Sei sulla pagina 1di 56
Gas guzzlers rejoice! Yo u wo n’ t be pay ing so much BUS INE
Gas guzzlers
rejoice!
Yo u wo n’ t be pay ing so much BUS INE SS , 10 B
Is your home looking fabulous for fall? AT HOME, 1C
Is your home looking
fabulous for fall?
AT HOME, 1C
, 10 B Is your home looking fabulous for fall? AT HOME, 1C WILKES-BARRE, PA timesleader

WILKES-BARRE, PA

timesleader.com

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013

50¢

Wife killed in domestic dispute, police say

Husband allegedly turns gun on self after killing spouse

EDWARD LEWIS

elewis@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — Residents liv- ing on Andover Street said they knew Vito Joseph Aiello was capable of harming his wife, Jane. Their concerns became real late Thursday night when he allegedly killed her in a shooting before turn- ing the gun on himself. He survived a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his

face, police said. The couple would have celebrated their 22nd wedding anniversary today. Authorities are treating the case as a murder/attempted suicide. An autopsy is scheduled today at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Neighbors, who said they were wary of Aiello, described a chaotic scene as the couple’s 15-year-old son, Salvatore, screamed for help. In a few minutes the small dead-end street

became congested with police cruis- ers and ambulances. “Last night was a nightmare,” a neighbor said across the street from the Aiello home at 389 Andover St. on Friday. “It shouldn’t have hap - pened and to do it in front of their son. No child should see that.” The couple’s eldest son, Vito Thomas Aiello, 19, was away at col- lege. A neighbor said he was lying in bed

and startled by gunfire and the boy’s screams just after 11 p.m. “All you heard was boom, boom, boom and then boom and a minute later, their son comes running out screaming, ‘Help, help my dad shot my mom,’ ” the neighbor said. The boy ran to a house across the street and banged on the door yelling “Help, call 911.” Police found Jane Aiello, 47, inside the house. She was transported to

Ja ne Aiello, 47, inside the house. She wa s transported to Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical

Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Vito Aiello and his wife, Jane, in Facebook photo. Police say Vito Aiello killed his wife

See DOMESTIC | 10A

and then shot himself Thursday night.

Friday night frenzy!

Friday night frenzy! Bill Ta rutis | Fo r the Time s Le ader Fred Ad
Friday night frenzy! Bill Ta rutis | Fo r the Time s Le ader Fred Ad

Bill Ta rutis | Fo r the Time s Le ader

Fred Adams | For the Times Leader

When the area’s high school football teams take the field, they’re not alone. Backing them up are a legion of football-crazed fans and students willing to explore new decibel levels to push their team to victory.At top, the Meyers student section gives up a big ol’ victory yell. And at left, Crestwood stu- dents show what they learned in cheering class. Did either team’s fans help them on to a win? Find out in the sports section, with high school action starting on Page 1B.

Attorney goes south of border so he can say, ‘Hablo Español’

With an increase in Spanish-speaking clients, Vito DeLuca traveled to Mexico to become more fluent in the language

SHEENA DELAZIO

sdelazio@timesleader.com

Attorney Vito DeLuca began noticing an increase in Spanish- speaking clients over the past few years. Conversing with clients was difficult – some would bring

a family member or friend to translate – or DeLuca would have to use a third-party inter- preter, turning the attorney- client relationship down a road DeLuca did not want to go. Luzerne County employs one Spanish-speaking interpreter and uses contracting services of the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts to hire interpreters for court purposes.

See ATTORNEY | 10A

hire interpreters for court purposes. See AT TO RNEY | 10A Submitted photo Vito DeLuca stands

Submitted photo

Vito

DeLuca

stands

with

Puebla,

Mexico in

the back-

ground.

DeLuca

travelled

to Puebla

for a

two-week

course on

speaking

Spanish.

Gunshot victim testifies against alleged shooter

Andre Fuller will face trial on charges of attempted homicide in the shooting of William Uggiano

EDWARD LEWIS

elewis@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — Confined to a wheel- chair after seven gunshot wounds, William Uggiano testified Friday he waited in the area of Wayne and South Grant streets for a woman who invited him to smoke “weed” on Aug.

3. Uggiano, 19, waited 10 minutes before he real- ized she wasn’t going to show. As he began walk- ing home, something told him to turn around. When he did, Uggiano said there was a man with a gun.

“Something told me to turn around and when I did, I saw Dre and he started firing,” Uggiano testified at the prelimi- nary hearing for Andre Fuller, 22, of John Street, Kingston. “I was hit in the head and I fell.” Uggiano said he suf- fered gunshot wounds to his head, shoulder, arm, hip, waist and buttocks. He is bound to a wheel- chair because he has lim- ited use of his legs due to the gunshot wounds, he said. After nearly an hour of testimony, District Judge Martin Kane determined Luzerne County Assistant District Attorney Jarrett Ferentino established a case against Fuller. He now faces charges of

See SHOOTER | 10A

Urban worried about levee fee increase

Councilman concerned about proposal to make flood authority more independent

JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES

jandes@timesleader.com

The 14,200 Wyoming Valley property owners charged a levee fee will likely pay more if Luzerne County officials proceed with suggestions to make the county ’s flood author- ity more independent, a county official warns. “There’s no way I would agree to this,” county Councilman Stephen A. Urban said of the pro- posed change. The county Flood

Protection Authority relies heavily on county employees and equip- ment to carry out its responsibility managing the 15-mile flood con- trol system along the Susquehanna River, said Urban, the authority chairman. If the authority must strike out on its own as proposed by county Manager Robert Lawton during last week’s coun- cil meeting, its expenses would increase and even- tually lead to a rise in the levee fee, Urban main- tains. The $1.29 million gen- erated by the levee fee is the authority ’s lifeblood

See LEVEE FEE | 10A

6 0 9 8 1 5 1 0 0 1 1
6
0 9 8 1 5
1 0 0 1 1

INSIDE

NEWS Obituaries 2A, 8A Local 3A Nation & World 4A

Editorials 9A

AT HOME: 1C

Puzzles 5C

Weather 10A

Birthdays 3C

CLASSIFIED: 1D

SPORTS: 1B

Movies 4C

Comics 28D

BUSINESS: 10B

Te levision 4C

PAGE 2A Saturday, September 28, 2013

NEWS

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Man gets 10 months in double-fatal wreck

Elderly couple was killed in Hanover Township crash

SHEENA DELAZIO

sdelazio@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – A elderly couple from Nanticoke were driving home from a senior citizens center in August 2011 when they were killed in a vehi- cle crash in Hano ve r Township. Since then, their grandson Jonathan Skwirut said Friday, “It’s been hell for our family.” Remorse, sadness and fam- ily issues revolve around the deaths of Edward Skwirut,

89, and his wife, Dorothy, 86, who died after their 2006 Chevrolet Impala was struck by a truck, driven by Kevin Allen

of Hano ve r To wnship, that wa s hauling 960 pounds of concrete

mix.

“It’s torn us apart as a fam- ily,” Jonathan Skwirut said. Allen, 36, of Martin Street, was sentenced Friday to 10 to 23 months in county prison and was incarcerated on two counts of homicide by motor vehicle and related driving offenses Friday. Allen pleaded guilty to the charges in July. “I’m sorry,” Allen said through sobs to the Skwirut family Friday. Police allege Allen was trav- eling 73 mph in a 45-mph zone

on the Sans Souci Parkway on Aug. 4, 2011, when he veered into oncoming traffic. Allen was driving a 2002 Chevrolet Xtreme truck transporting a dozen 80-pound bags of con- crete mix at the time of the crash. Deputy District Attorney Alexis Falvello said Allen has had a driving record involving speeding and driving too close- ly and requested some sort of prison sentence for Allen. Allen’s attorney, Basil Russin, said Friday that his client was in the process of construct- ing a patio for his wife and four children when the crash occurred, and that Allen has been remorseful since he first met Russin. Russin said his client was

injured in the crash and now walks with a cane due to inju- ries he sustained. Russin said Allen has under- gone surgeries repairing broken bones but will need to undergo additional surgery for a prob- lem with his heel. Russin requested that Allen be sentenced to a term of house arrest, but Judge Fred Pierantoni said he felt a prison term was appropriate. “Your suffering fails in com- parison to the Skwirut family,” Pierantoni said. “This was a tragic incident.” Pierantoni said Allen must complete 40 hours of communi- ty service, where he’d like Allen to go to school to tell students about how their lives could change in a matter of seconds.

about how their lives could change in a ma tt er of seconds. Sheena Delazio |

Sheena Delazio | The Times Leader

Kevin Allen leaves the Luzerne County Courthouse Friday after being sen- tenced for killing an elderly couple in an August 2011 crash.

Pierantoni said Allen must also undergo mental health and drug and alcohol evaluations and comply with any recom- mended treatment.

Politicians, bloggers gather

Plenty of candidates make appearances at Blogfest

STEVE MOCARSKY

smocarsky@timesleader.com

PITTSTON — As the November election fast approaches, regional bloggers and some of the politicos many of them write about hob- nobbed over drinks and pizza Friday night at the eighth semiannual Blogfest at The Red Mill tavern. And it was no surprise that candi- dates in the most talked-about races in Luzerne County were some of the guests at the shindig, those races being for Luzerne County controller, Luzerne County council and magis- terial district judge for Pittston. Blogfest co-founder Ben Hoon, who writes under Gort42 on blogspot.com, said the event isn’t meant to be political in nature - although scores of politicians are invited - but rather an opportunity to socialize. And not all blogs have political themes. Still, local candidates don’t think it’s wise to miss the event. Jerry Mecadon and Alexandra Kokura, candidates for district judge in Pittston, were among the happy minglers. Mecadon said he’s attended Blogfest before, but Friday was was his first time there as a candidate. “I get to get together with people running for office, talk about their races. It’s a good time,” he said. Kokura began attending last spring. “It’s another form of com- municating and getting messages out there. And we’re excited to par- ticipate in events that get members of the community together,” she said. Michelle Bednar, the Democrat nominee for controller, called Blogfest “a great event. I like to see the friendly faces. It’s just a happy gathering.” Bednar, who hasn’t missed a Blogfest in two years, denied having a favorite blog, saying she likes them all. “They keep you up on all the goings-on you might have missed.”

WHAT’S A BLOG?

“Blog” is short for “web logor “weblog” basically a collection or log of a person’s postings on the Internet through the World Wide Web about anything they’re interested in, from local or national politics to social issues to sports to cooking. Find a listing of local blogs at nepablogs.org.

On the other hand, Carolee Medico Olenginski, Bednar ’s Republican opponent, was a first- time attendee. But she didn’t feel the least bit out of place. “I never blogged, I never ‘Twittered,’ but I know all of them — Joe Valenti and Ben (Hoon) and all these guys,” Medico Olenginski said. Valenti writes the popular Pittston Politics blog. Other newbies to the blogger scene who arrived in the first hour were county council candidates Paul DeFabo, Richard Heffron and Renee Ciaruff oli-Ta ffera. “I’m not a ‘techie’ guy, but I fig- ured I better come because every- body else is going to be here. I wanted to see what it’s all about,” DeFabo said. “It’s interesting, but it’s the way people communicate now,” Heffron said. “I’m just trying to get a feel of exactly what they do,” Ciaruffoli said of the bloggers, adding that Blogfest itself is “a lot more com- fortable atmosphere for candidates than our usual meet-and-greets. It’s a more easy-going atmosphere.” County council candidates Eileen Sorokas and Mike Giamber have been to Blogfest before. “I come every year. I love it here, I never miss it,” said Sorokas. “Since May 22, I’ve been to 114 different events, and this is an important one. … It’s good press for you, it’s

is an important one. … It’s good press for you, it’s Pete G. Wi lc ox

Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader

Carolee Medico Olenginski, left, Eileen Sorokas and Tom Bindus chat Friday at the Red Mill Tavern in Pit tston during the semiannual Blogfest.

very good for a candidate to be here tonight.” Statewide candidates have attend- ed the twice-a-year gathering as well. Bill Goldsworthy, the Deputy Director of Gov. Tom Corbett’s Northeast Regional Office as well as a former We st Pittston mayo r and councilman, said Blogfest is a “great idea” that allows one “to see the faces behind the (computer) screen.” Goldsworthy said he thinks blog- gers have been treating Corbett fairly. “It’s the people who go onto the blogs (and post comments who might not be as fair) .” Still, blog posts give the staffers of elected officials an opportunity to “get a different feel” for people’s opinions of actions or initiatives, Goldsworthy said, citing bloggers’ and their readers’ reactions to Corbett’s Healthy Pennsylvania ini- tiative released last week.

