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Oat varieties released by the National Oat Breeding Program do not have resistance to the
Oat varieties released by the National Oat Breeding
Program do not have resistance to the pathotype of stem
rust which has virulence for Pga. If this pathotype is
present the stem rust reactions will be susceptible. It is
therefore important to monitor oat crops for early detection
of stem and leaf rust so that an effective fungicide
application program can be implemented.
Stem rust in
SA/Vic/NSW/
WA 1
Moderately
resistant
Better than Possum, Echidna
and Potoroo; same as Yallara
Leaf rust in
SA/Vic/WA 1
Resistant
Better than Possum, Echidna,
and Potoroo; same as Yallara
Moderately
Leaf rust in
NSW 1
susceptible to
Better than Echidna; same as
Possum, Potoroo and Yallara
susceptible
ByD Virus
Susceptible
Same as Possum; inferior to
Echidna, Potoroo and Yallara
Septoria in
Susceptible
SA
Same as Echidna and Potoroo;
inferior to Possum and Yallara
Susceptible
Septoria in
to very
WA
Same as Echidna and Possum;
inferior to Potoroo and Yallara
susceptible
Bacterial
Moderately
blight
resistant
Better than Possum, Echidna,
Potoroo and Yallara
red leather
Moderately
leaf
susceptible
Better than Possum, Potoroo
and Yallara; same as Echidna
CCN
Very
resistance
susceptible
Same as Possum; inferior to
Echidna, Potoroo and Yallara
CCN
Intolerant
tolerance
Same as Possum, Echidna and
Yallara; inferior to Potoroo
Stem
nematode
Intolerant
Same as Possum and Yallara;
inferior to Echidna and Potoroo
tolerance
1 Rust reactions may vary in different regions depending on the prevalent
pathotype
HerBICIDe reACTIoN This variety was tested from 2003 to 2006 in herbicide tolerance trials conducted
HerBICIDe reACTIoN
This variety was tested from 2003 to 2006 in herbicide
tolerance trials conducted at Hart in South Australia.
Yield reductions occurred in 2 or more years with
recommended rates of Banvel-M ® and Tigrex ® .
Mitika has also been tested in NSW. For updated information
visit www.nvtonline.com.au or contact the Oat Breeding
or New Variety Agronomy Programs.
SoWINg
Sowing rates should achieve a minimum plant density of 165
plants per m 2 . Amount of grain sown should relate to seedbed
conditions, germination percent and grain weight which for
Mitika is generally larger than Possum, Echidna and Yallara.
CoMpILeD By
Sue Hoppo and Pamela Zwer, National Oat Breeding Program,
SARDI.
INforMATIoN proVIDeD By
National Oat Breeding Program, SARDI and DAFWA, National
Oat Breeding Program co-operators in NSW and Victoria and
SARDI New Variety Evaluation Group.
SeeD AVAILABILITy
Seedmark. ph. (08) 8234 9333 or visit www.seedmark.com.au
Seedmark. ph. (08) 8234 9333 or visit www.seedmark.com.au MITIKA A A new milling quality oat for

MITIKA A

A new milling quality oat for all rainfall regions of Southern Australia

SuMMAry

Mitika (tested as SV94046-57) is a dwarf milling quality oat that also has good feed value.

Compared to other milling varieties, Mitika has high levels of ß-glucan, low grain hull lignin and high grain metabolisable energy.

Mitika is early maturing and similar to other dwarf varieties for standing ability (lodging) and shattering resistance.

Mitika has improved stem rust, leaf rust and bacterial blight resistance compared to other milling varieties.

Mitika is high yielding in all rainfall zones.

Mitika is susceptible to septoria and red leather leaf. If septoria is yield limiting, spraying with an appropriate fungicide may be required.

Mitika is very susceptible and intolerant to cereal cyst nematode and susceptible and intolerant of stem nematode. It is not suited to areas where these diseases are yield limiting.

