It has to be. You’re waking up with the camera in the morning and you don’t put it down until the night. We have to eat with it. Having a solid shoulder rig and nothing too big is important.

We don’t really bring sliders or glide cams with us on too many shoots. Mostly it’s just a shoulder rig, all day.

What shoulder rig do you use? Burghart: We try to keep moving, stay off the

photo by jerry ricciotti
photo by jerry ricciotti

Jake Burghart shoots morning time-lapses in the Sahara with a C300 for a piece on Mauritania.

tripod as much as possible. Everyone has his own shoulder rig. I like to keep mine light and tight. It’s a combo of Zacuto, Movcam and some custom stuff. Ricciotti: I have a Redrock Micro cage, with just the rails, and an offset grip that sits on the rails. That’s basically it for me. Just having to be so minimal with it, I put my lavs on the back of the rails on Velcro, behind the battery. Sometimes, depending on my setup, if I’m using the EVF, I’ll actually put the LCD and the XLR back there also, which is as much of a counterweight as I’d ever need.

What other gear are you using? Ricciotti: Typically the Litepanels Micro is the only light we bring with us. We use all Canon lenses on the cameras. Our equipment manager, Jaime Chew, started calling them the “three wise men”:

24-70mm f/2.8, 16-35mm and the 24-105mm. I also bring a 70-200mm f/2.8 and I have a doubler for that, which I find myself not using that often. Burghart: I have a personal set of Zeiss Distagon primes that I use for interviews and really low light, but the [Canon] 16-35mm is my go-to lens. For sound we use Lectrosonics lavs, Sennheiser shotguns, and when we have a sound guy we use a Sound Devices eight-track. We like to run a lot of wires and keep booming to a minimum. Nothing blows intimacy like a boom in your face.

We light interviews back home, but in the field we keep it pretty minimal. What

We light interviews back home, but in the field we keep it pretty minimal.

What are some of the situations you’ve been in with the cameras that really pushed them to their limits? Ricciotti: We went up the Niger River delta in

Nigeria a couple of months ago to do a story about oil pirates. These guys continue to break into Shell Oil’s pipelines across the delta where they live. They’ll take the oil out of the pipelines and build these large, basically like

moonshine stills, where they refine oil themselves. We weren’t sure if we’d have power there so we brought three to four days’ worth of batteries and cards, and camped up there to go out and find these guys. And we did. We found them in the middle of the night, so we shot with a small Litepanels unit and

a shoulder rig on a panga boat as we

sped along the river, doing pieces to

camera the entire way as we looked for the indication of oil pirates, which are big plumes of smoke flaring from their oil stills. All the time we shot on the 85mm f/1.2, which sometimes we’ll bring if we know we’re going to be in low-light situations a lot. Shooting on an 85mm at f/1.2 on a moving boat is not the easiest thing to do, but the footage came out great. It’s really steady and the audio sounds good on

a lav, and the shotgun—Fuzzy did a

really good job picking up the host’s audio. Once we got there, we had to walk through a foot of sludge, which is basically a combination of mud and oil that had been discarded by the guys on a daily basis. They’ll refine gallons and gallons of oil, but a lot of that gets discarded around them, so they’re throwing this oil out all over the place. You’re standing in big, knee-high rubber boots, and as the oil is being refined, it’s generating a lot of smoke. It’s a really dangerous environment because that smoke can catch fire and the whole place can go up in flames. Of course, you’d like to have a

tripod but you can’t, so you find yourself kind of balancing with one hand out, and the other hand shooting as you move across a pretty explosive terrain, and the whole time monitoring audio and pulling focus. I was really happy with the camera. I don’t think it was a situation that a camcorder would have really shined in. You didn’t need a heavy rig on your shoulder and you didn’t have to look through it all the time. The precision focusing and the low-light capabilities meant it

was the perfect camera for the job. dv

VICE launched in 1994 as a punk magazine and has expanded into a multimedia network that includes Vice.com, an international network of digital channels, a television and feature film production studio, a magazine, a record label and a book publishing division. This article was originally published on www. newsshooter.com.

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look

look Drinking BuDDies DavID HEuRIng

Drinking BuDDies

DavID HEuRIng

Drinking BuDDies

Ben Richardson Considers Collaborative Filmmaking

Olivia Wilde and Jake Johnson in Drinking Buddies L ast year, Ben Richardson’s rivet- ing
Olivia Wilde and Jake Johnson in
Drinking Buddies
L ast year, Ben Richardson’s rivet-
ing handheld Super 16 camerawork
for director Benh Zeitlin on Beasts
in the way of dialogue, which was left entirely
to the actors. Richardson had no trepidation
about the improvisatory approach.
“In Beasts, which was scripted, I found
a real energy shooting non-actors and not
knowing exactly how the scene might go,”
he says. “It was enjoyable to repeat that in
a different situation, watching these actors
repeat that in a different situation, watching these actors Cinematographer Ben Richardson During production the

Cinematographer Ben Richardson

During production the filmmakers expanded that outline with much more detail about the scenes and the locations, but there was still nothing

of the Southern Wild was the talk of the cin- ematography world. For his follow-up feature, Richardson teamed with indie director Joe Swanberg on a very different kind of film. Drinking Buddies, which has been called an “indie romantic comedy,” follows Kate and Luke (Olivia Wilde and Jake Johnson), co- workers at a craft brewery who find themselves alone one weekend, apart from their respec- tive significant others. “With Joe, there is no script,” Richardson explains. “In our first conversations we talked about how we enjoyed filmmaking as ‘creation in the moment’ as much as about planning and preparation. For Drinking Buddies, we just had a two-page outline describing where the characters needed to go. It was very loose.”

create in the moment. It was my job to keep up, and that’s an exhilarating way to make a movie.” The improvisational aesthetic, and the fact that much of the roughly 27-day shoot would unfold in an actual microbrewery in Chicago, led the filmmakers to some of their technical choices. “I was interested in exploring the RED Scarlet,” says the cinematographer of his first digitally shot feature. “I had some consultations with the RED people, and once I understood exactly what the sensor was doing, I knew I could make it

The power of Vegas Pro, and the Pros that use it We asked six lmmakers
The power of Vegas Pro, and the Pros that use it We asked six lmmakers

The power of Vegas Pro, and the Pros that use it

The power of Vegas Pro, and the Pros that use it We asked six lmmakers to

We asked six lmmakers to demonstrate the power of Vegas Pro by creating a promotional video for Goulian Aerosports, an award-winning aerobatic team. Relying solely on the content provided by Michael Goulian, each lmmaker used their Vegas Pro-centric media production toolkit, to create a video uniquely their own.

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Pro. Fast. Powerful. Designed to maximize your creativity. Chris Brickler Director, editor, music producer, Chris’

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of webisodes and music videos with his company, Xlantic. Justin Fornal Justin is an eccentric, Emmy

Justin Fornal

Justin is an eccentric, Emmy winning, lmmaker with a unique creative mind and a hardcore guerrilla approach. Justin’s character, Baron Ambrosia, can be seen in lm and on television.

Baron Ambrosia, can be seen in lm and on television. Ray Schlogel As a lmmaker and

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As a lmmaker and music video director, Ray’s credo at Underground Planet is to engage, provoke, and inspire through video. His artistic vision assures his productions deliver on all three counts.

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for Blue Note and Nonesuch with worldwide viewership. Ole Schell An NYU lm school graduate, Ole’s

Ole Schell

An NYU lm school graduate, Ole’s many documentaries have seen worldwide theatrical release. His resume

also includes extensive commercial and music video production.

includes extensive commercial and music video production. Franz Vorenkamp As Creative Director for a Detroit-based

Franz Vorenkamp

As Creative Director for a Detroit-based advertising agency, Franz writes and directs local and national TV commercials. His stylized aesthetic is evident in all his productions.

