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REVIT STANDARDS MANUAL January 2009 Revision 02

REVIT STANDARDS MANUAL

January 2009

Revision 02

Buro Happold

 

Revision

Description

Issued by

Date

Checked

00

Initial review copy

TEM

12/27/2008

BIM XC

01

Final review copy

TEM

1/7/2009

BIM XC

02

Released version

TEM

1/28/2009

BIM XC

C:\TMaFiles\BH-Standards\Revit\090128 TM 024139 Revit Standards Manual 02.doc

 

Buro Happold

 

This report has been prepared for the sole benefit, use and information of Buro Happold for the purposes set out

in the report or instructions commissioning it. The liability of Buro Happold Consulting Engineers P.C. in respect

of the information contained in the report will not extend to any third party.

report collation

Thomas Maleski

 

signature

TEM

date

1/2009

approval

signature

date

Buro Happold Section Ref Author Date Signature Approved Approved Approved Approved Approved
Buro Happold
Section Ref
Author
Date
Signature
Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved

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Contents

1 Introduction

 

15

1.1

How Revit Works

15

1.2

Bi-Directional Associativity

16

1.3

Support and Training Resources

18

2 Getting Started

 

21

2.1

Keyboard Shortcuts

21

2.1.1

Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts

21

2.1.2

Revit Structure

22

2.1.3

Revit Mechanical

22

2.2

Project start-up

22

2.2.1

Start With Massing

22

2.2.2

Imported DWG Files (2D)

22

2.2.2.1

Shared Coordinate System

22

2.2.3

From a Template

24

2.2.4

Revit Structure Project Setup

24

Linking in the Consultant File:

25

2.2.5

Revit MEP Project Setup

26

3 Project Standards

31

3.1

Network Organization

31

3.2

Directory Structure

31

3.3

Revit Project Files at Buro Happold

31

 

3.4

Revit File Naming Convention

31

3.5

Revit Worksharing

33

3.6

Default Worksets

33

3.7

Workset Names

33

3.8

Setting up Worksets

34

3.9

Create a Central File

35

3.10

Creating a Local File

35

3.11

Opening a Revit Central file with Detach from Central option

36

3.12

User Names

36

3.13

Datum – Grids and Levels

36

3.14

View Naming

37

3.15

Exported View Naming Convention

37

3.16

Sheet Organization

37

3.17

Layer Naming

37

3.18

Typical Detail Creation

38

3.18.1

For Structural Typical Details

38

3.18.2

Importing existing AutoCAD Typical Details into Revit

38

3.18.3

Inside Revit

38

3.18.4

Creating New Details in Revit

39

3.18.5

Changes to existing Revit typical details contained within the library file

40

4

Project Types

41

 

4.1

Foundation

41

4.1.1

Isolated Footing and Pile Caps

41

4.1.2

Foundation – Grade Beam (Ground Beam) & Caissons

41

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4.2

Concrete Construction

41

4.3

Precast Construction

41

4.4

Steel Construction

41

4.5

Timber

41

5

Component Standards

42

 

5.1

Family Types

42

5.1.1

System Families

43

5.1.1.1

Creating a New System Family Type

44

5.1.2

Standard Component Families

44

5.1.2.1

Creating Standard Component Families

44

5.1.3

In-Place Families

45

5.1.3.1

Creating In-Place Families

45

5.2

Standard Component Family Creation

46

5.2.1

Standard Component Family Creation Example 1 – Water Heater

46

 

Creating Shared Parameters

46

Assigning Shared Parameters to your Family

47

Creating Parameter Formulas

48

Creating Family Types

49

Mapping Parameters on Connectors

51

Placing the Water Heater

52

Circuiting the Water Heater

53

Lookup Tables

54

Valve Lookup Table Sample

57

Creating Family Parameter Formulas

58

 

Assigning Labels to Model Dimensions

59

5.2.2

Standard Component Family Creation Example 2 – Exhaust Fan

60

Introduction

60

Start the Family Editor

61

Define the Family Category

61

Create the Physical Model

62

Create the Curb Cap

62

Create the Lower Wind Band

63

Create the Fan Shroud and Motor Cover

64

Define Family Parameters for Geometric Sizing

64

Create the Family Parameters

64

Associate Parameters with the Curb Cap Geometry

67

Associate Parameters with the Lower Wind Band Geometry

69

Associate Parameters with the Fan Shroud and the Motor Cover

70

Add a Duct Connector

71

Add Shared Parameters for Electrical Data

71

Add an Electrical Connector

73

Define the Type Catalog

74

Create the Type Catalog File

74

Add Parameters and Types to Type Catalog File

74

Load the family into Revit MEP

76

6 Tips and Tricks

78

7 Drawing Standards

82

7.1

Dimension Standards

82

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7.2

Dimension String Spacing

83

7.3

Dimension String Hierarchy

83

7.4

General dimensioning Guidelines

84

7.5

Hatch Patterns / Material Symbology

85

7.6

Line Styles

85

7.7

Text Standards

85

8 Sheets and Plotting

87

8.1

Borders

87

8.2

Sheet Revisions, Addendums and Sketches

88

9 (Appendix / Figures / References)

89

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1

Introduction

The original premise of a CAD system was to automate the task of drafting. As such, the original focus of CAD

applications was to represent 2D geometry via graphical elements, such as lines, arcs, symbols, et al. In this

context, walls, for example, are merely represented as parallel lines. To establish some meaning behind these

graphical elements, the concept of layering was introduced to group related elements, such as the lines used to

represent walls on a given ‘wall layer.’ By doing so, discrete 2D drawing files could be generated and plotted from

CAD, but more complex information, such as the relationships between elements could not be represented. The

emergence of 3D CAD initially focused almost entirely on creating geometry in support of visualization, and

subsequent advances concentrated on creating realistic rendering and lighting effects.

More recently, object-oriented CAD systems (OOCAD) replaced 2D symbols with building elements (objects),

capable of representing the behavior of common building elements. These building elements can be displayed in

multiple views, as well as having non-graphic attributes assigned to them. The inclusion of parametric 3D

geometry, with variable dimensions and assigned rules, adds “intelligence” to these objects, permitting the

representation of complex geometric and functional relationships between building elements. In this paradigm,

walls are objects which can be stretched, joined, have height, be of a specific cross-section type, and “own”

associated properties, such as a fire rating or insulation value. Similarly, doors and windows are represented as

objects, capable of representing their relationship to the walls in which they are placed and behaving accordingly.

More importantly, abstract objects, such as a space, can be defined by the relationships between physical building

elements, identified (e.g. room number, room name, etc.), described (e.g. area, volume, use, occupancy, etc.), and

referenced (e.g. listed in a room schedule, counted to calculate total floor area, etc.). Capturing these relationships

and behaviors and the richness of the intelligence are just not possible in the previous CAD paradigm.

Building information modeling (BIM) is the latest generation of OOCAD systems in which all of the intelligent

building objects that combine to make up a building design can coexist in a single ‘project database’ or ‘virtual

building’ that captures everything known about the building. A building information model (in theory) provides a

single, logical, consistent source for all information associated with the building.

1.1

How Revit Works

How does Revit give you the ease and design flexibility while increasing your productivity? The key is the

parametric change engine. It allows you to make changes to your design and to see those changes automatically

appear in other views of your design.

The parametric building model provides you with all the views you need, all stored in one project. Your project can

include reflected ceiling plans, floor plans, elevations, sections, interior elevations, schedules, and other drawings.

Revit gives you the power to change your design from any view that you feel is intuitive for expressing a design

change. Revit propagates those changes to all other views of the building, guaranteeing consistency across all

your drawings.

In Revit, a project contains a complete description of a building and all of the information needed to represent it in

both two- and three-dimensional views, and in schedules. As you change the building design in one view, Revit

propagates those changes throughout the project. This means that the 3D model, plans, elevations, sections, and

the schedules all automatically update to reflect the changes.

To create the building model, you add the different parametric building components, such as windows, doors, and

walls. As you design the building, you can create different views of the building to work on plans, sections, or

elevations. You can create section views, elevation views, 3D views, and drawings of the model. All of these views

are associative. This means that if you change your building or add new elements, all views automatically update.

As you create your design, you also define the environment of the project. The environment includes material

settings and the display of the different components of the building. Establishing an environment provides a

realistic look for the model. Revit saves all your settings with the project and allows you to customize them at any

point in the design process.

1.2 Bi Directional Associativity

Many existing products have some ability to update elements of a design when other elements change; however,

with the exception of Revit, in many cases such updates are not automatic. Every case when a user has to take an

explicit action to do an update creates a possibility of error and uncoordinated design documents. It also

necessitates additional work by an end user. We also should not confuse the ability to display or edit a single

underlying data model in multiple views with full parametric associativity between various elements of design.