EILEEN M. CONLAN

Sept. 21, 2013

AMANDA FREY STRATFORD

Sept. 23, 2013

Eileen M. Conlan died Saturday, Sept . 21, 2013, in Clearwater, Fla. Born in West Pittston, she was a daughter of the late Dr. Francis J. and Mary Allan Conlan. Eileen was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and received her master’s degree in library science from Catholic University in Wa shington, D.C . She served at the U.S. embas- sies in Mexico City, Manila and Vienna, finishing her career at the school system in the U.S. Virgin Islands. She had a great love for classical music, theatre, movies, “The Business Channel” and good food. Eileen’s sympathy and honest compassion was felt by all who knew and loved her. She was a presence wherever she went and was truly drawn to people and people were drawn to her. She touched so many and will be missed by all who knew her. She was preceded in death by a brother, Monsignor Allan Conlan, Scranton; and two sis- ters, Mary Katherine and Ann, Clearwater. Eileen is survived by a sister, Betty Floro, Clearwater; her dear friend, Cathy Spoor, Oldsmar, Fla.; and her beloved dogs, Muffin and Duffy.

Oldsmar, Fla.; and her beloved dogs, Muffin and Duffy. The funeral will be Wednesday with a

The funeral will be Wednesday with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Corpus Christi Parish, Immaculate Conception Church, 605 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. Monsignor John J. Sempa, pas- tor, will celebrate the Mass. Interment will be in Mount Olivet Cemetery, 612 Mount Olivet Road, Wyoming. Viewing will be 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the Neil W. Regan Funeral Home Inc., 1900 Pittston Ave., Scranton. The family requests those attending the funeral pro- ceed directly to the church. For directions or to send online condolences, visit www. neilreganfuneralhome.com. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of the donor ’s choice.

Amanda Frey Stratford, 28, of Nanticoke, died Monday morn- ing in Easton. She was born in Kingston,

a daughter of Terry and Elaine

Sherrill Smith, and had attend- ed the West Side Vocational Technical School. Amanda was a member of All Saints Church, Plymouth. She had been employed as a waitress by Classic Pizza and many other restaurants in the valley. She always seemed to have a smile on her face and enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, especially around the Christmas holidays when she would spend time with her mom making pierogies from scratch for their Christmas Eve dinner. She was preceded in death by her maternal grandmother, Antoinette Sherrill, and her paternal grandparents, Malcom and Nanna Frey. In addition to her parents, she

is survived by a brother, Robert

Frey, Sweet Valley; a sister Sarah Smith, Plymouth; maternal grandfather Edward Sherrill, Plymouth; paternal grandmoth-

grandfather Edward Sherrill, Plymouth; paternal grandmoth- er, Rebecca Smith, Dallas; sev- eral aunts, uncles and

er, Rebecca Smith, Dallas; sev- eral aunts, uncles and cousins, and her two nephews, Caleb Marcy and Raylen Frey, whom she loved dearly. A funeral service will be at 9 a.m. Monday at the William A. Reese Funeral Chapel, rear 56 Gaylord Ave., Plymouth, fol- lowed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in All Saints Church, Willow Street, Plymouth.

Interment will be in St. Mary ’s Cemetery, Plymouth Township. Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. Sunday. Memorial contributions may be made to the family.

More OBITUARIES | 8A

COuRT BRIEFS

WILKES-BARRE — A man serving a life sentence in the 1983 killing of another man filed court papers asking that his appeal rights in the case be reinstated because his attorney at the time made errors. James Strong, 61, was found guilty of first- degree murder for a sec- ond time in May 2011, and sentenced to life in prison without parole fol- lowed by 16 to 40 years in prison on other related charges. Strong was found guilty of the 1983 mur- der of John Strock who had picked up Strong and another man who were hitchhiking along Interstate 81. A Luzerne County jury could not decide whether Strong should be sentenced to life in prison or the death penalty in the Dorrance Township killing. State law required a county judge to sentence Strong to life. Strong said through his attorney, John Hakim, in court papers filed Friday that Strong ’s for- mer attorneys didn’t file court papers with the state Superior Court in a timely fashion, resulting in the high court throw- ing out Strong ’s appeal in October 2012. WILKES-BARRE —A Hazleton man who pleaded guilty in June to

PuBLIC RECORD

Divorces sought and filed in the Luzerne County Prothonotary’s Office from Sept. 23 through 27, 2013:

• Lauren Smith, Lake Winola,

and Richard Smith Jr., Old Forge

• Tracey Gorham, Kingston, and John Gorham Jr., Kingston

• Susan Zaborney, Nanticoke,

and Jason Zaborney Sr., Gridley, Kan.

• Michael Chippi, Weatherly, and Judy Chippi, Weatherly

• Georgeann Drust, Wilkes-

Barre, and Robert Drust, Wilkes-Barre

• Ryan Flynn, Plains Township,

and Laura Flynn, Edwardsville

• Catherine Holtsmaster, Forty

Fort, and Walter Holtsmaster Jr.,

Fo rksto n Township

• Thomas Levitsky, Scottsdale, Ariz., and Sandra Levitsky, Mount ain To p

• Mia Ze iler, Mount ain To p, and Jason Lyman, White Haven

• William Mislivets, Hanover

Township, and Theresa Roye r- Mislivet s, Hanove r Township

• Thomas Lanning, Sweet Valley, and Stasia Lanning, Scranton

• Kevin Murphy, Wilkes-Barre,

and Lydia Murph y, Mount ain To p

• Sharon Niles-Alexis,Wilkes-

Barre, and Peter Alexis,Wilkes- Barre

• Mbathio Holloway, Wilkes-

Barre, and Christopher Holloway, Wilkes-Barre Marriage license applications filed in the Luzerne County

Register of Wills Office from Sept. 23 through 27, 2013:

• Raymond Edward Searfoss

Jr., McAdoo, and Tiffany Ann Hagans, McAdoo

• Stephen Edward Rowles,

Pittston, and Sarah Colleen Swiderski, Pittston

• Daniel Angel Rodriguez, Mount

Pocono, and Candace Marie Fox, Exeter

• Hector Julio Nunez Jimenez,

possession of child por- nography was sentenced Friday to three to six months in county prison. Jho w W. Calderon, 27, of Alter Street, was sentenced on five counts of child pornography by Ju dge Michael Vough. Vough also sentenced Calderon to four years probation and ruled Calderon does not meet the criteria to be classi- fied as a sexually violent predator. Calderon can- not have access to the Internet or have unsu- pervised contact with minors. Calderon must reg- ister his address under Megan’s Law for the rest of his life. According to court papers, on June 20, 2012, investigators became aware that Calderon was downloading videos of children engaged in sex acts. When interviewed by police, Calderon said he was curious and admitted to watching the videos. Vough ordered Calderon to have no unsupervised contact with minors and to undergo an evaluation by the state Sexual Offender ’s Assessment Board. Calderon faces a lifetime registration under Megan’s Law and deportation after sen- tencing, according to court papers.

Hazleton, and Gloria Isabel Mendez, Hazleton

• Paul Thomas Hiller Jr., Wilkes-

Barre, and Laurelle Rene Serota,

Wilkes-Barre

• John Joseph Haczewski, Plains

Township, and Be tty lou Ru th

Ko nc ew ic z, Plains Township

• Sterling Theodore Sprau III,

Mount ain To p, and Jill Elizabe th

Ur ba n, Mount ain To p

• Jeffrey Eugene Capps,

Nanticoke, and Janet Marie Nadolny, Nanticoke

• Robert Harry Booth III, Sweet

Valley, and Koren Alyn Gabel, Sweet Valley

•Peter M. Treible, Bear Creek,

and Charlene Patricia Maxwell, Wilkes-Barre

Addresses unavailable for the following:

• David Joseph Houssock and

Shawna Spencer

• Steven Anthony Spinosa and

Sarah Jean Scouton

• Mark James Searfoss and

Heather Lee Mumie

• Jamey Francis Bulford and

Sarah Elizabeth Gibblets

• Michael Ernest Munzing and

Desiree Moriah Hooper

• James Richard Sheridan III and Kerry Ann Hummer

• Paul Eugene Thomas Jr. and Kristen Ziomek

• Christian Albert Barsh and Kristin Gelsleichter

• Jennings Brent Coburn Jr. and Stacy Ann Hall

• Jonathan Montalvo and Cierra

Brown

• Shane Vincent Novak and

Stephanie Lynn Jacobs

• Brian Francis Scott and Katy Lynn McClay

• Brendan Adam Cunningham

and Kelsey Lynn Gower

• Robert James Brislin and

Misty Lea McWilliams

WALT LAFFERTY

Regional Business Development Director & General Manager (570) 970-7158

wlafferty@civitasmedia.com

THE TIMES LEADER

A CIVITAS MEDIA company

GEORGE SPOHR

Executive Editor (570) 970-7249 gspohr@civitasmedia.com

ANTHONY SPINA

Advertising Sales Manager (570) 970-7293 aspina@civitasmedia.com

JIM McCABE

Circulation Manager (570) 970-7450 jmccabe@civitasmedia.com

JEFF TINNER

Production Director (570) 829-7172 jtinner@civitasmedia.com

DETAILS

LOTTERY

MIDDAY DRAWING Daily Number - 8-9-9 Big Four - 3-8-0-0 Quinto - 1-8-0-9-4 Treasure Hunt

01-10-13-16-18

EVENING DRAWING Daily Number – 8-8-0 Big Four - 6-8-1-2 Quinto - 7-0-3-9-3 Cash 5

09-15-30-31-38

Mega Millions

09-23-27-49-51

MegaBall: 38

No player matched all five numbers in “Cash 5” jackpot drawing. Today’s jackpot will be worth

$500,000.

Lottery officials reported 84 players matched four numbers, winning $271.50 each; 3,035 players matched three numbers, winning $12.50 each; and 38,881 players matched two numbers, winning $1 each.

OBITUARIES

Aiello, Jane Beil, Dolores Bradbury, William Conlan, Eileen Homschek, Cheryl Knorr, Foster Koons, Robert Jr. Leo, William Lindbuchler, Dorothy Perkins, Madeline Richards, Sandra Sands, Annabelle Stratford, Amanda Weisbrod, Eugene Westfield, Rev. Henry Williams, Daniel IV

Pages 2A, 8A

WHOM TO CONTACT

Missed Paper

(570) 829-5000

Obituaries

(570) 970-7224

Advertising

(570) 970-7101

Advertising Billing

(570) 970-7328

Classified Ads

(570) 970-7130

Newsroom

(570) 970-7242

BUILDING TRUST

The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly.

Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to

help us correct an inaccuracy or

cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

CORRECTIONS

PAGE 12A STORY in Friday’s paper may not have been clear on the raise dispute between the teacher’s union and the Luzerne Intermediate Unit. Rulings have upheld the union claim to a raise

for the first year after the cur-

rent contract expired (2010-11)

but denied any other retroactive

raises for succeeding years.

A POLICE BLOTTER ITEM

published Sept. 22 on The Times

Leader website should have said

Heather Graham crashed her car

into the rear of Austin Falensky’s

while driving on South Church

Street, Hazleton.

MEYERS HIGH SCHOOL was

misspelled in a headline on Page

1B of Friday’s Times Leader.

2013-271

Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLL

LOCAL

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Saturday, September 28, 2013 PAGE 3A

IN BRIEF

HAZLETON

Chief DeAndrea back after crash

City police Chief Frank DeAndrea is

sore but back at work after a crash sent him to the hospital on Wednesday. Mayor Joe Yannuzzi

said DeAndrea has a sore knee, chest and hand, but he’s “back on the job” and he’s “fine.” He said DeAndrea filed a workers’ compensation claim because of the hospital

visit while on duty. DeAndrea was involved in a two- vehicle crash on Cedar Street while responding to an incident and driving an unmarked police vehicle with emergency lights activated but without a siren acti- vated. The driver of a pickup truck had pulled over to allow marked police vehicles with activated lights and sirens to pass but apparently did not see DeAndrea’s vehicle approaching and began to turn into a doughnut shop, causing DeAndrea to veer off the street and crash into a pole. It was DeAndrea’s second crash on the job in 16 months. State police had charged him with running a red light and causing a three-vehicle crash in which a man was thrown from a motor scooter and suffered severe injuries. A district judge found DeAndrea not guilty.

WASHINGTON

Airport receives $575,000 grant

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport has been awarded a $575,000 grant from the Federal Aviation Administration that is designed to allow the airport to expand service and lower costs, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton, announced Friday. The funds could help attract addi- tional flights to Florida, Pittsburgh or Washington, Casey said.

