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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

INTRODUCTION In todays competitive business environment, organizations can no longer afford to waste the potential of their workforce. The workplace environment that is set in place impacts employee morale, productivity and engagement both positively and negatively. There are other factors that when combined provide a more powerful determinant of employee performance. When theses other factors are missing or diluted, the employee does come to work only for a paycheck. In this case, the employee is present at work in body only.,Leaving their mind outside the gate., It is the quality of the employees workplace environment that most impacts on their level of motivation and subsequent performance. OBJECTIVES To analyze workplace factors affecting the workers. To analyze the relationship between the employees performance and workplace environment. To determine the impact of work environment on employee productivity To suggest the measures to improve the working conditions for better performance.

METHODOLOGY The type of the study is descriptive in nature, sample technique used is Population, the sample size is 59 workers, the primary data is collected through questionnaire and the secondary data are collected through journals, articles, internet and the tools used are percentage analysis, factor analysis, Chi-square, Mean score. FINDINGS The Findings are related to the demographic factors of the respondents, factors that impact workers, and to find that there is no significant relationship between the age of the respondents and the security about work, and there is significant relationship between the gender of the

respondents and the work enjoyments of workers, the satisfaction of workers with the facilities provided in factory.

RECOMMENDATIONS Health awareness campaigns can be held to reduce the health issues faced by the workers. Performance based incentive system can be implemented to motivate the workers to improve productivity. Recreation activities can be arranged for better coordination among workers and superiors and more young people can be recruited as it can help to increase the efficiency and productivity.

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1. Concept of Study In todays competitive business environment, organizations can no longer afford to waste the potential of their workforce. There are key factors in the employees workplace environment that impact greatly on their level of motivation and performance. The workplace environment that is set in place impacts employee morale, productivity and engagement both positively and negatively. It is not just coincidence that new programs addressing lifestyle changes, work/life balance, health and fitness previously not considered key benefits are now primary considerations of potential employees, and common practices among that most admired companies. In an effort to motivate workers, firms have implemented a number of practices such as performance based pay, employment security agreements, practices to help balance work and family, as well as various forms of information sharing. In addition to motivation, workers need the skills and ability to do their job effectively. And for many firms, training the worker has become a necessary input into the production process. 1.2. Theoretical background of the study Workplace Environment and its Impact on Employee Performance Many managers and supervisors under the mistaken impression that the level of employee performance on the job is proportional to the size of the employees pay packet. Although this may be true in a minority of cases, numerous employee surveys have shown by and large this to be untrue. In fact, salary increases and bonuses for performance, in many instances, have a very limited short-term effect. The extra money soon comes to be regarded not as an incentive but as an entitlement There are other factors that when combined provide a more powerful determinant of employee performance. When these other factors are missing or diluted, the employees does come to work

only for a paycheck. In this case, the employee is present at work in body only, leaving their mind outside the gate. It is the quality of the employees workplace environment that most impacts on their level of motivation and subsequent performance. How well they engage with the organization, especially with their immediate environment, influences to a great extent their error rate, level of innovation and coordination with other employees, absenteeism ,ultimately, how long they stay in the job. Many studies have revealed that most employees leave their organization because of the relationship with their immediate supervisor or manager. Workplace Performance Factors Goal setting Involve employees in setting meaningful goals and performance measures for their work. This can be done informally between the employee and their immediate supervisor or as part of an organizations formal performance management process. The key here is that each employee is actively engaged in the goal setting process and takes ownership of the final agreed goals and measures. Performance feedback Regularly feed back to employees information on how they are performing. This should consist of both positive feedback on what the employee is doing right as well as feedback on what requires improvement. The feedback needs to be as objective as possible and delivered with the appropriate interpersonal and conflict resolution skills. It can be a mix of both informal feedback and feedback delivered as part of a formal performance management cycle. Role congruity Work to ensure that the role that the employee is required to perform is consistent with their expectations on joining the organization and subsequent training. The organizations role expectations are typically reflected in formal documents, such as Job Descriptions and Role Specifications. These expectations should be consistent with tasks allocated by the employees immediate supervisor.