There are 3 main classes of elements in any building design:

1. Building components (walls, roofs, doors, windows, floors, etc.)

2. Views including schedules and sheets

3. Annotations (text notes, dimensions, spot elevations, etc.)

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actions

automatically

by this view

Revit is the only product on the market today which was engineered from the ground up to provide full “bi-

directional associativity” between all 3 main classes of elements. Below are the examples of this associativity and

corresponding parametric change propagation from elements of one class to another.

Building components to building components:

Move one wall and connected adjacent walls adjust to become longer or shorter

Move walls and a floor adjusts to cover area enclosed by walls

Raise/lower a roof and attached walls grow or shrink

Thicken a wall and door frames adjust to new thickness

Raise a level and all elements placed on this level will follow

Building components to views:

Change to a building component is automatically reflected in all graphical views without additional user

Move walls and room schedule updates room areas

Add or remove building components or change parameters of existing elements and schedules update

Building components to annotations:

Change geometry and dimension value updates

Move things higher or lower and spot elevation reflects new heights

Move walls and room tags update displayed area values

Changes to properties of wall, windows, doors, etc. are automatically reflected in their tags

Views to building components:

Any graphical view (plan, elevation, section, callout) may be used to effect a change to building component

Changes to building components may be made by editing their parameters in schedules

Changes to view phase or level of detail automatically reflected in display of all building components shown

Views to other views

Move section or detail view backward or forward and callouts move with their parent section

View and drawing schedules (view/drawing lists) may be used to change properties of other views and

drawing

Views to annotations

Change view scale and all dimensions, text notes, etc. adjust to maintain their sizes on printed output

Place a view on a drawing sheet and view tags update to reflect sheet number

Change view scale and scale tag in view title on sheet updates

Annotations to building components

Change dimension value and building component changes accordingly

Changes to property values shown by tags automatically propagate to building components

Change elevation value displayed by level tag and level moves up or down

Impose dimension equality constraint or lock dimension value and building components behave accordingly

Annotations to views

Flip direction of section view tag and view forward direction flips.

Annotations to annotations

Change sheet number in a title block and the change will propagate through drawing to views placed on this

drawing and then to their view tags (section and callout heads).

All these examples are made possible in Revit not only because it has a patent pending Parametric Change Engine

(PCE) in the middle of its software architecture but also because all Revit's elements are implemented with

parametric change in mind. There are countless other examples made possible by the PCE and the unifying notion

of associativity between all 3 kinds of design elements.

1.3 Support and Training Resources

Internal Support – use the BH Revit SharePoint site

https://magellan2.burohappold.com/sites/Collaboration/bau/Disciplines/bhrevit/default.aspx

Buro Happold library.
Buro Happold
library.

e Learning via Autodesk Subscription – self-paced tutorials and testing on Autodesk products. Log-in required.

tutorials and testing on Autodesk products. Log-in required. Access this feature from Revit’s Help menu: AUGI

Access this feature from Revit’s Help menu:

AUGI Forums (Autodesk User Group International) – join up for free and participate in the most active user forum

in the AEC industry. Revit developers and even the founders themselves frequent the AUGI forums to provide

input and listen to suggestions. Go to http://forums.augi.com

Revit Tutorials – in the Revit Help menu, select Tutorials.

Autodesk Training Courseware – manuals for fundamentals and advanced training can be borrowed from your

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2

Getting Started

2.1

Keyboard Shortcuts

There are many predefined keyboard shortcuts for Revit commands. You can also configure your own keyboard

shortcuts. Shortcut key combinations appear in the Revit interface next to their corresponding menu item.

You can create multiple shortcuts for one menu command. In the menu, the shortcut that displays in the menu is

the first shortcut listed in the KeyboardShortcuts.txt file.

2.1.1

Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts

1. Open the KeyboardShortcuts.txt file in a text editor. This file is typically located in the following directories:

C:\Program Files\Revit Structure 2009\Program\

C:\Program Files\Revit MEP 2009\Program\

At the top of the file you will see several paragraphs with each line preceded by a semi-colon. A list of

commands begins after the text. Command lines are not preceded with semi-colons.

Command syntax is as follows:

“key(s)” menu:”menu-string”

Fkey menu:”menu-string”

For example, in the following command line, "M" launches the menu command, Edit Move.

"M" menu:"edit-move"

Function key (F2-F12) command syntax does not require the shortcut key in quotes. For example, in the

following command line, the shortcut key F5 has no quotes. F5 launches the menu command, View

Refresh.

F5 menu:"view-refresh"

2. Insert a new line between any 2 existing commands.

3. Type the new command using the examples above, or modify existing lines.

4. Save and close the file.

5. Restart Revit.

The KeyboardShortcuts.log file (located in the same directory as KeyboardShortcuts.txt) contains any errors

encountered while reading the KeyboardShortcuts.txt file.

2.1.2 Revit Structure

See Appendix

2.1.3 Revit Mechanical

See Appendix

2.2 Project start up

There’s no set way to get started in Revit…but here are some possibilities:

2.2.1 Start With Massing

Start from scratch in Revit, possible with the massing tools. Take a look at the document/presentation titled

From Napkin to BIM - Preliminary Design in Autodesk Revit” by Revit product designer, Matthew Jezyk.

Importing SAT files from MAX or Rhino

2.2.2

Imported DWG Files (2D)

2.2.2.1

Shared Coordinate System

The hierarchy of defined coordinate systems that shall determine a project’s World Coordinate System and Origin

are as follows:

1. Client established coordinates or benchmark system. If not defined, use…

2. Electronic data from survey. If not available, use…

3. Architect established coordinate system

Digital survey data must be procured as early in the design process as possible. Once this data is received, it shall

be “flattened” to remove any unnecessary 3D data, then referenced in the WORLD coordinate system at 0,0 with 0

degrees rotation. If the survey data is in decimal feet or meters, it may need to be scaled appropriately when

referenced.

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One or more project-specific User Coordinate Systems (UCS) shall then be developed for local work on the

building or components of the building as required. The project-specific UCS’ shall be determined based on the

geometry of the building, but subject to one or more of the following criteria:

The default 0,0 location shall be the lower left intersection of the outermost column lines that remain

constant on most floors.

Lower left corner of the property line.

Center of the building, for symmetrical or round buildings.

The major geometry of the building shall be orthogonal to the XY axis of the project-specific UCS.

A guide shall be developed if the building’s UCS is different from the World coordinate system. This file shall be

called UCS.dwg and should be located in project’s Revit folder. Graphic symbols indicating the locations of the

World origin and the origin and orientation of all other UCS’ will be displayed along with text attributes indicating

the X,Y coordinates of each UCS’ origin in relation to the World origin.

1. Import\Link a 2D DWG plan into a working or coordination plan view and use Current view only and Auto

Center to Center options.

2. Use Tools Shared Coordinates Acquire Coordinates and pick the imported DWG to align Revit’s

shared coordinates with the World Coordinate System of the DWG file.

3. All subsequent DWG imports can then use the Auto By Shared Coordinates import option

Current View Only – Always use this option when importing a DWG file unless ABSOLUTELY necessary. If

this option is not selected, the linked file will be visible in ALL other views including 3D views.

Center to Center – The first time you link in a DWG plan, use the center-to-center option. Then use the

Acquire Coordinates tool to adjust Revit’s shared coordinates to match those in the DWG file. All

subsequent plan DWG’s can be placed using “By Shared Coordinates”

By Shared Coordinates – If a DWG file has not already been linked into the Revit project, this option will

align the DWG file’s World Coordinate System origin with Revit’s internal origin with 90° aligned to true north.

DO NOT explode imported DWG files. - While immediately convenient, this will clutter Revit’s Object Styles

and Line Styles with data from the exploded imports.

Fonts – because Revit only used True Type fonts, AutoCAD shape fonts can be mapped on import based on

the settings specified in a file called SHXFONTMAP.TXT. This file is located in the “Data” folder under

Revit’s installation directory.

Line weights – layer colors in DWG files can be mapped to Revit line weights. Check these settings under

File Import/Export Settings Import Line Weights DWG/DXF.

2.2.3 From a Template

4. Select File New Project…

5. In the New Project dialog box, make sure the BH_Structures_* or BH_MEP_* file is selected in the Template

file section and Project is select under the Create new section.

6. Select the OK button

2.2.4 Revit Structure Project Setup

Autodesk’s Getting Started with Revit Structure 2009

1. Create a folder under …\CAD Download\ for today’s date, in the format of YYMMDD [Description], where

…\ is the root folder for the project and [Description] is an optional folder description.