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work. I wanted to be able to light as efficiently as possible, but also make

work. I wanted to be able to light as efficiently as possible, but also make daylight scenes work. We paired our Scarlet with Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2

losing a little bit of dynamic range with the Scarlet’s sensor compared to what I was used to with film, but I think a lot of what makes things feel filmic has

wanted was to not just protect the highlights, but to allow the highlights to have the kind of detail and texture that we’re used to in film work.”

lenses, which are good looking and very light. It

to

do with the look of the highlights.

Like some cinematographers with a film

was a nice combination. I could shoot by cutting and manipulating the existing light rather than

“I rated the camera EI 1250 and metered primarily to preserve highlights, sometimes just

background, Richardson prefers to skip grading on set and to treat the sensor as he would a film

trying to add light.”

letting the darks go,” he elaborates. “That wasn’t

stock. His preferred method, he explains, is to

A 2.40:1 widescreen frame was extracted in post

a

problem because there’s so much more detail

“learn exactly how that medium is going to see

from the 16:9 .r3d files, which allowed for reframing

in

the shadows [relative to film negative] than you

the world, and adjust the world to the medium,

and stabilization of shots where necessary. “With digital cameras, careful exposure is the most important thing,” Richardson says. “You’re

know what to do with anyway. You typically crush some of that [shadow detail] out in post to give the image a bit more grounding anyway. What I really

rather than trying to adjust the image after the fact. That’s the way I approached it. Then I made occasional ‘printing’ notes for dailies if we were

it. Then I made occasional ‘printing’ notes for dailies if we were 32 creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv | 11.2013
it. Then I made occasional ‘printing’ notes for dailies if we were 32 creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv | 11.2013
on the edge of exposure or in a weird color temperature scenario.” Richardson says he

on the edge of exposure or in a weird color temperature scenario.” Richardson says he used minimal equipment when it came to lighting, but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t exacting about illuminating his shots. “I’m very particular about the way I cut light,” he says. “I’ll spend as much time tweaking and refining the lights as placing them. [In cinematography] you’re always trying to bring a three-dimensional feel to a two-dimensional image.” The freedom accorded the actors in performance sometimes argued for a handheld camera. In many situations, Richardson would light a set for 360-degree coverage to facilitate this approach. Richardson says that in operating, he was always looking for edit points during a take. “There wasn’t always continuity to the dialogue,” he says. “So I would sense that a certain line or moment might be a good place for Joe to cut later and take that opportunity to swing over to the other character. I’m getting ‘coverage,’ but not in the usual sense.” Swanberg would subsequently study Richardson’s camera moves in his editing to help him piece scenes together from the best performances. “Being behind the camera is something that I really enjoy in that situation. Rather than treating a shot as a defined thing and wondering if you executed it correctly, I’d get to remain focused and aware, in the moment. I like thinking about how a performance will read to an audience, and what we can do with the camera to support that. “If the performance is so strong that we don’t want to look away, then I’ll just hold on the actor,” he explains. “It’s great to have a director who is supportive and who leaves some of that kind of decision-making to me. Joe is a very good editor also, so when he said, ‘We’ve got the scene,’ you knew we did. It was an efficient, fast, comfortable way to work.” In post, Richardson worked with colorist Alex Bickel at Color Collective in New York. “Alex is a wonderful colorist who really understood what I was going for,” says Richardson. “I wanted the process to stay as close to

that of traditional film timing as possible. I find when images are ‘over-DI’d,’ they can lose a little bit of life. We stayed mainly in the [Blackmagic Design] DaVinci Resolve’s ‘printer light’ settings and used the new log curve tools to open shots up a little and hold soft detail in the highlights.” While Beasts’ look was deliberately stylized, Drinking Buddies has more of a naturalistic feel. Of the new film, Richardson says, “It was very

important that the characters and environments feel natural. Everything was a part of that: the costumes, the makeup, the way we lit and the way we shot. The two productions couldn’t have been more different, but they were both a tremendous amount of fun, and I think the films complement each other in many ways. I’m incredibly grateful to have gotten to do them both at the beginning of my career.” dv

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LUST

review

red giant BulletProof

red giant BulletProof

NED SOLTz

Better Manage Your Media

Work and Workflow with Red Giant Software BulletProof

 Quick Take Product: Red Giant Software BulletProof Pros: Ingests footage quickly and accurately. Import
 Quick Take
Product:
Red Giant
Software BulletProof
Pros:
Ingests footage
quickly and accurately.
Import process includes vali-
dation and backup to multi-
ple destinations. Use is intui-
tive. Powerful metadata and
keyword capabilities. Color
correction and LUT applica-
tion. Transcode and export to
popular editing formats.
Cons:
Does not properly
read and display clips with
embedded timecode. Copies
clips into library even if the
clips already exist elsewhere
on the same drive.
Bottom Line:
A must-
have for DSLR shooters.
Securely copies and backs
up data while providing
straightforward tools to
prepare clips for edit.
MSRP:
$199
Online:
www.redgiant.
com/products/all/bulletproof/
digital
video
Excellence
Award

The folks at Red Giant Software are smart. Not only do they create someamazingtools, theydesignthemfor maximumuser productivity. The release of BulletProof 1.0 proves the point. For the past several months, Red Giant has put the software through a public beta testing period, soliciting feedback on all features of the media workflow tool. From the stability and usability of the 1.0 release, it would seem they listened to their users.

Currently available for Mac and forthcoming for PC, BulletProof is a solution for ingesting, backing up, organizing, preparing and transcoding footage, bridging the gap between camera and editor. If you shoot compatible cameras and codecs, it could very well be the best $199 you ever spent. (BulletProof is also available as part of Red Giant’s $399 Shooter Suite, which includes Frames, Instant HD, LUT Buddy and PluralEyes.) The BulletProof workflow is presented in a series of five views, arranged in a left-to-right flow that mirrors what filmmakers do on set. The five components are: import, organize, review, refine and export. BulletProof streamlines the process of getting material recorded on solid-state media to the editing drive. Without BulletProof, you would just drag-copy those files to a hard drive, or possibly use your NLE to ingest the files directly from the card. The first method, the finder copy, is slower and has less error correction than copying through an application. And while importing through your NLE is preferable to a drag-copy, importing through BulletProof is even better.

BulletProof will validate and back up your footage to multiple destinations. If you have defined presets for color, metadata or keywords, they may be specified at time of import. At this time, BulletProof is limited to use with footage from GoPro, Canon and Nikon cameras and Apple ProRes files. I am looking forward to Red Giant adding support for AVC formats and MXF- wrapped material. While the format is not supported explicitly, I have been able to import .mp4 files from Sony XDCAM SxS footage. BulletProof also recognized Sony PMW-F55 XAVC files as H.264 files and imported them. Once footage is imported, the next step is to organize it: delete clips, rename them, add metadata, add keywords. Nothing esoteric here. Just a logical workflow. Organize view is the most detailed way of viewing and sorting the media in your catalog. (A catalog is a project file, saved to your hard drive, that includes a database and cache files. Most likely you will create a new BulletProof catalog for each project. The software keeps only one catalog open at a time.) You can

each project. The software keeps only one catalog open at a time.) You can 34 creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv
BulletProof import screen Imported footage in the thumbnails panel organize your project by creating new

BulletProof import screen

BulletProof import screen Imported footage in the thumbnails panel organize your project by creating new folders

Imported footage in the thumbnails panel

organize your project by creating new folders and subfolders, moving the clips between folders, and removing clips from the catalog. The next step in the workflow occurs in the review tab, where you look at individual clips to further organize the catalog. Double-click a clip to review it. Identify in/out points, set a poster frame, etc. I found the most compelling part of the software in the refine tab. You can add and edit detailed metadata for each clip, from EXIF settings to markers to client notes. You can auto- balance the image, do a one-light correction with Magic Bullet Colorista (in my mind, about the best color plug-in out there), adjust curves and add a lookup table. All metadata and color settings are non-destructive.