Defined processes Many errors, defects and customer complaints are the result of poor process management. Constrain the variability of how work is actually performed through documenting processes and communication such expectations to employees. Verify on a regular or random basis that the work is actually performed in the way required. Along with goal setting, getting employees to help define and improve processes is a powerful opportunity for engagement. Workplace incentives Determine what motivates your employees in particular and set up formal and informal structures for rewarding employees that behave in the way required. Rewards may consist of a mix of internal rewards, such as challenging assignments, and external rewards, such as higher compensation and peer recognition. Supervisor support Act as advocates for employees, gathering and distributing the resources needed by them in order for them to be able to do a good job. Immediate supervisors and managers need to display the interpersonal skills required to engage employees and enhance their self- confidence. This includes providing positive encouragement for a job well done. Mentoring/ coaching Make available to employees skilled and respected people to help them perform better in their current role and to assist them develop further into a future role. Mentors and coaches may be internal to an organization or external. Either way, they will need to process the necessary facilitation skills to assist employees apply existing sills and develop new skills. Resource availability The vast majorities of employees takes pride in their work and try hard to do a good job. Make sure that individual workloads and organizational systems and processes do not hinder

employees from applying established skills or form practicing newly learned skills. Adequate time and material resources need to be available to enable them to perform to the best of their ability. Make their work easier and help minimize error rates and customer dissatisfaction by supplying job aids. These can include templates, guides, models and checklists. Money is not a sufficient motivator in encouraging the superior workplace performance required in todays competitive business environment. Managers and supervisors will need to be comfortable with working with the whole gamut of workplace factors that influence employee motivation. Skills required include the ability to engage employees in mutual goal setting clarify role expectations and provide regular performance back. Time and energy will also need to be given to providing relevant performance incentives, managing processes, providing adequate resources and workplace coaching. Last but not least to drive their organizations to peak performance managers and supervisors must put out front the human face of their organization. Paramount here is the human to human interaction through providing individualized support and encouragement each and every employee. 1.3 Review of Literature Matthew.J.Stoessel (2001)1 conducted a study on The impact of the work place on effective employee performance in corporate America, and examined about an understanding of where the need of office space has emerged and to provide the insight of where the industry is heading and to what the industry is striving towards. The result was said that the company needs to adapt itself around the world growing and expanding within the culture. On the idea that the problem with the workspace is that there is an unpredictable need for change and that the solution is incomparable adaptability. James K.Harte et al.(2002)2 conducted a study on Well - being in the workplace and its relationship to business outcomes A review of the GALLUP studies, and examined on the well being approach to understand the benefits of promoting the well being of workers. And the result was said that the well being of the worker clearly depends on the employer. Employees who report experiencing a greater balance of positive emotional symptoms over negative emotional symptoms received higher performance rating. ____________________

Matthew J.Stoessel (2001) The impact of the work place on effective employee performance in corporate James K.Harte et al. (2002) Well being in the workplace and its relationship to business outcomes

America
2

Flourishing: The positive person and the Good life (Chapter 9, pp.205 224)

Whittington et al.(2004)3 found that Goal setting enhanced the direct relationship between transformational leadership and employee commitment and performance, and concluded that goal oriented environments provide clarification, direction, focus, and longer- term perspective needed to translate transformational leadership effectively into performance. Further research could examine the specific influence of leaders in the form of behavioral modeling and leader member exchange on the personality work environment performance relationship. Arman Abdul Razak et al. (2007)4 conducted a study on Work environment factors and job performance: the construction project managers perspective, and examined the relationship between work environment factors and job performance and secondly to rank these work environment factors in the order of importance. From the analysis conducted on the gathered data, it was found that the performance level of the project manager had a very high correlation with the level of authority as well as the type of client within a specific project. Job satisfaction also influenced work performance and it was discovered that the importance ranking of work environment factors were dominated by factors attributed to the projects being undertaken. William N. Cooke et al.(2007)5 conducted a study on The effects of workplace climates on employee Performance capacities: a knowledge based perspective, to examine these largely untested assumption, they integrate and extend the literature on knowledge based perspectives of firms and psychological workplace climates; developing a structural model of the multifaceted nature of knowledge and skill development climates and the direct and multiplicative effects of these climates on employee psychological states of performance. It was Estimated against a sample of 888 employees and was found that employees psychological states of performance are positively and strongly associated with climates within which employees place greater value on learning new skills and are more receptive to the diffusion of new technologies. ______________