2. Copy/Download the Revit file into the …\CAD Download\YYMMDD folder created above

3. In Revit, choose File Open and navigate to the folder created above

4. Select the file and then select the Detach from Central option on the Open dialog box

5. Select OK to the dialog box that will display indicating “Detaching creates an independent file and

prohibits saving any changes back to the original Central File”

6. Select the Open button

7. Choose File Save As… and the save the file under …\Arch\Revit folder with the original name

When a new file is received, follow the above procedure, overwriting the file. Verify in the Manage Links dialog box

that your file has NOT been referenced in this link file. If so, select the file and then select the Remove button. You

access the Manage Links dialog box from File Manage Links…

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design bar

Linking in the Consultant File:

1. Start a new project

2. Open a plan or elevation view

3. Select File Import/Link Revit… then navigate to and highlight the consultants “Link” file

4. Under the Positioning section of the Import\Link RVT dialog box, select the Auto – Origin to Origin option

and select the Open button

You might need to Zoom to Fit to see the consultants model

You might need to Zoom to Fit to see the consultants model 5. On the toolbar,

5. On the toolbar, select the Copy/Monitor button

and then the Select Link menu option

6. Select the Revit file

You will now be placed into Copy/Monitor mode; this is reflected in the design bar tab.

7. Review and apply the Copy/Monitor options by selecting the Options button on the Copy/Monitor design bar

8. To copy elements from the consultants file to your file, select the Copy button on the design bar. If you plan

on copying multiple elements, select the Multiple check box option on the options bar.

9. Draw either a window crossing or window around the element(s) you want to copy. Remember you can use

your Filter button after your selection is created.

10. Select the Finish button on the options bar

11. You can open additional views if you need to copy additional element(s) just follow the above steps

12. When you are done using the Copy/Monitor command, select the Finish mode button on the Copy/Monitor

Be aware that you may have copied the levels from the consultants file but no plan view(s) have appeared into

the Project browser. You will need to create the Floor Plan views.

13. Select View New Floor Plan…

14. In the New Plan dialog box select all the views you wish to create, choose your scale and then select the OK

button. You should now see your view(s) listed in the Project Browser under the Structural Plans

Coordination area.

You have now finished setting up your file using the consultants Revit elements. The elements you either

copy/monitored or just monitored will be linked to this file so when you get an updated file and follow the above

steps on naming and storing the file, you will be notified when elements between your file and theirs are different.

2.2.5 Revit MEP Project Setup

Autodesk’s Getting Started with Revit MEP 2009

1. Create a folder under …\CAD Download\ for today’s date, in the format of YYMMDD [Description], where

…\ is the root folder for the project and [Description] is an optional folder description.

2. Copy/Download the Revit file into the …\CAD Download\YYMMDD folder created above

3. In Revit, choose File Open and navigate to the folder created above

4. Select the file and then select the Detach from Central option on the Open dialog box

5. Select OK to the dialog box that will display indicating “Detaching creates an independent file and

prohibits saving any changes back to the original Central File”

6. Select the Open button

7. Choose File Save As… and save the file under …\Arch\Revit folder with the original name

When a new file is received, follow the above procedure, overwriting the file. Verify in the Manage Links

dialog box that your file has NOT been referenced in this link file. If so, select the file and then select the

Remove button. You access the Manage Links dialog box from File Manage Links…

8. Close the Architectural Revit file

9. Start a new project

10. Select Settings Project Information…

11. Under the Energy Analysis group, click Edit…

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bar

12. Select appropriate Building Type for the Building Type parameter

13. Enter the project Postal Code.

14. Click OK to close the Type Properties dialog box.

15. Enter values for the parameters under the Other group. For example; Issue Date, Client Name, Project

Address, Project Name, Project Number and BH Project Number.

16. Right click on the BH Arch Dummy Model.rvt file under the Revit links section of the Project Browser and

select the Reload From… option.

17. Select the Architect’s Revit file.

18. Open the COPY/MONITOR VIEW view. You might need to Zoom to Fit to see the consultants model

You might need to Zoom to Fit to see the consultants model and then the Select

and then the Select Link menu option

19. On the toolbar, select the Copy/Monitor button

20. Select the Revit file

You will now be placed into Copy/Monitor mode; this is reflected in the design bar tab.

21. Review and apply the Copy/Monitor options by selecting the Options button on the Copy/Monitor design

22. In Revit MEP we only need to copy the levels. Therefore, to copy the level elements from the consultants

file to your file, select the Copy button on the design bar. If you plan on copying multiple elements, select

the Multiple check box option on the options bar.

23. Draw either a window crossing or window around the element(s) you want to copy. Remember you can

use your Filter button after your selection is created. USE THE FILTER SELECTION TO VERIFY ONLY

LEVELS ARE BEING COPIED.

24. Select the Finish button on the options bar

25. You can open additional views if you need to copy additional element(s) just follow the above steps

26. When you are done using the Copy/Monitor command, select the Finish mode button on the

Copy/Monitor design bar

Be aware that you may have copied the levels from the consultants file but no plan view(s) have appeared

into the Project browser. You will need to create the Floor Plan views.

27. In the COPY/MONITOR VIEW view, delete the level DELETE ME. Select OK when the dialog box appears.

28. Select View New Floor Plan…

29. In the New Plan dialog box select all the views you wish to create, choose your scale and then select the

OK button. You should now see your view(s) listed in the Project Browser under the Floor Plans ???

??? section.

30. Select the view(s) and right click. Choose the Apply View Template… option.

31. In the Apply View Template dialog, select the Architectural Plan – Reference view template to apply to

the selected view(s)

32. Next you will need to duplicate each view for each discipline and apply the corresponding view template.

You have now finished setting up your file using the consultants Revit elements. The elements you either

copy/monitored or just monitored will be linked to this file so when you get an updated file and follow the

above steps on naming and storing the file, you will be notified when elements between your file and the linked

file(s) are different.

Buro Happold BH Tools Integration, see appendix for full use of tool. above, so the
Buro Happold
BH Tools Integration, see appendix for full use of tool.
above, so the development team created a tool.
The following dialog box will appear
You will still need to apply the proper view template.

Buro Happold saw the need to streamline the creation of the numerous views in step 32

Select Create Base Drawing Views from the BH Tools BH View Tools menu

You will have two options; create All Views/Levels or Specific View/Level(s)

3 Project Standards

3.1 Network Organization

Static Drive Mappings:

Project Drive – Usually P:\ or G:\

Local Project Drive – User’s Documents folder

Common Drive – L:\

3.2 Directory Structure

3.3 Revit Project Files at Buro Happold

As mentioned previously, the entire Revit project is stored in a single file. On larger projects, we may divide the work into 2 or more Revit project files that are then linked together. Almost all of the project files at BURO HAPPOLD will be enabled with Revit’s worksharing functionality. When worksharing is enabled, there will be a CENTRAL file stored on the project drive,

located under the Project. Do NOT open and work in this file! Instead, follow the steps detailed in Creating a Local File

section of this manual.

3.4 Revit File Naming Convention

The central file shall be named using the six digit project number – Project Description – Discipline Version-Office and shall include the suffix “_CENTRAL.rvt” - for example, “022733-TurnerFarm-S08-NY_CENTRAL.rvt”. The central file shall be saved

with a minimum of 10 backups specified. Do not use the preset preview option to a view with a linked image file.

be saved with a minimum of 10 backups specified. Do not use the preset preview option

The local file shall be copied, using File Save As…, to a project folder under the BH_Revit subfolder in the user’s My

Documents folder. The file shall be renamed from “_CENTRAL.rvt” to “_initials.rvt” - for example, 022733-TurnerFarm-S08-

NY_CENTRAL.rvt would become 022733-TurnerFarm-S08-NY_tem.rvt

NY_CENTRAL.rvt would become 022733-TurnerFarm-S08-NY_tem.rvt Office Designations: Office Abb. Office Abb.

Office Designations:

Office

Abb.

Office

Abb.

Office

Abb.

Bath

BA

Edinburgh

ED

New York

NY

Belfast

BE

Glasgow

GL

Pune

PU

Berlin

BN

Kuwait

KU

Riyadh

RI

Birmingham

BI

Leeds

LE

Sheffield

SH

Boston

BO

London

LO

Toronto

TO

Copenhagen

CO

Los Angeles

LA

Warsaw

WA

Dubai

DU

Manchester

MA

   

Dublin

DN

Munich

MU

   

3.5 Revit Worksharing

Revit Worksharing distributes the power of the Revit parametric building modelling environment across the project team. Worksharing provides a complete range of collaboration modes from entirely on-the-fly simultaneous access to the shared model, through the formal division of the project into discrete shared units, to complete separation of project elements or systems into individually managed linked models. Worksharing allows the team to choose the best way to collaborate and interact based on their workflow and the project requirements.