I reviewed BulletProof with

footage shot on a Canon DSLR using the Technicolor CineStyle profile. BulletProof ships with 12 LUTs, including several CineStyle options. Additionally, you may import any 1D LUT you have created or downloaded. Once you’ve refined your images, export them for use in your favorite NLE. Here again, you can export to multiple destinations and in multiple formats. Codec choices include all flavors of ProRes, MPEG-4 AVC

or PJPEG formats. You may also change resolutions, set or ignore in/ out points, or even burn timecode in several formats.

For this test, I exported my footage

as well as an XML file for Apple FCP X. I likewise could have exported XML or XMP for Adobe Premiere Pro 6 or CC. BulletProof also supports XML for Final Cut Pro 7. The next step is to launch your NLE and begin the edit. You may choose to import individual clips at this point,

Adding a LUT
Adding a LUT
BulletProof’s color tools
BulletProof’s color tools
Exported footage in Final Cut Pro X
Exported footage in Final Cut Pro X
color tools Exported footage in Final Cut Pro X but the better bet is to use

but the better bet is to use the XML options in the BulletProof export process. Since I exported an XML file for FCP X, all I needed to do within FCP X was choose Import XML and navigate to the folder in the BulletProof catalog containing the exports. Importing the XML brings all of the footage into FCP X, organized by keyword collections. The same process takes place with Premiere Pro and FCP 7. All the metadata—whether generated by the camera, added by the user or modified in BulletProof—is available in the NLE. Depending on the export options specified, color information, markers and trimmed clips will also be present. In my case, the one clip to which I applied a LUT and performed a one-light correction imported with those color corrections intact. BulletProof is not without its limitations. It works with only certain cameras and formats. It would not recognize AVC files from my Sony NEX camera, for example, and could not parse MXF- wrapped clips. Additionally, ProRes files recorded on my Sound Devices PIX 240 did not transfer with their embedded timecode. Timecode all started at 1:00:00:00. Importing that footage into FCP X, though, the starting timecode displayed as 55:55:12, meaning that something was interpreting this 23.98 footage as drop frame, which is impossible. Red Giant has acknowledged this issue and has indicated that it will be fixed in a software update. I would position BulletProof as a DSLR or GoPro shooter’s best friend. The ability to not only ingest files to multiple locations but also to perform basic color correction, add keywords and metadata and export in multiple formats makes BulletProof a valuable tool. I’ll reiterate the value of its strong backup workflow. File-based video recording can be a scary proposition; multiple backups are the best insurance policy a filmmaker can buy. This is a solid product. The extensive testing with many thousands of beta users and careful attention to feedback has produced a version 1.0 release far more stable and feature-laden than many other vendors’ 1.0 offerings. BulletProof 1.0 belongs in the toolkit of every editor who deals with media supported by this application. While I hope that Red Giant expands codec and file format support in future software updates, it’s still a great product in the interim. Use it and speed up your workflow while protecting your data. dv

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lust

lust Zacuto EVF Flip CHuCk GLoMAn

Zacuto EVF Flip

CHuCk GLoMAn

NEw pErspEctiVEs

Zacuto EVF Flip Adds Flexibility to Viewing and Reviewing

 Quick Take Product: Zacuto eVF Flip Pros: Long-lasting battery, compact size, multiple menu options
 Quick Take
Product:
Zacuto eVF Flip
Pros:
Long-lasting battery,
compact size, multiple
menu options and the
ability to be mounted just
about anywhere a portable
monitor would be needed.
Cons:
adds too much
weight for handheld
shooting. HDMI connection
from camera may disable
the camera’s viewfinder.
Bottom Line:
For
DsLrs, a must-have to
properly frame the shot.
MSRP:
$775
Online:
store.zacuto.com/
evf-flip/

I can’t count the number of times I’ve needed to see the camera’s viewfinder and I was on the opposite end of a jib. Zacuto offers a solution in its EVF Flip, a portable 3.2” high-resolution monitor that puts the camera’s viewfinder where you need it most.

Zacuto’s EVF system allows a shooter to operate with his camera “in line” with the rod system and an offset viewfinder in front of his eye. The EVF Flip has a Z-Finder frame built into the unit that can be flipped open to 180 degrees. If a director/ client/producer wants to see into the viewfinder, for example, the camera operator can flip it open instead of having to adjust so he can get his eye to the loupe.

photo by leo lee/fragola productions
photo by leo lee/fragola productions

JJ Kim of Orange Wedding Films with Zacuto eVF Flip

button activates the main menu, allowing selection of screen settings (brightness, contrast and chroma), color

bars, battery level display, scaling, focus assist, zebra, image flip, zoom, audio meters and function buttons. The second and third buttons scroll up or down within the menu screen, and the fourth selects the highlighted option.

A miniscule 7.4V lithium-ion battery in

the rear powers the unit. An adjustable mount

screws into the bottom of the EVF Flip, allowing the hotshoe to be mounted.

At only 800 x 480, the resolution isn’t as sharp

as some DSLRs, but it will display standard definition’s 480i/p, as well as high definition’s 720p and 1080i/p. Zacuto quotes an 8.5-hour battery life, but in the real world it lasted only about six.

In use

I quickly teamed the review model EVF Flip with

Features

At 3.2”, the Zacuto EVF Flip has the same size LCD screen as most DSLRs. A cover latches securely over the screen to protect its surface from scratches. If you’re facing the unit, the right side has two HDMI ports, out and in, allowing video to be looped through. The left side has four circular black buttons and a larger red button that turns the unit on and off. The top

buttons and a larger red button that turns the unit on and off. The top 38
buttons and a larger red button that turns the unit on and off. The top 38
Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II DSLR in a jib shoot project I’d lined up. I

Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II DSLR in a jib shoot project I’d lined up. I was unable to see the camera’s viewfinder when it was at the end of the extended jib arm, but the supplied HDMI cable was long enough to reach from the Canon’s output to the input of the Zacuto monitor, providing an accurate representation of what the camera was seeing. A slightly larger screen would have been better, but the only other monitor available was a 9” LCD that couldn’t display 1080p, making the EVF Flip a better choice. After selecting the 16:9 aspect ratio, I was ready to shoot in a matter of minutes. The monitor can be swiveled or angled to provide better viewing in sunny situations, and the screen can be closed to transport the unit or to keep it dry in bad weather. The loop-through feature of the HDMI ports permits the director and other members of the crew to view the action from different locations. (As with most cameras, once you use a HDMI port, the viewfinder on the camera is deactivated.) The EVP Flip also proved quite useful on a Steadicam shoot. Our operator aligned the wide tracking shot without needing to see camera’s LCD screen. By using the extension cable, the director

EVF Specs

LCD

Size

3.2” TFT LCD IPS LED

 

Resolution

800 x 480

 

Color

16.7M

 

Viewing angle

H: 170° V: 170°

 

View area

70.6mm (H) x 42.76mm (V)

Power

Battery

7.2V Canon LP-E6 or equivalent

 

External

12V power adapter optional

Video I/O

HDMI

480i/480p/576p/720p/1080i/1080p

Operating temperature

 

-4° F to 158° F

Storage temperature

 

-22° F to 176° F

Power consumption

 

2.5W (8.5 hours with 1,800 mAH battery)

and I were able to evaluate the operator shots live—another great use of the EVP Flip. The only negative is when shooting handheld. If the director wants to view the shot while the DP is shooting, attaching the EVF Flip renders the camera’s viewfinder inoperable (at least on the Canon EOS 5D).