ASHLEY

County Dems to hold fall picnic

The Luzerne County Democratic Committee’s annual fall picnic will start at noon Sundayat the Catholic War Vets Grove. State Democratic Party Chairman Jim Burn will offer remarks, and candi- dates for state governor also are sched- uled to attend. The event is free.

governor also are sched- uled to attend. The event is free. DeAndrea WA SHING TON Red

DeAndrea

WASHINGTON

Red Cross holiday mail drive begins

The American Red Cross will start its annual Holiday Mail for Heroes program on Monday and invites Americans to show their gratitude and best wishes for those who serve our country and their families by sending holiday cards. Americans can create and send cards to service members, veterans and their families who will receive cards across the country and around the world. Messages of thanks and holiday cheer should be mailed to: Holiday Mail for Heroes, P.O. Box 5456, Capitol Heights, Md. 20791- 5456. They must be postmarked no later than Dec. 6. Participants are asked not to send let- ters, monetary donations or any other kinds of inserts with the cards and not use glitter. More information and card requirements can be found at redcross. org/holidaymail. Red Cross volunteers sort and deliver the cards throughout the holiday season. The public can share photos and videos of their card signing efforts or their holiday greeting for troops by using the hashtag #HolidayMail on their Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Vine accounts. The Red Cross will use the material on its social sites throughout the holiday season. The public also can connect with fellow card senders through Facebook.com/redcross and Twitter.com/redcross.

LA PLUME

Keystone College hosting visitation

Keystone College will host a visitation day Oct. 7 to give prospective students the opportunity to learn more and meet with personal enrollment advisers. There are morning and afternoon sessions, and campus tours will be at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Registration begins one-half hour before each tour. Students interested in attending may call Keystone College toll-free, 877-4-COLLEGE or email admissions@ keystone.edu. For more information, visit www.keystone.edu.

Man sentenced in sex assault

SHEENA DELAZIO

sdelazio@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – A Jenkins Township man who was con- victed of sexual assault charges

after a jury deliberated for only

10 minutes at a trial he failed to

attend was sentenced Friday to

18 to 36 years in state prison.

Clyde Tonkin, 30, of Main Street, was sentenced on seven charges stemming from the sexual assault in 2011 of a now- 14-year-old girl, who later gave birth to their child and six other unrelated incidents. Tonkin was convicted of the assault charges in April after a one-day jury trial and pleaded guilty to the other charges, including theft and trespassing. “I’m sorry,” Tonkin told Judge Joseph Sklarosky Jr. on Friday. “I wish I could take it all back.” Sklarosky deemed Tonkin

a sexually violent predator after hearing testimony from

a member of the state Sexual Offender’s Assessment Board, which requires him to register his address under Megan’s Law for life. Tonkin was scheduled to stand trial in April after a failed plea agreement, but he did not appear at the Luzerne County Courthouse. Investigators said Tonkin cut off an ankle bracelet he was required to wear as part of his bail conditions and fled the area. Assistant District Attorney Nancy Violi asked that the trial be held in Tonkin’s absence, a request Judge Joseph Sklarosky Jr. granted. Violi said Friday Tonkin “thumbed his nose at the author- ity of the court and justice sys- tem” when he failed to show up for his trial, and that Tonkin violated the trust and innocence of the girl.

“He has shown no remorse,” the girl’s mother said Friday. “He

will do it again to another child.” The 14-year-old testified at the trial she trusted Tonkin and even regarded him as a father- figure in her life. Until, she said, he began sexually assaulting her

– even to the point where she

became pregnant and gave birth to a girl. “He raped me,” the girl testi- fied in the first day of Tonkin’s trial while holding a stuffed bear. “Eventually, I stopped fighting him. I thought I was in love with him, but I was also still scared of him.” The girl said that in November 2011, she discovered she was 28 weeks pregnant. She told Tonkin of the pregnancy, she testified, and Tonkin said the two would “go away.” Tonkin instructed the teen in February 2012 to write a letter that she was going to her father’s home in Louisiana. She took her mother’s bank card and the two drove to Ohio, where a car

Tonkin had purchased had bro- ken down. The girl said the two checked into a hotel and she began to have stomach pains. Thinking she was in labor or that there

was a problem with the baby, Tonkin drove her to an Ohio hospital. After she was released from the hospital a short time later, police arrived at the hotel room where the couple was stay- ing, and the girl was eventu- ally returned to her mother in Pennsylvania. The teen gave birth to her daughter a few days later. After his April trial, Tonkin was located by authorities three days later and taken into cus- tody. Tonkin received 16 to 32 years in prison on the sexual assault charges and an additional two to four years on burglary and crimi- nal trespassing charges. Tonkin was also sentenced on charges of

trespassing charges. Tonkin was also sentenced on charges of Clark Va n Or den | The

Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader

Clyde Tonkin was sentenced Friday morning in Luzerne County Court.

theft of a motor vehicle, resisting arrest and escape, all of which were concurrent sentences. The incidents occurred in 2012 in Jenkins Township and Pittston.

incidents occurred in 2012 in Jenkins Township and Pittston. Bill Ta rutis | Fo r The

Bill Ta rutis | Fo r The Time s Le ader

Blaschak Coal Chairman and CEO Greg Driscoll speaks during the 15th annual ‘Bringing the World to Northeastern Pennsylvania’ trade conference at the Woodlands Inn & Resort in Plains Township on Friday. Among those in attendance were 24 trade advisers from around the world as well as state and local economic and political leaders.

Pa. impresses international trade advisers

BILL O’BOYLE

CEO of Blaschak Coal Co., were

and its businesses.

an exemplary program.”

preneurial spirit, work ethic,

boboyle@timesleader.com

featured speakers.

Lewis said he was surprised

Baker said the image of

research capacity, top-shelf

PLAINS TWP. — Some 24 international trade advisers

The 24 trade advisers met with existing and former clients and others to assess their inter-

to see the high level of interest local companies have in utiliz- ing his services. He said the

Northeastern Pennsylvania is key in attracting business. “Ask someone from outside

educational institutions and training facilities, robust health care.”

completed their two-week tour

national business development

annual visit offers the advisers

the area to name an industry,

Baker said exporting success

of

Pennsylvania in the Wyoming

plans and opportunities and

and the companies the oppor-

and chances are the first answer

requires that state legislators

Valley and came away impressed

provide firsthand market experi-

tunity to meet face to face and

is coal,” she said. “Probably

take care of important business

by the state’s diversity in compa- nies and quality of products. Two — Bhavna Tahilramani

ence. Michael Horvath, interna- tional business development

get a thorough understanding of products and services. “By doing so, we save them

takes a lot of guesses for some- one to come up with paper manufacturing at Procter &

in their backyards. “We must attend to the trans- portation network, the pipe-

of

Dubai and Martin Lewis

manager for conference spon-

a

huge amount of time, money

Gamble — maker of Bounty

lines, and the port facilities nec-

of

the United Kingdom —

sor Northeastern Pennsylvania

and legwork,” he said. “And by

and Pampers.”

essary to move goods overseas,”

said Pennsylvania businesses and particularly those in Northeastern Pennsylvania

Alliance, and Jeff Box, Alliance president and CEO, said busi- nesses benefit from the knowl-

increasing export sales, that translates into jobs.” Tahilramani said she made

Gas drilling spotlight Baker said the spotlight that natural gas drilling has put on

she said. Box and Horvath said some 250,000 local jobs rely on the

offer the best variety of prod- ucts. Tahilramani and Lewis were

edge, market intelligence and experience of the trade advisers. They said the advisers assist

connections with local compa- nies that export products for skin care, food, technical items,

the region lets people know there is more to NEPA than ski slopes, golf courses and heart-

exporting business. Driscoll said one area that has grown in recent years and continues to

at

The Woodlands Friday for the

and work directly with the busi-

advanced health care and more.

shaped tubs.

grow is anthracite coal mining.

15th annual “Bringing the World to Northeastern Pennsylvania” conference. State Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman Township, and Greg Driscoll, President/

nesses to help locate trading partners. But it was Lewis and Ta hilramani that had the most to say about the region

“We have dealings with 80 companies so far and we get new targets every year,” she said. “Pennsylvania is the best among all the states. They have

“We are an evolving leader in the energy sector, and Marcellus Shale is changing our state and region,” she said. “We have the essential pieces here — entre-

“Estimates of the anthracite reserve have varied to as much as 14 billion tons,” Driscoll said. “Let me just say that there is plenty of it.”

Mother says victim’s life was on an upswing

JON O’CONNELL

joconnell@timesleader.com

The mother of a woman slain Sunday in Northampton County remembered the time her daughter helped deliver a baby

goat about two years ago on the family farm in Hunlock Creek. “The goat needed help, and as gross as it was, she reached

in saved that animal,” said

Elaine Smith, who lives in Nanticoke. Amanda Stratford, 28, of Wilkes-Barre and Nanticoke, was found dead around 11:30

Sunday night in a pickup truck

in Easton. The Northampton

County coroner ruled her death

a homicide after she was shot multiple times. Smith and her husband did

not get word of her death until Wednesday, when the coroner called. Unanswered questions swirl around the woman’s death. Run- ins with the county judi- cial system speckled her

past,

Easton police

say her death was drug-

related. Smith knows her daughter had trou- ble with the law years ago, but she said things seemed to be on the upswing.

About a year ago, when Smith’s husband was in the hos-

pital for about a month, Smith stayed by his side. Stratford checked in every day, always

stayed by his side. Stratford checked in every day, always Stratford and Sm ith said. The

Stratford

and

Smith said. The grieving moth- er said she started running with the wrong crowd when she got home. “That place was a nightmare … She was a little different after that,” Smith said. Court records show Stratford, whose maiden name was Frey, pleaded guilty to drug traffick- ing charges in 2003. She had been separated from her hus- band and she had worked most recently as a waitress. Sh e dropped out of We st Si de Vocational-Technical School in Pringle, her mother said, because other girls treated her

poorly. Stratford was before the

Wind Gap following a domes- judge again in 2007 for more

a juvenile detention center in

Stratford spent a few months in

bringing something along. “She would bring me food to make sure I ate. She brought me clothes to hospital because she knew I was staying there,” Smith said. When the family fell on hard times, they sold the farm in Hunlock Creek and bought a fixer-upper in Nanticoke. Smith said everyone got together to restore the old home and Stratford was there often, despite her small stature, swinging a sledgehammer to help clear out crumbling walls. When she was in high school,

tic dispute with her sister, a sentence she served by order of then-Judge Mark A. Ciavarella,

drug charges. But Smith was certain she had left those days behind.

“The last time she got in trouble, I would not go see her. I told her, ‘The only thing you can do is get yourself cleaned up and I’ll come and see you,’ And she did,” Smith said. “She never wanted to go back to that.” When she heard last, her daughter was helping a friend move in Easton. They spoke last We dnesday, she sa id. Smith and her husband had been planning a trip to Maine, where they often go and rent a home for a week. Stratford had never been there, she said. “She always wanted to go with us in the fall,” Smith said. “So we were thinking we were all going to get our money together. Now we’re never going to have a chance to do that.”

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

NatioN & World

Saturday, September 28, 2013 PAGE 4A

IN BRIEF

World Saturday, Sept ember 28 , 2013 PA GE 4A IN BRIEF AP pho to Small

AP photo

Small survivor found amid the rubble Rescuers pulled a small girl alive from a collapsed apartment building in India’s financial capital nearly 12 hours after the structure caved in Friday, killing at least eight people and leaving dozens trapped under the rubble. A cheer erupted from hundreds of onlookers when rescuers working in a drizzling rain plucked the young girl out of a tunnel dug through the rubble. At least 32 people were rescued.

TRENTON, N.J.

Judge rules for gay marriage

New Jersey is unconstitutionally deny- ing federal benefits to same-sex couples and must allow gay couples to marry starting Oct . 21, a judge ruled Friday. Superior Court Judge Mary Jacobson sided almost entirely with a group of same-sex couples and gay rights groups who sued the state in July, days after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down key parts of a law that blocked the federal government from granting benefits to gay couples. New Jersey allows same-sex couples to enter into civil unions that give them some of the same legal protections as married couples, but Jacobson said the two labels — marriage for opposite-sex couples and civil unions for same-sex couples — means gay couples are excluded “from certain federal benefits that legally married same-sex couples are able to enjoy.”

BOISE, IdahO

Captain dies after plane is diverted

The captain of a United Airlines flight died hours after his apparent heart attack in midair forced the craft he was piloting to make an emergency landing in Boise, Idaho, officials said Friday. The pilot, 63-year-old Henry Skillern of Humble, Texas, was alive when he taken from the plane, but died overnight at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, spokeswoman Jennifer Krajnik said. The Boeing 737-900 had 161 pas- sengers and a crew of six on board. No injuries were reported.

dETROIT

Feds offer $300M to broke Detroit

Obama administration officials said Friday that they are sending someone to Detroit to oversee a federal effort that includes millions of dollars in grants to help fix the beleaguered city — a situation one adviser described as “an exceptional circumstance.” Don Graves will coordinate the public and private money going to hire more police and firefighters and clear out blighted neighborhoods, among other things, officials said. Graves, a Treasury Department official, serves as executive director of the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness. But critics said the combined $300 million in federal and private funds falls well short of a wider bailout sought by some in the city facing $18 billion in long-term debt.