3.6 Default Worksets

Worksets are the medium for which Revit’s worksharing functionality is enabled. Remember that worksets are NOT layers – they are a higher level of organization within the project. For example, the “Core” workset would contain walls, doors and openings within the zone of the building’s core. They can be used for hardware resource conservation or for customizable visibility.

At the time Revit Project Sharing is enabled, elements that are not part of a standard Revit workset are assigned to a default

Workset1. After the project workset naming is defined, the default set is renamed as the shell workset and all of the others

added. Finally, elements are moved from the shell workset to their appropriate location.

3.7 Workset Names

The following represents the most fundamental worksets which should be established at the beginning of a project:

Core

Core Stairs

Structure

Exterior Enclosure

Site

Rooms

Equipment

Naming shall be established based on the following convention:

[DISC] – [SYSTEM] – [ZONE]

Examples:

HVAC-Equipment

Depending on the nature of the project, worksets can be further granulated into multiple horizontal quadrants for projects such

as airports; or multiple vertical quadrants (low-rise, mid-rise, high-rise) for tower projects.

Note: A workset for notation is NOT needed as Revit automatically manages all view-specific elements.

3.8 Setting up Worksets

Do not set up worksets until it is time for more than one person to work on a project.

1. Open the Worksets toolbar if it is not already open.

1. Open the Worksets toolbar if it is not already open. Right-click on any visible toolbar

Right-click on any visible toolbar and select Worksets from the menu. If there is a check in front of the toolbar’s

name, it already on screen.

2. Start the Worksets command by selecting the icon above. It looks like a puzzle piece.

A dialog box will display the default worksets and where Levels and Grids and remaining elements will be placed. Click OK to

create the worksets.

elements will be placed. Click OK to create the worksets. There are four different types of

There are four different types of worksets created by default:

Project Standards

Families

Views

 

User Created

These worksets hold the building elements. Revit creates two of these by default. Levels and Grids AND

Workset1

After you have set up the default worksets the Worksets dialog box will appear where you can create additional worksets as

needed. You can also return to this dialog box by starting the Worksets command.

The Structural team’s current practice will be to have just these two User-Created worksets.

Note: All of the worksets are open and editable by the person who is setting the worksharing file.

3.9 Create a Central File

You will now need to create the central file to which the worksets will be saved. The central file keeps tracks of worksets available and coordinates the changes made in each workset with the rest of the worksets. It needs to be accessible to all team members though it is not worked in directly.

1. In the project where you have defined the worksets, select File Save As… and add the word _CENTRAL to the

file’s name. 022733-TurnerFarm-S08-NY.rvt would become 022733-TurnerFarm-S08-NY_CENTRAL.rvt

2. Select File Save to Central.

3. In the dialog, specify the worksets you want to “relinquish” to make available for others to work on.

4. Start the Worksets command, which will bring up the Worksets dialog box. Select the worksets you want to Close or to make Non-Editable, and click the appropriate button. At this time you would want the worksets Editable to others so the value should be No.

5. Close the Central File.

3.10 Creating a Local File

1. Start the Open command

2. In the Open dialog box before you select the central file to open specify how you want any worksets opened. You can

choose to open All worksets in the file, only the Editable worksets, the Last Viewed, or you can Specify the ones

you want in the Worksets dialog box.

3. Select the Central file and, if needed, specify the workset(s) to open.

4. Use Save As and save the file locally C:\BH_Revit\<Project Folder>\Project-Description-DeptVersion-Office_Initails.

So the above 022733-TurnerFarm-S08-NY_CENTRAL.rvt will become 022733-TurnerFarm-S08-NY_TEM.rvt

3.11 Opening a Revit Central file with Detach from Central option

If you do not wish to be connected to the central file, check the option to “Detach from Central.” You may continue to work

and, if you choose to save your work, the resulting file you save will be a new file – not related to the original central file.

be a new file – not related to the original central file. 3.12 User Names <User

3.12 User Names

<User Name>: Each member of the project team will use their own name for general use. (Settings Options General

Username). User name shall be your windows login name.

Project: This special user is managed by the Data Leader for tasks that are project related.

Locked: This special value is used to lock elements (such as the grid) to prevent their being changed inadvertently. The

workset is deliberately left checked out.

3.13 Datum – Grids and Levels

As levels are added to the starter set that came from the template, the corresponding views are added (see View Naming

which follows.) The View Purpose, Discipline and Sub-Discipline properties of views are set so that the Browser Organization

setting behaves properly.

Levels are easy to create but add a bit of overhead and can clog up the Project Browser with unneeded plan / RCP views.

Only use levels to define stories and other major vertical datum in the project. Note the “Create Plan View” checkbox when

using the level tool – do you need a plan view for every level? Note too that you can delete plan and RCP views for a level (from the Project Browser) and also recreate them (View>New>Floor Plan…).

3.14 View Naming

Basic views (as created with the Revit View commands and as distinguished from copies of views) are named in a way that is appropriate when they appear in other views as part of the documentation. Typically this has a descriptive, readable form such as:

Level 1

Revit’s base plan, considered a working view

For each unique usage of a plan, create a duplicate of the original “Level” plan and rename it accordingly. Add a suffix based on the usage of the view such as:

Level 1 - Documentation

Level 1 - Export

Level 1- Working

Level 1 - Reference

View Purpose - A custom parameter assigned to views which helps organize the project browser. This is a text parameter which can be populated with values such as _Reference, _User, Documentation, Reference, Working, Exports, Perspectives, Cutaway Axons, etc.

3.15 Exported View Naming Convention

Refer to Buro Happold CAD Standards.

3.16 Sheet Organization

3.17 Layer Naming

Revit does not use layers as in traditional CAD programs such as AutoCAD. Revit uses the term categories. The major categories are set at the program level and user categories are prohibited. A user can create additional subcategories under the main category. To request additional subcategories, send your request to CAD Support.

3.18 Typical Detail Creation

Typical Details show portions of the building components in a general or typical situation. They are place into project

documents to give the contractors a guide to construct the project. They are in no way to replace creating a section to show

situations on the project.

All details will be drafted into a modular system based on a 6 inch by 6 inch (150 mm by 150 mm) system. If a detail needs to

be expanded, it will occupy another grid.

3.18.1 For Structural Typical Details

Although Typical Details are generally not given a scale, they are still drafted to a scale. Concrete details are drafted at a scale

of 1:20 or 1/2” = 1’-0” and steel details are drafted at a scale of 1:20 or 3/4" = 1’-0”.

3.18.2 Importing existing AutoCAD Typical Details into Revit

AutoCAD drawings are usually drafted with each building type on a different layer. When working in Revit, it is not necessary to

use this concept. Lines are drafted using Detail Lines. There are details line styles created in the templates for the first ten line

weights in solid, dash and dash long styles. If additional line styles are needed, create new styles using the same naming

conventions, document the change and notify the support team.

1.

Open the detail inside of AutoCAD.

2.

Make sure there is only one detail per file.

3.

Make sure there are no attached external references.

4.

Perform a purge.

5.

Modify the layers to conform to the Revit line styles convention. There is a cheat sheet located within the appendix.

You can also insert a file named RevitLineStyles.dwg to obtain the Revit line styles as AutoCAD layers.

6.

Delete ALL AutoCAD hatches but do take note of the types and settings.

7.

Delete the Title.

8.

Purge again.

9.

Review detail for inconsistencies.

3.18.3

Inside Revit

15. Create a new drafting view. Name the view according to the standard typical detail naming convention (under separate

cover) and then make sure to set the scale to be consistent with the AutoCAD detail’s scale.

16. Insert the CAD file setting the Colors option to be Black and White

17. Select the CAD detail and on the Options Bar, select the Full Explode button Modify the view’s scale if required

18. Place the _Typical Details Bounding Box symbol in the view

19. Change ALL text to the proper Revit text type, such as BH 3/32” Arial W0.8 Confirm that there are no AutoCAD “layer” line styles

20. Add Detail Component as required, such as Break Lines

21. Fix and line styles that do not automatically convert, such as wire welded fabric. Replace ALL AutoCAD dimensions with Revit dimensions.

22. Fix ALL text so that common lines are part of the same note and replace AutoCAD leaders with Revit leaders.

23. Replace any removed hatch patterns with filled regions

24. Within the Project Browser, right-click on the detail and select Properties… In the Element Properties dialog box, set the Title on Sheet name to be the original AutoCAD detail’s title. Set the View Purpose parameter according to the details construction type.