Summary

Zacuto’s EVF Flip is a convenient way to put a multifunctional, portable LCD monitor exactly where you want it. Although it’s a bit on the expensive side, EVF Flip provides much more control over the viewable image than many other portable LCD monitors on the market. dv

side, EVF Flip provides much more control over the viewable image than many other portable LCD

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K-TeK NauTilus

CARl MRozeK

spiral symmeTry, superior souNd

Recording with K-Tek’s Nautilus Mic Suspension Mount

 Quick Take Product: K-tek Nautilus Pros: excellent isolation of microphone from camera. enables fast
 Quick Take
Product:
K-tek Nautilus
Pros:
excellent isolation of
microphone from camera.
enables fast and easy mic
changes. Lightweight and
flexible, yet sturdy, modular
and expandable.
Cons:
Has a somewhat
high profile for on-camera
use. requires the camera
shoe for attachment to
camera. Grips thinner-
barreled mics loosely.
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suspension coils simplify
and accelerate microphone
changes in the field,
while their movability
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I often shoot alone, so it’s up to me to shoot clean audio, not a boom operator or a sound person. This means I usually handle the mic’ing myself, mostly with the mic mounted on or very near the camera. Mounting the microphone off-camera is the best way to go, but that’s really only feasible when you’re shooting in a fairly stationary position. When I’m using the mic on camera (which is most of the time), I need some kind of shock mount to isolate vibration and handling noise.

Some shock mounts curtail the use of windscreens, or at least require their removal to mount the mic in the suspension. This can make

switching mics in the field a cumbersome process, and something to avoid if at all possible. Moreover, some shock mounts are flimsy and vulnerable to damage. Combining stability and suppleness with

a rugged design is something of a challenge. K-Tek

Boom Poles has met this challenge with the Nautilus

microphone suspension mount. (We awarded the

K-Tek Nautilus a best-in-show Black Diamond Award

at the 2013 NAB Show.)

K-tek Nautilus with two spring Mounts
K-tek Nautilus with
two spring Mounts

material that balances strength and flexibility, allowing the microphone to hang suspended, yet with the strength to support the mic’s weight. The Spring Mounts slide along a 4” rail and lock in place. They may be positioned anywhere on the rail to accommodate different sized mics. The Nautilus suspension comes standard with four Spring Mounts: two provide tighter tension for heavy microphones and two offer less tension to suit smaller,

Features

Nautilus’ form is inspired by the logarithmic spiral,

a design found in nature in objects like hurricanes,

spiral galaxies and the chambered nautilus, a conch- like shellfish that’s widely admired for its graceful

symmetry. The Nautilus spiral was chosen over a host of other natural and artificial designs after a year

of intensive R&D by the K-Tek design team.

Nautilus is a universal microphone shock mount that is engineered to offer suspension and vibration absorption to any shotgun mic. The mount's spiral design applies an even distribution of force in three dimensions. Nautilus floats the microphone in this spiral spring design with horizontal clips to achieve optimal isolation. K-Tek’s Spring Mounts are made from a composite

lightweight mics. There is only one point of contact between the microphone suspension and the

lightweight mics. There is only one point of contact between the microphone suspension and the mount. Less contact means less vibration. With a spiral design, the force applied to the mount is spread evenly over one long, circular surface, creating even force distribution in three dimensions. The mount’s spiral resembles a small letter “e,” without the horizontal line bisecting its center. A pair of rubberized pincers grasps the shaft of the microphone. These pincers do not lock, but rather flex enough that the microphone shaft pushes past their

doves and sparrows, and even the braying of burros. The gusts were occasionally strong enough to force me to tighten my grip on the camera, yet none of this handling noise found its way onto the soundtrack thanks to Nautilus’ ability to isolate the mic from the camera body, despite being mounted to it.

sUmmary

K-Tek’s Nautilus microphone suspension system

takes a fresh approach to isolating field vibration and mic handling noises by employing a spiral coil to spread out forces evenly over one long, circular surface, thus creating an even force distribution in three dimensions. Thanks to meticulous system design and testing—including the development of lightweight and resilient base materials—the Nautilus takes microphone suspension to a new level. dv

Nautilus takes microphone suspension to a new level. dv nautilus with sennheiser mKH 418 shotgun mic
nautilus with sennheiser mKH 418 shotgun mic
nautilus with
sennheiser mKH
418 shotgun mic

nearly touching tips into the spiral’s open center. The mount thereby forms

a cradle that can accommodate the

shaft of most standard shotgun-type microphones.

In Use

I tested the Nautilus with a standard- sized shotgun mic, Sennheiser’s new ENG-style MKE 600, which is 10” long and has a 3/4” shaft. My MKE 600 backed easily into mounting position on the twin coils and then pushed easily into both clamps after a slight bit of initial resistance. Once seated, the MKE 600 couldn’t be dislodged from the Nautilus, even with vigorous shaking. In the time that I had the Nautilus for evaluation, I subjected it to daily jarring vibration on several miles of gravel “washboard” roads in the Black Mountains of Arizona. Even though the

mic flexed visibly, it remained attached, enabling me to record some of my best ambient desert audio ever. I was able

to capture wind gusts blended with the

singing of mockingbirds, thrashers, desert

to capture wind gusts blended with the singing of mockingbirds, thrashers, desert creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv | 11.2013

creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv | 11.2013

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Pixelmator

OlIVER PETERS

effects for editors

Pixelmator Team’s Tool Enhances Your Timeline

 Quick Take Product: Pixelmator Pros: Broad file format compatibility. Engineered on OS X core
 Quick Take
Product:
Pixelmator
Pros:
Broad file format
compatibility. Engineered
on OS X core technologies.
Recognizes third-party
core image filters. Built-in
vector tools.
Cons:
Mac only. Some
Photoshop layer styles are
not translated. Limited to
8-bit/channel graphics.
Bottom Line:
Pixelmator 2.2 “Blueberry”
is a powerful vector
and raster-based design
and graphics tool at a
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Online:
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digital
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Excellence
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www.pixelmator. com digital video Excellence Award Pixelmator supports multiple layers and includes a wide

Pixelmator supports multiple layers and includes a wide range of design tools and effects filters.

Over the years, Adobe Photoshop has become the go-to photo and design application for many editors, yet others have simply never warmed to it. For those with an interest in alternative solutions, there’s Pixelmator. The company responsible for Pixelmator, called Pixelmator Team, was an early proponent of selling through the Mac App Store, a move that quickly vaulted Pixelmator to the top of the Mac App Store’s sales list and earned it the “Best of Mac App Store” honor in 2011.

The company recently released Pixelmator v2.2 (codenamed Blueberry) to an enthusiastic response of 500,000 software updates in one week. Some of that may have been a reaction to Adobe’s Cloud-only software announcements or to the $15 introductory price. Also, the new version is a free update through the Mac App Store for existing customers. No matter the reason, Pixelmator is clearly gaining attention. Pixelmator is a paint, design and graphics application built specifically around core OS X technologies. It’s 64-bit and taps into Apple’s Core Image for GPU- based acceleration. By building on the OS technology itself, the Pixelmator team has been able to develop an application that is well integrated and can be sold at a far lower price than would otherwise be the case. The

application is new, streamlined and clearly fits into the same interface design aesthetic as Final Cut Pro X or Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve. Previous versions boasted a nice set of paint, effects, retouching and layer tools. Pixelmator 2.2 adds several new shape and vector tools, gradients, shape styles, color popovers and a new light leak effect. If you own Noise Industries FxFactory Pro filters, they will show up as image effects available for use inside Pixelmator—a serendipitous byproduct of FxFactory and Pixelmator’s common use of Core Image. Pixelmator saves files in its own format, but it can open and export a range of standard graphics files, including JPEG, PNG, TIFF, PDF and layered Photoshop file formats. If your main interest is in software that lets

you do sophisticated and artistic design and image manipulation, then Pixelmator more than fits the

you do sophisticated and artistic design and image manipulation, then Pixelmator more than fits the bill. The real question is whether it’s a viable substitute for Photoshop. The answer to that question depends on how much of a Photoshop “power user” you are, and how much compatibility you need to maintain with clients who supply Photoshop files to you. The most recent version of Adobe Photoshop Extended is a behemoth application in the best sense. It can do video, a certain level of 3D, and it has an advanced system of layer styles and effects. Most of these cannot be accomplished

in Pixelmator, but then most casual users also never use such functions. If the most you do is apply some basic layer styles to text or a logo—adding a drop shadow, for example—then you can get the same look in Pixelmator, but via a different route. Think of Pixelmator’s capabilities as a very modern version of Photoshop’s feature set around the time of Photoshop 4.0. There were no layer styles, but you could duplicate, darken and blur a layer to create a drop shadow. You’d approach it in a similar fashion with Pixelmator, but even better is the new ability

fashion with Pixelmator, but even better is the new ability Third-party core image filters, such as

