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Volume 126 Issue 19 kansan.com Tuesday, September 24, 2013


UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
SLEEPING PILLS
PAGE 2
All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 7
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 8
SUDOKU 5
Mainly sunny. West
northwest winds at 5 to
10 mph
Apply for an Alternative Break by Friday. Index Dont
forget
Todays
Weather
Sunny and perfect. Am I right?
HI: 77
LO: 53
Companies are seeking a new
approach to reaching out to college
students using their peers to
market products.
Campus representatives are
becoming essential to on-campus
marketing strategies.
Businesses with a focus on youth
turned their sights toward uni-
versity students with interests in
things such as music and partying,
which has proved quite proftable
to companies marketing to twen-
ty-somethings. Tis revelation by
many companies has caused them
to seek out college students to
take their wares to the collegiate
masses.
Teyre very college-based, said
Lauren Watkins, a junior pre-busi-
ness major, who is also a campus
representative for the music-play-
ing application, Spotify. I love
music, and I love Spotify. I thought
the best way to get experience
in the music business was to get
involved with them.
Other companies like Southern
Tide, Vineyard Vines and South-
ern Coast have their own campus
representatives distributing ap-
parel, products or services as well.
Spotify is gaining popularity with
students who dont want to pay on
other outlets like iTunes. And with
over 20 million downloads, its not
going away anytime soon.
So many kids use the app, at
parties, at the library, its really
cool to think about how much
things have changed in just a few
years about how and how much we
listen to music, Watkins said.
Being a campus representa-
tive also has its benefts for the
students.
Te networking opportunities
are really good, said Rose Shriver,
a senior studying flm and media.
You get to meet a lot of people
through the program and it looks
great on a resume.
Many of the largest campus
representative programs in the
nation have been initiated by
New York-based marketing frm,
Mr. Youth. Te frm focuses on
marketing products that univer-
sity students are interested in and
helps companies reach students in
nontraditional ways.
People are really trying to
become more like brands, and
brands are trying to become more
like people, said Matt Britton,
co-founder and CEO of Mr. Youth,
at the 2010 L2 Generation Next
Forum. Customers expect brands
to talk with them instead of adding
to the clutter.
Mr. Youth runs several student
ambassadorships across the nation
with several major brands, includ-
ing Coca-Cola, Nike, Playstation
and Microsof.
While marketing agencies like
Mr. Youth are revolutionizing the
way students are marketed to,
some of the oldest strategies for
selling products still work.
I think TV and radio will still be
around in the future to advertise
and market to people, but the
internet has really changed every-
thing, Watkins said.
Watkins said the best way for
reaching out to students is still by
word of mouth.
Even with the emergence of
social media and the internet,
our generation can easily get lost
in the ocean of information out
there, Watkins said. It works
better when someone you know
promotes a product.
Edited by Heather Nelson
A recent study authored by a KU
professor found that saving a little
at a young age can provide big
benefts as an adult.
Terri Friedline, an assistant pro-
fessor of social welfare, authored
a three-part series entitled, Chil-
dren as Potential Investors, which
found that young people who start
a savings account are more likely
to invest, diversify their funds and
accumulate more money in the
long term than those who do not.
Friedlines previous work helping
young men in the juvenile justice
system prepare for life on their
own served as an inspiration
for the study. She found that
many young people may not be
prepared to make simple fnancial
decisions.
A lot of my responsibility there
was preparing them to transition
out of care to live independent-
ly, Friedline said. A lot of their
decisions that they would have to
make regarded fnances, like how
to get a job, how to manage funds,
how to use a bank, very basic
Kansas legislators are weighing
in on the situation surround-
ing KU Professor David Guth
following his controversial tweet
regarding the Navy Yard shooting
last Monday.
High ranking members of the
Kansas GOP have issued state-
ments condemning Guths tweet
and calling for his termination.
I feel I have no choice but
to call upon the University of
Kansas and Chancellor Gray-
Little to remove Professor Guth
from the Universitys faculty,
Senate Majority Leader Terry
Bruce (R-Hutchinson) wrote in a
statement on Facebook Tursday.
Wishing death and damnation
upon parents and their chil-
dren is reprehensible and is not
beftting of an employee of such a
distinguished university.
Guth, a Strategic Communica-
tions professor in the School
of Journalism, tweeted on
Monday: #NavyYardShooting
Te blood is on the hands of the
#NRA. Next time, let it be YOUR
sons and daughters. Shame on
you. May God damn you.
In his call for Guths termina-
tion, Bruce also cited the resigna-
tion of University Professor Paul
Mirecki in 2005 for comments he
made in an online forum regard-
ing religious fundamentalists.
In light of the recent tragedy
that befell our nation, the com-
ments of Professor Guth refect
as poorly, if not more so, upon
the University of Kansas as the
comments made by Professor
Mirecki, Bruce wrote.
In the days following Guths
tweet, the University placed him
on indefnite administrative
leave. In a statement released on
Friday, State Senate President
Susan Wagle (R-Wichita) was
supportive of the measures taken
by the University, but said she
wants more action taken.
While initial steps have been
CHECK OUT OPINION
PAGE 4
O
MONEY PAGE 3
Tenured faculty members of
the William Allen White School of
Journalism and Mass Communica-
tions released a statement Monday
regarding associate professor
David Guths controversial tweet.
The faculty members stated their
strong support of Guths First
Amendment right to express his
opinions, though they disagree
with his comments.
The statement also explained why
and how his classes have been
adjusted due to his administrative
leave.
Because of the polarized nature
and the volume of response to
Professor Guths comments, we
support his decision and the
decision of the University admin-
istration for Professor Guth to
transfer his students and classes
to other professors at this time,
the statement said.
Thirteen tenured journalism
faculty members signed the
statement.
Tara Bryant
Faculty members
respond to Guth tweet
WHAT ARE YOU SELLING?
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY GEORGE MULLINIX
Companies like Erodr, Pink, ASOS, Red Bull and Microsoft are using students to market their products on campus. The opportunity benefts students with real-world experience and gives companies a students perspective for their marketing plans.
BUILDING A BRAND
Marketers use student ambassadors to promote products
ROBERT PYATT
rpyatt@kansan.com
Controversial tweet receives
backlash from legislators
SOCIAL MEDIA MONEY MATTERS
CODY KUIPER
ckuiper@kansan.com
GUTH PAGE 3
Youth savings leads to
building investments
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ASHLEIGH LEE
CODY KUIPER
ckuiper@kansan.com
Te Campus Food Pantry at the
Ecumenical Campus Ministries
(ECM) building opened its doors
for the frst time this month to
provide food for students, com-
munity members and anyone
who can walk up the hill, said
Rayyan Kamal, one of three coor-
dinators at the food pantry.
One in six Americans lives in a
household that struggles to put
food on the table, according to the
Economic Research Service of the
U.S. Department of Agricultures
annual report on food insecu-
rity in the U.S., and University
students arent immune to that
statistic.
According to a survey conducted
by KU Fights Hunger, 36 percent
of students said they eat smaller
meals due to fnancial concerns,
and 12 percent of students said
they do not have adequate access
to food.
Te food pantry is located on the
lower foor of ECM and will be
open from 4-8 p.m. the frst and
third Tursday of each month.
Te Campus Food Pantry aims
not only to make sure students
dont go hungry, but to strengthen
the Universitys community as
well. Individuals of all incomes
are welcome to
visit the pantry,
Kamal said.
Even if you
dont come for
food, just come
in, he said. If
someone of a
higher income
wants to come
in, I dont see a
problem with
that.
Te Campus
Food Pantry operates as a collab-
orative efort of ECM, KU Fights
Hunger and the Douglas County
food bank, Just Food. ECM and
KU Fights Hunger have been
eager to fll the need for a food
pantry on campus, Kamal said.
We dont want the whole clich
of eating ramen noodles three
times a day, Kamal said.
When an individual enters the
food pantry, they are encouraged
to submit minimal information
for the staf to keep track of the
demographic they serve. Te
individual is then given a card
based on family size, which indi-
cates how many
units of each
food group they
may take. Te
pantry operates
on the honor
system, but
coordinators ask
that individuals
come only once
each Tursday
that the pantry
is open, Kamal
said.
Katherine Hybl, a freshman from
Wichita, volunteers at the ECM
building and thinks the food pan-
try is a great opportunity to build
the community.
People here are really nice,
no one is here to judge you and
theres other people in the same
situation as you, Hybl said. May-
be some better of, maybe some
worse of. Te whole point of this
is that everyone can come in. Its
not for an exclusive set of people
and theres no stereotype.
Although the pantry has only
been open twice this month,
Kamal is eager to see the program
grow and continue to share the
food.
You might be poor and you
might need food, but we have
food for you even if youre not
poor, Kamal said.