3.18.4 Creating New Details in Revit

1. All new details shall be done in Revit.

2. Create a new drafting view. Name the view according to the standard typical detail naming convention (under separate cover) and set the scale

3. Place the _Typical Details Bounding Box symbol in the view

4. Create the detail using the detail lines 01 through 10. You can use the AutoCAD layer conversion guide to gage the line weights.

5. Within the Project Browser, right-click on the detail and select Properties… In the Element Properties dialog box, set the Title on Sheet name to be the original AutoCAD detail’s title. Set the View Purpose parameter according to the details construction type.

6. When you are finished with the detail, it must be sent to the engineer in charge for that construction material for checking.

3.18.5 Changes to existing Revit typical details contained within the library file

Either open a detached from central file, import the view into a new file or create an electronic mark-up. The update will need

to be uploaded to the NA Typical Detail Development Drop Box at Collaboration Business As Usual Disciplines

Structures Collaboration North America Structural DDG Collaboration NA Structural Drawings NA Structural

Drawings.

In this site, select the

Drawings NA Structural Drawings. In this site, select the under the NA Typical Detail Development Drop

under the NA Typical Detail Development Drop Box.

4 Project Types

4.1

Foundation

4.1.1

Isolated Footing and Pile Caps

4.1.2

Foundation – Grade Beam (Ground Beam) & Caissons

Go to Elevation & set/create top of grade beam level. “LL” by pick lines & uncheck “Make Plan View” Rename level Ref -0’-8” Top of Grade Beam

4.2 Concrete Construction

4.3 Precast Construction

Structural Usage Property – For walls bearing, shear or combined.

If you are linking in an arch model, the bearing, shear or combined walls all show with a solid poche. The standard is solid for shear and hollow for bearing. To achieve this look one must use a Filled Region using a White Solid to mask out the solid wall. Where possible combine all masking into one sketch. To aid in the placement of the region, create by using a transparent region and when completed, switch to the solid. Use this method also when doing edits.

4.4 Steel Construction

Steel beams are reference from a level. Beams are placed at minus the slab thickness (bottom of deck) as an offset. When beams are below or above this elevation adjust the start and end offset.

4.5 Timber

5 Component Standards

Within Revit, components such as beams, columns, ducts or lighting fixtures are referred to as Families. Families can be

created in a separate environment known as the Family Editor or they can be created on the fly within an actual project.

Families created within an actual project are called In-Place Families.

In-Place Families are used in cases in which they are not likely to move, be relocated or copied. They are particularly helpful

when the geometry of the model is needed to construct the family. A single complex or blended roof form is one such

example, as you want the roof to maintain relationships to other elements (like walls) in the project. In all other cases, it is best

to create the family in Family Editor. This gives you the maximum flexibility to place multiple copies of the same component or

to use the same component in other projects.

If more than a single instance will occur in the project, it’s usually best to create it in the Family Editor and load it into the

project.

5.1

Family Types

All elements in Autodesk Revit are classified according to their category, family, type and instance.

There are three family types in Autodesk Revit: system families, standard component families, and in-place families. Standard

Component families can be loaded into projects whereas system families cannot be loaded into projects. In-place families can

be used to create elements that are unique to a project and not provided in family content libraries.

Categories are the most general and are subdivided into model categories and annotation categories. Model categories

include beams, columns, doors, windows, and walls. Annotation categories include dimensions, grids, levels, and text notes.

Families are classes of elements within a category that group elements with a common set of parameters, identical use, and

similar graphical representation. Different elements within a family may have different values for some or all properties, but the

set of properties are the same.

Parameters, in general, provide you the ability to define certain characteristics about an object. Parameters may be used to

define properties of the solid geometry, such as length, width, and height. Parameters may also be used to define other

characteristics about an object such as fluid flow, voltage, current, or fixture units. Parameters used to define aspects of a

family are either Family parameters or Shared parameters.

Family parameters cannot appear in schedules or tags. Family parameters are limited to usage within the family in which they

are defined. Family parameters are commonly used to define various portions of the geometry in a family. For example the

table below shows several parameters that are used to calculate lengths in different portions in a duct fitting.

For example, in the _Water Heater.rfa family, the dimensional parameters were all created as family

For example, in the _Water Heater.rfa family, the dimensional parameters were all created as family parameters based on the data found in a manufacturer’s cut sheet. Since not all dimensions were explicitly defined on the cut sheet, some liberties were made when modeling the family. When creating a family, you may want to simplify the geometry to make it easier to model, and possibly to make it more adaptable to other manufacturers.

Shared parameters provide the most flexibility, because unlike family parameters, shared parameters can be scheduled. If you have common properties that you want to use in multiple families such as the length, width, and height of components within a modular air handling unit, shared parameters let you define the parameter once, and use it multiple times. Shared parameters are also required if you want to schedule characteristics such as the voltage, motor horsepower rating, electric heat requirements, and other such properties that are commonly found in mechanical equipment schedules.

When you are defining a parameter in a family, you have to specify whether the parameter is a family parameter or a shared parameter. If you want to schedule or tag the property, use a shared parameter.

The definition of a shared parameter exists externally to your .rvt model file in a .txt file. Since the shared parameters are in an external file, they may be used by multiple .rvt models, as well as multiple .rfa families. Only the definition of the shared parameters exist outside the model, the parameters themselves exist in the model, so there is no need to send the shared parameters file if you are sharing your model.

Note: Although shared parameters are stored in a .txt file, DO NOT edit the file directly.

5.1.1 System Families

Families that are basic to all project files are called system families. System families are built into projects and contain predefined sets of properties and graphical representations.

A system family is available in all Autodesk Revit projects. It has a standard size, configuration, and parameters for its elements.

You cannot create or load a system family into a project. However, you can modify the type parameters to create new system family types and save them in a project template for use in other projects.

You cannot delete a system family from a project.

5.1.1.1 Creating a New System Family Type

1. Select an existing system family type.

2. Edit the desired type parameters, such as line weight, color, and line pattern, of the existing system family type by clicking

line pattern, of the existing system family type by clicking in the Element Properties dialog box.

in the Element Properties dialog box.

3. Create a new system family type by clicking

dialog box. 3. Create a new system family type by clicking in the Type Properties dialog

in the Type Properties dialog box.

4. Enter a name for the new system family type and select

.
.

5. Specify the type parameters, such as line pattern and symbol, of the new system family type according to your

requirements.

6. Select

system family type according to your requirements. 6. Select twice. 5.1.2 Standard Component Families Revit’s default

twice.

5.1.2 Standard Component Families

Revit’s default Imperial and Metric family libraries are located on the “L” drive under the BH-Revit\Revit09 folder.

on the “L” drive under the BH-Revit\Revit09 folder. 5.1.2.1 Creating Standard Component Families See Section 5.2

5.1.2.1 Creating Standard Component Families

See Section 5.2 for creating Standard Component Families

5.1.3

In Place Families

5.1.3.1

Creating In Place Families

From the Modelling menu, select Create or click Create from the Modelling tab on the Design Bar

or click Create from the Modelling tab on the Design Bar Note: You can also click

Note: You can also click

the Modelling tab on the Design Bar Note: You can also click on the Options Bar

on the Options Bar when a specific tool is active, for example, the Window or Door tool.

The Family Category and Parameters dialog opens.

Note: This dialog does not open when you click

on the Options Bar. Options Bar.

Select the appropriate family category, and click

In the family Name box, enter a name, and click

.
.

.and click In the family Name box, enter a name, and click . Use the tools

Use the tools on the Design Bar to add components, massing geometry, and lines.

When you finish creating the in-place family, click Finish.

Note: You can click Quit to quit making the family. All changes are lost.

5.2

Standard Component Family Creation

5.2.1

Standard Component Family Creation Example 1 – Water Heater

For the water heater, we will create some shared parameters to define characteristics that will be used by both the plumbing

designer on plumbing schedules, and by the electrical designer when circuiting. We will create parameters for KW, Voltage,

Phase, and Capacity.

NOTE: Sharing parametric information about a component, such as the voltage between the plumbing schedules and

electrical connections requires that a single model be used. Using linked files is not an option.

Creating Shared Parameters

As noted above, shared parameters are defined in an external file. Shared parameters may be grouped to help you organize

the parameters.

1. Open the _Water Heater.rfa

2. From the File menu, click Shared Parameters…

3. Click Create…

The practice-wide shared parameters file is located at

L:\BH Revit\Revit09\SharedParameters\BH_Shared_Params.txt. The file may or may not be defined on the machine you are

working on. You will not have write access to this file so you will have to create a project shared parameters file.