Third-party core image filters, such as those from Noise Industries, also function in Pixelmator.

to change text into a shape. Once you’ve done that, shape styles can be applied. This lets you fill text with color or gradients, stroke an outline and add shadows—all while still in a vector mode. The keyboard shortcut of command-shift-V switches you into the Vectormator mode, which changes the interface configuration to bring forward all of the vector-based shape, text and drawing tools. Effectively this gives you a mini-equivalent of Adobe Illustrator right inside of Pixelmator. I tested compatibility in both directions between

Pixelmator 2.2 and Photoshop CS6. It was actually much better than I expected. Layers came across in both directions. Layer effects applied in Photoshop were there, but not with the right look unless I merged the layer in Photoshop. For example, a drop shadow would show up, but Pixelmator couldn’t read the elaborate emboss treatment I applied. On the plus side, the vector font was brought in as separate clean layer. Pixelmator files that were exported as Photoshop files with shape styles applied to text layers opened more or less correctly in Photoshop. The bottom line is that there is a reasonable level of interchange between Photoshop and Pixelmator, as long as you merge or flatten any layers with layer effects. Pixelmator is a fun application to use. The 2.2 version has some great features and delivers high- quality final results. Excluding DaVinci Resolve Lite (which is available for free), Pixelmator has to be the best bang-for-the-buck of any content creation software. Regardless of whether you use Photoshop a lot or not at all, Pixelmator is a good addition to your toolkit. The more you use it, the more you’ll find it your new go-to design application. dv

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Learn

Learn DIgItal Bolex D16 JAY ANkeNeY Icon, InspIratIon, InnovatIon Digital Bolex’s D16 Camera Becomes A Reality
DIgItal Bolex D16

DIgItal Bolex D16

JAY ANkeNeY

Icon, InspIratIon, InnovatIon

Digital Bolex’s D16 Camera Becomes A Reality

Digital Bolex D16 camera
Digital Bolex D16 camera
D16 Camera Becomes A Reality Digital Bolex D16 camera B olex. The name is so iconic

B olex. The name is so iconic that it can separate DPs into their own generational divide: those who remember the famed

16mm film cameras and those who don’t. The Bolex company was founded in 1927 by Jacques Bogopolsky, whose name was usually shortened to “Bolsky”—hence the Bolex name for the company he founded. Bolex cameras were spring- wound clockwork workhorses, originally 16mm, that served both professional documentarians and amateur home movie buffs. While later models adopted electric drives, no film student of the 1960s or early ’70s can forget the first

time they loaded sprocket-driven celluloid into a Bolex H-16 camera and wound its crank to start shooting. Now a group of enthusiasts headed by L.A. cinematographer Joe Rubinstein are bringing the style of the original Bolex into the digital cinema era. Rubinstein showed a prototype of the Digital Bolex D16 camera at the 2013 SXSW Film Festival

the Digital Bolex D16 camera at the 2013 SXSW Film Festival in March. Since then I’ve

in March. Since then I’ve had the chance to speak with some lucky cinematographers who have been able to test a few preproduction models of the D16 camera. You can see samples of their test footage at www.digitalbolex.com. If everything works out as planned, the Digital Bolex D16 should be shipping by the time you read this article.

Digital Bolex’s Elle Schneider and Joe Rubinstein
Digital Bolex’s Elle Schneider
and Joe Rubinstein

“Joe wanted a 2K camera that shot raw images at 24 fps for well under $10,000, and it looks like the D16 will sell for $3,299,” explains Elle Schneider, creative director at Digital Bolex. “With the help of Kickstarter web-based funding, he arranged to be able to use the Bolex name for the camera and decided to partner with the Ienso company of Toronto, Canada, to produce it.” A key to Rubinstein’s design is that the D16 uses a sensor approximately the same size as a Super 16mm film frame and 16mm lenses with no crop or vignetting. Using its Kodak 1” CCD sensor, the D16 shoots 2K (2048 x 1152) resolution in Super 16mm mode and HD (1920 x 1080) at its 16mm setting. It can record up to 32 fps at 2K, 60 fps at 720p and 90 fps at 480p. It stores images through an internal 400 GB Micron P400e SSD buffer onto dual CF cards; the company recommends using CF cards with transfer speeds of at least 400x for best performance. The D16 shoots raw images as CinemaDNG format stills or TIFF sequences, with 12-bit color depth. The camera supports C mount lenses standard, and EF, PL, M43 and turret mounts with optional modification. Initially there are no compressed formats on board, although some may be added in the future. The D16 sports the original Bolex’s iconic teardrop-shaped body and a real hand crank on the right-hand side. Try not to jump to the end of this article to find out what the crank does.

Lan Bui

Director of photography Lan Bui had just finished shooting his first feature, Redemption: The Darkness Descending, with Canon EOS C300s when he heard about the D16. “It’s the feeling of complete control with the D16 that was very attractive to me,” Bui says. “Most modern digital cameras give you what is baked in them to produce. The D16 lets me set every parameter so I can shoot a base image and manipulate it later. I think of its recording as a digital negative that can be fully developed in post. And it looks cool too!” Bui loves the D16’s small size, since it fits easily in his hands. “There is a handgrip that attaches to the underside that can easily be removed to mount rails or a baseplate,” Bui says. “The quality of its raw recordings will let me replace all my DSLRs and still come back with superior images.” But the D16 will not be the daily shooter for Bui. “The workflow with raw recordings requires transcoding the files to get them into post, although you can do workarounds. Then again, if you use an external recorder and store the images compressed into something like ProRes, what is the point? When used properly on a feature film, the D16 gives me a higher-quality look when I have the time to handle its relatively bigger files during post to create the look I want.”

Kathryn BriLLhart

Kathryn Brillhart is a working DP who recently completed the made-for-TV feature Miracle at Gate 213, which will air later this year on NBC. She is also a

213 , which will air later this year on NBC. She is also a From Lan
213 , which will air later this year on NBC. She is also a From Lan
213 , which will air later this year on NBC. She is also a From Lan

From Lan Bui’s test shoot of the Digital Bolex D16

visual effects specialist, which is worth mentioning since she is involved with a high-profile project for the king of Jordan: the Red Sea Astrarium on the Gulf of Aqaba. Think of it as a multicultural leisure destination you probably can’t afford. Joe Rubinstein contacted Brillhart as a cinematographer to test out an early D16 model because she’s been shooting 16mm film with a Bolex H-16 camera

Kathryn Brillhart shot footage with an early model of the D16 on the L.a. Metro
Kathryn Brillhart shot footage with an early model of the D16 on the L.a. Metro
Kathryn Brillhart shot footage with an early model of the D16 on the L.a. Metro

Kathryn Brillhart shot footage with an early model of the D16 on the L.a. Metro and in downtown Los angeles.

since, as she says, “forever.” “Joe and I took a weekend to shoot with it in downtown Los Angeles at night,” she recalls. “We rode the L.A. Metro to test the way the camera reacted to high and low lights in different situations, and it felt just like a Bolex film camera.” Online D16 at Night (Kathryn Brillhart): www.digitalbolex.