Kamal said the use of food pan-
try or food bank has been up
for debate. He doesnt mind either
title, but he thinks food bank
has a more positive connotation.
Pantry tends to give the idea of
charity, I think, but bank is like
a treasure, like you go in there
and theres awesome things for
everyone, Kamal said.
Edited by Sylas May
1
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison Kohn
Dylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Business manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren Armendariz
Hayley Jozwiak
Elise Reuter
Madison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole Anneberg
Allyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
Media director and
content stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: UDK_News
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student
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The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-
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KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out
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on Knology
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Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
youve read in todays Kansan and other
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KJHK is the student voice
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2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
Whats the
Wednesday Thursday Friday
HI: 82
HI: 87 HI: 87
LO: 57
LO: 60 LO: 62
weather.com
Mainly sunny.
East winds at 5 to
10 mph
Mainly sunny.
South southeast
winds at 8 to 11
mph
Mostly sunny.
South winds at 6
to 12 mph.
Sunny with a chance of fannel The heat goes on And on...
Calendar
Tuesday, Sept. 24 Wednesday, Sept. 25 Thursday, Sept. 26 Friday, Sept. 27
What: Screening of American
Movie and conversation with
producer Sarah Price
When: 6:30 to 10 p.m.
Where: Budig Hall 110
About: Sarah Price, a director and
producer, has had documentary
flms premiere and garner top
awards at Sundance, Toronto and
Berlin International Film Festivals.
What: SUA presents Grocery Bingo
When: 7 to 9 p.m.
Where: Hashinger Hall, Black Box
Theater
About: Play bingo and win food,
simple as that.
What: Ten-year anniversary celebration
Ambler Student Recreation Fitness
Center
When: 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Where: Ambler Student Recreation
Fitness Center
Cost: Free
What: International Peace and Confict
Studies Film Festival
When: Spencer Museum of Art auditori-
um
Where: 5 to 7:30 p.m.
About: The center of Latin American &
Caribbean Studies presents "Machu-
ca" (2004). The flm runs 121 minutes.
What: Facing Genocide and its After-
math: Cartographies of the Holocaust
and Genocide
When: 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Where: Hall Center, Seminar Room
About: Alberto Giordano, from Texas State
University at San Marcos, will speak
at a seminar open to faculty, staff and
graduate students.
What: KU common book: An evening with
author Timothy Egan
When: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Where: Lied Center
About: In a free event, Timothy Egan,
author of the 2013-14 KU Common Book
The Worst Hard Time, will speak to
his experience writing the novel, as well
as take questions from the audience. A
book signing will follow the event.
What: Refecting Forward: Jazz Artists
through Oral History
When: 10 to 11 a.m.
Where: Watson Library, 455
About: Coffee and conversation with
Maxine Gordon. Part of American Studies
celebration of 60 years at the University.
What: The Museum Collection Across the
Curriculum: Lives of Buddhist Artifacts
When: Noon to 1 p.m.
Where: Spencer Museum of Art
About: In this free event, religious studies
professor Daniel Stevenson discusses
the ways in which Buddhist images and
objects found their way into the lives of
Buddhist clergy and institutions, follow-
ers of Buddhism, and vernacular culture.
JENNIFER SALVA
jsalva@kansan.com
Campus Food Pantry provides for students in need
COMMUNITY
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
The Ecumenical Campus Ministries building now houses the Campus Food Pantry.
HEALTH
ELLY GRIMM
egrimm@kansan.com
Sleep medication usage increases across campus
As many as 80 million Americans
currently sufer from insomnia, a
common problem characterized
by trouble falling asleep or staying
asleep. Many of those who sufer
with insomnia ofen turn to sleep
aids or medications to help.
According to the Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report, approx-
imately 5 percent of men and 3
percent of women around age 20
use sleep aids or medications to
help them sleep, and the use has
gone up in the last decade.
I think a lot of times college
students are interested in a quick
fx for insomnia, because when
you actually have time to sleep you
really need to sleep because your
days are so busy and you have so
much to do that a lot of times you
cant sleep, said Loree Cordova,
a staf physician at Watkins Me-
morial Health Center. "Its a very
uncomfortable position to be in to
not be able to sleep.
Cordova says other causes of
insomnia that led to students tak-
ing sleeping medications include
keeping odd schedules, taking
other medications with stimulants,
depression and stress from studies.
However, Cordova says its ofen
these and similar underlying issues
that need to be addressed before
resorting to sleep medications.
She also added that sleep-medi-
cation abuse tends to happen with
sedative medications like Ambien
(which can be more habit-form-
ing), and said that, especially with
college students, the most import-
ant thing to do is to remember that
sleeping medications should be
used very rarely.
However, she says that if a stu-
dent is getting to the point where
he or she is requiring a daily med-
ication to sleep even afer making
behavioral and environmental
changes, its important to work
with a physician.
Another reason to avoid sleep-
ing medications is their efects
on thinking and focus, which can
particularly afect students as they
make their way through school,
work and other activities, Cordova
said.
Whats important is just
realizing that, most of the time, the
behavioral things that you can do
to sleep better are ofen overlooked
with college students and those
are things that are in your control,
Cordova said.
Edited by Sylas May

People here are really


nice, no one is here to
judge you and theres
other people in the same
situation as you.
KATHERINE HYBL
freshman
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Although many students take sleeping medications to soften their all-nighters, behavioral changes are often healthier.
MOSCOW One of the im-
prisoned members of the Russian
punk group Pussy Riot declared
a hunger strike on Monday to
protest what she described as in-
humane working conditions and
threats to her life at a women's
penal colony.
Nadezhda Tolokonnikova is
serving a two-year sentence for
"hooliganism motivated by reli-
gious hatred." She and two other
group members were arrested in
early 2012 afer Pussy Riot burst
into Moscow's main Orthodox
cathedral and tried to perform a
"punk prayer" denouncing Vladi-
mir Putin.
In a passionate fve-page letter
published on the group's blog,
Tolokonnikova said inmates in her
penal colony are forced to work
up to 17 hours a day in a shop that
makes police uniforms in order to
fulfll the quotas. Brigades that fail
to meet the quotas are punished
by being denied food, prevented
from using the bathroom or made
to stand outside in the cold, she
wrote.
She also said the deputy warden
threatened her last month by
suggesting that other prisoners
would be encouraged to kill her
in retribution for her attempts to
challenge the prison system.
"If they fnd out that this hap-
pened because of you, then things
will certainly never be bad for you
because nothing is ever bad in the
next world," Tolokonnikova quot-
ed the deputy warden as saying.
She described a system where
inmates with ties to the prison
administration are used to terror-
ize other inmates to keep them
in line.
Tolokonnikova submitted
separate complaints to Russia's
chief investigative agency and the
prison service about the threats
she said she has received and the
working conditions at the penal
colony in the Mordovia region,
about 500 kilometers (300 miles)
east of Moscow.
Te prison service said the
inmates work in two shifs and
denied that the women spend any
more than eight hours per day in
the sewing shop, the Interfax news
agency reported.
Te head of the presidential
human rights council, Mikhail
Fedotov, said on Twitter that four
members of the council would
travel to the prison on Tuesday to
look into the complaints.
Tolokonnikova said she frst ap-
pealed to the prison administra-
tion to shorten the work day and
call of the inmates threatening
her, but it led only to increased
pressure.
"Terefore, on Sept. 23, I am
declaring a hunger strike and
refusing to take part in the slave
labor in the colony until the
administration starts obeying the
law and stops treating incarcerat-
ed women like cattle thrown out
of the justice system to serve the
needs of the sewing industry but
like people," she wrote.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
It was one year ago today that
the president of the Republic of
Columbia visited campus. Juan
Manuel Santos happens to be a KU
alumnus!
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriffs
Offce booking recap.

A 24-year-old male was


arrested Sunday on Kansas
Highway 10 on suspicion of
criminal trespassing, criminal
damage to property, aggravated
burglary and domestic battery.
A $12,000 bond was paid.
A 38-year-old male was arrested
Sunday on Interstate 70 on
suspicion of possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession
of controlled substance. A
$2,000 bond was paid.
NEW YORK An Oscar-win-
ning composer's son was sen-
tenced Monday to at least a quar-
ter-century in prison in the death
of his fashion designer girlfriend,
capping a saga of a one-hit-won-
der father and an aimless son both
were accused of seriously abusing
women.
As Nicholas Brooks was given
the maximum 25-year-to-life
sentence for his
conviction in
the murder of
Sylvie Cachay,
there was no
way his father
could have
been there to
see him.
Joseph
Brooks, who
wrote the 1970s
touchstone
song "You
Light Up My Life," killed himself
in 2011, while he was fghting
charges of raping or molesting 13
would-be actresses.