4. Browse to the project’s families subfolder location.

5. Enter the project number and project description, 123456 Example Project Shared Parameters.txt

6. Click Save

7. Click New… under Groups.

8. Enter the name Electrical, and then click OK.

9. Click New… under Parameters.

10. Specify the following, then click OK

Name: Voltage

Discipline: Electrical

Type: Electrical Potential

11. Repeat step 9 to create the following parameters:

Name

Discipline

Type

Power

Electrical

Power

Phase

Common

Integer

Number of Poles

Electrical

Number of Poles

12. Repeat step 7 to create another group called General.

13. Repeat step 9 to create the following parameter under General:

Name: Capacity

Discipline: Common

Type: Integer

14. Click OK to close the Edit Shared Parameters window.

Assigning Shared Parameters to your Family

1.

Click

window. Assigning Shared Parameters to your Family 1. Click on the design bar. 2. Click Add…

on the design bar.

2. Click Add… under Parameters.

3. Under Parameter Type, select Shared parameter.

4. Click Select…

5. In the Shared Parameters dialog, select General from the Parameter group list.

6. Select the Capacity parameter, then click OK

7. In the Parameter Properties dialog, select Other from the Group parameters under list.

8. Select Type

9. Click OK

10. Repeat steps 2-9 to add the following shared parameters:

Parameter Group

Parameter

Group parameter under

Instance/Type

Electrical

Number of Poles

Electrical

Type

Electrical

Phase

Electrical

Type

Electrical

Power

Electrical

Instance

Electrical

Voltage

Electrical

Type

NOTE: The Voltage and Number of Poles properties must be set as Type parameters. If they’re not Type parameters, you

can’t create a new circuit from the water heater.

11. Click OK to close the Family Types dialog

Creating Parameter Formulas

The formulas defining the water heater characteristics have not been defined. In this section, the formulas will be defined.

1.

Click

In this section, the formulas will be defined. 1. Click on the design bar. 2. Add

on the design bar.

2. Add the following shared parameters:

Parameter

Discipline

Type of Parameter

Parameter Group

Instance/Type

P1

Electrical

Power

Electrical

Instance

P2

Electrical

Power

Electrical

Instance

P3

Electrical

Power

Electrical

Instance

3. Enter the following formulas as listed below.

3. Enter the following formulas as listed below. NOTE: The per-phase power parameters (P1, P2, and

NOTE: The per-phase power parameters (P1, P2, and P3) only apply to L-L single phase or three phase connections.

NOTE: The if statements are structured as follows: if(conditional statement, result if true, result if false). Thus, for the P1

parameter, if Phase=3 (i.e., a 3 phase load), then the load on P1 (phase 1) is the total power divided by 3 (Power / 3), if it is not

a 3 phase load (assumed to be a single phase, L-L load as noted above), then the load on P1 is Power divided by 2 (Power /

2).

4.

Click OK to close the Family Types dialog.

Creating Family Types

A family is a general definition of an object, whereas a type may be a specific size of object. In the case of the water heater, we

will create three types for three sizes of water heaters: 50 gallon, 80 gallon, and 119 gallon.

1.

Click

heaters: 50 gallon, 80 gallon, and 119 gallon. 1. Click on the design bar. 2. Click

on the design bar.

2. Click New… under Family Types.

3. For the name, enter: 100 gallon, then click OK

4. Set the values as shown below:

5. Click New… and create two more family types using the following values: ∑ Name:

5. Click New… and create two more family types using the following values:

Name: 40 gallon

types using the following values: ∑ Name: 40 gallon ∑ Name: 50 gallon Revision 02 January

Name: 50 gallon

6. Click OK Mapping Parameters on Connectors In the water heater family, we added parameters

6. Click OK

Mapping Parameters on Connectors

In the water heater family, we added parameters for voltage, power, phase, and number of poles. However, these properties are not yet associated with a connector. Until we add a connector, and map the associated properties of the connector to the parameters, the load information can’t be utilized in circuiting the object. We need to place an electrical connector object, and then associate the connector’s properties with the parameters in the family.

1.

Click

properties with the parameters in the family. 1. Click on the design bar. 2. Select the

on the design bar.

2. Select the

in the family. 1. Click on the design bar. 2. Select the method. 3. Place the

method.

3. Place the connector.

4. Select the newly placed connector, and click Properties

5. Set the Number of Poles to 3.

and click Properties 5. Set the Number of Poles to 3. on the Options Bar. 6.

on the Options Bar.

6. Set the System Type to Power Unbalanced.

10. Click

6. Set the System Type to Power Unbalanced . 10. Click in the column of the

in the

the System Type to Power Unbalanced . 10. Click in the column of the Apparent Load

column of the Apparent Load Phase 1 row.

11. Select P1, and then click OK.

12. Click

12. Click in the column of the Apparent Load Phase 2 row. 13. Select P2 ,

in the

12. Click in the column of the Apparent Load Phase 2 row. 13. Select P2 ,

column of the Apparent Load Phase 2 row.

13. Select P2, and then click OK.

14. Click

2 row. 13. Select P2 , and then click OK . 14. Click in the column

in the

column of the Apparent Load Phase 3 row. Apparent Load Phase 3 row.

15. Select P3, and then click OK.

16. Click

3 row. 15. Select P3 , and then click OK . 16. Click in the column

in the

row. 15. Select P3 , and then click OK . 16. Click in the column of

column of the Voltage row.

17. Select Voltage, and then click OK.

18. Click

row. 17. Select Voltage , and then click OK . 18. Click in the column of

in the

17. Select Voltage , and then click OK . 18. Click in the column of the

column of the Number of Poles row.

19. Select Number of Poles, and then click OK.

20. Click OK.

21. Save the family.

NOTE: In this example, I opted to demonstrate how you would calculate a per-phase load, and assign the load to each phase.

In the case of this water heater, I could have left the Balanced Load option checked, and instead of assigning the load on a

per-phase basis (Apparent Power Phase 1, 2, and 3), I could have assigned Power to the Apparent Load parameter.

Placing the Water Heater

In this example we will load and place the water heater in a sample project. Additionally, we will create a voltage specific type

in the project.

1. Create a new project.

2. Set the LEVEL 1 PLUMBING – WORKING view active.

3. Click Mechanical Equipment on the design bar.

4. Click Load… on the Options bar.

5. Browse to and Open _Water Heater.rfa.

6. Place the water heater in the model.

7. Select the placed water heater in the model, and click Properties

8. Click

water heater in the model, and click Properties 8. Click 9. Select the 80 gallon type.

9. Select the 80 gallon type.

10. Click

.
.

11. Enter the name: 80 gallon – 480v – 3ph

12. Click OK.

13. Set the Voltage to 480.

14. Set Number of Poles to 3.

15. Click

15. Click .

.

16. Set Power to 12,000 W.

17. Set Phase to 3.

18. Click

18. Click .

.

Circuiting the Water Heater

1. Create a piece of wall

2. Create a electrical panel

1. Create a piece of wall 2. Create a electrical panel on the Options Bar. 3.

on the Options Bar.

3. Open the LEVEL 1 POWER – WORKING view.

4. Select the water heater.

1 POWER – WORKING view. 4. Select the water heater. 5. on the Options bar to

5. on the Options bar to create a new circuit for the water heater.

Click

the Options bar to create a new circuit for the water heater. Click 6. on the

6. on the Options bar to specify the panel.

Click

7. Select the panel.

8. Create a Panel Schedule

Lookup Tables

Lookup tables provide a method to define parameter values using tabular data. This functionality is very beneficial because

many properties can not be described based on a simple formula, or even be described using a complex formula with many

nested if statements. The functionality of lookup tables is limited to defining pipe fittings, valves, and the like, where the overall

geometry is directly related to the nominal size of the component.

is directly related to the nominal size of the component. Take for example the Pipe PVC

Take for example the Pipe PVC Bend as partially shown here. For a 4” pipe elbow, the dimensions for outside radius (Radius)

and the radius from the pipe centerline to the sweep radius (Center Radius) are shown. For a 2” pipe, these dimensions are

Radius = 1 5/16” and Center Radius = 1 13/16”. To construct an If statement for the Radius parameter based on the nominal

pipe size, it would be something like this:

if(Nominal Size = 0' 4", 0' 2 7/8", if(Nominal Size = 0' 2", 0' 1 5/16", 0' 1"))

This formula only defines the Radius if the nominal size is 2” or 4”. Imagine if there were 15 sizes as in the case of the case of

this Pipe PVC Bend. The nesting of the if statement would be unmanageable.

This is where lookup tables are very handy. Instead of having to create an unruly if statement, a lookup table may be used.

Lookup tables are simply .csv (comma separated value) text files that define rows and columns of information, similar to a

spreadsheet. Each row essentially defines a type in a family, i.e., the size in the case of the Pipe PVC Bend.