NaIROBI, KENya

Troops blamed for collapse at mall

Kenya’s military caused the collapse of three floors of the Westgate Mall in the deadly terrorist siege, a top-ranking offi- cial disclosed Friday, while the govern- ment urged patience with the pace of an investigation that has left key questions unanswered. Seven days after 67 people were killed in the attack on the upscale shopping center, there is still no clear word on the fate of dozens who have been reported missing and no details on the terrorists who carried it out. The account of the roof collapse raises the possibility that the military may have caused the death of hostages in its rescue attempt. An undisclosed number of people are feared to be buried in the rubble.

Senate vote averts shutdown

Battle far from over, as compromise with GOP-controlled House necessary

ALAN FRAM

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A poten- tial federal shutdown hurtling ever closer, the Senate dealt an emphatic defeat to a core of rebellious young conservatives Friday and approved legislation preventing government agen- cies from closing next week. The 54-44 vote, however, hardly spelled an end to Washington’s latest down-to- the-wire budget drama. It remains unclear whether the Democratic-led Senate and the Republican-run House will be able to craft a compromise and rush it to President Barack Obama for his signature before the gov- ernment has to tell hundreds of thousands of federal work-

ers to st ay home on Tuesday. The fight, which restive conservatives want to use as leverage to dismantle Obama’s prized health care law, was cer- tain to spill into the weekend at least. House GOP leaders are struggling to concoct a new ver- sion of the shutdown bill able to win approval in their chamber and clear the Senate, too. The high-stakes showdown was playing out in a climate of chaos, unpredictability and GOP infighting that was extraordinary even by congres- sional standards. Reflecting the building tension, Senate Chaplain Barry Black opened Friday’s session with a prayer that included, “Lord, deliver us from governing by crisis.” Before final approval, the Senate voted 79-19 to reject an

effort by some Senate conserva- tives to block final passage of the legislation. Led by first-term GOP Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas and Mike Lee of Utah, the band of con- servatives has wanted to derail the shutdown bill. They argued such a move would have prevented Democrats from removing a provision blocking money for Obama’s health care law and forced Democrats to negotiate on reining in that 2010 over- haul, which conservatives and many Republicans despise. Yet many Republican law- makers opposed the conserva- tives’ tactics, worried that it was doomed to fail and would only enhance the chances of a government shutdown for which the GOP would be blamed by voters. The lopsided roll call against the conservatives underscored the opposition they stirred in

the conservatives underscored the opposition they stirred in AP photo Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, ce nter

AP photo

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, center, accompanied by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., left, and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, right, expresses his frustration Friday after the Senate passed a bill to fund the government but stripped it of the defund ‘Obamacare’ language crafted by House Republicans.

their own party. Twenty-five GOP sena- tors voted against them, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and the Senate’s other two top Republicans, Jo hn Cornyn of Texas and John Thune of South Dakota.

“It is not easy to disagree

with your political party,” said Cruz. “But at the end of the day, what we’re doing here

is bigger than partisan poli-

tics. What we’re doing here

is fighting for 300 million

Americans,” who, he asserted, widely oppose Obamacare.

Americans,” who, he asserted, widely oppose Obamacare. AP photo Iranian Pres ident Has sa n Ro

AP photo

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks Friday during a news conference at the Millennium Hotel in New York.

From ‘Great Satan’ to ‘great nation’

New Iranian president expresses hope for good relationship with United States

EDITH M. LEDERER

Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS — Iranian President Hassan Rouhani called the United States a “great” nation Friday in a sharp reversal from his predeces- sors and expressed hope that at the very least the two governments can stop the escalation of tensions. Wrapping up his first trip to the United States as Iran’s new leader, Rouhani said President Barack Obama struck a new tone in his U.N. speech this week, which he welcomed. He said he believes the first step to a meeting between the two leaders was taken Thursday at a meeting on Iran’s nuclear program, where the foreign ministers of both nations talked for the first time in six years. “I want it to be the case that this trip will be a first step, and a beginning for better and constructive relations with countries of the world as well as a first step for a better relationship between the two great nations of Iran and the

United States of America,” Rouhani told a press conference at a hotel near U.N. headquarters. He expressed hope that “the views of our people, the understanding of each other, will grow, and at the level of the two governments that at the very least we can as a first step stop further escala- tion of tensions and then reduce tension as a next step and then pave the way for achieving of mutual interests.” Iran and the United States have trad- ed harsh rhetoric for years. During the 1979 Iranian revolution, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned from exile, seized power and declared the U.S., which was a strong supporter of the ousted Shah of Iran, the “Great Satan.” He set the tone for Iranian offi- cials who came after him. Rouhani was upbeat about his four- day visit to New York to attend the U.N. General Assembly ’s ministerial session, reeling off a long list of leaders he met and saying “I believe that our success was greater than our expectation, espe- cially with the European countries …

and I think that the path really has been paved to expand relations in various centers, key world economies.” Iran’s economy has been hit hard by four rounds of U.N. sanctions for its fail- ure to suspend uranium enrichment, a process that can be used to make fuel for both nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. The U.S. and its allies have taken even more devastating measures targeting Iran’s ability to conduct inter- national bank transfers and to export oil. Rouhani said he has a mandate from the Iranian people, who opposed “extremism” and voted for “modera- tion.” He said this has created a “new environment” that could pave the way for better relations with the West . He said Iran would put forth a proposal at talks in Geneva on Oct. 15-16 aimed at resolving the standoff over his country ’s nuclear program and easing internation- al sanctions, and he expressed hope that “within a very short time” the nuclear issue will be resolved and relations with the We st will improve .

Use of drug for execution might cut supply

JIM SALTER

Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — The planned use of a common anesthetic in a Missouri execution is raising concerns that the anti- death-penalty European Union could limit export of the drug, endangering the supply of a vital medication used every day in thousands of American hospitals and clinics. The execution scheduled for Oct. 23 would be the first to use propofol, which is by far the nation’s most popular anesthetic. About 50 million vials are administered annually in some 15,000 locations. That’s about four-fifths of all anes- thetic procedures, according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

Propofol is popular because it works quickly and patients wake up faster with fewer side effects such as post-operative nausea. Roughly 85 percent of the U.S. supply of propofol is made in Europe, where capital pun- ishment is outlawed, by the German company Fresenius Kabi. Export is controlled by the European Union, which prohibits trade in goods that could be used for executions. The EU is reviewing whether to subject propofol to that rule. If it is added to the regula- tion, propofol would be subject to export controls, not a com- plete ban, EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said. Still, any change in export practices could have a drastic effect on propofol’s availability

could have a drastic effect on propofol’s availability Propofo l is the nation ’s mo st

Propofol is the nation’s most popular anesthetic. The plan to use it in a Missouri execution scheduled for October is raising concerns that the European Union could limit its export, endangering the supply of the vital drug to thousands of U.S. hospitals.

AP photo

in the U.S., said Matt Kuhn, a spokesman for Fresenius Kabi USA. The Food and Drug Administration is worried about any move that could

affect access to propofol. FDA spokeswoman Erica Jefferson said the agency is weighing how to reach out to European officials to ensure the drug remains readily available.

Syria

visit

taking

shape

MIKE CORDER

Associated Press

THE HAGUE, Netherlands — The world’s chemical weapons

watchdog was preparing Friday

to launch a risky United Nations-

backed mission into the heart of Syria’s deadly civil war to verify and destroy the country’s chemi- cal arsenal in a matter of months. The risks inspectors will face were underscored when a car bomb exploded outside a mosque

north of Damascus, killing at least 30 people, the latest victims of a civil war which has claimed more than 100,000 lives and driven another 7 million — around a third of the country’s pre-war pop- ulation — from their homes since March 2011. Law experts, meanwhile, said discussions were underway to set

up a war crimes tribunal for Syria

to punish perpetrators from all sides of atrocities.

A late-night meeting at the

Hague-based Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons was expected to approve a plan to rid Syria’s regime of its estimated 1,000-ton chemical arsenal by mid- 2014, significantly accelerating a destruction timetable that often takes years to complete. The United Nations Security Council also was meeting Friday night in New York to discuss Syria and vote on a resolution to destroy Syria’s chemical weapons that will underpin the OPCW plan. The draft agreed upon Thursday by Russia, China, the United States, France and Britain includes two legally binding demands: that Syria abandon its chemical stock- pile and allow unfettered access to the chemical-weapons experts. If Syria fails to comply, the draft says, the Security Council would need to adopt a second resolution to impose possible military and other actions on Damascus under Chapter 7 of the U.N. charter. President Barack Obama called the Security Council deal “poten-

tially a huge victory for the inter- national community.” The agreement represents

a

breakthrough after 2½ years

of

paralysis in a deeply divided

Security Council. Diplomatic efforts to find some agreement on Syria gathered momentum in the aftermath of an Aug. 21 poison gas

attack that killed hundreds of civil- ians in a Damascus suburb and Obama’s subsequent threat to use military force. The U.S. and Russia agree that Syria has roughly 1,000 metric tons of chemical weapons agents and precursors, including blister agents such as sulfur and mustard gas and nerve agents like sarin. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Friday that progress “should give an impetus to” moves to establish a zone “free

of weapons of mass destruction

and means of their delivery in the Middle East.”

PAGE 5A Saturday, September 28, 2013

NEWS

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Global warming‘extremely likely’man-made, climate panel says

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change calls for global action to control emissions of CO2

enough literature on “this emerging question.” The IPCC said the evi- dence of climate change has grown thanks to more and better observations,

 

a

clearer understanding

KARL RITTER

IPCC but wasn’t involved

of

the climate system and

Associated Press

in the report released Friday. “And now that’s 5

improved models to ana- lyze the impact of rising temperatures. “Our assessment of the science finds that the atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amount of snow and ice has dimin- ished, the global mean sea level has risen and the con- centrations of greenhouse

STOCKHOLM — Scientists now believe it’s “extremely likely” that human activity is the dominant cause of global warming, a long-term trend that is clear despite a recent plateau in the tem- peratures, an international climate panel said Friday. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used its strongest language yet in a report on the causes of climate change, prompting calls for global action to control emissions of CO2 and other green- house gases. “If this isn’t an alarm bell, then I don’t know what one is. If ever there were an issue that demand- ed greater cooperation, partnership, and com- mitted diplomacy, this is it,” said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry. The IPCC, which has 195 member countries, adopted the report Friday after all-night talks at a meeting in Stockholm. In its previous assess- ment, in 2007, the U.N.- sponsored panel said it was “very likely” that global warming was due to human activity, particu- larly the CO2 emissions resulting from the burning of coal, oil and gas. The change means that scientists have moved from being 90 percent sure to 95 percent — about the same degree of certainty they have that smoking kills. “At 90 percent it means there is a 10 percent prob- ability that it’s not entirely correct,” said Chris Field, Carnegie Institution scien- tist who is a leader in the

percent. So it’s a doubling of our confidence. That’s actually a consequential change in our level of understanding.” One of the most con- troversial subjects in the report was how to deal with what appears to be

a

slowdown in warming

gases have increased,” said

if

you look at temperature

Qin Dahe, the other co- chair of the working group. The full 2,000-page report isn’t going to be released until Monday, but the summary for policy- makers with the key find- ings was published Friday. It contained few surprises as many of the findings had been leaked in advance. As expected, the IPCC

raised its projections of the rise in sea levels to 10-32 inches (26-82 centimeters)

data for the past 15 years. Climate skeptics say this “hiatus” casts doubt on the

scientific consensus on cli- mate change, even though the past decade was the warmest on record. Many governments had objections over how the issue was treated in ear- lier drafts and some had called for it to be deleted altogether. In the end, the IPCC made only a brief mention of the issue in the sum- mary for policymakers, stressing that short-term records are sensitive to natural variability and don’t in general reflect long-term trends. “An old rule says that climate-relevant trends should not be calculated for periods less than around 30 years,” said Thomas Stocker, co-chair

by

the end of the century.

The previous report pre- dicted a rise of 7-23 inches (18-59 centimeters). But it did acknowledge that the climate may be less sensitive to CO2 emis- sions than was stated in 2007. Back then, the IPCC said that a doubling of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere would likely

result in 2-4.5 C (3.6-8.1 F)

degrees of warming. This time it restored the lower end of that range to what it was in previous reports, 1.5 C (2.7 F). The IPCC assessments

important because they

are

of

the group that wrote the

report. Many scientists say the temperature data reflect random climate fluctua- tions and an unusually

hot year, 1998, picked as

form the scientific basis of

a

starting point for chart-

U.N. negotiations on a new climate deal. Governments

supposed to finish that

are

ing temperatures. Another leading hypothesis is that heat is settling temporar- ily in the oceans, but that wasn’t included in the summary. Stocker said there wasn’t

agreement in 2015, but it’s unclear whether they will commit to the emissions cuts that scientists say will

Need a New Roof? 80002629
Need a New Roof?
80002629

BELLES

CO NSTRUCTIO N C O .
CO NSTRUCTIO N C
O .