Te younger Brooks, 27, and
Cachay had a tumultuous six-
month relationship, bolstered by
obvious afection but hampered
by diferences in age, attitude
and ambition, according to trial
testimony.
Te liaison was laced with
Brooks' jealousy and violence,
prosecutors said; police once were
summoned afer he allegedly
slammed Cachay's head into a
wall, though no charges were
fled. Prosecutors said Brooks ul-
timately strangled Cachay because
she was dumping him.
Brooks' lawyer argued Cachay's
December 2010 death was an
accident, and Brooks told a court
Tuesday it was "the most devastat-
ing thing that has ever occurred
in my life.
"I think about her every day, and
it breaks my heart. I loved her
very much, and not a moment
goes by where I do not miss her,"
said Brooks, who plans to appeal.
But Cachay's relatives lashed
out at Brooks:
"a cowardly
liar, a parasite
to our society,
an abuser of
women and a
repulsive mur-
derer," said one
of her brothers,
Patrick Orlan-
do.
Manhattan
state Supreme
Court Justice
Bonnie Wittner
said Brooks squandered his edu-
cation and privilege.
When Cachay met Brooks, he
was a college dropout working
odd jobs and living largely of a
trust fund from his father. Te el-
der Brooks largely raised him afer
a custody fght, said their mutual
lawyer, Jefrey Hofman.
Cachay, 33, had worked as a de-
signer for Marc Jacobs, Victoria's
Secret and Tommy Hilfger and
had her own swimsuit line.
Te duo checked into the Soho
House hotel afer a small fre in
Cachay's apartment. A surveil-
lance camera showed the two
wobbling into their room, then
Nicholas Brooks leaving and re-
turning several times, at one point
appearing frantic, before taking
of for hours.
Cachay's partially clothed body
was discovered in an overfowing
bathtub. Medical examiners ruled
she was forcibly drowned and
strangled.
"Couples break up every day
without one ending up in a gur-
ney inside the coroner's ofce.
He just had to walk away. Tat's
all he had to do," Manhattan
Assistant District Attorney Joel
Seidemann said.
Hofman argued Cachay
drowned accidentally, passing out
from an overdose of alcohol and
prescription drugs used to treat
migraines and fbromyalgia, a
disorder that causes widespread
pain.
Brooks wanted to spend his fu-
ture with Cachay, and "it was the
frst time in this man's life that he
had ever had that depth of feeling
for anyone and from anyone,"
Hofman said.
Joseph Brooks won the Academy
Award for best original song in
1977 for "You Light Up My Life,"
sung by Debby Boone. Brooks
wrote and directed the romantic
comedy of the same name, but
then his career foundered.
Prosecutors said the songwriter
lured the women to his Manhat-
tan apartment through an online
ad ofering movie auditions, then
sexually assaulted them afer
making them drink apparently
drugged wine for an "acting exer-
cise." He pleaded not guilty.
Four days afer his suicide at 73,
his former assistant pleaded guilty
to criminal facilitation, saying
she helped him meet 10 of the
women.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pussy Riot inmate declares hunger strike
PROTEST
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 26, 2013 fle photo, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, foreground right, a member of the feminist punk band, Pussy Riot,
listens from behind bars at a courtroom at a district court in Saransk. Nadezhda Tolokonnikova says she is beginning
a hunger strike to protest harsh working conditions and threats to her life.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Composers son sentenced to
25 years in prison for murder

I think about her every


day, and it breaks myheart.
I loved her very much, and
not a moment goes by
where I do not miss her.
NICHOLAS BROOKS
CRIME
life-skills.
Tese decisions are complicated,
especially for young people.
In her research for Children
as Potential Investors, Friedline
analyzed seven years of data on
young people who began savings
accounts at the average age of 17.
She found that those who started
accounts were twice as likely to
maintain their account, and four
times more likely to have invested
in stocks and accumulated an
average of $2,000 by the time they
were 23. Young people who did
not start an account accumulated
an average of about $100 in the
same amount of time.
Friedline said her fndings also
indicate that people who open
savings accounts at a young age
are more likely to develop a good
relationship with fnancial insti-
tutions and understand how they
operate.
Having connections with banks
and learning how to use them well
is important for transitioning into
independence and adulthood,
Friedline said. Being able to
invest in future assets and making
those decisions at a young age can
make it easier to make healthy
fnancial decisions throughout the
course of your life.
Friedline said her research
indicates not all young people are
being properly educated when
it comes to fnance, which she
thinks needs to be addressed in
schools.
In some ways, it shows as a
country we kind of neglected
helping people grow up to be
fnancially capable citizens,
Friedline said. Many kids are
learning about fnancials through
osmosis from their parents, but it
is something that needs to be inte-
grated much more systematically
as far as schools and our public
discourse and conversation.
Ginger Werp, a senior from
Overland Park, said she wasnt
taught the nuances of savings and
fnance in school or at home, and
that most young adults are forced
to learn through experience.
I think its just life, Werp said.
When you run out of money,
you realize maybe next time you
shouldnt spend so much, and
prioritize bills and food instead of
clothes and going out.
Werp added that an education
plan similar to what Friedline
calls for could be benefcial for
students.
Maybe if high schools, or when
youre a freshman in college, if
they kind of teach you about
fnances, that would be helpful,
Werp said. Even just an hour of
a class could make a diference in
what you think about when youre
spending.
Not everyone thinks a fnancial
education is necessary, however.
Evgeny Grishin, a junior from
Russia, said with the resources
available, people shouldnt need a
class to learn the basics of savings.
I probably wouldnt attend it,
Grishin said. Its time, and there
are other things to spend time on.
I can probably learn it on my own;
theres Internet and other things,
so people can fnd out on their
own.
Edited by Duncan McHenry
encouraging, I trust University
leaders will seek to minimize
further damage to the reputation
of the University of Kansas by
severing all ties to Mr. Guth,
Wagle wrote.
Guths Twitter account has been
removed in the wake of the public
backlash, but he has refused to
apologize for his comments.
All I did was what any Ameri-
can should have the right to do:
express his or her opinion in an
opinion forum, Guth said last
Tursday. I regret that theres
been a blowback at KU. I didnt do
it on a KU site.
Senator Greg Smith (R-Over-
land Park) also called for Guths
dismissal this weekend, citing his
past conduct in addition to the
recent tweet. Te University cen-
sured Guth in 2010 for unpro-
fessional, threatening and abusive
behavior towards another faculty
member.
Professor Guth has a history
of threatening colleagues, and he
was censured for that, Smith said.
Apparently he likes to threaten
people whether its in social media
or in person, and thats not the
person I want to be spending tax
dollars on educating the people of
Kansas.
Another topic working its way
into the discussion surrounding
Guth is the subject of tenure,
which could prevent the Univer-
sity from dismissing him. Smith
said the issue is one that should be
evaluated on a state level.
Te problem I have with tenure
is that sometimes it protects em-
ployees that do acts like this that
would get someone in the private
sector fred, Smith said. Te
legislature can defnitely look into
that, but we would probably defer
to the Board of Regents on that
issue.
Edited by Duncan McHenry
MONEY FROM PAGE 1
GUTH FROM PAGE 1
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 PAGE 4
B
eing an American male isnt
what it used to be. Te idea
of traditional masculinity
that was predominant in the time
of our fathers and grandfathers is
not so ubiquitous today. One of
the many great achievements of
feminism and the LGBTQ-rights
movement has been the decon-
struction of rigid, traditional
gender structures. Of course, we
still have a long way to go before
we can say the work is fnished.
But what goes largely unmen-
tioned is where the advances of
social egalitarianism and econom-
ic shifs have lef a generation of
young men in America.
Te most glaring example of
these shifs is rooted in the reces-
sion. Economic hardship brought
on by unemployment or high
costs has forced a swap in gender
roles for many families. Women
in general have benefted more
from the slow recovery, in large
part because male-dominated in-
dustries have been the hardest hit.
Tere are more stay-at-home fa-
thers than ever before, and many
experts expect those numbers to
rise. Te fact that women have
adapted to roles as parents and
breadwinners while many men
have struggled to cross similar
boundaries has led some more hy-
perbolic observers to declare that
men are becoming obsolete. Not
only is this diagnosis egregiously
sexist, it is also far from the truth.
When I hear stories about rigid,
anachronistic barriers being bent
or broken, I cant help but feel
encouraged. Tese shifs are not
omens of economic doom or the
loss of masculine identity. Tese
are opportunities to create our
own identities, and to enjoy the
freedom that the feminist (or as
I prefer to call it, egalitarian),
movement has spent generations
struggling for. Its an opportuni-
ty to redefne and give limitless
potential to the idea of being a
man. Chief among these is the
opportunity for todays young
men to give the next generation
of children stable, loving fathers
something millions of young
people of our generation have
lived without. More men are also
pursuing careers that would have
been looked down upon as wom-
ens professions just a generation
or two ago. Te number of male
nurses is at an all-time high, and,
in England at least, the number of
male primary school teachers has
risen by 50 percent.