Online D16 at Night (Kathryn Brillhart): www.digitalbolex. com/d16-night/ One feature Brillhart found especially handy

com/d16-night/

One feature Brillhart found especially handy is the fact that it has a full-resolution 1080p HDMI port so you can mount a small high-definition monitor on top of the camera. This lets you see your shots in 16:9 on the upper screen while simultaneously zooming in on sections of the footage in a 1:1 pixel ratio on the camera’s built-in 320 x 240 display. “This lets you shoot at eye level just like a film camera with the HD monitor,

at eye level just like a film camera with the HD monitor, Kurt Lancaster shot a
at eye level just like a film camera with the HD monitor, Kurt Lancaster shot a
at eye level just like a film camera with the HD monitor, Kurt Lancaster shot a

Kurt Lancaster shot a short documentary with breakdancing performers on Venice Beach with a beta preproduction model (it had an uncalibrated sensor) of the Digital Bolex D16. color graded by Michael Plescia with adobe camera raw.

but achieve critical focus on the camera’s display,” she explains. “On most DSLRs you have to switch back and forth on the display to get that information. The D16 lets you concentrate on the image being recorded.”

Kurt Lancaster, Ph.D.

Our final D16 beta tester, Kurt Lancaster, Ph.D., is not only a director/ cinematographer but also associate professor at Northern Arizona University School of Communication and author of DSLR Cinema: Crafting the Film Look with Video from Focal Press. Lancaster took a beta preproduction model of the D16 to Southern California, where he found some remarkable eye candy to shoot with vintage 16mm C mount lenses. He turned his footage into a mini documentary about breakdancing performers on Venice Beach.

Online Venice Beach Breakdance D16 Digital Bolex: www.digitalbolex. com/guest-post-kurt-lancaster/ “It has the ability
Online Venice Beach Breakdance D16 Digital Bolex: www.digitalbolex. com/guest-post-kurt-lancaster/ “It has the ability

Online Venice Beach Breakdance D16 Digital Bolex: www.digitalbolex. com/guest-post-kurt-lancaster/ “It has the ability to capture a filmic feel in color and texture that made the images feel un-digital,”

he says. “The ability to adjust its shutter angle gave

a smoothness to the skateboarders we captured

on the Strand, and there was richness to the colors that is different from the DSLRs I’ve used.” He also appreciated the camera’s built-in XLR connections for audio and the fact that you can remove the front plate to accommodate Canon EF

or ARRI PL mount lenses without having to put an

adapter on the camera’s native C mount thread. “The camera’s internal SSD buffer lets you record to the CF cards sequentially so you can easily transfer the footage into a post system,” he notes. Lancaster has been to Toronto to see the camera under development and credits the Digital Bolex team with being sincerely interested in user feedback. “You need to understand a raw workflow,” he says, “but with the D16, the results are worth it. We shot some beautiful sunsets with the lights coming on over L.A. With the D16’s wide exposure latitude and 12-bit color depth, it responds more like a film camera than a DSLR.”

Hand Crank

Now, how about that unexpected hand crank on the right side of the D16’s body? Its most remarkable function was not activated on the beta versions of the D16 our early testers were using, unfortunately. Digital Bolex creative director

Schneider says, “The crank is really my innovation

or my fault, depending on how you want to look at

it. You can use it to adjust settings such as shutter angle, frames per second, headphone volume or ISO level. But since the D16 records discrete still images in CinemaDNG or TIFF formats, you can determine the frame rate at which those images are recorded by manually grinding the crank at variable speeds.” Yes, that’s right, you can actually overcrank or undercrank the recordings—by hand—to achieve slow motion and upspeed shots when footage is played back at 24 fps. Frankly, though, that crank is also a very clever eye-catcher that signifies the dedication and nostalgic enthusiasm responsible for the birth, or perhaps digital rebirth, of a great cinematography tradition in the form of the Digital Bolex D16 camera. dv

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Learn TableT TeleprompTers CRAIg JOHNSTON

TableT TeleprompTers

CRAIg JOHNSTON

TableT-based TeleprompTers

User-Friendly, Energy-Efficient Options for Production

T eleprompters have always existed as a series of components. You had a source of text, whether it was a computer or simply

paper scripts being fed under a camera; a display for that text, originally a CRT but now a flat-screen monitor; a prompter assembly to display the copy over or near the camera’s lens; and a scrolling controller. Now that nearly every professional has access to a tablet computer of some kind, however, the list of components in the teleprompter chain has shrunk considerably.

“No-BraiNer”

“With everyone having an iPad or Android tablet for work or entertainment, the idea of building a teleprompter frame for them was kind of a no- brainer,” says Mike Burdick, sales manager for Mirror Image Teleprompters, in Oshkosh, Wis. Autocue first built a prompter assembly to mount an Apple iPhone. “It was pretty clear that the iPhone iOS was going to be an important direction for us to go in,” says Aaron Brady, Americas managing director for Autocue in New York. “As soon as the iPad came out, we had an iPad prompter ready to go.” Autocue currently offers the Starter Series iPad Teleprompter Package with iAutocue app. Listec, a Tiffen company, was also quick to market with a prompter assembly to mount a tablet computer. “The nice thing about the tablet is they tend to be very bright, have very good backlighting, so they’re visible outside,” says Michael Rubin, senior product manager at Tiffen in Hauppauge, N.Y.

Built-iN iNtelligeNce

What companies such as Autocue, Listec and Mirror Image bring to the table when they incorporate a tablet into their prompting systems is expertise in providing lightweight but rugged prompting assemblies, high-quality beam-splitter glass, and sophisticated software and controllers.

glass, and sophisticated software and controllers. Field teleprompting has come a long way since its origin

Field teleprompting has come a long way since its origin as a paper roll memory aid in the 1950s. in 1969, autocue introduced the closed-circuit prompter, in which a camera filmed a scrolling paper script and displayed that image on a monitor attached to the camera shooting the speaker.

Tablet prompting assemblies are generally built for the 10-inch tablets, and some companies offer a smaller assembly for the iPad Mini. “Some of the companies are making prompters to work with the iPhone,” says Burdick, “but frankly it’s too small to allow the cameraman to get very far” from the speaker, who needs to be able to read the script. “With a tablet, there’s some intelligence built in,” says Rubin, “so you’re able to do a bit more and not be tethered to a computer for your source of information.” If a field crew is using a tablet for

prompting, they may additionally use the tablet to do additional research on a subject or receive script material from the studio via e-mail or text message. Burdick says that Mirror Image has chosen not to write software for the tablets. “The iPad and Android tablets have a large number of apps for prompting, [so for us] there’s just really not that much money in doing that.” He adds that Mirror Image’s iPad teleprompter kit, the IP10, will work with any of those prompting apps. Listec’s PromptWarePlus software is available

Mirror Image IP10 iPad teleprompter kit Listec’s PW-10EBTeleprompter includes an adjustable camera mount Autocue
Mirror Image IP10 iPad teleprompter kit Listec’s PW-10EBTeleprompter includes an adjustable camera mount Autocue

Mirror Image IP10 iPad teleprompter kit

Listec’s PW-10EBTeleprompter includes an adjustable camera mount
Listec’s PW-10EBTeleprompter
includes an adjustable camera mount

Autocue Starter Series iPad Teleprompter Package

for iOS and Android operating systems, along with a PromptWare Remote Controller. These options augment Listec’s PW-10 series of tablet teleprompter solutions. “Tablet-based teleprompters are the most portable way of doing prompting,” says Brady. “There’s no power cable in, there’s no video cable in, and if you set up the wireless controller, there’s no wires at all.” Wireless control of the tablet is often via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, while some users employ a smartphone as the controller. Rubin points out there’s a cost advantage to tablet-based prompters because the computer and the display are combined. And the tablet is

the primary cost; if the camera owner already has a tablet, there’s less upfront cost in buying a teleprompting assembly to mount it in front of the lens.

“Tablet-based teleprompters are the most portable way of doing prompting.”