Whittington et al. (2004): Goal setting enhanced the direct relationship between transformational leadership and Arman Abdul Razak et al. (2007); Work environment factors and job performance: the construction project William N.Cooke et al. (2007): The effects of workplace climates on employee Performance capacities: a

employee commitment and performance


4

managers perspective
5

knowledge based perspective

A.K. Srivastava (2008) 6 conducted a study on Effect of Perceived Work Environment on Employees, Job Behaviour and Organizational Effectiveness and examined the effect of two constituents of work environment (i.e physical and psychosocial on employees job satisfaction and performance, and organizational effectiveness in a sample of 360 technical supervisors and operating core personnel. The analyses revealed that participants who perceived their work environment as to be adequate and favourable scored comparatively higher on the measures of job satisfaction, performance, and perceived organizational effectiveness. Robert Levering (2009)7 conducted a study on Creating a great place to work: why is it important and how is it done, and examined the attitude and behavior of the management rather than the type of organization. How the management relates to its employees is what makes the difference and found that becoming a great workplace may not be rocket science, but it does require paying attention to the basic issue of trust in the relationship between management and employees. Trust is a delicate commodity that must be earned daily. But when it is present, both management and employees benefit. Nowier Mohammed Al-Anzi (2009)8 conducted a study on Workplace environment and its impact on employee productivity, the purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between personality, work environment preferences, and the outcome variables, performance and commitment, Also to discuss the key factors in the employees workplace environment that impact greatly on their level of motivation and performance. Also to assess the effect of employees health on their work performance. The results of this study indicate that the relationship between personality, work environment, and employee outcomes is interrelated and in need of further examination. The significance of employee goal orientation preferences in fully mediating the relationship between personality and workplace outcomes provides further evidence to support the contention that the relation between personality and performance may not be divaricates, and that intervening variables play a substantial role.

Akinyele Samuel Taiwo (2010)9 conducted a study on The influence of work environment on workers Productivity: A case of selected oil and gas industry in Lagos, Nigeria, and to analyze the impact of work environment on future workers productivity. Investigation revealed that factors in both the external and internal work environment as well as employment policies as they currently obtain are unfavorable to the enhancement of labor productivity. T-test was used to test the research hypotheses. The respondents were randomly chosen from four selected oil and gas industry in Lagos metropolis. The results of T-test indicate that employee productivity problems are within the work environment. Conducive work environment stimulates creativity of workers. Improvement in work environment and bad working conditions contribute to low productivity of employees. Dr.K.Chandrasekar (2011)10 conducted a study on Workplace environment and its impact on Organisational performance in public sector Organisation, and analyzed the working environment at different public sector organizations and the research as done to understand the performance level of the employed due to the work environment, and also aims at suggesting few interactions to provide better work environment at Public Sector Organisations. The result was public sector organizations are providing a good workplace environment to their employees, which does not affect more on their work performance.
9

Akinyele Samuel Taiwo (2010): The influence of work environment on workers Productivity: A case of selected

oil and gas industry in Lagos, Nigeria African Journal of Business Management Vol.4 (3), pp. 299-307, March 2010.
10

Dr.K.Chandrasekar (2011); Workplace environment and its impact on Organisational performance in public

sector Organisations International Journal of Enterprise Computing and Business Systems (Online) Vol.1 Issue 1 January 2011.

1.4 statement of the problem The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between personality, work environment preferences, performance and commitment. To discuss the key factors in the workers workplace environment that impact greatly on their level of motivation and performance. To assess the effect of employees health on their work performance and to identify the relationship between work environment factors and the job performance 1.5 Objectives of the study To analyze workplace factors affecting the workers. To find out the relationship between the workers performance and workplace environment. To determine the impact of work environment on employee productivity. To suggest the measures to improve the working conditions for better performance.

1.6. Scope of the Study This study is done to help the factory provide better work environment at workplace and to understand the performance level of the workers due to the work environment. 1.8. Limitations This study is limited only to the factory in Coonoor division. This study is limited only to the workers of the factory.

The study is limited to short time span.