But for all the opportunities
being presented, men are acting
slowly to take advantage. Great
chances are squandered, reward-
ing careers arent considered and
risks with huge potential payouts
arent taken. Why? Maybe theres a
deep underlying fear of femini-
zation that we are losing part
of our identity or giving up too
much of ourselves by venturing
into new territory once thought
of as reserved for women. Perhaps
young men just dont think these
opportunities are there for them,
or overlook the ones that are.
At the same time, a generation
of girls has been raised to defne
their own identities and self-
worth. Sadly, gender equality
is still not a reality for women
who earn unequal pay for equal
work and face many other types
of adversity. Tis is a cause that
men shouldnt be opposed or
ambivalent to; as gender equality
thrives, everyone benefts. Still,
too many young men slip between
the cracks of the education system
and fail to complete college or
even high school. Young men of
lower socioeconomic statuses are
ofen as likely to go to jail as to
fnish college or vocational school.
Huge numbers of young men are
also victims of unhealthy or abu-
sive relationships (with men and
women alike) and dont use the
resources available to help them.
Tis isnt because our changing
society is now punishing men or
starting to unfairly favor women.
Its because not enough men have
chosen to be active participants
in their own futures. In the push
for true egalitarianism, men have
too ofen been viewed as, or made
themselves into, adversaries or
bystanders instead of partners. It
is clear that we cannot just cling
to the tropes and structures that
shaped our fathers and grandfa-
thers. We must be more fexible,
adaptive and resilient than men
of recent generations have been.
Te forming of our identities is
up to us, and no one female,
male, young or old should do
it for us.
Eric Schumacher is a senior from
majoring in political science and
English from Topeka.
Modern males have ability to redefne role in society
Take advantage of art for
better cultural understanding
Love takes effort and
constant evaluation
GENDER ROLES
GLOBAL THINKING RELATIONSHIPS
I
recently saw A Comedy
of Sorrows, a play written
by Ibrahim El-Houssini
to illustrate the trials awaiting
the Egyptian nation afer the
2011 revolution, in Studio 354
in Murphy Hall. Te work is
poetic, rhythmic, full of rich
symbolism and raw emotion.
Halfway through, I closed my
eyes to block out the harsh stage
light and try to imagine the
scenes through Ibrahims eyes,
transporting my mind to a dark
graveyard housing those seeking
out missed opportunities or the
smoky Tahrir Square punctuated
by periodic gunfre.
Ideally, of course, wed all
travel the world and seek out
these people and experiences
frsthand, but that isnt always a
possibility. Travel costs, language
barriers and safety concerns all
prevent me from pitching camp
in Tahrir Square to try to grasp
what fnally drives people to
risk their lives and livelihoods
to create a new government in
their homeland. Teater and flm
obliterate these barriers, allowing
us to live diferent experiences
vicariously through the charac-
ters until the lights come on and
the credits roll.
Art also presents us with
experiences wed never imagined
existed. Tis summer, while
casually browsing the docu-
mentaries section of Hulu, I
came across the movie Vol-
canic Sprint. For 52 minutes,
I was a virtual spectator at the
Mt. Cameroon Race of Hope,
cheering on runners like Sarah
Etonge and Max Ekema in their
extraordinary race up and down
a 10,000-foot volcanic mountain
in West Africa. Ill likely never
meet Max or Sarah, but Im lucky
to know their story and feel my
world broaden as I hike up Mt.
Oread every morning.
Critics of theater and flm as
a source of serious education
might point out that authors
hold specifc points of view and
hope to evoke specifc reactions
in their audiences. Tis is com-
pletely accurate, but it doesnt
undermine the value of the
medium. While I was studying in
Jordan, I watched two documen-
taries about Palestinian refugees
living in Jordanian camps and
residents of Palestine purchasing
holiday passes to visit their Is-
raeli hometowns. Obviously the
producers deeply opposed Israeli
policies, and the palpable feeling
in the audience reinforced how
strongly most of the viewers
agreed. While I wasnt presented
both sides of the argument in
that setting, I did gain a much
better understanding of why
the issue framed how many of
my fellow moviegoers viewed
the world. We cant understand
diferent cultures without under-
standing the diferent points of
view they contain.
Its possible that, as our world
becomes more technological and
image-oriented, flm, art and
theater will gain a more promi-
nent place in the classroom. In
2013, Young Imm Kang Song, a
graduate student of creative arts
in learning at Lesley Universi-
ty, published an article in the
International Journal of Social
Science Studies about methods
of teaching that combine flm,
artistic production and refection
as a way to teach foreign culture.
In the case study, students at
Lesleys Power of Image class
watched a Korean flm before
creating Korean ink paintings,
writing personal refections
and fnally participating in a
classroom discussion. Te author
noted that students were excited
to undertake the project, and
learned in an interactive way
by responding to the characters
presented that prompted serious
refection on the topic.
For those of us whose teachers
arent planning to begin showing
video in classes any time in the
near future, the opportunity to
experientially learn through art
is still easily available. Te Spen-
cer Museum of Art frequently
hosts flm screenings, and Liber-
ty Hall on Massachusetts Street
also shows flms that fall outside
of mainstream movie culture.
Tis October, the Glenwood Arts
Teater in Overland Park will
hold the Kansas International
Film Festival with over 50 mov-
ies. I personally cannot wait for
the Oct. 25 showing of Wadjda,
a Saudi flm directed by a woman
and detailing one girls quest to
obtain a bicycle of her own.
Unbelievably, I had the chance
to speak with Ibrahim El-Houss-
ini immediately afer A Comedy
of Sorrows concluded. We talked
about the play, about Egypt and
about how much Id enjoyed
myself. I thanked him, sincerely,
because I hadnt just been enter-
tained (for free) on my colleges
campus for an evening. For those
two hours, Id had the chance to
travel to another world.
Amanda Gress is a junior studying
political science and economics from
Overland Park.
C
ollege is that time in your
life where youre looking
for that special someone.
Well, thats what everyone says
anyway. Every girl hopes for that
fairytale-like future with that
ideal boy. Sometimes all that
corny material shown in movies
can really make me nauseous, but
at the end of the day, we all would
secretly like to be in that corny
situation. Im starting to notice
that fnding love doesnt quite re-
semble the movies. I dont think I,
or anyone else for that matter, will
ever quite have anything similar
to the classic tearjerker known as
Te Notebook. I think if some-
one ever said anything like, If
youre a birdthen Im a bird, to
me I would probably immediately
burst out laughing anyway. Sorry,
girls, but no. Just no.
All this has me wondering if
dating has become extinct in this
day and age. Notice that we live
in a time where relationships
are progressing on the Internet
instead of on a face-to-face basis.
Boyfriends and girlfriends are
just someone to take pictures
with, and courting isnt even in
our vocabulary. Girls are wrapped
up in the media that surrounds
us with fake ideas of what a
relationship should be, and dont
even get me started about those
captivating Luke Bryan love
songs. Is he trying to kill us with
his charming words?
Love has become one of those
words tossed around like a Fris-
bee, and similarly, itll occasion-
ally smack you in the face. Ive
never found love myself, and you
all are probably thinking that I
dont have a clue about love at the
age of 19.
Tats probably true, but I have
seen love. Ive learned what love
is through my older brother
and sisters. Being the youngest
of the family (by a lot), I got to
learn from a lot of mistakes,
wrong turns and bad choices. For
instance, dont try to sneak out
when Dad is asleep. He WILL
catch you. It was kind of like
sitting back and watching a movie
of three diferent lives, learning
what to do and, of course, what
not to do.
But I also got the privilege of
watching each of my siblings fall
in love. Teyve taught me that
love is unconditional, sharpened
by challenges and strengthened
by our growth. No, its nothing
like the movies. Ive seen that
its more real and genuine. It has
faws, and whats beautiful about
it is that its not perfect. I love
that my sister, afer having been
married for a few years now, still
says she has the best husband in
the world.
I guess Im just hoping that
we as a society havent killed
romance. For all those girls
who, like me, havent found the
perfect guy that they want to
be with forever, I want to suggest
that you take a look at yourself
frst. For I believe that loving
yourself is key to knowing what
you want from any relationship.
Start by getting rid of people that
drag you down, people that have
been nothing but wrong to you
and, most importantly, those peo-
ple that dont make you a priority.
To guys reading this article, try
to take the initiative to bring ro-
mance back to life. I know some
of you are wrapped up in being
the player that all your friends
want you to be, but someday
youre going to grow up and wish
you had gotten the experience of
falling in love.