—Aaron Brady, Autocue

“There’s also a weight advantage. Today, with the DSLRs and the smaller DV cameras, [using a

tablet] allows you to put a lot less weight on the front of the camera,” Rubin says. “So certainly if the cameraman is shoulder-carrying, he’s very happy, or if he’s using a Steadicam, it just makes it a lot lighter, a lot more compact.” And while tablet-based teleprompters are well suited to the smallest video cameras, Brady adds, “we saw that the different cameras that people were using with it weren’t restricted to the smallest types of cameras. We saw people with large, professional cameras using tablet-based teleprompters.” Tablet computers and teleprompters seem to be a perfect match. dv

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production process. Immersion in software and expert training is available. Target
Audience: Editors and motion graphics professionals seeking to maximize their
creativity and efficiency on their software and tools.
DC post | production Conference: December 3-5, 2013
packages
pricing
DC Post | Production Conference Full Pass (3 Days) Tuesday Focus On Workshops + Full Conference
$895
Certification Prep Course 2-days Tues. 12/3 & Wed. 12/4
$895
DC Post | Production Conference (1 Day) Pass Choose either Wed., 12/4 or Thurs., 12/5
$550
Tuesday “Focus On” Workshops Only
$495
TuESDay, DECEmBER 3RD, 2013
Focus On:
Focus On:
Focus On:
Track
Full Day
Full Day
Full Day
10:30am -
Color Correction & Grading
4:30pm
Best techniques for Shooting and
Lighting Interviews
Online Video -
Compression,
Distribution, and More
WEDNESDay, DECEmBER 4Th, 2013
Adobe Creative
Producer/Director
Track
Video Production
Cloud Workshop
Workshop
Premiere Pro for
Experienced Editors
9:00 -
11:45am
IN-DEPTH: Getting Better
Keys: Green Screen Workflow
IN-DEPTH:
IN-DEPTH:
Putting the Camera In Motion
The Art of the Interview
11:45am -
Lunch Break
12:45pm
1:00 -
Time Floats By:
2:15pm
Title Design for
Adobe Creative Suite
Creating Timelapse Footage
Music & Footage
Licensing Essentials
Certification Prep Class
(Day 1 of 2)
2:30 -
3:45pm
The Best Ingest and Export
Strategies with Premiere Pro
Essential Gear for
Your Next Production
Budgeting Video Projects
4:00 -
5:15pm
Using Cinema 4D with
Adobe After Effects
Making the Transition from
Production to Post
Production Gotchas –
Where Things Can Go
Horribly “Wrong” and
How to Avoid Them
ThuRSDay, DECEmBER 5Th, 2013
Adobe Creative
Track
Video Production
Cloud Workshop
Post Production
Tecniques and Secrets
Premiere Pro for
Experienced Editors
The Power is in the Trim:
9:00 -
Mastering the Trim Tools in
Premiere Pro
Lighting Class
10:15am
Cutting a Commercial
with FCP X
10:30 -
Multi-camera Editing
Workflow for Premiere Pro
Audio Class
11:45am
Best Media Composer
Editorial Tips
Certification Prep Class
(Day 2 of 2)
11:45am -
Lunch Break
12:45pm
12:45 -
Audio Class Adobe Audition
2:00pm
Photoshop for Video Editors - 10
Techniques you Need to Know
New & Emerging Formats
*Note: Schedule subject to change. Visit gvexpo.com for updated session times.
Register at gvexpo.com with code GVE8
REGISTER NOW WITh CODE GVE8 TO RECEIVE $50 Off CONfERENCE pROGRam RaTES aND TO CLaIm
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pro media Conference
The Pro Media Conference is a series of papers, panels, case studies, and
networking opportunities giving media pros access to the information
and technology that allows them to create, manage, monetize, and deliver
compelling content for all video applications, across all platforms and for all
customers. Target Audience: Managers and executives interested in learning
about trends in the industry and the next big thing.
@GVEXPO@GVEXPO@GVEX@GVEXPO
pro media Conference: December 4-5, 2013
packages
pricing
Pro Media Conference 2-Day Pass
$415
Pro Media Conference 1-Day Pass
$225
Pro Media Conference Tracks:
pRODuCTION TEChNOLOGy aND TRENDS
Stay current on the latest trends in live video capture. Sessions on 4K, lighting,
cinematography, acquisition/multi-camera technology, and more will help you make
the most of your next shoot.
NEW TEChNOLOGy fOR GOVERNmENT VIDEO CONTRaCTORS
Want to keep up on the latest new technologies with government video applications?
Get the low-down on new up-and-coming technology to add to your portfolio of
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CaSE STuDIES ON GOVERNmENT VIDEO pROjECTS
Hear what works and doesn’t work for government video projects from seasoned
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the government video world functions.
NEXT-GENERaTION VIDEO DELIVERy
The landscape for broadcasting video is constantly changing and evolving. See the
latest technology and best practices in online streaming, encoding, media storage,
DAM, compression, security, mobile content and more.
Government Video Expo
Government Video Exhibit Hall Only Pass includes exhibits,
networking events and all Presentation Theater sessions.
Exhibit hall: December 4 -5, 2013
packages
pricing
Exhibit Hall Pass
FREE WITH CODE GVE8
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Learn

Learn

Fighting

FilterS

If you have ever had a screw-on filter

stuck on your lens so tight it seems

a pipe wrench is the only thing that

will get it loose, read on. Try putting a rubber band around the filter. Or, as the technicians at Fujinon’s lens repair facility suggested, wear a rubber dishwashing glove to give your fingers a better grip. Another tip is to wrap a piece of

cloth tape (like gaffer’s) around the filter in a clockwise direction, then pull the end to unscrew it.

in a clockwise direction, then pull the end to unscrew it. empty net I attended an

empty net

I attended an awards ceremony

last week at which large projection screens gave the audience a much better view of the speakers. There was only one camera shooting the event, which normally would not

have been a problem. Unfortunately, the producers failed to tell the emcee

to stay at the lectern until the next

speaker got there, so we were treated

to many shots of what hockey fans

would call an “empty net.” Another solution for the problem, besides telling the host to stay at the podium until the next speaker arrived, would have been for the emcee to leave by the same path on which the new speaker was approaching. This would allow the camera to follow him until he passed the speaker, and then follow the new speaker back to the lectern.

and then follow the new speaker back to the lectern. ShAre yOur tip Now it’s your

ShAre yOur tip

Now it’s your turn to share a favorite shooting or production tip or question with your fellow professionals. Please send e-mails to dvtips@nbmedia.com. All submissions become the property of Reizner & Reizner. None can be returned.

DICK REIZNER

TIPS TO CLIP

clOtheS mAke the mAn (Or WOmAn)

When I shared several tips about what people appearing on camera should wear, it brought this important comment from Houston producer Philip Booth. “Your comments about dressing talent were right on, but how about the crew? Although they must be comfortable, their dress and personal grooming should reflect a professional

attitude and be appropriate to the setting—nice shirt, clean pants and good shoes.

“I have seen shooters show up

to cover a college commencement

in shorts, grimy T-shirt and sandals. I don’t know if I would hire that person for my next project.”

I know of many producers

who share those sentiments. Remember, you have to get hired to do the job before any of the tips we talk about can help you.

the job before any of the tips we talk about can help you. Script Security Scripts

Script Security

Scripts can be dropped, jumbled, revised, confused and otherwise mixed up—unless, of course, you follow these tips. The most important one is to print a large page number and revision number at the top of each sheet so they be quickly reassembled if (when) they are dropped. You can easily tell whether everyone is using the same version of a script if material is printed on a different colored paper each time the

document is revised. Index cards (3x5 or 4x6 sizes) are handy if you’re going to be reading at a lectern. Make them drop-proof by punching a hole in one corner of the stack and attaching a beaded keychain. The chain provides more flexibility than the ring many speakers use.

provides more flexibility than the ring many speakers use. pArt picker During a recent equipment repair,
provides more flexibility than the ring many speakers use. pArt picker During a recent equipment repair,

pArt picker

During a recent equipment repair, Jane Borges of Manteca, Calif., knocked over a container of small parts and found herself with a lot of very small non-magnetic parts hiding in the carpeting. Her solu- tion was to put a piece of nylon stocking over the end of her vac- uum’s hose. She then turned the vacuum on to retrieve the parts. Thanks for sharing, Jane.