EN ERG Y S AVIN G S WINDO W SALE

FR EE Trip le Pa ne Up grade o n a ll Plygem L ifestyle W ind o w s

Maximum Efficiency& Sound Control

Ro Ro o o fing fing & & S S id id ing ing

Exp Exp erts erts To To o o ! !

“Like our prices

CALL

Love our quality”

824-7220 824-7220

PA012959

be necessary to keep the temperature below a limit at which the worst effects

of climate change can be avoided. Using four scenarios

with different emissions controls, the report pro- jected that global average

temperatures would rise by 0.3 to 4.8 degrees C this century. That’s 0.5-8.6 F.

OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEK 7AM - 9PM to see daily specials and discount offers. CHEESE PRODUCE
OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEK
7AM - 9PM
to see daily specials and
discount offers.
CHEESE
PRODUCE
2 WHiTEAMERiCAN
WHITE
2.99
2.99 lB
LB.
RED POTATOES
SUPER
MIX OR MATCH ALL
99
AMERICAN CHEESE
MIX OR MATCH ALL VARIETIES OF
SWiSS
3.99 lB
WOW!
SWISS
LB.
10
LB Bag
SPECIAL
3.99
PROVOlONE
3.99 lB
Gala apples
APPLES
APPLES OR PEARS)
PROVOLONE
3.99
LB.
VARIETIES OF APPLES
HOT PEPPER
3.99 lB
McIntosh
GInGer GolD
HOT PEPPER
3.99
LB.
RED POTATOES
SUPER
99
MUENSTER
MUENSTER
APPLES
APPLES
3.99
3.99 lB
LB.
5
LB Bag
RED
GRANNYSMITH
SPECIAL
COOPER
4.49
BraeBurn
1 COOPER
3.99 lB
LB.
GrannY sMIth
¢
LAND O’ LAKES 4
CHEESE
DELICIOUS • CAMEO
APPLES
APPLES
99
1 lAND O’lAKES 4 Cheese Blend
4.99 lB
ITALIAN BLEND
4.99
LB.
GOLD
ROME
• 99¢ LB.
iDAHO POTATOES
SUPER
99
reD DelIcIous • Bartlett
DELICIOUS • GALA
LB.
APPLES
PEARS
5
LB Bag
SPECIAL
HAM
GolD DelI
Bosc pears
2.99
LB.
cIous apples
• cortlanD
MiDDlESWARTH POTATO CHiPS
2for 5
COOKEDHAM
COOKED
2.99 lB
pInK laDY
CHOPPED
2.99
LB.
CHOPPEDHAM
2.99 lB
WEEKENDER Regular or BBQ
EA.
IMPORTED
3.99
LB.
SEEDlESS
SUPER
2 49
iMPORTEDHAM
3.99 lB
OVAL SPICED
3.99
LB.
WATERMElONS
SPECIAL
EA.
NARDONES
4 99
OVAl SPiCE HAM
3.99 lB
SAHLEN’S
HAM OFF THE BONE
4.99
LB.
PiNE
APPlES X-lG Size
2 49
PiZZA 12 CUT
SAHlEN’SHAMOFFTHEBONE
4.99 lB
PEPPERED HAM
4.99
LB.
2for 5
TASTY-KAKES
TURKEY
TURKEY
( All VA RiETiES )
CAliFORNiAORANGES
2 99
4lB.BAG
OVEN ROASTED
3.99
LB.
OVENROASTEDTURKEY
OVEN ROASTED
TURKEY
3.99
3.99 lB
LB.
BUTTERBALL LOW SALT 4.99 LB.
BUTTERBALL LOW SALT 4.99 LB.
TRY OUR OWN
SMOKEDTURKEY
4.99 lB
4 99
OVEN
CAJUN TURKEY
ROASTED
3.99
4.99
LB.
LB.
CAJUN TURKEY
4.99
LB.
REDSEEDlESSGRAPE
S
SMOKED
BUTTERBAll lOWSAlT TURKEY
BUTTERBALL LOW SALT 4.99 LB.
SMOKED TURKEY
4.99
4.99 lB
LB.
SMOKED TURKEY
4.99
LB.
1 49 LB.
LB.
CAJUN TURKEY
HONEY TURKEY
4.99
4.99
LB. LB.
CAJUNTURKEY
HONEY TURKEY
4.99
4.99 lB
LB.
KIELBASA
SMOKED TURKEY
4.99
LB.
MCiNTOSHAPPlE
S
SUPER
1
99
HONEY TURKEY
CHICKEN
4.99
LB.
CHICKEN
SPECIAL 3 LB
Bag
8” HOAGiE
CHICKEN BREAST
3.99
LB.
3for 1 00
lEMONS OR liMES
Italian, Turkey, Roast Beef, Tuna
CHICKEN ROLL
3.99
LB.
2 FOR $5.00
BUFFALO CHICKEN 4.99 LB.
99
¢
Made Fresh Daily
GREENSQUASH
BUFFALO CHICKEN 4.99 LB.
BOLOGNA
BOLOGNA
LB.
Bunch
WUNDERBAR
BOLOGNA
2.99
LB.
99 ¢
WUNDERBAR
2.99
LB.
CElERY
coMInG soon
ECKRICH
2.99
LB.
ECKRICH
2.99
LB.
2.99
WUNDERBAR LIVERWURST
2.99
LB. LB.
LIVERWURST
2.99
LB.
ItalIan WIne JuIce
2.99
ECKRICH PICKLE LOAF
3.99
LB. LB.
2for 1 00
PICKLE LOAF
3.99
LB.
2.99
CUCUMBERS
LIVERWURST LEBANON
4.99
LB. LB.
orDer noW
LEBANON
4.99
LB.
3.99
PICKLE SWEET LEBANON LOAF
4.99
LB. LB.
SWEET LEBANON
4.99
LB.
LEBANON
4.99
LB.
99
¢
RED
SPECIALTY
GREENPEPPERS
SWEET LEBANON
4.99
LB.
SPECIALTY
LB.
• Amarone
• Melavasia
ROAST BEEF
SPECIALTY
3.99
LB. WOW!
• Barbera
Merlot
3.99 LB. WOW!
ROMAiNE
HEARTS (3 PACK)
• ROAST BEEF
ROAST BEEF
3.99lB WOW!
1
SLAB BACON
4.99
LB.
• Bandolino
Montepulciano
ROAST BEEF
3.99
LB. WOW!
SUPERSPECIAL
4.99
99 Pack
• HATFiElD ROAST PORK
SLAB BACON
HATFIELD ROAST PORK
4.99
4.99 lB
LB.
LB.
• Cabernet
• Nebbiolo
LB.
SLAB BACON
4.99
LB.
• CORNEDBEEF
HATFIELD
CORNED BEEF
ROAST PORK
4.99
4.99 lB
LB.
SUPER
¢
HATFIELD
ROASTPORK
4.99
4.99
LB.
LB.
99
Sauvignon
Sangiovese
EGGPl
ANT
HATFIELD
ROAST PORK
4.99
LB.
CORNED BEEF
PASTRAMI
SPECI AL
• Chianti
• PASTRAMi
Valpolicella
CORNED BEEF
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99 lB
LB.
LB.
LB.
CORNED BEEF
4.99
LB.
• Dolcetto
Vino de Casa
SlABBACON
ICECREAM
PASTRAMI
4.99 lB
PASTRAMI
ITALIAN
4.99
LB.
SUPER SPECIAL
4.99
LB.
• Lambrusco
Bavolo
EA.
2 99
HARD SALAMI
ITALIAN
3.99
LB.
PUMPKiNS
ITALIANICE - 99 ¢ ea. all varieties
SLICING PEPPERONI
4.49
LB.
WhIte
HARD PROSCIUTTO SALAMI
3.99
6.99
LB. LB.
EA.
2 00
SLUSHIES - 99
¢
SLICING PEPPERONI
4.49
LB.
CORN STAlKS
ea. all varieties
• Frascati • Pinot Grigio
PROSCIUTTO
RETAIL
6.99
LB.
• Soave Classico
EA.
5 00
CHOCOLATE & VANILLA
SOFT CONES - 99
RETAIL
STRAWBAlES
HAZLE PARK HOT DOGS (3 LB. PACK)
4.49
• Verdicchio • Vermentino
¢
HAZLE PARK FOOTLONG HOT DOGS 1.99 LB. WOW!
ea.
Available in 6 Gal. Pails or
HAZLE PARK HOT DOGS (3 LB. PACK)
4.49
lARGE
VARiETiES OF GOURDS
LARGE SUNDAES - 1
99
58 Gal. Drums
ea. all varieties
1.99 LB.
CALL VITO
HAZLE PARKFOOTLONGHOT DOGS
WOW!
NEWITEM
FOR DETA ILS
FA
ll
MUMS
JOHNMARTINSHREDDED
SOFTCREAMSICLETWIST
570-262-8683
1.99
CHEESES 8 OZ. (ALL VARIETIES)
SUPER
3 for
10
PLUMROSE BABYBACKRIBS
5.99
SPECIAL
WHiTE
10 LB
2
99
ICE CREAM
(F
ULL BLO CK ONLY)
SUPER SPECI AL
Bag
WHOLESALE
SUPE R S PE CIAL !
POTATOES
PRE-SLICED WHITE AMERICAN
2.49
LB.
(F
ULL BLO CK ONLY)
3.29
LB.
1
00
COOPER SHARP CHEESE
GET 1 FREE SOFT ICE
YAMS
2LBS.
PRE-SLICED WHITE AMERICAN
2.49
LB.
CREAM CONE WITH THE
3.29
JUMBO WHiTE
OR
69
¢ LB.
HORMEL-
PURCHASE OF A
LONG STICK PEPPERONI
3.99
LB.
YEllOW ONiONS
MARGHERITA PEPPERONI
4.99
LB.
MALACARI SHIRT
YEll
OW COOKiNG
3 lB
1 49
FOR $3.99
SMALL DELI’SAND PIZZASHOPS
ATTENTION WE OFFER ALL RESTAURANTS, OF OUR ITEMS BARS, AT
ONiONS
Bag
DISCOUNTED SMALL DELI’SAND WHOLESALE PIZZASHOPS PRICES.
WE OFFER STOP IN ALL AND OF ASK OUR TODAY! ITEMS AT
(Youth Small to XXL, 10 Colors)
lARGE SliCiNG
29
DISCOUNTED WHOLESALE PRICES.
TOMATOES
1 LB.
STOP IN AND ASK TODAY!
We Accept Access and All Major Credit Cards
Rt. 309 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd (Near Home Depot) 822-2025
Prices Expire 10/4/13
80014080
and All Major Credit Cards Rt. 309 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd (Near Home Depot) 822-2025 Prices Expire

PAGE 6A Saturday, September 28, 2013

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

ONE ONLY! DAY
ONE ONLY! DAY
REBREBREBRRRRRREEEEEEBBBBBBENNAENNAENNAEEEEEENNNNNNNNNNNNAAAAAACCCCCCKKKKKKKKKAPPLIAAPPLIAAPPLIAAAAAAAPPPPPPPPPPPPLLLLLLIIIIIIAAAAAANNNNNNCCCCCCEEEEEEEEE
FACTORY DIRECT SALE!!
Don’t Miss Out! Lowest Prices Of The Year!!
ONE DAY
Food &
Refreshments
from
Today, Sept. 28 • 9am - 5pm
ONLY!
DAY ONE
ONLY!
10am-2pm
UP TO 12 MONTHS NO INTEREST!
With Approved Credit and a
minimum purchase of $300
DISHWASHERS
WASHERS
While
While
GAS
RANGE
REFRIGERATOR
Supplies
Supplies
Stainless Steel
5 Burner
Griddle Included
was $ 719
NOW!
Stainless Steel
4 Door
Last!!
Last!!
starting g
starting
ng
was $ 849
NOW!
at
at
(Save $1,049!!)
$ 592
$ 2,250
$ 265
$ 388
BUY A 30”
PRO-STYLE ®
REFRIGERATOR
DUAL-RANGE
AND RECEIVE
A FREE
JENN-AIR
$ 1,149
value
“Pro-Style” ”
TRI-
FECTA ™ DISH-
WASHER
SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS OFF
$ 1,749
MANUFACTURERS LIST PRICES ON
AREA’S EXCLUSIVE INDEPENDENT
MODEL# JDRP430WP
MODEL# JDB8200AWS
ALL KITCHEN PACKAGES
JENN-AIR DEALER
After $ 300 Mail-In Rebate
ELECTRIC
ELECTRIC
OR
GAS
REFRIGERATORS
Over The Range
DRYERS
RANGES
(18 cu. ft. • white)
MICROWAVES
While
While
While
Supplies
Supplies s
Supplies
Last!!
Last!!
Last!!
While
Supplies
starting
starting
starting g
starting
at
at
Last!!
at
at
$ 348
$ 370
$ 448
$ 172
SAVE
Many Factory
Representatives
Will Be
Available
HUGE SAVINGS!
HURRY IN FOR
YOUR BEST
SELECTION
$$$$$ ON
MANUFACTURERS
REBATE
STOP BY AND
ENJOYTHELAST
BARBEQUE OF THE
SEASON!
LARGEST
AREA’SEXCLUSIVE
DEALER
YEAR END
FACTORY CLOSEOUTS
AND FLOOR MODELS
ALSO AVAILABLE AT
DEEPLY DISCOUNTED
PRICES!
269 Wyoming Avenue • Kingston • (570) 287-1175
AND FLOOR MODELS ALSO AVAILABLE AT DEEPLY DISCOUNTED PRICES! 269 Wyoming Avenue • Kingston • (570)

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

NEWS

Saturday, September 28, 2013 PAGE 7A

Philly mayor seeks solution to street violence

Michael Nutter says too many ‘black men are getting slaughtered’

The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter is calling on the U.S. to find new ways to combat street violence because too many “black men are getting slaughtered.”