Molly Smith is a sophomore majoring
in speech-language pathology from
Lenexa.
So checking out a book in the library
and a Hustler nude card being used
as a bookmark falls out. At least he
reads.
Lil Wayne be like I only see my son
once a week, call that Sunday
I can tell exactly who was at the
game Saturday by the darkness and
angle of their sunburn.
Whenever my calculus professor says
factor out it sounds like f**ked
around because of her accent. Poor
woman is a comedian and doesnt
even know it.
It sounds like Optimus Prime and
Megatron are battling outside of
learned.
Im a ginger with a fabulous booty.
Come fnd me!!
3 days of perfect, cloudless weather
means tomorrow will most likely be a
hurricane-blizzard.
This campus is beginning to smell
like Abercrombie Fierce and I am 100
percent not okay with it.
At this point I wonder if I will be
wearing my Class of 2015 shirt
in 2020.
Is he a manly muppet or a muppet
of a man?
The only thing Ive accomplished
today is making people laugh by trip-
ping up the stairs in Summerfeld.
I always hope Im going to have a
good day and then my horoscope
number says otherwise. Today is
just a 5.
Can someone please explain to me
how Boy Meets World wasnt in the
Television Throwback article?!?
Have you ever wondered what it
would look like if a full blood bank
truck were to crash?
Trent Smiley makes me smiley ;)
I turned on my computer intending
to log onto blackboard, but I ended
up watching Swedish rap videos for
hours. Why do my professors want me
to use the Internet again?
Crossft is ruining our nations gyms.
Dear Ginger-lover, youre probably a
ginger.
Im lonely and single, so I just end up
double-fsting ice cream at Sylas &
Maddys college nights.
Give me liberty or give me meth!
I wish to be a permanent writer for
the UDK FFA.
Text your FFA
submissions to
7852898351 or
at kansan.com
Time to break out the
frst world problems:
Whats your least
favorite thing about
iOS7?
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
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Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
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akohn@kansan.com
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dlysen@kansan.com
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wwebber@kansan.com
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jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
@Davis_Samuel
@KansanOpinion ...the fact that my Snapchat keeps
logging me out!!! Anyone else?!
@TheEmmaBean
@KansanOpinion if Im listening to music and then
try to unlock my phone to reply to a text the song Im
listening to starts over!
@superpowers
@KansanOpinion the weather is missing from the
pull down menu!
By Eric Schumacher
eschumacher@kansan.com
By Amanda Gress
agress@kansan.com
By Molly Smith
msmith@kansan.com
1
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 6
Don't stick your neck out for the
moment... it's not necessary. It'll be
easier to learn for the next two days,
and you're extra brilliant. Associates
become entranced. Don't overextend.
Keep a low profle.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
It's getting easier to make household
changes. Add candles, new textiles, or
a pretty detail. Make more money than
you spend today and tomorrow. Extra
income is possible. Practicality vies
with idealism, and wins.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
You're hot today and tomorrow. Don't
take anything for granted. Conditions
are changing in your favor, though.
Don't start anything new yet. Handle
your priorities and adjust as needed. A
distant relative appears on the scene.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 6
Finish your work in private today and
tomorrow, and postpone a fnancial
discussion, expense or trip. Finish up
old projects instead. Make plans, a
budget, and copy the itinerary. Keep it
quiet for now.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 5
Fantasies may need to be delayed.
Don't fall for a sob story. Talk it out
with friends today and tomorrow and
handle a misunderstanding. Discuss
your next move with your partner.
Resting at home may be best.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 5
Don't encourage the peanut gallery,
when you all should be quiet and
respectful. Keep them focused and
occupied. There may be a test. Career
matters demand your attention today
and tomorrow. Give thanks, and
double-check the data.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 6
Create a plan for the long-range
future with short-term actions, and
schedule them. The next two days are
good for travel. Don't try to impress
anyone. Aim for colorful freedom
and fun, preferably with someone
delightful.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 5
Do fnancial planning today and tomor-
row. Discuss shared fnances. Discover
you're worth more than you thought.
Reconsider a change at home, and
reward yourself after with romance and
compassion. Treat yourself nicely.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 6
Negotiations resume. It's all in the
game. Compromise is required for
the next two days. A misconception
gets uncovered. Recall a friend's wise
advice. Watch what you say. Refne the
plan. Keep the faith.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
Power on for the next two days. There's
plenty of work coming. Something you
want is prohibitively expensive. Don't
waste your money or worry about it.
Find a viable substitute, or share it
with a group.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 6
Take more time for play today and
tomorrow. Maintain a modicum of
decorum. You're lucky in love. Devote
yourself to your own passions and
pursuits. Re-draw and revise your pic-
tures. Indulge your creativity. Include a
fun partner.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 5
Associates provide answers today and
tomorrow. Revise vague statements.
Reconsider beliefs, dogma or an out-
dated view. Don't gossip about work.
Household matters need attention, and
travel conditions aren't great. Find a
pool and enjoy the water.
Follow
@UDK_Entertain
on Twitter
WANT ENTERTAINMENT
UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
Songs of the day
Rhythm and roll for your Tuesday enjoyment
MUSIC
Epitaph Records
RCA Records
Artist: Rancid
Song: Olympia, WA.
Album: And Out Come the Wolves (1995)
Label: Epitaph
Rancid has been around a long time, but
Rancids infuences on contemporary music will
be around much longer than their music will be.
For anyone who is a fan of punk music but for
some reason hasnt heard a Rancid song, this is
a good place to begin. Te band also performed
this past Saturday, Sept. 21, at the Granada Te-
ater, and put on a wonderful show.
Artist: Te Strokes
Song: 12:51
Album: Room On Fire (2003)
Label: RCA
From of Te Strokes second album, 12:51 is
a simple song that is just as catchy as it is simple.
Tough the song is a decade old, that doesnt
change much about it or its likability. 12:51
is a good song to accompany any day, not just
Tuesday.
Tom Dehart
Female college students aged
18-24 have the opportunity to
earn a $50,000 scholarship with-
out any essays, recommendation
letters or transcripts. Tey need
only possess certain assets, and
be able to work hard and twerk
harder.
On Aug. 21, rapper Juicy J
tweeted, im giving out a 50k
scholarships to the best chik that
can twerk, but later deleted the
tweet. On Aug. 31 he made it
ofcial and tweeted, Twerk dat
ass! the $50,000 #JuicyJScholar-
ship contest Enter here! http://
www.worldstarhiphop.com/
scholarship #StayTrippy. To
qualify, applicants must submit
a video showing and telling why
they deserve the scholarship.
Students have mixed reactions
to the subject.
Melissa Stasi, a freshman from
Overland Park, said the values
around something so inappropri-
ate show how the world is today.
Instead, they should be ofering
large scholarships to someone
with good grades; someone aca-
demically gifed, Stasi said.
Ali Oguz, a freshman from Mer-
riam, said he found it humorous.
Getting a
scholarship
for twerk-
ing is like
stripping your
way through
college, Oguz
said.
It is more
dignifed,
though. Tey
keep their
clothes on.
Oguz also said he didnt believe
the contestants should be viewed
negatively.
All it says is they want a free
education, so lets quit judging,
Oguz said. It says they are good
dancers, they work hard and have
drive.
Stasi did not agree.
I am not the type to enter, I
would not do something so inap-
propriate for money, Stasi said.
Its scandalous, and I think they
do it because it makes them feel
naughty and they can get money
for it.
According to
World Star Hip-
Hops website,
the Twerk
Sumthin schol-
arship does not
explicitly require
any show of
twerking. It just
asks participants
to tell or show
Juicy J why they
need sholarship.
Videos need to be posted on
YouTube with the tags #Stay-
Trippy and #JuicyJScholarship
by Sept. 30. Viewers will vote for
their favorites and Juicy J will
personally choose the winner out
of the top ten.
Edited by Duncan McHenry

Getting a scholarship for


twerking is like stripping
your way through college.
ALI OGUZ
freshman
JOURNEY CAPETTINI
jcapettini@kansan.com
Juicy J to award $50,000
twerk college scholarship
FEEL THE BEAT
http://bit.ly/19v5m9t
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
www.HomesForLease.org www.HomesForLease.org
12 behind Kansas States Kait-
lynn Pelger. She is among the Big
12s leaders in kills per set (4th),
blocks per set (5th) and hitting
percentage (7th).
K Kansas records. Riley has the
Kansas all-time digs record with
1,746 while Jarmoc is nearing the
all-time blocks record. With 475
career blocks, Jarmoc is 39 blocks
away from passing Amanda Reves
on the list.