Lookup files may be edited in Excel or Notepad. If you use Excel, make sure to specify the .csv format for the file type as

shown below:

The lookup file must be stored in a specific location for Revit to be able

The lookup file must be stored in a specific location for Revit to be able to find the file when generating a family. This location is defined in the Revit.ini file using the LookupTableLocation setting.

Take a look at a sample .csv file opened in Excel (Pipe PVC Fitting Sizes.csv) below:

file opened in Excel (Pipe PVC Fitting Sizes.csv) below: Row 1 is used for column headers

Row 1 is used for column headers which are used to identify lookup parameter names, parameter types, and parameter units.

In the above figure, column C defines a parameter named PipeOD of type length in unit’s inches. Note the ## between each

component in the header.

Column A is used to provide an identifier for the type. Revit doesn’t use this column, but it must exist. The column is for the user to identify each size. Also, note that cell A1 is intentionally left blank.

but it must exist. The column is for the user to identify each size. Also, note

The Radius parameter above is calculated using a function called text_file_lookup. This function is used to lookup values in a

lookup table (csv) file. The signature of the text_file_lookup function is as follows:

value=text_file_lookup(LookupTableName, LookupColumn, DefaultIfNotFound, LookupValue)

Where:

Value

is the result of the function

LookupTableName

is the name of the CSV file to lookup

LookupColumn

is the name of the column from which the result value is to be returned

DefaultIfNotFound

is the value that will be returned if LookupValue is not found.

LookupValue

is the value to find in the second column of the table (column B when viewing in Excel)

Inspecting the usage of the text_file_lookup function in the Pipe PVC Bend family can provide an understanding of how the

function works. In the formula, the following parameters are passed to the text_file_lookup function:

text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, “PipeOD”, 4,4)

LookupTableName

Pipe PVC Fitting Sizes.csv (defined in the Other group)

LookupColumn

“PipeOD” (when viewing the CSV file in Excel, this is column C)

DefaultIfNotFound

Nominal Size (in this example, 4”)

LookupValue

Nominal Size (in this example, 4”)

When the text_file_lookup function is used in this case, it will lookup the PipeOD (from column C) associated with the 4”

Nominal Size 0 (column B). In this case, the result value is 4.5 (column C row 11 in the spreadsheet). If we substitute 4.5 in the

formula, it simplifies to:

value=0’ 0 1/8” + (4.5 / 2) = 0’ 2 3/8”

What happens if we try invalid values? It depends…

Invalid LookupTableName

Invalid LookupColumn

Invalid LookupValue

The .csv file doesn’t exist

The column doesn’t exist in the

The specified value doesn’t exist

table

The result of the text_file_lookup function will be the value specified

by DefaultIfNotFound

Invalid LookupValue example: Say we wanted to know the PipeOD if the Nominal Pipe Size (column B) was 5.5”, but this value

doesn’t exist in the table. However, the function allows a substitution of another value, namely the DefaultIfNotFound. In the

formula for this example, the Nominal Size specified as both the LookupValue and the DefaultIfNotFound. Since 5.5 can’t be

found in column B, the DefaultIfNotFound = Nominal Size = 5.5 will be the result of the text_file_lookup function. Substituting

this back into the formula for the Radius, we get

value=0’ 0 1/8” + (5.5 / 2) = 0’ 2 7/8”

NOTE: If you want to keep an invalid value from being used (i.e., to disallow a 5.5” valve), you can specify the

DefaultIfNotFound parameter to be -1” on a property that specifies a dimension in the family.

If the following row were added to the PVC Fitting Sizes.csv, the result would be different:

to the PVC Fitting Sizes.csv, the result would be different: value= 0’ 0 1/8” + (6

value=0’ 0 1/8” + (6 / 2) = 0’ 3 1/8”

NOTE: If you modify a lookup file, you must restart Revit for the file to be re-read.

Valve Lookup Table Sample

In this example, a very simple version of the valve shown here will be configured to use a lookup table to read the values A, C, D, and D1 based on the ND1 parameter.

In the _Valve.rfa family, the valve geometry and family parameters have already been created. The

In the _Valve.rfa family, the valve geometry and family parameters have already been created. The first task is to define the

ND1 parameter on the main body of the valve, and map the ND1 parameter to the valve connectors. However, there is a catch.

Revit doesn’t define curved surfaces in terms of diameter, everything is defined in terms of radius. Thus, there is a NR1 and

D_Rad parameter to assign to the appropriate geometry.

It is notable that the valve will ‘know’ what size it needs to be when placed on a pipe. The valve ‘reads’ the size of the pipe,

and it is inherited into the connectors’ radius property. This sample will use a parameter called NR1, then calculate the ND1

based on NR1. Then, all the other properties will be read from a .csv file based on ND1.

Creating Family Parameter Formulas

All the necessary parameters are assigned to the model dimension lines and extrusions. Now we need to create the

text_file_lookup and radius formulas.

1. Copy a .csv file to your LookupTable folder.

NOTE: The LookupTable location is defined in your Revit.ini file. The Revit.ini file is found in the C:\Program Files\ Revit MEP

2009\Program folder. Open the Revit.ini file, and find the line that starts with: LookupTableLocation. In a default install, you will

find that the LookupTable location is defined as: LookupTableLocation=C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application

Data\Autodesk\Revit MEP 2009\LookupTables

2. Open the _Valve.rfa file.

3.

Click

MEP 2009\LookupTables 2. Open the _Valve.rfa file. 3. Click on the Design bar. 4. Set the

on the Design bar.

4. Set the value of the Lookup Table Name to: _Valve Sample.csv

5. Define the values and formulas as shown below

NOTE: NR1 is specified as a value only, with no formula. Since the NR1 parameter

NOTE: NR1 is specified as a value only, with no formula. Since the NR1 parameter is determined from the pipe to which the valve is connected via the connector, NR1 must NOT have a formula.

6. Click OK.

Assigning Labels to Model Dimensions

1. Set the Left view current.

2. Select the circle extrusion seen in elevation, and click Edit on the options bar.

3. Select the radial dimension line, and on the options bar, select D1_Rad from the Label list.

4. Click Extrusion Properties on the Design bar.

5. Click the

Click Extrusion Properties on the Design bar. 5. Click the button in the Extrusion End row.

button in the Extrusion End row.

6. Select A from the list, then click

.
.

7. Click Finish Sketch,

8. Click

the list, then click . 7. Click Finish Sketch , 8. Click to switch to a

to switch to a 3D view.

9. Select the two connectors (use Ctrl to select multiple), then click Properties.

10. Click the

to select multiple), then click Properties. 10. Click the button in the Radius row. 11. Select

button in the Radius row.

11. Select NR1 from the list, then click

.
.

12. Click

12. Click to close the Connector Properties dialog box. 13. Set the Floor Plan Ref Level

to close the Connector Properties dialog box.

13. Set the Floor Plan Ref Level view current.

14. Select the long dimension line, and select A from the Label list in the Options bar.

15. Select the short dimension line, and select HalfA from the Label list in the Options bar.

16. Select the circle, and click Edit in the options bar.

17. Select the 1’-0” radial diameter, and select D_Rad from the Label list in the Options bar.

18. Click Finish Sketch,

19. Set the Back Elevation view active.

20. Select the 3’-6” dimension line.

21. Select C from the Label list in the Options bar.

22. Select the extrusion representing the handle post, then click Properties .

23. Click the

the handle post, then click Properties . 23. Click the button in the Extrusion End row.

button in the Extrusion End row.

24. Select C from the list, then click

Extrusion End row. 24. Select C from the list, then click 25. Save the family .

25. Save the family .

twice.

Now, you can use Pipe Accessory tool on the Design bar, and Load… the _Valve.rfa family into a project to place these

valves in your project.

5.2.2 Standard Component Family Creation Example 2 – Exhaust Fan

Introduction

In this example, we will build a simple exhaust fan including physical geometry, family parameters, shared parameters, and a

type catalog. The basis of the fan is shown in the image below:

As you can see, we don’t really have all the information to replicate all the

As you can see, we don’t really have all the information to replicate all the dimensional information, so we will make some assumptions. Namely, we will assume that the height of the fan shroud is equivalent to the height of the lower wind band, and that the width of the motor cover and lower wind band are proportional to the fan shroud width. Since everything will be parametric, it is easy to modify later if necessary.

Start the Family Editor

1. File New Family…

2. Select Generic Model.rft

3. Click the Open button

4. Save the file as Exhaust Fan.rfa

Define the Family Category

1. Settings Family Category and Parameters…

2. Select Mechanical Equipment for the Family Category

3. Set the Part Type to Normal.

4. Select the OK button

Create the Physical Model As we are creating the physical model, the actual sizes that

Create the Physical Model

As we are creating the physical model, the actual sizes that are created will not really matter. We will come back after creating

the model to define parameters to define the geometry.