The United States needs a solution on the level of the anti-terrorism measures cre- ated after the 9/11 attacks, Nutter said Thursday in Wa shington, D.C ., where he was attending a Justice Department conference on youth violence.

“What if our response to domestic terrorism was as thorough and as engaged as our response to international terrorism? What if we had a 9/11 commission about black men getting slaughtered on the streets of America,” Nutter said, speaking with New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu at the National Press Club. He believes the solution is a joint effort among govern-

ment, nonprofits, businesses and concerned citizens, a plan backed by a group of more than 50 mayors called Cities United. Nutter is the past president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. He and Landrieu also urged federal agencies, including the FBI, the Bureau of Alcohol, To bacco and Fi re arms, and the Drug Enforcement Administration, to redirect their resources to address the

pressing problem. They also asked for more funding for community policing. Nutter and Landrieu have spoken to President Obama about the problem, and said he is “ready to act.” “The question is where is the Congress and what are they prepared to do?” Nutter said. Philadelphia’s homicide rate has dropped from more than 500 deaths a year to about

300, but gun fatalities remain a near-daily event. Hours after the mayor’s address, a 27-year-old man was shot and killed Thursday night in Philadelphia in the backyard of a home where he was visiting his grandmother. Homicide investigators were also investigating the death of a man shot and killed while riding his bicycle in the city.

Police: Suspect in Pa. trooper shooting is dead

The Associated Press

BROCKWAY, Pa . — A northwestern Pennsylvania man who critically wound- ed a state trooper as a warrant was being served appears to have killed him- self, police said Friday. Trooper Brad Wilson, a 24-year veteran of the state police, is in critical condi- tion at a Pittsburgh hospi-

tal, state police said. The dead man was identified as 60-year-old Kenneth Lees Sr. Police were seeking to serve a warrant early Thursday afternoon at Lees’ house in Brockway, about 100 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, as part of an investigation into a pos- sible methamphetamine lab. Police say they believe

Lees shot Wilson through

a window and then killed

himself. The investigation

is ongoing.

Lees was the sole occu- pant of the home, but police also issued a warrant for the man’s son, Kenneth Lees Jr. Officers spotted the car of the younger Lees on Thursday evening and attempted to stop it. But

Hundreds of mink released from Pa. mink farm

Most of the animals, which cannot survive in the wild, were recaptured

The Associated Press

EBENSBURG — An animal rights group says it released hundreds of mink from cages at a western Pennsylvania mink farm this week. A police officer saw

a few of the animals on

a ro ad early We dnesday and contacted the fam- ily of 92-year-old George Rykola, who raises mink on a farm in rural Cambria County, police in Cambria Township said. Someone got on the property and released hun- dreds of mink from their cages, also destroying some cages and records, George Rykola told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Pick your own Tomatoes

HAYRIDES starting Sept 28

groups by reservation

Open Daily 8am - 5pm

DYMOND’S FARM

Brace Rd., Orange, PA 675-1696 • 333-5011 80070117

The Animal Liberation Front was claiming respon- sibility, according to an anonymous statement sent to Bite Back, an animal rights publication based in West Palm Beach, Fla. Chief Mark We strick estimated that fewer than 500 animals were released, and the majority were recaptured. The species developed for the fur industry have no idea how to find food and

water, Michael Whelan,

executive director of the Fur Commission USA, a mink farm trade organiza- tion, told The (Johnstown) Tribune -Democrat. “These are domestic ani- mals,” he said. “They can’t survive in the wild.” Animal liberation activ- ists pick this time of year for such actions because winter is approaching and it’s time for the pelting season, said Bob Noonan,

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

Highest Prices Paid In Cash. Free Pickup. Call Anytime.

VITO & GINO

288-8995 • Forty Fort

editor of Maine-based Trapper ’s Post . “This is when they can do the most economic harm to the farmers,” he said. “They believe it is murder to kill an animal.” Rykola said mink coats aren’t worn by many Americans these days, and Greece and China are now his most lucrative markets. “I don’t think a mink

What to do when your aging parents say: “Don’t Put Me in a Nursing Home”
What to do when your aging parents say:
“Don’t Put Me in a
Nursing Home”
Join Marshall, Parker & Weber
for a free breakfast seminar.
Tuesday, October 8, 2013
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Attorney
Nicholas D. Lutz
Hilton Garden Inn
242 Highland Park Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre, PA
Attorney
Tammy A. Weber
Learn:
What options are available to keep your loved one at home.
How Family Caregivers can legally get paid to help a loved
one.
How to qualify for Veteran’s Benefits and the Waiver
Program Program to to cover cover the the cost cost of of care care at at home. home.
Registration & Breakfast is FREE. Reserve your seat today!
570-822-6919 or www.paelderlaw.com
Elder Law & Estate Planning for over 30 Years
1065 Hwy 315, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
www.paelderlaw.com

Lees led them on a 20- to

25-minute chase, State Police Capt. Bernard

Petrovsky said. The vehi- cle was disabled by strips placed across the road, and Lees tried to run away before being taken into cus- tody. The younger Lees faces felony charges of fleeing and eluding and aggravated assault.

farmer is doing anything wrong by pelting,” he said. At one time, there were 30-odd mink farmers in the area, but now, there are only four, he said. Rykola said he and other family members have raised mink on the farm about 90 miles east of Pittsburgh for almost six decades. “We’ve always lived a peaceful life here,” he said.

shavertown • kingston • dallas prices effective: sep. 28-sep. 30 our signature specialties You can’t
shavertown • kingston • dallas
prices effective: sep. 28-sep. 30
our signature specialties
You can’t find these signature meat and deli items
anywhere else. The proof is in the taste!
our famous store baked smoked chicken kielbasa breast $ 3 99 $ 5 99 signature
our famous
store baked
smoked
chicken
kielbasa
breast
$
3 99
$ 5 99
signature recipe
lb
signature recipe
lb
signature recipe
signature recipe
italian, turkey or american
meal of the week!
our signature
delicious
italian seasoned
regular or italian
16 inch
$ 9 99
pot roast
super subs
pork butt
$
2 49
store baked
includes 2 sides & biscuit
$ 4 99
porketta
roast beef
lb
lb
YES, 16 inches!
ea
roasts
signature meals-to-go $ 5 99

GET YOUR ROOF ON BEFORE WINTER BEFORE SHINGLE PRICES INCREASE

80020122

Need a New Roof?

BEFORE SHINGLE PRICES INCREASE 80020122 Need a New Roof? 80002629 DOMBROSKI BUILDERS, LLC • Custom Homes
80002629
80002629

DOMBROSKI BUILDERS, LLC

80020122 Need a New Roof? 80002629 DOMBROSKI BUILDERS, LLC • Custom Homes • Ad ditions •

Custom Homes Additions Remodeling Roofing Siding Interior Damage Fire, Water and Storm Restoraton

We Will Work With Your Insurance Company!

Prompt – Reliable – Professional

Over 26 Years Experience

570-406-5128 / 570-406-9682

PA#088686 • Fully Insured

80020845

farm fresh produce

ripe 6 oz. driscoll’s FOR yellow 49 ¢ lb premium 2 $ 3 bananas raspberries
ripe
6 oz. driscoll’s
FOR
yellow
49 ¢ lb
premium
2
$
3
bananas
raspberries
green beans or
fresh
broccoli
99 ¢
extra large
green or
green
99 ¢
yellow
crowns
peppers 99 ¢
lb
lb
squash
lb
california sleeved
sweet
FOR
FOR
ripe
celery or
golden
grape
2
2
$
3
iceberg
$
3
pineapples $ 1 88
ea
tomatoes
lettuce

butcher shoppe meat

beef loin boneless sirloin steaks $ 3 99 lb family packs only fresh fresh whole
beef loin
boneless
sirloin steaks
$ 3 99
lb
family packs only
fresh
fresh whole
80% lean
$ 2 69
chicken
99lb ¢
ground
breasts
lb
beef
(split breasts $1.19 lb)
family packs only
family packs only
boneless & skinless
center cut
chicken
$ 1 99
boneless
breasts
pork chops $ 2 49
lb
or tenders
lb
10.5-11 oz bag, asstd. varieties 405.6 oz. pkg. 16 oz. select varieties 28-29 oz. asstd.
10.5-11 oz bag,
asstd. varieties
405.6 oz. pkg.
16 oz. select varieties
28-29 oz. asstd. varieties
herr’s potato
ronzoni
redpack
chips
poland spring
24 pack water
67.6 oz., bottle
asstd. varieties
pasta
tomatoes
pepsi
$ 2 14
99 ¢
$
3 99
99 ¢
2 liter
club card price
limit 6 offers
club card price
limit 8 offers
bottles
fresh baked!
2 lb. skim or whole milk
1 lb. skim or whole milk
club card price
limit 1 offer
12 roll pack
foodtown
foodtown
large
fiora
ricotta
mozzarella
italian
bath tissue
FOR
bread
5
cheese
cheese
$
5
$
3 99
$
2 99
FOR
2
99 ¢
$
5
club card price
club card price
club card price
beertown available in dallas & kingston
cans, budweiser or
bottles, asstd. varieties
cans, extra gold or
bud light
select var., busch,
keystone, natty,
genesee, mil. best
shock top
natural
24 oz. cans
12 packs
6 packs
12 packs
FOR
$ 9 99
$ 7 99
$ 6 99
4
$
5
Save Up To
That’s a Total of
Now thru October 18, shop with your Foodtown Club Card and earn savings coupons.
*Spend $250-$399.99, receive a
*S
e
a a
*Spend $550-$699.99, receive
$10 off Coupon
Another $10 off Coupon
*Spend $700 or more, receive a
an Additional
$
InI 44 Weeks!W
!
$20 off Coupon
I In Savings!
Fall In to
Savings
$

PAGE 8A Saturday, September 28, 2013

OBITUARIES

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

MADELINE PERKINS,

80, of Budd Lake, N.J., and for- merly of Murrells Inlet, S.C., passed away Thursday, Sept . 19, 2013, in Budd Lake. Born

in Glen Lyon on April 7, 1933,

she was a daughter of the late Charles and Stella Yurek. She was buried Friday in St. Michael’s Cemetery, Glen Lyon. Local arrangements by the George A. Strish Inc.

Fu neral Home, 211 W. Main

St., Glen Lyon.

JANE HELFRICH AIELLO, 47, of Wilkes-Barre, died Thursday evening at home. Funeral arrangements are

being finalized by the Lehman Family Funeral Service Inc.,

689 Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre.

For more information, visit the funeral home’s website at www.lehmanfuneralhome. com.

FOSTER KNORR, 81, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away Friday in the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Arrangements are pend-

ing from the Metcalfe-Shaver- Kopcza Funeral Home Inc.,

504 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming.

DOROTHY MAE HILDEBR AND LINDBUCHLER, 90, formerly of Wilkes-Barre, died Thursday in Hampton House. Dorothy

was preceded by husband, Fred Lindbuchler; daughter, Susan Rhodes; sisters, Blanche Myers, Evelyn Heller, brothers, Kenneth and Ernest Heller; granddaughter, Lynn Ann Hildebrand; great-grandson, Dylan Hildebrand. Surviving are children, Raymond and Henry Hildebrand, Duane Lindbuchler, Norma Albert, Lois Thomas; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; brother, Clyde Heller; nieces and neph- ews. Funeral service 10 a.m. Monday at Lehman Family Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Interment in St. Mary ’s Cemetery. Friends may call 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday or 9:30 a.m. to service Monday. For information, visit www. lehmanfuneralhome.com.