L Libero Brianne Riley contin-
ues her impressive play on defense
and is currently eighth on the Big
12s all-time career digs list and
has reached double-digit kills in
39 consecutive matches. Riley
currently ranks third in the Big 12
with 4.77 digs per set this season.
M Middle blockers Soucie
(second) and Jarmoc (ffh) are
ranked in the Top 10 in the Big 12
in blocks per set and have been
forces ofensively this season.
N NCAA Tournament prepa-
ration. Te Jayhawks have played
teams from the Atlantic Coast-
Conference, Big East, Big Ten, Pac
12 and Southeastern Conference
this season. Five of Kansas oppo-
nents so far (Central Arkansas,
Arkansas, Creighton, Wisconsin
and Georgia) look to be headed to
the NCAA Tournament.
O Outside hitters have con-
tributed to the ofensive attack
this season. Senior Catherine
Carmichael, junior Sara McClin-
ton, freshman Tiana Dockery and
Chelsea Albers have continued
their strong play from last season.
Aside from leading the conference
in kills per set, the Jayhawks are
third in the Big 12 with a .256
hitting percentage.
P Persistent on defense. With
Riley, Wait and senior defensive
specialist Jaime Mathieu leading
the way, the Jayhawks rank third
in the Big 12 with 15.98 digs per
set.
Q Quick turnarounds. From
Aug. 30 to Sept. 14, the Jayhawks
never had more than two ofdays
between matches. Many of the of-
days were spent traveling, leaving
little time for practice.
R Ray Bechard earned his
250th career win with Kansas afer
defeating Arizona in the third
match of the season. In his 16th
year at Kansas, Bechard is 258-212
as head coach of the Jayhawks.
S Sara McClinton, one of the
Jayhawks hardest hitters, reached
double-digit kills nine times this
season and ranks eigth in the
Big 12 in kills per set with 3.12.
McClinton was named to the
All-Tournament Team at the Ar-
izona Invitational and the Kansas
Invitational.
T Tiana Dockery, who was a
member of the Big 12s All-Fresh-
man team last season, has avoided
the sophomore slump. She posted
a career-high 21 kills in a tough
road win against Wisconsin in its
home opener and was named a
member of the All-Tournament
Team at the InnTowner Invita-
tional.
U Under-23 Italian National
Team comes to Lawrence for an
exhibition match on Wednesday,
Sept. 25. Te Jayhawks will get a
taste of international volleyball
and one last chance to hone their
skills before conference play.
V Vengeance. Afer losses to
Arkansas and Notre Dame last
season, the Jayhawks avenged
both losses. Kansas defeated
Arkansas on the road in fve sets
and defeated Notre Dame in four
sets at home to clinch the Kansas
Invitational.
Edited by Heather Nelson
the line of scrimmage. Two
weeks in a row we havent done
that.
Sims efectiveness has been
limited at times without holes to
run through.
Against Louisiana Tech, Sims
said he took what the defense
gave him. He ended the game
with 79 yards on 20 carries, with
his biggest gain of the day going
for 12 yards.I wasnt trying to
force anything, or do too much,
Sims said afer the game.
Louisiana Tech running back
Kenneth Dixon, who fumbled
the ball with a minute and 33
seconds lef on the clock, gave
Kansas the opportunity to steal
the win. Te fumble led to the
game-winning 52-yard feld goal.
Sims said afer the game that if
a running back is fghting for ex-
tra yards, he also needs to think
about holding onto the football.
Te focus at practice Tuesday
will be strengthening the physi-
cality in order to provide room,
not just for Sims, but for all of
the Jayhawks playmakers.
Edited by Heather Nelson
VOLLEYBALL PAGE 8 WEIS FROM PAGE 8
Recycle, Recycle, Recycle
Recycle, Recycle, Recycle
Texas gets back on track
after beating K-State
Reeling afer three games and
two straight losses, Texas needed a
redemption win and they got one
as they beat Kansas State 31-21 on
Saturday night.
Texas, afer giving up more than
822 rushing yards in the last two
games, buckled down this week
in their frst league game, yielding
only 115 yards to K-State.
Texas head coach Mack Brown
mentions that the diferent
schemes in the defense were much
simpler, and credited Greg Robin-
son for toning it down and allow-
ing the players to just let loose.
Brown said it was a much-needed
win, and their goal to win the Big
12 is still intact.
I think what it does it gives them
the confdence to move forward,
Brown said in the weekly Big 12
media teleconference. Big 12 has
been a really important goal since
January.
Baylors offense keeps
rolling
Baylor head coach Art Briles
showed last year that its not neces-
sarily the Quarterback that makes
the system, but rather the system
that makes the QB.
When QB Nick Florence put up
monstrous numbers last year it
was a testament to Briles ability to
construct a high-powered ofense
with diferent players and recruits.
Now Bryce Petty flls that lauded
Baylor QB role, and Baylor is still
putting up points again this year.
Art Briles thinks the ceiling on
Petty is sky-high right now and he
still needs to work to reach it.
Hes been okay, Briles said. He
can be better. Teres a lot of areas
he can get better and he will get
better.
Baylor now has totaled 209
points in just three games, albeit
against lower competition, and
is tops in the country by a large
margin. Petty currently leads the
country in QB rating with a stu-
pendous 239.5.
Coupled with Pettys passing
attack is top-fight Big 12 running
back Lance Seastrunk, who is sec-
ond in the country with 11 yards
per carry. Seastrunk has had three
straight 100-yard-plus games and
has amassed 417 yards thus far.
Lance is a guy that takes care of
himself from a physical stand-
point and a mental preparation
standpoint, Briles said. Really
tuning in to what he needs to do
to become the most complete back
in America and thats what his
goal is.
While the ofense has dazzled
with points through the frst three
games, Briles isnt looking with a
wide scope, but is instead gazing at
the little things in front of him.
You know, the strange thing is
were not really looking at it and
saying wow, Briles said. Were
just looking at it like we need to
improve here, we need to execute
better here, we need be able to pick
up this 4th and-2; were looking at
it like were just getting going.
Big 12 Game of the Week
Afer a heartbreaking loss last
year against Notre Dame, Bob
Stoops realizes its going to take a
lot of tight play and discipline to
beat the Irish.
I think frst, turnovers are a
huge deal, Stoops said. Tird
down conversions, each way stop-
ping them and us get them. Being
able to have good balance run and
pass. I think last year they made
all the plays down the stretch and
thats what changed the game.
While Notre Dame has lost its
defensive linchpin Manti Teo, the
teams defense is still extremely
stout, and Stoops says not a whole
lot has changed.
Teyre a very similar team.
Teir schemes are all the same,
Stoops said. Tey good athletes
and well disciplined in everything
they do.
Oklahoma is recognized for
going on the road against tough
competition and, with QB Blake
Bellsfrst career road start, the
atmosphere will be just another
factor, but Stoops is well-seasoned
when it comes to these situations.
Hopefully well handle it well,
Stoops said. With our style of not
huddling, hopefully well be able to
handle it the right way.
Edited by Sylas May
CONNOR OBERKROM
coberkrom@kansan.com
BIG 12
FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK
A look at conference competition
MINNEAPOLIS Brian Hoyer
and the Cleveland Browns refused
to let a stunning midweek trade
and widespread assumptions
they'd given up on this season
keep them from a late rally on the
road for their frst win.
Tey didn't finch afer any of
Hoyer's three interceptions, either,
against a Minnesota team in ur-
gent need of a victory. Why would
Hoyer be bothered by a little
pressure, anyway? He grew up as a
Browns fan, afer all.
Jordan Cam-
eron caught
three touch-
down passes in
Hoyer's second
career start,
including the
go-ahead grab
in the back of
the end zone
with 51 sec-
onds lef, and
the Browns
kept the Vi-
kings winless with a 31-27 victory
Sunday.
"We have a really resilient group,"
Hoyer said, "and I think we
showed that this week."
Hoyer threw 54 passes, com-
pleting 30 for 321 yards. Josh
Gordon's return from a two-game
suspension opened up the feld,
and the Vikings had little success
stopping him. Hoyer targeted him
19 times, and he caught 10 passes
for 146 yards and a score. Te
Browns didn't miss running back
Trent Richardson, who was dealt
to Indianapolis, at all.
"We're never going to quit. Te
guys in this room aren't that way,
and I'm not that way. It's not even
in our terminology," said frst-
year coach Rob Chudzinski, who
earned his frst career win.
Here are fve things we learned
from Hoyer's frst win as a starter
and Minnesota's last home opener
at the Metrodome:
1. PONDERING THE FUTURE:
Vikings coach Leslie Frazier
said Christian Ponder is still the
starting quarterback, despite two
more turnovers. His interception
was turned into a touchdown in
the second quarter, and his fumble
at the Cleveland 16 on the last play
of the frst half cost the Vikings the
chance to try a short feld goal they
could've used later.