1.7. Methodology To fulfill any task, it is necessary to follow a systematic method. The methodology followed in this study is detailed here. Research design: The type of research design used here is the descriptive research. Sample design: probability sampling. Sample Size: 59 Data Collection: The Primary and secondary data collection method is used here. The primary data can be collected from questionnaire and the secondary data can be collected from the journals, articles, and websites and from the TANTEA database. Tools Used: The tools used for analyzing the data are Percentage analysis, Chi-square and Mean score. 1.9. Chapter Scheme Chapter 1: INTRODUCTION The chapter deals with the introduction which deals with the background study, theoretical background of the study, review of literature, statement of the problem, objectives of the study, scope of the study, methodology adopted and the limitation of the study. Chapter 2: ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE The chapter organization profiles deals with the history of the organization the management, organization structure, programme profile and the market potential, competitive strength of the company, future plans and the description and various functional areas. Chapter 3: MACRO MICRO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS The chapter macro micro analysis gives an insight about the industry in the global scenario as well as the scenario.

Chapter 4: DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION Analysis and interpretation deals with the analysis of the data collected for the study and the interpretation for the same. Chapter 5: CONCLUSION This chapter deals with the result discussion and suggested recommendations.

COMPANY PROFILE High field tea Estate is one of the prestigious and professionally managed tea garden in the Nilgiris queen of hill station in South India, located at an altitude of 1800 meters above MSL. The property was owned by a Britisher, Mrs. Millerm EGA during the pre-independence period. Mr. K.s. Omrigar & Sons, Bombay bought this property from her during 1950. Mr. Ratanlal and Sons, Coonoor acquired the property from Mr. Kumaraswamy procured the estate in 1972. Currently, the property is under the control of Chairman Mr. K. Kandavadivel which is topping both in yield and the quality of CTC tea produced in the Nilgiris. 1. At present the estate is managed by Mr. V. Benjamin Bino who look after the production aspects both in the field and factory. All the modern scientific tea crop husbandry techniques covering the entire gamut of tea culture are adopted in the fixed which helps in harvesting the highest yield besides providing quality tea.

2. The total area under tea is around 400 he.

3.

Under the tea quality upgradation programmes, implemental with the assistance of the Tea Board of India, High Field factory was modernized by replacing all the old machineries with the latest one. The modernized the factory is fully equipped to manufacture one million kg made tea per annum with the an average of 12000 kg green leaf per day.

4. Now the factory produces 5,00,000 kgs CTC and 5,00,000 kgs orthodox per year.

The following are the grades

Grade CTC

Leaf Grade BOPL BOPS BOP BP BOPF

Dust SFD SRD RD PD GD

ORTHODOX

BOP BOPF BOPD (S) BOPD

India is a major exporter of Black Tea. Tea is cultivated in North India & South India. Both have different altitude of agroeimateic condition. Hence the tea which is euperted from India is the beenel of North Indian and South Indian teas to get the desired taste of aroma.

For blending,the teas has be purchased through Public auction system. The purchase settlement should be 15 days and any failure in this you will not be able to participate in the auction system. For the infrastructure tea the procurement form auction and others expenses, the approxment. Hence we have to have our own blending unit. So, that teas can be blended and exported. Also govt. approved warehousing unit is required for storage of lending and packed teas. At present, the estate is managed by Mr. V. Benjamin Bino who looks after the production aspects both in the field and factory, under the guidance of Mr. P.Swaminathan, Tea Consultant and Advisor, (Retd. Dy. Director of the UPASI Tea Scientific Department). All the modern scientific tea crop husbandry techniques covering the entire gamut of the culture are adopted in the field which helps in harvesting the highest yield besides producing quality tea.

FIELD CULTURAL PRACTICED Use a high yielding quality clonal planting materials like UPASI -2, UPASI -3, UPASI -8, UPASI 10, CR-6017, TRI 2024 & 2025, for replanting, to replace the existing low yielding old China fields, in a phased programme. Proper nutrition management, by putting out the soil application of fertilizers in six splits besides, monthly foliar application. Adopted of four year pruning cycle to harvesting quality raw material by maintaining closer plucking interval and harvesting only 2-3 leaves and a bud.

All the replanted young tea areas are under drip irrigation and mature tea under sprinkler irrigation and mature tea under sprinkler irrigation by making use of the abundant supply of water available in the estate.

PROCESSING 1. Under the tea quality upgradation programme implemented with the assistance of the Tea Board of India, High field Tea Factory was the first to modernize by replacing all the old machineries with the latest ones by spending more than a crore of rupees and it was inaugurated by Shri.Vikram Kapur, I.A.S Executive Director of the Tea Board on 21.06.2002. 2. The modernized tea factory is fully equipped to manufacture one million kg made tea per annum- with an average of 12000 kg of green lead, per day.