EU GENE W. WEISBROD, 75, of Dutch Mountain Road, Lopez, passed away on Friday, surrounded by love and family. To send condolences or sign the e-guestbook, please visit

www.homerfuneralhome.com.

William F. leO

Sept. 26, 2013

William F. Leo passed away Thursday, Sept . 26, 2013, at Mercy Center Nursing Unit, Dallas.

Born in Wilkes-Barre on Dec.

6, 1929, he was a son of the late

Elisabeth (Finarelli) and August Leo. He graduated from GAR Memorial High School in 1947 and proudly served in the U.S. Navy. He was employed by Superior Combustion and was a boiler- maker and blacksmith for Local

13 Union.

He was a member of Sacred Heart Church, Wilkes-Barre. Willie enjoyed playing cards and was an avid fan of the New York Yankees and the New York Giants. His children and grandchil-

dren were the center of his life. He was preceded in death by his wife, Veronica (Ungvarsky) Leo; and his brother, Joseph Leo. Surviving are his sons, William and his wife, Laura Leo, New Tripoli, and Robert Leo, Mountain Top; daughter, Marilyn Leo, Plains Township; brother, Vincent Leo; sister, Mary S. Graziano; grandson, Michael Leo, Denver, Colo.; granddaughters, Emily Leo, Mount ain To p, Melanie Leo, Mount ain To p, Ji llian Leo and her fiance, Joseph San Philip, Bayonne, N.J., and Patricia and her husband, Ty Sh reve ,

Wa shington Township; great-

grandchildren, Caleb Shreve and John Shreve. The family thanks the staff at St. Therese Residence, Wilkes- Barre, Mercy Center, Dallas,

St. Therese Residence, Wilkes- Barre, Mercy Center, Dallas, and Hospice of the Sacred Heart fo r

and Hospice of the Sacred Heart for their compassionate care and support. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Funeral services have been entrusted to Graziano Funeral Home Inc., Pittston Township. Viewing hours will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday and 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Monday at the funeral home. Funeral services will begin at 9:30 a.m. Monday at the funeral home. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10 a.m. Monday in St. Maria Goretti Parish, Laflin. The St. Maria Goretti Bereavement group will recite the divine mercy chaplet and the rosary in the church at 9:30 a.m. prior to the funeral Mass. Interment services will take place in St. Mary ’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. For directions to the funeral home or to express condolences to William’s family, please visit www.grazianofuneralhome.

to William’s family, please visit www.grazianofuneralhome. dOlOres beil Sept. 22, 2013 Dolores Beil, 84, a lifetime

dOlOres beil

Sept. 22, 2013

Dolores Beil, 84, a lifetime resident of Mountain Top,

passed away Sunday evening at Mount ain To p Se nior Care. Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late Joseph and Cassie (Viscitis) Samolis. She was educated in Fairview schools and was

death by a brother, Casmir; and a sister, Catherine. Surviving are her son, Leonard; a brother, Raymond and his wife, Marie Samolis, all of Mountain Top. A viewing will be held Sunday at the Desiderio Funeral Home Inc., 436 S. Mountain Blvd.,

graduate of Fairview High School. She was last employed at Dana Perfume, Crestwood

a

Mountain Top. Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m. Private interment will be at Calvary Cemetery, Drums.

Industrial Park, retiring after

The family requests floral

30

years of service.

arrangements be omitted and

She was a founder and mem- ber of Mountain Post 781,

memorial donations be made to the Ve terans Affairs Medical

American Legion Auxiliary, for

Center, Plains Township.

68

years.

Online condolences may be

In addition to her husband, Henry, she was preceded in

expressed at www.desideriofh. com.

More OBITUARIES | 2A

annabelle

sands

Sept. 27, 2013

com. More OBITUARIES | 2A annabelle sa nds Sept. 27, 2013 Annabelle Sands, 84, of Tunkhannock,

Annabelle Sands, 84, of Tunkhannock, passed away at the Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, on Friday morning. She was born in Stillwater on Nov. 28, 1928, a daughter of the late Furman A. and Mary (Edwards) Lunger. She was a graduate of the Tunkhannock

High School and soon after mar- ried Gerald Sands on Dec. 31,

1948.

Annabelle, along with her husband, fo unded AJ Ta xi and she worked for the Shadowbrook Dairy Bar and Perkins restau- rant for more than 50 years, where she was well known for her cookies and deserts. For her most of her life, she was a babysitter for many families throughout the Tunkhannock area. Annabelle enjoyed canning, jigsaw puzzles and loved her dogs. In addition to her husband and parents, Annabelle was pre- ceded in death by son Dennis Sands; sisters, Margaret “Peg” Roberts and Dorothy Heinrich; brothers, Ve rnon, Ja mes, Atwood and Donald Lunger. She is survived by daughter, Susan and her husband, Bill Stephens; grandchildren, Jason Stephens, Jeremy and his wife, Stephanie Stephens, Josh and his wife, Julie Stephens, Sean and his wife, Patricia Sands, Eric and his wife, Tracy Sands; broth- ers, Robert and Jane Lunger, Leo and his wife, Evelyn Lunger, and Furman and Dolores Lunger; daughter-in-law Cheryl Sands; eight great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Monday at the Harding- Litwin Fu neral Home, 123 W. Tioga St ., Tunkhannock, with the Rev. Peter F. Geschwindner of the Tunkhannock United Methodist Church officiating. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Interment will be at Sunnyside Cemetery. For directions or online con- dolences, visit www.aplitwinfu- neralhomes.com.

Obituary

pOlicy

The Times Leader publishes free

obituaries, which have

a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph.

A funeral home

representative can call the obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to 570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@ civitasmedia.com. If you fax or email, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number.

cheryl l. hOmschek

Sept. 25, 2013

Cheryl L. Homschek, 53, died unexpectedly at home on We dnesday, Se pt . 25, 2013, after a courageous battle with cancer. Born on Nov. 16, 1959, in Pittston, she was a daughter of Rita Redmond Hensley and the late Russell Hensley. She was a 1977 graduate of Pittston Area High School. She was a member of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Hughestown. Cheryl was employed by Bank of America as a manager in the call center in Moosic. Cheryl will always be remembered for her generosity and thoughtful- ness to all that knew her. She was preceded in death by her father, Russell Hensley; grandparents, Clarence and Henrietta Hensley and Harry and Leona Redmond; brother-in- law, Buddy Cramer. Surviving are her loving and devoted husband, George; moth- er, Rita Hensley, Hughestown; her beloved collie, Pal; sister, Rita Pahl and her husband, David, Pittston; brother, Dr.

Rita Pa hl and her husband, David, Pittston; brother, Dr. Thomas Hensley and his wife, Deborah,

Thomas Hensley and his wife, Deborah, Maryland; sister, Debbie Cramer, Old Forge; sister-in-law, Rit a Wa ll and her husband, Tom, Harding; several nieces, nephews and cousins. A memorial service will be held at 8 p.m. Monday at the Howell-Lussi Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming Ave. We st Pittston. The Rev. Robert Sauers and the Rev. Dr. Denise Brown will offi- ciate. Relatives and friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. at the funer- al home. Interment will be held at the convenience of the family.

William J. bradbury

Sept. 26, 2013

William J. Bradbury, 91, for- merly of Trucksville, passed away Thursday, Sept . 26, 2013, at the UPMC Altoona. He resided at The Winds at Mattern Orchard, an assisted living facil- ity, in Hollidaysburg. Born in Luzerne on Oct. 17, 1921, he was a son of William and Elizabeth Bradbury. He graduated from Luzerne High School. He worked at Kingston Provision in high school and continued work- ing there in between active duty military assignments and attending various colleges until 1947. He was a member of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve Corps in 1942. The fol- lowing year, he received orders to the U.S. Army Air Forces as an aviation cadet. While stationed in El Reno, Okla., flying his favorite aircraft, the Stearman, he married his sweetheart, Martha, a U.S. Army nurse from Luzerne. He earned his flight officer (warrant) designation in May 1945, training B-25 pilots and bombardiers at Carlsbad, N.M., until his honorable discharge in November. He graduated from Lincoln Chiropractic College in Indianapolis in 1949. Returning to the area, he joined the prac- tice of Dr. Van Loon and subse - quently started his own practice in Trucksville. He worked as a corrections officer/infirmary supervi- sor at the State Correctional Institution at Dallas from 1960 until he retired in 1982. He enjoyed his retirement, working part-time for several years for his

his retirement, working part-time for several years for his friend, Bill We ntz, at his print

friend, Bill We ntz, at his print and die shop in Dallas. He attended Trucksville United Methodist church. He was also a 50-year member of George M. Dallas Masonic Lodge, Caldwell Consistory A.A.S.R., Irem Temple and the VFW. He volunteered with the Kingston Township Ambulance Association. He was preceded in death by his wife, Martha Revalene Hendershot Bradbury, on April 21, 1991; brothers, Joseph and Lewis; sister, Edith; and special friend, Layiah Martin. He is survived by his son, William and his wife, Cynthia, Boise, Idaho; daughter, Karen Allen and her husband, Barry, Hollidaysburg; grandchildren, Rachel Allen and her husband, Jeff Dickson, Burlington, Vt., and Erin Allen, Richmond, Va.; sister, Rowena Jones, Hazleton; close relatives, Jean Scovill, York, Lois and Shirley VanBuskirk, York; and nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held, at the fam- ily ’s convenience, for family and friends. Arrangements are by E. Merrill Smith Funeral Home, Altoona.

Arrangements are by E. Merrill Smith Funeral Home, Altoona. da niel rOsser Williams iV Sept. 24,

daniel rOsser Williams iV

Sept. 24, 2013

Daniel Rosser Williams IV, 39, of Harding, passed away Tuesday, Sept . 24, 2013, in Wilkes-Barre. Born in Kingston on Oct. 30, 1973, he was the beloved and only son of Arlene and the late Daniel R. Williams. Dan was a 1993 graduate of Vo -Tech, Pringle. In addition to his mother, Arlene, he is survived by a sis- ter, Jennifer Williams, Harding; aunt , Linda We at hers, Pittston; grandmother, Jeanne Williams Dow, Wyoming; and niece, Ashley Donovan. The funeral will be held at 9 a.m. Tuesday from the Kizis- Lokuta Funeral Home, 134 Church St., Pittston. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. in St.

of Christian Bu rial will be celebr ated at 9:30 a.m. in St. John the Evangel

John the Evangelist Church, William Street, Pittston, with Father Peter Tomczak as offici- ant. Interment will be in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Family and friends may call from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday at the funeral home.

reV. henry edWard WestField

Sept. 25, 2013

The Rev. Henry Edward

We stfield passed into Heave nly

Life on September 25, 2013. He was born on July 5, 1938.

He died at home, Dallas, Pa. He was preceded in death

by his Mother and Father Fred

and Esther Mitchell We stfield

of Kingston, Pa.

A man of great strength,

he endured the death of sons Henry We stfield, age 39, and Chief Petty Officer Medical Corpsman, John-Mark, age 38, one year apart to the exact date. He is survived by his wife, Alice Sh re y We stfield, who

will deeply miss him; sons Paul

We stfield and Wayne and wife,

Margo, and children David and Katie, who loved and cared

and supported him; his dearest daughter-in-law, Renee, widow

of John-Mark who gave unend-

ing support, and daughters Krystal and Bianca; Krystal’s husband, Demetrius, and chil- dren; Henry ’s children Erik, Mark and sweet hearts Levi and Noah; Beverly Sobocinski, sister who cheered him with outings, and her four sons; Mitch Morgan, who is a son born of the heart and a gift from God who eased the loss of his sons, and wife, Holly, and Hannah; and nieces and neph- ews. His dear friends Joe and Carol Wideman, who gave him

the pleasure of special events. His family feels deep grati- tude to Dr. Pernikoff, Dr. Saidman, and Dr. Killduff, PAS; nurses; to the Dallas United Methodist Church, who are true Christians, and their dedicated Pastor Rev. Robert Wo od, and the lo ving care of the nurses of Hospice of the Sacred Heart who ministered unto him like Angels. The Rev. We stfield wa s a man

of many gifts, and abilities. He

proudly served in the Navy on the USS FORESTAL for most of his eight years of service.

on the USS FORESTAL for most of his eight years of service. He studied theology at

He studied theology at We sly Se minary, Wa shington, D.C ., was ordained into the United Methodist Church as a minis- ter in 1969, and served actively at Huntsville United Methodist Church, the Hop Bottom Charge, UMC, the McClure , N.Y. , UMC, and Alderson

UMC, Harveys Lake. He gradu- ated from Luzerne County Community College with an Associate Degree in Science. He was the volleyball coach at LCCC when it gained PRIZE WINNING CHAMPIONSHIP, for volleyball. He coached vol- leyball at Dallas High School. He worked at Clearbrook Drug and Alcohol Lodge as direc- tor of education for 10 years, and his final job was as direc- tor of the Family Drug And Alcohol Program at Choice of the former Nesbitt Memorial Hospital, before becoming dis- abled.