Ponder fnished 25 for 42 for 228
yards, making several on-target
throws when he had to but misfr-
ing again on too many. Ponder did
run for 46 yards and two touch-
downs, but hustle
won't be enough
by itself to keep
the job for the long
term.
Ponder was
booed several
times, and a brief
chant for backup
quarterback Matt
Cassel broke out.
"I think it was
impossible not to
hear them," Ponder
said. "We want to win just as bad
as the fans."
2. NO RUNNING ROOM:
Richardson's departure lef Willis
McGahee, Bobby Rainey and
fullback Chris Ogbonnaya to fll
the backfeld, and they had little
impact.
Cleveland's best runs were a
34-yarder by Josh Aubrey on a
fake punt that set up a feld goal
in a wild second quarter and a
22-yard reverse by Gordon to set
up a touchdown on the previous
possession.
McGahee, who's fourth among
active players on the NFL's career
yards rushing list, gained 9 yards.
He took eight handofs.
3. STOUT FRONT SEVEN:
Peterson had a hard time, too,
against a Browns defense that is
giving up 2.81 yards per rush.
He fnished with 88 yards and a
touchdown but lost a fumble and
never found any gains of 10 yards
or more.
Rookie outside linebacker
Barkevious Mingo had one of the
six sacks, and inside linebacker
Craig Robertson recovered Peter-
son's fumble and tipped the ball
that T.J. Ward intercepted in the
second quarter.
4. BANGED UP:
Te Browns lost outside line-
backer Jabaal Sheard and defensive
end Billy Winn to knee injuries,
and kicker Billy Cundif had quad-
riceps trouble. Te Browns failed
to convert a fourth-and-4 at the
Minnesota 37 midway through the
third quarter, and they used punter
Spencer Lanning to kick the last
extra point. Lanning threw an
11-yard scoring pass to Cameron
in the second quarter on a fake
feld goal.
For the Vikings, top corner-
back Chris Cook was lost in the
frst quarter because of a groin
injury. Safety Jamarca Sanford
was missing in the second half
because of a hamstring problem,
and cornerback A.J. Jeferson hurt
his ankle. Tight end/fullback Rhett
Ellison didn't suit up because of a
hyperextended knee.
5. LONDON CALLING:
Te Vikings gave up a home date
to play the NFL's annual showcase
in London, so their overseas fight
on Monday night might feel a little
longer afer this ominous loss. Te
good news is they play Pittsburgh,
one of the other fve winless teams
lef in the league.
"Te only thing we can do now
is bounce back. We can't let this
direct us on a diferent path,"
Peterson said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cleveland Browns cornerback Buster Skrine (22) breaks up a pass in the end zone intended for Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Greg Jennings (15) during the frst half of
an NFL football game Sunday, Sept. 22, 2013, in Minneapolis
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFL
Cleveland Browns beneft from early trade, road win

Were never going to quit.


The guys in this room
arent that way, and Im
not that way. Its not even
in our terminology.
ROB CHUDZINSKI
Browns head coach
A
s we approach the 2013-2014 NBA
season, there are two stories that
plague sports headlines across the
nation: Will the Heat be able to three-peat,
and what will be the outcome of former
MVP Derrick Roses return?
It has been almost a year and a half since
the superstar point guard tore his ACL in
the frst game of the 2012 playofs against
the 76ers. A few weeks later, LeBron James
and company raised the championship
trophy, leaving a gaping hole in the hearts
of Chicago fans and Rose himself.
Fast forward to the 2013 ofseason.
Roses return for the season opener against
Miami is certain, but will he be able to
reach the level of intensity he once had?
Ask Rose this question and he will answer
with a defnite yes.
Period. No ifs, ands or buts about it.
He will enter the season with a higher
shooting range and ten pounds of added
muscle. His vigorous summer workouts
have made him stronger and quicker than
ever before, and hes stated that he is more
explosive to the rim without those old
nagging injuries.
Forget making a slow and steady come-
back. Rose has only one goal for this year:
winning a championship.
Some may think this goal is little far-
fetched for a guy who hasnt
played a single second in the NBA
in over a year. Tose people would
be wrong. Tis is a man who stood
in front of the media and told the
world he would be the leagues
MVP. A few months later, Rose
spoke to the media again, this time
giving his 2010 Most Valuable Player
acceptance speech.
He is one of the most self-driven
athletes in the world and will stop at
nothing to prove himself as the best.
Tat is what is so soothing to fans about
his confdence. We have seen what happens
when Rose has the fre in his eye, and boy,
is it scary.
But even with Roses high expectations,
the fans of Chicago will still be worrying.
Te sight of their hero clutching his knee in
agonizing pain is forever engrained in their
mem-
ories, and
every time
the star takes a
hard foul they will
hold their breath in concern.
NBA players and fans all over the country
will be keeping a close eye on Roses
long-awaited return. Afer all, everybody
loves a great comeback, unless you are on
the opposing team.
Edited by Sylas May
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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 PAGE 7 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN

!
?
I put so much into my craft. Im working
hard. I think Im one of the hardest workers
in the NBA, if not the hardest worker. I
think you should see it in my game when I
step on the court.
Derrick Rose
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
By Tori Rubinstein
trubinstein@kansan.com
This week in athletics
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Womens Golf
2013 Marilynn Smith
Sunfower Invitational
All Day
Manhattan
Volleyball
TCU
1 p.m.
Lawrence
Volleyball
Italy U-23 National
6:30 p.m.
Lawrence
Soccer
Santa Clara
9 p.m.
Santa Clara, Calif.
Mens Golf
Badger Invitational
All Day
Madison, Wis.
Mens Golf
Badger Invitational
All Day
Madison, Wis.
Womens Tennis
ITA All-American
All Day
Pacifc Palisades, Calif.
Womens Tennis
ITA All-American
All Day
Pacifc Palisades, Calif.
Womans Golf
2013 Challenge
at Onion Creek
All Day
Austin, Texas
Mens Golf
Desert Classic
All Day
Laramie, Wyo.
Q: Who replaced Rose in the 2012-2013
season as the starting point guard?
A: Kirk Hinrich
ESPN.COM
Before going down with a torn ACL in the
fnal minutes of regulation, Derrick Rose
led all players with 23 points
ESPN.COM
Fans anticipate Derrick Rose comeback
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. Wil
Myers tied it with a two-run single
on a jarring play in the seventh
inning then pinch-hitter James
Loney stunned the Orioles with
a leadof homer in the ninth, and
the Tampa Bay Rays completed a
four-game sweep that put a serious
damper in Baltimore's wild-card
hopes with a 5-4 victory Monday.
Te Orioles also lost All-Star
third baseman Manny Machado
to a leg injury in the top of the
seventh.
Machado's lef leg buckled when
he stepped on frst base running
out an infeld single. He was taken
of on a stretcher.
Te win pushed the Rays a full
game ahead of idle Cleveland for
the top AL wild card. Baltimore
fell fve games back of the Indians
with six games to go for both
teams.
With the bases loaded, two outs
and trailing 4-2 in the seventh,
Myers, a rookie, sent a fare behind
second base. Second baseman
Alexi Casilla, who entered the
game in the eighth, made a fully
extended diving catch but he col-
lided with Nick Markakis, racing
in toward the ball from right feld.
Te ball came loose and two runs
scored.
Casilla was shaken up on the play,
but remained in the game. Howev-
er, he lef one inning later.
Hitting for Sean Rodriguez,
Loney lined an 0-1 pitch from
Tommy Hunter (6-5) down the
right feld line.
Joel Peralta (3-8) pitched a per-
fect ninth for the Rays, who have
won nine of 12.
Chris Davis hit his major league-
best 52nd homer for Baltimore.
Afer Matt Wieters was thrown
out attempting to stretch a leadof
double into a triple in the eighth,
Nate McLouth turned a bunt to the
frst base side of reliever Jamey
Wright into a double. Wright
worked out of the jam by retiring
the next two batters.
Machado singled for the Orioles'
frst hit leading of the fourth and
Davis followed with his two-run
shot of Chris Archer as part of a
three-run inning that put Balti-
more ahead 3-1. J.J. Hardy had an
RBI single.
Going back to the fnal 11 innings
of the Orioles' 5-4, 18-inning loss
to the Rays Friday night, Baltimore
had just two runs and 10 hits over
32 innings before getting the three
runs on four hits in the fourth.
Te fourth inning ended when
Ryan Flaherty was retired on a
strange strikeout with two on. He
swung and missed a two-strike
pitch that ended up hitting him in
the leg.
Jose Molina got the Rays to 3-2
on an RBI double in the bottom of
the fourth.
Brian Roberts gave Baltimore a
4-2 lead on a ffh-inning homer.