3. Soon after the arrival of green lead to the factory, lead samples are collected at random and shoot analysis is carried out to ensure quality raw material before it is taken up for processing. Appropriate corrective measures are taken to see inflow of only standard lead into the factory.

The factory has got 12 withering trough of 60 x 60 size. The green leaf is spread in the troughs and retained for about 16-18 hours for proper withering. This is a prerequisite for the next stage- rolling. The withered lead is given a per-condition roll in the orthodox roller to reduce the temperature during rolling. After this, the leaf is given four cuts in the CTC (Crushing, Tearing and Curling). In the rolling room, the leaf is crushed and the expelled juice chemical contents on the left, the catechins and polyphenols for the next stage in the processing Fermentation (Oxidation).

The fermentation (Oxidation) is carried out initially in the fermenting drum for about 30 minutes, which helps in getting proper granulation leading higher bulk density. From the drum it is passed through the CFM (Continuous Fermenting Machine). The entire process of fermentation (Oxidation) takes about 1.5 to 2 hours depending on the agro-climatic conditions. All this stage, the polyphenols and catechins are converted into chemical like caffine, theoflavin (compound responsible for briskness and flavor) and theorubigin (chemical responsible for strength and cuppage) by the enzymatic action of polyphenol oxidase. Then it goes to the next state drying. This is done with the twin objective of arresting the oxidation and to reduce the moisture content to 2-3 per cent in the end product. After drying the made tea is cleaned to remove the stalk and fibre (lignin and cellulose) The penultimate stage in tea processing is grading separation of different sized particles by passing them through different size meshes. The final stage is packing in polythene lines laminated jute bags and dispatch of teas to action centers or destination of exports. OTHER ALLIED ACTIVITIES OF THE COMPANY 1. Coconut Plantation : The chairmans family own a coconut farm of about 20 Hectares adjoining the renowned Sugarcane Breeding Institute at Coimbatore. The entire area is under drip irrigation. The plantation is one of the prestigious high yielding model coconut farm in the Coimbatore district. 2. Textile Mills : The family is running two textile mills M/s Sree Karunambikai Mills Private Limited unit A at Somanur and unit B at Puliampatti in Coimbatore District.

CHAPTER III MACRO AND MICRO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Macro Analysis Tea is one of the most popular and widely consumed hot beverages all over the world. Today cultivation of tea is spread over all the continents wherein more than 30 countries are into tea production. The estimated global production is 3800 million kg, out of which 43% is exported and the world consumption being 3700 million kg approximately. the global production and consumption are finely balanced with production little ahead of demand. Tea, being an

agricultural commodity, its production is bound to fluctuate due to vagaries of nature, the prevailing difference between production and demand is well below any reasonable limits. Amongst all tea producing countries, the major producers are India, china, Sri Lanka, Kenya and Indonesia. These five countries contribute 77% of the total world production and 805 of global exports. In the past few decades, many new entrants have joined the tea family, notable among them are African countries like Kenya, Malawi and Turkey etc. In the international market, the Vietnam and China have emerged as the prominent forces to reckon with, during the last decade. Across various countries, the average per head consumption of tea varies widely, from more than 2 kg in Ireland and the U.K and around 1 kg in Sri Lanka and Pakistan to only 800 grams in India. Still despite having one of the lowest per head consumption in the world, the total consumption in India is the largest due to its population size. This distinct position is in sharp contrast with other producing countries, which hardly have any domestic demand. In the last decade, there has been a relative decline in the production of black teas and an increase in the production of green tea which has more than doubled 692 m.kgss in 1998 to 1490 ,.kg in 2007, this is mainly due to a huge expansion in China. Over the past ten years, the entire increase in global production is accounted by the Green Tea since the black tea production remained static around 2300 million which could be attributed to the scientific studies linking green tea drinking with reduced cancer risk whilst the latest studies have proved that black tea too have the same healthy properties as that of green tea. Since 2007 Chinas production has grown by 464 m.kgs ie.,e 8.8% cumulative annual growth and because of this steady growth, Indias position has been pushed to 2 nd place since 2010 when Chinas production exceeded Indias for the first time in 110 years and has continued to be higher since then. Micro Analysis