Funeral will be held Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 7:30 p.m. at the Richard H. Disque Funeral Home, 2940 Memorial Highway, Dallas with the Rev. Robert Wood, pastor, Dallas United Methodist Church, offi- ciating. Friends may call Sunday

from 6 p.m. until time of service. Interment will be at a private time with family.

In lieu of flowers, if desired

please consider Wounded Wa rriors and/or The Hospice of the Sacred Heart. Thank you.

rriors and/or The Hospice of the Sa cred Heart. Thank yo u. rO ber t k

rObert kOOns Jr.

Sept. 23, 2013

Robert Koons Jr., 36, of Suscon, passed away Monday

at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township.

He was born in Suscon, June 4,

1977, and was the son of Robert J. Koons (Carol Koons) and Renee Renfer (Chris Renfer). Robert was a member of Sacred Heart Of Jesus Parish Church, Dupont. He was a resident at St. Joseph’s Center, Scranton, for

the last 27 years. Robert enjoyed the outdoors, especially fishing. He also loved being with his family and friends, and enjoyed taking part in the many activi- ties that St. Joseph Center had

to

offer. He will be deeply missed

by

all.

In

addition to his parents,

Robert is survived by his sister

Renee Giambra, and her husband Brian, of Pittston Township; his nephews Michael Kishel and Brian Giambra Jr. and several aunts, uncles and cousins.

He was preceded in death by

his paternal grandparents Robert and Mary Claire (McHale) Koons and maternal grand- parents Edward Kolankiewicz Sr. and Shirley (Renfer) Kolankiewicz.

A Mass of Christian Burial

was held at 10 a.m. Thursday in Sacred Heart of Jesus Church Chapel, Dupont, with Fr. Joseph Verespy officiating. Arrangements were by Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc., 255

McAlpine St., Duryea. Online

condolences may be made to

www.kiesingerfuneralservices. com.

sandra richards

Sept. 25, 2013

Sandra Richards, of Luzerne, passed away We dnesday, Se pt . 25, 2013, at her home. Born in Kingston, a daugh-

ter of the late Harry and Lillian Hopple Turner, Sandy was

a member of the Trucksville

United Methodist Church. She attended the Dallas schools and graduated from Dallas High School. Prior to retirement, Sandy

worked at the State Correctional Institution, Dallas, and was also employed by Leslie Fay in Wilkes-Barre and Stul Brothers

in Kingston.

She was preceded in death by her husband, John Richards; a son, Jay Richards; and a sister Debbie Steele. Surviving are son, Bruce and his wife, Catherine Richards; daughter, Nadine and her

husband, James Santewan Sr.; grandchildren, Christine Atcavage, James Santewan Jr., Scott Richards and Matt Richards; great-grandchilren, Brendan Richards, Logan

Atcavage, Matthew Richards II, Ba ilee At cava ge , Tyler Richards and Maci Lynn Richards; sis- ters, Doris Vosburg and Marian Williams. Funeral for Sandra will be held at 11 a.m. Monday from the Lehman-Gregory Funeral Home Inc., 281 Chapel St., Swoyersville. Interment will

be in Chapel Lawn Cemetery, Dallas. Family and friends may call 9 a.m. to service. The family requests no flowers and that donations be made to the Trucksville United Methodist Church, 40 Knob Hill Road, Shavertown.

Funerals

atWell - Linda, Mass of Christian Burial 11 a.m. today in Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, Lackawanna Avenue, Dupont. Friends may call 9:30 a.m. until Mass. belinsky - Albert, Mass of Christian Burial 11 a.m. today at Holy Name of Mary Catholic

In Loving Memory Karen Groshek It has been 3 years our hearts still ache in

In Loving Memory Karen Groshek

It has been 3 years our hearts still ache in sadness and secret tears still flow. What it meant to lose you, no one will ever know.

Love, Always & Forever Always Remembered Never Forgotten

Your Husband Rick Son Ricky & Daughter Holly 80126740

& Forever Always Remembered Never Forgotten Your Husband Rick Son Ricky & Daughter Holly 8 0

Church. bOmber - Alexander, military funeral services 11:30 a.m. today at George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. Mass of Christian Burial noon in St. Robert Bellarmine Parish, West Division Street, Hanove r Township.

In Loving Memory Juanita Marie Todd

In Loving Memory Juanita Marie To dd 12-16-49 to 9-28-72 Unsolved Murder Victim who was brutally

12-16-49 to 9-28-72 Unsolved Murder Victim who was brutally murdered 41 years ago today, September 28, 1972 in Wilkes-Barre City.

Gone but not forgotten:

Sadly missed by Odetta, Tamu and Family

80127784

brennan - Thomas Jr., funeral services 11 a.m. today in First Baptist Church, 48 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 10 a.m. to services. bytheWay - Lori, friends may call 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday at Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tu nkhannock. charnetski - Irene, funeral services 1 p.m. today at Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave.,

Kingston. Friends may call 11 a.m. to services. deFine - David Sr., funeral 9 a.m. today at E. Blake Collins Funeral Home, 159 George Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in St. Maria Goretti Church, with 9 a.m. recitation of the rosary by the Parish Bereavement Group. eVans - Evelyn, visitation 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday at Connell Funeral Home, 245 E. Broad

IF NURSING HOME PLACEMENT BECOMES NECESSARY… DON’T PRESUME ALL IS LOST! Even under current law,
IF NURSING HOME PLACEMENT BECOMES
NECESSARY… DON’T PRESUME ALL IS LOST!
Even under current law, there ARE still ways to legally protect your home
and other hard-earned assets from being spent down on long term care
when you, your spouse or a loved one are either in or about to enter a
nursing home.
• Can you save your residence?
• Can you transfer assets within the five year look-back period?
• How can annuities help?
• Can more income be protected for the spouse at home?
STRAIGHTFORWARD ANSWERS TO COMPLEX QUESTIONS!
THE SOONER YOU ACT, THE MORE YOU’RE ABLE TO SAVE!
Attorney DAviD r. LipkA
Certified As an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation
50 East Main Street, Plymouth, PA (570) 779-5353
Estate & Medicaid Planning; Wills; Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts: Estate
Probate and Administration; Guardianships; and Special Needs Trusts.

St., Bethlehem, and 9 to 9:45 a.m. Monday at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church 3219 Santee Road, Bethlehem. Mass of Christian Burial 10

a.m. at the church. Burial 1:30 p.m. in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Ha nove r Township. Fuller - Richard Sr., reception in his honor noon to

2 p.m. today at Leggio’s Italian

Restaurant, 1 E. Center Hill Road, Dallas. GadOmski - Daniel, funeral Mass 9:30 a.m. today in St. Monica’s Parish in Our Lady of Sorrows Church, West Wyoming. GnaZZO - Helen, graveside service noon Monday in Old Forge Cemetery. hOFFman - Donald Sr., funeral services 11:30 a.m. Monday at Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave.,

Wyoming. Friends may call 5 to

8 p.m. Sunday.

labarr - Iris, funeral 11 a.m. today at Richard H. Disque Funeral Home, 2940 Memorial Highway, Dallas. Friends may call 10 a.m. to service. lescaVaGe - Edith, friends may call 6 p.m. Sunday at Dutcavich Funeral Home, 200

Sunbury St., Minersville. Mass of Christian Burial 8 a.m. Monday in St. Matthew Church, 139 Spruce St., Minersville. lispi - Gene, funeral services 9:30 a.m. Saturday at Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in St. Joseph Morello Parish in Our

Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Pittston. matheWs - Patricia, celebration of life 10 a.m. today in Queen of the Apostles Church, Hawthorne Street, Avoca. nareski - Joseph, funeral 9:30 a.m today at S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, Plymouth. Mass 10 a.m. in All Saints Parish, Plymouth. Friends may call 8:30 a.m. to service. OWens - Jane, memorial funeral Mass 10 a.m. today in St.

Robert Bellarmine Parish at St. Aloysius Church, Division and Barney streets, Wilkes-Barre. piccOlOtti - Samuel, visitation 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday at Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter. Funeral services 10 a.m. Monday. rhOads - Dorene, memorial

services 11:15 a.m. today in Trucksville United Methodist Church. Friends may call 10 a.m. to services. ryan - Leo, funeral 11:30 a.m. today at Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial noon in St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, Swoyersville. shampack - Marie, funeral 9:30 a.m. today at Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, 116 Hughes St., Swoyersville. traVer - Hiram, memorial service 11 a.m. Sunday in St. Luke’s Reformation Lutheran Church, Noxen. WarnaGiris - Paul, Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. today in St. John Evangelist Church Community, the former St. Casimir’s Parish, William Street, Pittston. ZikOWski - Daniel Sr., memorial service noon today at Andrew Strish Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St., Larksville. Friends may call 10 a.m. to service.

Editorial

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Saturday, September 28, 2013 PAGE 9A

Other OpiniOn: schOOl bus safety

Cameras could nab dangerous drivers

Most people know what it means when a school bus comes to halt, red lights flash and a stop sign swings out from the driver’s side. Cars behind the bus and approach- ing it must stop until the sign retracts after all students either climb aboard or disembark. At a four-way intersection, cross traf- fic also has to wait. It’s about children’s safety; most everyone understands this and obeys Pennsylvania’s School Bus Stopping Law. Yet about 1,000 people a year are in too much of a hurry and ignore the stop signs. They’re not only reckless, but bold, considering a conviction carries a 60- day driver ’s license suspension, five points on their driving record, and a $250 fine Perhaps they see there are no police officers around and figure the bus driv- er is too busy to jot down their license plate numbers. What are the odds of getting caught? If a new bill becomes law, the odds will be pretty high. State Rep. Seth Grove, R-Dover Township, wants to give school dis- tricts the option of installing cameras on the school bus stop signs. They would sense when a car is passing and

snap images of the license plates, allow- ing police to track down the offender and cite him or her. We support the bill because it’s optional, and — unlike York City Police Department’s license plate scanners that are constantly recording images

of every license plate in the vicinity —

the cameras would only capture drivers

in the process of breaking the law.

The bill already has the backing of much of York County ’s delegation, including House Majority Whip Stan Saylor, R-Windsor Township. “I agree with the big brother argu-

ment on some things, but in this case there’s no way a bus driver can catch

a license plate number,” Saylor said.

“The bottom line is they’re putting a young child in danger and breaking the law, and I don’t know how you’re sup - posed to catch these people. “If somebody has a better idea than Seth has, let us have it,” he said. Don’t look at us. Short of stationing police officers at every bus stop, twice a day, we don’t know what else will stop the scofflaws. That, of course, is just not feasible. Cameras on school buses seem to be

a good option for catching these driv- ers and, hopefully, deterring others from such behavior.

York Dispatch

Other OpiniOn: capitOl hill

Conservative tactics play havoc on country

It wasn’t the longest speech on the Senate floor, and not quite a filibuster, but Se n. Te d Cruz, R-Texas, made his points during his talkathon about the Affordable Care Act: Socialism! A jobs killer! Americans don’t want it! A red herring to impose a single-payer sys- tem! By noon We dnesday, after 21 hours and 19 minutes on his feet, and assist- ed once in a while by Florida’s junior Sen. Marco Rubio and other tea party conservatives, Sen. Cruz sat down. Then he voted, along with Sen. Rubio, for the procedural measure to have Congress vote on a spending bill that would raise the debt ceiling. Sen. Cruz, a freshman who, like Mr. Rubio, has his eye on the White House for 2016, wants to “defund Obamacare” or hold the budget hostage and spark an unpopular government shutdown. Many Republican senators who were around during the Clinton-Gingrich budget battles of the 1990s know bet- ter. As Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, noted:

“I just don’t believe anybody benefits from shutting the government down, and certainly Republicans don’t. We learned that in 1995.” Sure, Mr. Cruz’s political act was entertaining. There was a reading of “Green Eggs and Ham,” directed at his young daughters who watched on TV before they went to bed. There wa s eve n a St ar Wa rs imper- sonation and a reference to the Duck Dynasty reality TV show. All that was missing during the marathon in which Mr. Cruz was not allowed to go to the bathroom was a commercial for adult diapers. Laughs aside, the threat of this latest tactic against the president’s health- care law remains if the Senate can’t reach agreement by midnight Monday on the spending plan and debt ceiling. Here’s the reality check: Obamacare passed muster in the conservative- leaning U.S. Supreme Court.

It is not a socialist plot — just ask insurance companies that will be sell- ing policies. It is not a jobs killer — just ask

hospitals and healthcare professionals who are poised to hire more workers as insurance options expand this year for millions of Americans. And it