Create the Curb Cap

1. On the Family Design Bar, click Solid Form Solid Extrusion

the Family Design Bar , click Solid Form Solid Extrusion 2. On the Options Bar ,

2. On the Options Bar, click Rectangle

Solid Extrusion 2. On the Options Bar , click Rectangle 3. Click two points to define

3. Click two points to define the rectangle sketch crossing over the intersection of the reference planes:

4. Click the two Make this Temporary Dimension Permanent controls

parameters with the dimension lines.

5. Click

controls parameters with the dimension lines. 5. Click on the Family Design Bar. . We will

on the Family Design Bar.

the dimension lines. 5. Click on the Family Design Bar. . We will come back later

. We will come back later and associate

6. Click

6. Click to open the default 3D view. Create the Lower Wind Band 1. Click Solid

to open the default 3D view.

Create the Lower Wind Band

1. Click Solid Form Solid Extrusion

2. On the Toolbar, click

Click Solid Form Solid Extrusion 2. On the Toolbar, click 3. Select the Pick a plane

3. Select the Pick a plane option

4. Click OK

5. Move the cursor over the extrusion to highlight the top face, and then click.

the extrusion to highlight the top face, and then click. 6. On the Options Bar ,

6. On the Options Bar, click Circle

face, and then click. 6. On the Options Bar , click Circle 7. Click somewhere near

7. Click somewhere near the middle of the top of the box to place the center of the circle, then click another point to define the radius.

8. Click Finish Sketch

top of the box to place the center of the circle, then click another point to

Create the Fan Shroud and Motor Cover

Repeat the steps for creating the Lower Wind Band to define the Fan Shroud and Motor Cover.

Lower Wind Band to define the Fan Shroud and Motor Cover. Define Family Parameters for Geometric

Define Family Parameters for Geometric Sizing

We will be defining the primary dimension parameters as Family Parameters, because we don’t expect to include this

information in Schedules or Tags.

Create the Family Parameters

1. Click

in Schedules or Tags. Create the Family Parameters 1. Click on the Family Design Bar 2.

on the Family Design Bar

2. Click Add… under Parameters.

3. Define the parameter as shown below:

under Parameters. 3. Define the parameter as shown below: 4. Click OK 5. Repeat steps 2

4. Click OK

5. Repeat steps 2 - 4 to create additional parameters as defined below:

Name

Discipline

Type of Parameter

Group Parameter Under

Instance/Type

Curb Cap Height

HVAC

Duct Size

Dimensions

Type

Fan Shroud Height

Fan Shroud Radius

Lower Wind Band Height

Lower Wind Band Radius

Motor Cover Height Motor Cover Radius Overall Height
Motor Cover Height
Motor Cover Radius
Overall Height

If you happen to mis-group a parameter, you can re-group it. For example, below, I accepted the default of ‘Other’ for the Motor Cover Radius. This really has no effect on the functionality, but it is nice to keep things organized under logical groups. To re-group it under Dimensions, simply select the row of the mis-grouped parameter, and click Modify, and then select the appropriate group. You can also use this method to rename the parameter and to change the Instance/Type setting.

the parameter and to change the Instance/Type setting. Revit is case, spacing, and spelling sensitive, i.e.,

Revit is case, spacing, and spelling sensitive, i.e., the following are all different:

Lower Wind Band Height

LowerWindBandHeight

lower wind band height

Lowr Wind Band Hight

Be very careful on your spelling, spacing, and casing.

If you incorrectly define the Discipline or Type of Parameter, you will have to first Remove the parameter, then Add… it again.

6. Using our base image for the fan, we will define the parameter values and formulae as follows:

Parameter

Value

Formula

Overall Height

12.125”

 

Motor Cover Radius

 

Fan Shroud Radius * 0.8

Motor Cover Height

 

Overall Height – Lower Wind Band

Height – Fan Shroud Height

Lower Wind Band Radius

 

Fan Shroud Radius * 0.6

Lower Wind Band Height

5”

 

Fan Shroud Radius

9.6875”

Fan Shroud Height

 

Lower Wind Band Height

Curb Cap Width

17”

 

Curb Cap Height

1.75”

Note: For instructional purposes, the grey cells indicate cells where you will NOT enter information.

When you are complete, your data should resemble:

7. After you have defined all the parameters, click OK Associate Parameters with the Curb

7. After you have defined all the parameters, click OK

Associate Parameters with the Curb Cap Geometry

1. In the Project Browser, double click on the Ref. Level under Floor Plans to re open the top view.

Ref. Level under Floor Plans to re open the top view. 2. Select the rectangular extrusion,

2. Select the rectangular extrusion, and click Edit on the Options Bar.

extrusion, and click Edit on the Options Bar . 3. Select the two dimension lines (use

3. Select the two dimension lines (use Ctrl to select multiple).

4. On the Options Bar, select Curb Cap Width for the Label:

This will associate this parameter with the two dimensions. 5. Next, we will constrain the

This will associate this parameter with the two dimensions.

5. Next, we will constrain the rectangle to be centered on the reference planes. Click

the rectangle to be centered on the reference planes. Click 6. You will make a total

6. You will make a total of 4 clicks to create the dimension:

Click the left vertical magenta segment.

Click the vertical reference plane (green dashed line).

Click the right vertical magenta segment.

Click to place the dimension line above the rectangle.

7. Click the

place the dimension line above the rectangle. 7. Click the to change it to . on

to change it to

.
.

on the Design Bar.

Note that the rectangle is now centered on the vertical reference plane.

rectangle is now centered on the vertical reference plane. 8. Repeat steps 5 7 to center

8. Repeat steps 5 7 to center the rectangle on the horizontal reference plane.

9.

Click

9. Click . 10. Associate the Curb Cap Height parameter with the Extrusion End property: ∑

.

10. Associate the Curb Cap Height parameter with the Extrusion End property:

Click the little button in the right column in the Extrusion End row:

little button in the right column in the Extrusion End row: ∑ Select Curb Cap Height

Select Curb Cap Height.

Click OK, OK

11. Click Finish Sketch

Associate Parameters with the Lower Wind Band Geometry

1. Select the circular extrusion representing the lower wind band.

2. Click Edit on the Options Bar.

3. Select the Magenta Circle.

4. Click

on the Options Bar.on the Options Bar . 3. Select the Magenta Circle. 4. Click 5. Check the Center

5. Check the Center Mark Visible Box.

6. Click OK.

7. Align and lock the circle to the horizontal and vertical reference planes (make sure you are in the Ref. Level Floor Plan view):

Click

sure you are in the Ref. Level Floor Plan view): ∑ Click on the Tool Bar.

on the Tool Bar.

Click the horizontal reference plane.

Click on the circle center mark.

Click the

.
.

Click the vertical reference plane.

Click on the circle center mark.

 

Click the

.
.

8.

Click

on the Design Bar .

on the Design Bar.

9.

Select the Magenta Circle again.

 

10.

Click the dimension control:

10. Click the dimension control:

11.

Click

on the Design Bar .

on the Design Bar.

12.

Select the dimension.

 

13.

On the Options bar, set the Label to Lower Wind Band Radius.

14.

Click Extrusion Properties on the Design Bar.

15.

Associate the Lower Wind Band Height with the Extrusion End property.

Click the button in the right column in the Extrusion End row.

Select Lower Wind Band Height.

16.

Click OK, OK

 

17.

Click Finish Sketch

 

Associate Parameters with the Fan Shroud and the Motor Cover

Repeat the steps above for the Fan Shroud and Motor Cover. Use the parameters as applicable. Your final model should

appear as follows:

Add a Duct Connector To add a duct connector, you will likely want to define

Add a Duct Connector

To add a duct connector, you will likely want to define additional parameters for the duct opening, possibly for the height and width. This will not be covered in this exercise but is based upon methods presented in this document.

Add Shared Parameters for Electrical Data

1. Click Family Types… on the Design Bar.

2. Click Add… under Parameters.

3. Select Shared parameter

4. Click Select…

5. The practice-wide shared parameters file is located at

L:\BH Revit\Revit09\SharedParameters\BH_Shared_Params.txt. The file may or may not be defined on the machine you

are working on. You will not have access to this file so you will have to create a project shared parameters file.

If you are prompted with the following message, click Yes then go to Step 6.

If the Shared Parameters window opens, click Edit… Then go to Step 6.

6. Click Create…

7. Browse to the project’s families subfolder location.

8. Enter the project number and project description, 123456 Example Project Shared Parameters.txt