In India, tea cultivation on commercial scale was first started in Assam in 1839 and then it was extended to other parts of the country between 50s and 60s of the 19 th century. However, due to certain specific soil and climatic requirements its cultivation was confined to only certain parts of the country. Major tea producing states in the country are Assam, West Bengal, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. 75% of the total tea produced in India is accounted by Assam and West Bengal together. Some of the worlds finest teas are produced in India. While assam tea are famous for their strong, brisk and full bodied liquor, Nilgiri teas are well known for their delicate flavor, strength and brightness and the production of the famous Darjeeling tea is aided by the low temperature in the hills of Darjeeling. With their own diverse agro-climatic conditions, other areas produce medley of tea which suits many different tastes. The distinct characteristics of each region set them apart from one another in many different ways. In India, tea industry is one of the oldest agro-based well organized industries. More than a million workers get direct employment from this industry of which a sizeable number are women. A large number of temporary workers are also engaged during the plucking season. The labour cost is the largest cost overhead accounting for about 60^ of the total cost of production of Indian tea because the tea plantations are not just economic production units, but rather social institutions, which controls the lives of their resident work force to a large extent. Apart from employment, the plantations are also responsible for providing hour, water, welfare and many other facilities that affect the daily lives of the workers. This is because most of the employees come from socially and economically weaker sections of the society and majority of employees are women who work and reside in an ideal industrial community. Their livelihood is directly linked with the prosperity of the tea industry. Therefore, the tea industry must grow, not only to fulfill its primary function of producing a wholesome beverage for domestic and overseas consumer, but also to fulfill its social obligations is sustaining and improving the well being of all those who are dependent on its fortunes.

India has been a dominant player in the global tea industry. Despite its fluctuating situation in the share of world exports, still India is a key source for tea as well as the largest market. The industry faced steep decline in prices during 1999 2006, which brought out the vulnerable areas that need to be addressed for guarding against reoccurrence of such eventualities and also achieve sustainable global competitiveness and sustainable livelihood to millions of workers employed in the industry. Around 130 gardens were closed, abandoned or suspended their operations for some time due to this recession of which majority of tea gardens have reopened with the gradual improvement in tea prices from 2008 onwards. The decline in the price has mainly been due to strong growth in supply in the face of sluggish demand. The tea industry sees fluctuating trends due to agricultural nature of the operations, long gestation periods and unstable prices of tea which are not likely to undergo any changes in the future. In the past tea prices have shown brief periods of boom followed by longer periods of depression. During recession, the root cause for the closure of the tea gardens in several parts of the country, as reported by the experts, are that these gardens were inherently weak and suffered from low productivity and lack of investment on development activities. Therefore, it becomes very important that suitable packages for raising the productivity with cost effectiveness suiting to the conditions of under/less developed sectors are devised and put into place quickly. The problem of ageing and senile bushes is a major problem for the Indian Tea Industry. More than 21.2 Milion hectares constitution a substantial chunk of Indian Tea gardens are in the end of economic life age category at present because of which the industry is running down gradually in vitality and productivity and faces a high cost of production. This situation can endanger the prospects of keeping the plantations in a state of maximum vigor if not counted effectively now.

Renovation of the field assets and R & D on a sound footing financially organizationally and managerially would help succeed in meeting the challenges of the future. The research instituted are expected to continuously develop appropriate technology suiting to the demands of the industry and disseminate the same. Therefore, research requires backing from well spread, fine tuned, efficient extension services, covering different regions and all segments of the industry. Adequate technical support is not available to the small and medium size producers. Thus, it becomes necessary for the research institutes to set up a dedicated extension service exclusive for the benefit of small and medium producers. Over the past 10-15 years, the emergence of small sector had assumed a form of a socioeconomic movement and served as a vehicle for social transformation in the N.E region as well as in North Bengal and Bihar state which has also opened up avenues for setting up of new tea factories in the small scale industry sector leading to generation of employment in the tea industry. 26% of the total production of India is accounted for by this tiny sector. This sector has its strength in the young and most productive age of the plantations of the entrepreneurs with receptiveness to a new and improved agro-techniques. In both Kenya and Sri Lanks too, most of the success of the tea industry is lined to the growth of the small and holder sector over past few decades. The size of production from the small sector in Kenya and Sri Lanka are interestingly at par with the volume of tea produced by the small growers in India. Because of the scattered nature of holdings, the major problem faced by the small growers in India is the inadequacy of the technical guidance.