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XA-10
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• Smooth variable zoom with 3 fixed zoom speeds

#CAHV40

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#SOHDRFX7

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HDR-TD30V

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#SOHDRFX7 HDR-TD30V 3D Flash Memory HD Camcorder 20 Mega Pixels • Dual 1/3.91 back-illuminated Exmor-R
20 Mega Pixels
20 Mega
Pixels

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• Record to SD/SDHC/SDXC MS PRO-HG Duo & XC-HG media

• 1920 x 1080 Full HD 24p/60p video

• Sony G series wide 10x 17x extended zoom lens

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• Watch 3D on 3.5" (16:9) LCD without special glasses

• Built-in GPS • Microphone & headphone input

#SOHDRTD30VB

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XA20 / XA25

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• 1/2.84” HD CMOS sensor with RGB primary color filter

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color filter • 20x HD Zoom Lens • 2 x SD/SDHC/SDXC card slots with relay and
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card slots with relay and dual recording

• Canon Digic DV 4 image processor

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• 3.5” LCD screen and color viewfinder

• 2 phantom-powered XLR audio inputs

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XA25 Step-up Features: HD/SD-SDI output and pre-record 3-sec. buffer

#CAXA20

$2,199.00

CAXA25

$2,699.00

pre-record 3-sec. buffer #CAXA20 $2,199.00 CAXA25 $2,699.00 HXR-NX5U 3-CMOS NXCAM Flash Memory Camcorder • Three

HXR-NX5U

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• Three 1/3” Exmor CMOS sensors, with a ClearVid array

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• 20x wide G series lens

• HD-SDI & HDMI output, SMPTE Time Code in/out, Dual XLR inputs

• Built-in GPS system • 3.2” Xtra Fine LCD

#SOHXRNX5U

• Built-in GPS system • 3.2” Xtra Fine LCD #SOHXRNX5U HXR-NX30 Compact HD Camcorder • Shoots
• Built-in GPS system • 3.2” Xtra Fine LCD #SOHXRNX5U HXR-NX30 Compact HD Camcorder • Shoots
• Built-in GPS system • 3.2” Xtra Fine LCD #SOHXRNX5U HXR-NX30 Compact HD Camcorder • Shoots

HXR-NX30

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• Shoots AVCHD Up to 1080/60p at 24Mbps

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• Features SD or Memory Stick Card Slot

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• 1/4" 4.2Mp, ClearVid Exmor R CMOS sensor

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• Manual lens ring with assignable parameters

#SOHXRMC2000U

Manual lens ring with assignable parameters #SOHXRMC2000U 4 Mega Pixels XF100 / XF105 HD Professional CF

4 Mega

Pixels

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XF100 / XF105

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4 Mega Pixels XF100 / XF105 HD Professional CF Camcorders • 1/3" CMOS 1920 x 1080
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• 10x HD zoom lens

• 3.5" 920K dot LCD monitor

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• Dual XLR inputs • Waveform Monitor

XF105 Step-up Features: HD/SD-SDI, SMPTE Time Code, Genlock

#CAXF100

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#CAXF105

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Time Code, Genlock #CAXF100 $2,499.00 #CAXF105 $2,999.00 HDR-AX2000 3-CMOS AVCHD Flash Camcorder • Three 1/3”

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CinemaTone Gamma and CinemaTone Color Control #SOHDRAX2000H NEX-VG900 35mm Full-Frame Interchangeable Lens Camcorder •
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NEX-VG900

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#SONEXVG900

24 Mega

Pixels

• 3.0" LCD screen #SONEXVG900 24 Mega Pixels PMW-100 XDCAM HD422 Handheld Camcorder • 1/2.9" CMOS
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PMW-100

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• 1/2.9" CMOS Sensor (1920 x 1080)

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• 10x Zoom Lens - 40-400mm (35mm Equiv)

• 3.5" LCD Screen (852 x 480 Pixels)

• HD-SDI & HDMI Outputs

• Dual XLR Inputs / Timecode & Genlock I/O

• Dual ExpressCard SxS Card Slots

• Compatible with XDCAM Disc & EX Formats • DVCAM Recording

#SOPMW100

XDCAM Disc & EX Formats • DVCAM Recording #SOPMW100 Prices, speci cations, and images are subject

Prices, speci cations, and images are subject to change without notice. Manufacturer rebates are subject to the terms and conditions (including expiration dates) printed on the manufacturers’ rebate forms. Not responsible for typographical or illustrative errors. © 2000-2013 B & H Foto & Electronics Corp.

FDR-AX1Digital 4K Camcorder • 1/2.3" back-illuminated Exmor R(R) CMOS Sensor • Dual XQD Memory Card

Digital 4K Camcorder

• 1/2.3" back-illuminated Exmor R(R) CMOS Sensor

• Dual XQD Memory Card slot

NEW
NEW

Records 4K video resolutions (Up to 3840x2160 60P/50P)

20x Sony G-Series zoom lens

Optical image stabilization

Cinematone Gamma / Color

Records in 2K and 4K: 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p • XLR audio input

Video format XAVC S format, MPEG4-AVC/H264 • 3.5" LCD screen

#SOFDRAX1

• 3.5" LCD screen • • • • • #SOFDRAX1 NEX-EA50UH HD Shoulder Mount Interchangeable Lens

NEX-EA50UH• 3.5" LCD screen • • • • • #SOFDRAX1 HD Shoulder Mount Interchangeable Lens Camcorder

HD Shoulder Mount Interchangeable Lens Camcorder

Exmor APS-C CMOS sensor (AVCHD / MPEG2-SD) • Supplied 18-200 servo power zoom • E-mount interchangeable e lens system • Add lenses without being locked on a lens brand or lens mount

without being locked on a lens brand or lens mount • Use Alpha A-mount lenses with

Use Alpha A-mount lenses with 15‐point phase detection AF Mechanical shutter Still Picture

3.5’’LCD Panel • Record onto Memory Stick/SD/SDHC/SDXC/HXR- FMU128 (Optional) • Records on media card and FMU128 Simultaneously

#SONEXEA50UH

on media card and FMU128 Simultaneously • • #SONEXEA50UH AG-AC130A / AG-AC160A 3-MOS HD Handheld Camcorders
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AG-AC130A / AG-AC160A

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3x 1/3”, 2.2 Mp CMOS sensor - 18-bit dsp

22x optical zoom lens

1080p 1080i 60/p30/p24 & 720p60

Three rings; Manual Zoom, Focus & Iris

Dual SD/SDHC/SDXC card slots

AVCHD & DV recording (SD) modes

dsp AG-AC160A
dsp
AG-AC160A

AG-AC160A Step-up Features:

HD-SDI & LPCM audio recording

• 59.94 Hz / 50 Hz switchable • Slow/quick motion recording mode

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P2 card and DVCPRO mode recording AG-HPX255 Step-up Features:

Remote terminal for studio control

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sp
sp
terminal for studio control #PAAGHPX250 / #PAAGHPX255 sp XF300 / XF305 3 CMOS Solid State HD
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XF300 / XF305

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Record HD 1080/720 onto Compact Flash cards

50Mbps MPEG-2 4:2:2 recording

3 1/3" 2.37Mp CMOS sensors

18x Canon HD L series lens

DIGIC DV III image processor

4" 1.23 Mp LCD monitor

1.55 Mp Color EVF

Over and under crank

XF305 Step-up Features: HD-SDI Output, Genlock & SMPTE Time Code

#CAXF300

$4,999.00

EOS C100 EF Cinema Camcorder
EOS C100
EF Cinema Camcorder

Super 35mm 8.3MP CMOS sensor

Canon EF mount with EF contacts

Dual SDHC/SDXC memory card slots

Multiple recording modes and frame rates

Full manual control and focusing aids