Tim Beckham, taken frst overall
in the 2008 draf, put the Rays up
1-0 on a sacrifce fy in the second.
It was the rookie's frst major
league RBI.
Archer gave up four runs and fve
hits in 4 1-3 innings. Baltimore
lef-hander Wei-Yin Chen also
went 4 1-3 innings, allowing two
runs and six hits.
Myers helps lead Rays past Orioles
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wil Myers scores on a Tim Beckham sacrifce fy to right in the second inning which
gave the Tampa Bay Rays a 1-0 lead against the Baltimore Orioles at Tropicana
Field Monday, in St. Petersburg, Fla.
MLB
Follow @KansanSports to stay updated on Kansas Athletics all day, every day.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Te Kansas volleyball team
stands at 10-3 and will begin con-
ference play on Saturday, Sept. 28,
against Texas Christian Univer-
sity. Heres a look back on some
highlights from the non-confer-
ence season.
A Aggression. Te Jayhawks
rank frst in the Big 12 with 14.21
kills per set.
B Balance on ofense. Five
diferent players led the team in
kills in a match this season.
C Chelsea Albers, junior
outside hitter, is having a solid
all-around year. Albers set
career highs of 16 kills and 18
digs against Arizona to clinch
a tie for frst place at the Ari-
zona Invitational. She earned a
double-double in three of the frst
four matches of the season.
D Defensive honors. Redshirt
senior middle blocker Caroline
Jarmoc was the Big 12s Defensive
Player of the Week afer posting
24 blocks in a three-match span
on Sept. 1-7. Te next week,
senior libero Brianne Riley earned
the honor afer collecting 93 digs
in four matches, which included
31 in a fve-set road win over
Bowling Green at the InnTowner
Invitational.
E Erin
McNorton,
who led the
Big 12 in
assists last
season, is on
pace to repeat
the feat. She
leads the
Big 12 with
an average
of 12.08 assists per set, and was
recently named the Most Valuable
Player of the Kansas Invitational
afer averaging 13 assists per set in
the tournament.
F Freshman success. Middle
blocker Tayler Soucie and de-
fensive specialist Cassie Wait are
getting ample playing time this
season and will play big roles on
the team moving forward.
G Going the distance. Te Jay-
hawks are 3-1 in fve-set matches
this season. Tese matches came
during a two-week span that in-
cluded a road victory in which the
Jayhawks won the ffh set 17-15
and saved two match points along
the way.
H Home Sweet Home. Te
Jayhawks have played just four
home matches and are 3-1 in
those matches. Te only loss came
to Arkansas in fve sets in the
home opener.
I Invitational titles. Kansas tied
for frst in the Arizona Invitation-
al and won the InnTowner Invi-
tational and Kansas Invitational
tournaments outright.
J Jarmoc, a second-team
All-American last season, eclipsed
the 1,000 kill mark in the match
against UMKC and now has 1,131
for her career, which ranks second
among active players in the Big
Kansas looks to improve
physicality over bye week
Volume 126 Issue 19 kansan.com Tuesday, September 24, 2013
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Ben Ashworth
bashworth@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
A little luck goes
a long way
K
ansas registered a victory
on Saturday night because
its kicker and quarterback
decided to bounce back from early
mistakes with clutch performances
in pressure situations.
Louisiana Tech lost on Saturday
night because two of its players
had the audacity to make the extra
efort.
Ultimately, fortune smiled upon
the Jayhawks.
Louisiana Tech had two opportu-
nities to ice the game with fourth
quarter touchdowns, and both times
it had the misfortune of making a
costly error despite a valiant efort.
With 14 minutes remaining in
the game and a chance to put the
Bulldogs up by two touchdowns,
quarterback Ryan Higgins, in an
attempt to put a spectacular fnish
on a strong 27-yard run, dove for
the end zone and extended his
arm to the pylon. However, he lost
control of the football as he dove
and essentially threw the ball into
the end zone for a touchback.
While there was plenty of time
lef for the Jayhawks to mount a
comeback, it seemed unlikely seeing
as how Kansas ofense had the
momentum of Han Solo encased in
carbonite.
Using the energy derived from
such an unexpected turnover, the
Jayhawks marched down the feld to
a Jimmay Mundine touchdown. Te
crowd erupted, and Mundine got
a much-needed confdence boost af-
ter the previous two games in which
his hands proved about as reliable as
George Costanza.
Louisiana Tech and Kansas both
punted their next possessions. With
six minutes lef, the Bulldog ofense
got the ball back and embarked
upon a frustrating 80-yard drive.
Louisiana Tech seemed ready to
hold onto the ball as long as possible
and kick the winning feld goal. All
they had to do was not fumble.
If you havent guessed by now,
Louisiana Tech fumbled. Running
back Kenneth Dixon had already
gotten a frst down and was going
for the dagger. It was a run that,
had he not fumbled, would have
been hailed as gritty and tenacious.
However, Kansas junior Michael
Reynolds dislodged the ball from
Dixons grip and the Jayhawks
emerged with the football.
With the ball on its own fve yard
line, two timeouts lef and the clock
ticking, Jake Heaps orchestrated a
beautiful drive with pinpoint passes
that gave the receivers plenty of
room for yards afer the catch.
Matthew Wyman, with a weight
on his shoulders that would have
made Atlas himself shudder, kicked
the winning feld goal from 52 yards
out. Pandemonium ensued.
None of these positives would have
happened were it not for a fortuitous
turn of events.
For Kansas to succeed this season,
it needs that dumb luck. When
combined with a little talent and a
lot of heart, it can cause a team to
exceed expectations.
More importantly, Kansas needs
to continue to capitalize on that luck
as it did on Saturday. Both Bulldog
turnovers led to lengthy drives and
points on the board. Without those
drives, Louisiana Tech still wins
despite its miscues.
Without those drives, it would
be hard to diferentiate this Kansas
team from last years.
Edited by Duncan McHenry
ALPHABETICAL RECAP
KILLIN IT
An A-Z summary of the Jayhawks non-conference season
GEOREG MULLINIX/KANSAN
Redshirt seniors Catherine Carmichael and Caroline Jarmoc celebrate a point against Arkansas on Sept. 7. The team begins conference play at TCU on Saturday.
If players were not sore afer
the 13-10 victory on Saturday
over Louisiana Tech, they will
be afer practice on Tuesday.
Te frst thing were gonna
do is were going to beat the hell
out of each other on Tuesday,
Charlie Weis said over the Big
12 media teleconference call.
Weis has something diferent
planned for each day of the bye-
week to prepare the team for
conference play, which begins
Oct. 5 with Texas Tech.
Te concern at the moment
is that the Jayhawks dont play
with enough physicality.
We still need to become a
tougher team, Weis said, and I
think that an of-week is a good
time to do that.
Te ofensive line isnt the only
unit that Weis said needs to
become more physical, but its
where hes emphasized it most.
In the game against Louisiana
Tech, the ofensive line failed to
get enough push on two fourth
down and short yardage situa-
tions. Te Jayhawks turned the
ball over as a result.
Weis said the line is still a
work in progress with about
eight players in competition for
playing time.
I dont think inexperience is
the issue, Weis said. Were go-
ing to come out tomorrow and
have a really physical practice.
For Kansas to have any success
in the Big 12, the ofensive line
must gain toughness.
Te strength of the team is its
running game, which has an
array of running backs and is
led by senior James Sims.
If were going to be any good
we need to be able to run the
ball efciently, Weis said, and
you need to be able to control
MAX GOODWIN
mgoodwin@kansan.com
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Charlie Weis consults offcials during Saturdays game against Louisiana Tech. Kansas won 13-10.
FOOTBALL
TRANSFER
SEE WEIS PAGE 6
Defensive tackle to leave
football team
Junior college transfer Marquel Combs
asked for and has been granted his
release from the Kansas football team,
the University announced Monday.
At defensive
tackle, Combs was
a key pickup for
coach Charlie Weis
in the offseason
and helped recruit
other junior college
players to Kansas
under the moniker
of building a
dream team.
Marquel was a great factor in our re-
cruitment of last years signing class,
Weis said in a statement released by
Kansas Athletics We would like to wish
him well in his future endeavors.
The junior saw little time on the
feld in the Jayhawks frst two games
and appeared to be heading toward
redshirting this season.
I appreciate the Jayhawk commu-
nity, as well as my teammates and
the staff, for all of the support I have
received during my time with the
program, Combs said in a statement
released by Kansas Athletics. It has
been an incredible opportunity and I
wish them the best of luck the rest of
this season and in the future.
Blake Schuster
BRIAN HILLIX
bhillix@kansan.com
VOLLEYBALL PAGE 6
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Junior college transer Marquel Combs runs drills during practice this season.
Combs
McNorton

Valuta