2009-10 witnessed international prices bouncing back even surpassing the highs attained in 200 which was primarily driven by almost unprecedented drop in production due to unfavourable weather in India, Sri Lanks, and Kenya proving once again that climate related swings are the key determinants of the global demand supply balance. Despite economic downturn, the facts that demand for tea has remained relatively robust have strengthened the belief that the prices will remain firm even when production returns to normal levels. Even though the stock has depleted in the major production returns to normal levels. Even though the

stock has depleted in the major importing countries and consumption growth in India and China, it is optimistically expected that the prices will not sink back to the previously depressed levels.

CHAPTER III DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION This chapter deals with analysis and interpretation of data based on the demographic profile, analysis of factors creating an impact on workers and on the factors creating an impact workers performance as collected through questionnaire.

4.1. DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF RESPONDENTS Table 4.1.1 Gender of the Respondents Gender Male Female Total No of Respondents 31 28 59 Percentage 52.5 47.5 100.0

4.1.2 chart

Gender
53 52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 Male Fem ale

Gender

Interpretation: From the above table it can be inferred that the majority (52.5%) of the respondents are female and (47.5%) of respondents are male.

Table 4.2.1 Age of the Respondents

Age (in years) Below 25 years 25-35 years 36-45 years 46-55 years Above 56 years Total

No. of. respondents 7 11 19 9 13 59

Percentage 11.8 18.64 32.2 15.25 22.03 100

4.2.2 chart

Interpretation:

The above table shows that, majority of the respondents fall in the age group between 36 to 45 years with 32,2% and the minority of the respondents fall in the age group below 25 years. Table 4.3.1 Education of the Respondents

Education SSLC HSC ITI UG Others Total

No. of respondents 24 17 9 7 2 59

Percentage 40.68 28.81 15.25 11.86 3.39 100.00

4.3.2 chart

Interpretation: From the above table it is clear that 40.68%of the respondents have completed SSLC,28.81% of respondents have completed hsc,15.25% of the respondents have completed iti,11.86 of the respondents have completed ug and 3.39% have completed pg.

Table 4.4.1 Experience of the Respondents

Experience

No. of respondents

Percentage

< 1 Year 1-5 years 6-10 years 11-15 > 16 years Total

1 7 9 20 22 59

1.69 11.86 15.25 33.89 37.28 100

4.4.2 chart

Interpretation: From the above table it can be inferred that the majority of the respondents have More than 16 years of work experience with 37.28% and that minority of the respondents have < 1 year of work experience with 1.69% .

4.2 FACTOR ANALYSIS This part of the analysis helps to reduce a vast number of variables to meaningful interpretable and manageable factors. This analysis is used to find the major factors that create an impact on workers.

Table 4.2.1 KMO and Bartlett's Test Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square .616 162.521

Df 28 Sig. .000 From the above table it can be inferred the KMO value is .616 which is adequate to conduct the factor analysis.

Table 4.2.2 Communalities Initial Extraction 1.000 .729 1.000 .739 1.000 .451 1.000 .880 1.000 .762 1.000 1.000 1.000 .698 .800 .740

Stress Absenteeism Sleeplessness lack of focus on work non-cooperation with workers and supervisors health issues decrease in productivity making errors at work Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.

The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted. Therefore the initial value of the communalities should be 1 and the minimum accepted value is 0.05. It is observed from the table that all parameters are well defined by the extracted factor. Thus the 2 components are extracted through the principal component analysis.

Table 4.2.3 Total Variance Explained Extraction Sums of Initial Eigenvalues Total % of Variance 1 2.802 35.028 2 1.631 20.386 3 1.365 17.061 4 .888 11.094 dimension0 5 .502 6.271 6 .349 4.362 7 .270 3.377 8 .194 2.419 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. Squared Loadings Cumulative Total % 35.028 55.414 72.476 83.570 89.841 94.203 97.581 100.000

Component

2.802 1.631 1.365

The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the percentage of variance by each component. Since only those components whose Eigen values are more than 1 are considered. The 3 components have been taken as the factors which constitute 72.476 of variance of the aggregate parameter.

Chart 4.2.4 Scree Plot

From the above scree plot the number of components extracted are the 3 factors.

Table 4.2.5. Rotated Component Matrixa

1 lack of focus on work non-cooperation with workers and supervisors decrease in productivity Stress health issues making errors at work Absenteeism Sleeplessness FACTORS 1: Lack of focus on work Non-cooperation with workers and supervisors Decrease in productivity .932 .815 -.694 -.106 .195 -.467 .150

Component 2 -.226 .553 .849 .827 .138 .101 -.221

3 .216 -.116

.827 .714 .616

FACTORS 2: Stress Health issues

Thus these are the major factors in which the organization must concentrate more in order to reduce the negative impact work creates on workers.

4.3 MEAN SCORE ANALYSIS 4.3.1 Table Factors Interesting Work Opportunity to develop special skills Adequate information Enough Freedom Sufficient and helpful co-workers Opportunity to see results of work Clearly defined responsibilities Good pay Mean Score 1.98 5.73 5.93 3.42 2.58 6.59 7.19 2.58 Rank 1 4 6 5 2 7 8 2

4.3.2 Chart

Interpretation:

From the above table it can be inferred that interesting work, Good pay, Sufficient and helpful co-workers, are the factors that have major impact on the workers performance. 4.4. CHI SQUARE ANALYSIS This part of the analysis deals with the relationship between the demographic factors like age, gender and the Workplace Environment issues. To test the relationship between the gender of the respondents and security about work the chi square test has been done by framing the null hypothesis H10: There is no significant relationship between the gender of the respondents and the security about work The chi square results are shown below. Table 4.4.1The relationship between the gender and the security about work Chi- Square Tests Value Df Asymp. Sig. (2-sided) Pearson Chi Square Source : Primary data
6.456a 4 .168

Result Accepted

The p value is .016. So there is no significant relationship between the age of respondents and of the respondents ad the security about work. To test the relationship between the gender of the respondents and the work enjoyment of workers the chi square test has been done by framing the null hypothesis. H20: There is no significant relationship between the gender of the respondents and the work enjoyment of workers. The Chi square results are shown below Table 4.4.2The relationship between the gender and the work enjoyment of workers Chi- Square Tests Value Df Asymp. Sig. (2-sided) Pearson Chi Square Source : Primary data
17.827a 4 .001

Result Rejected

The p value is .001. So there is significant relationship between the gender of the respondents and the work enjoyment of workers.

To test the relationship between the age of the respondents and the satisfaction of workers with the facilities provided in factory the chi square test has been done by framing the null hypothesis. H40: There is no significant relationship between the gender of the respondents and the satisfaction of workers with the facilities provided in factory The chi square results are shown below. Table 4.4.3 The relationship between the age and the satisfaction of workers with the facilities provided in factory Chi- Square Tests Value Df Asymp. Sig. (2-sided) Pearson Chi Square Source : Primary data
12.776
a

16

.689

Result Rejected

The p value is .068. So there is significant relationship between the age and the satisfaction of workers with the facilities provided in factory.

CHAPTER V CONCLUSION RESULTS AND DISSCUSIONS 5.1 PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS Demographic profile: Majority (53%) of the respondents are female and (46%) of respondents are male. Most (32%) of the respondents are in the age group of 36 to 45 years Most (41%) of the respondents have completed sslc. Most (37%) of the respondents have more than 16 years of working experience.

5.2. FACTOR ANALYSIS The major factors that create an impact on workers are lack of focus on work, Non-cooperation with workers and supervisors, Decrease in productivity, Stress, Health issues 5.3. MEAN SCORE ANALYSIS

Factors The mean score analysis that interesting work, Good pay, Sufficient and helpful coworkers, are the factors that have major impact on the workers performance. 5.4 CHI SQUARE ANALYSES There is no significant relationship between the age of the respondents and the security about work. There is significant relationship between the gender of the respondents and the work enjoyment of workers. There is significant relationship between the age and the satisfaction of workers with the facilities provided in factory.

5.3. RECOMMEDATIONS Health awareness campaigns can be held to reduce the health issues faced by the workers. Performance based inventive system can be implemented to motivate the workers to improve productivity. More young people can be recruited as it can help to increase the efficiency and productivity. Recreation activities can be arranged for better coordination among woekrs and superiors.