Mitika can develop leaf reddening post flowering. This has not affected grain yield or quality.

are yield limiting. Mitika can develop leaf reddening post flowering. This has not affected grain yield
are yield limiting. Mitika can develop leaf reddening post flowering. This has not affected grain yield
BreeDINg Mitika was developed by the National Oat Breeding Program and collaborators. Mitika was bred
BreeDINg
Mitika was developed by the National Oat Breeding Program
and collaborators. Mitika was bred from the cross SV87072-
13/SV87080-1//SV88045-12. All of these are dwarf breeders
lines which were promoted to stage 4 trials on the basis of
disease resistance and grain quality. Mitika was evaluated as
SV94046-57. The name, Mitika, was selected from Australian
marsupials native to southern Australia as with other varieties
previously released from the Oat Program.
CoMMerCIALISATIoN
Mitika is protected by Plant Breeders Rights and is marketed
exclusively by Seedmark.
grAIN yIeLD
Mitika has excellent grain yield across all four states (Table 1).
TABLe 1
Average grain yield of Mitika compared to four varieties in
four states( 2004 to 2010). No. trials in brackets. Analysis
courtesy Bev Gogel, Statistics for the Australian Grains
Industry (SAGI).
grain yield (t/ha)
VArIeTy
SA
VIC
NSW
WA
Mitika
2.9
(88)
1.9
(23)
2.9
(61)
3.2
(129)
Possum
2.8
(88)
1.9
(23)
2.8
(61)
3.2
(70)
Echidna
2.9
(71)
1.9
(16)
2.9
(36)
3.0
(10)
Potoroo
2.9
(86)
1.9
(20)
2.9
(47)
3.0
(24)
Yallara
2.7
(88)
1.8
(23)
2.7
(59)
3.0
(100)
grAIN QuALITy
The grain quality of Mitika is milling standard. Mitika has
comparable physical grain quality to the premium milling
variety Yallara (Table 2). Groat percent is not as high as Yallara
but comparable to Possum and an improvement compared to
Echidna (Table 3). ß-glucan is higher than the other varieties
compared in Table 4.
Mitika also has good feed grain qualities. It has good grain protein, average oil content
Mitika also has good feed grain qualities. It has good grain
protein, average oil content (Table 3) and high metabolisable
energy combined with low grain hull lignin (Table 4).
TABLe 2
Average hectolitre weight, 1000 grain weight and screenings
percentage for Mitika compared to four varieties (combined
SA, Vic, NSW and WA data, 2005 to 2009). Analysis courtesy
Bev Gogel, SAGI.
Hectolitre
1000 grain
weight
weight
Screenings
percent
(kg/hl)
(g)
(% < 2mm)
Mitika
50.4
33.3
9.1
Possum
49.5
31.1
8.6
Echidna
48.3
30.2
16.6
Potoroo
45.7
30.6
19.8
Yallara
51.4
32.8
8.2
No. trials
53
33
53
TABLe 3
Average protein, oil and groat percentage for Mitika
compared to four varieties (combined SA, Vic, NSW and WA
data, 2005 to 2009 using NIR whole grain analysis). Analysis
courtesy Bev Gogel, SAGI.
oil %
protein %
groat %
(dry basis)
Mitika
12.6
6.5
75.6
Possum
12.5
5.7
76.3
Echidna
11.2
6.0
74.3
Potoroo
11.6
6.6
74.4
Yallara
11.6
4.6
79.3
No. trials
48
42
40
TABLe 4 Average grain hull lignin, estimated metabolisable energy and ß-glucan percentage for Mitika compared
TABLe 4
Average grain hull lignin, estimated metabolisable energy
and ß-glucan percentage for Mitika compared to four
varieties (combined SA, Vic, and NSW Vic data, 2005 to
2009). Analysis courtesy Bev Gogel, SAGI.
estimated
grain hull
metabolisable
ß-glucan %
lignin 1
energy
(dry basis)
(MJ/kg dm)
Mitika
L
12.6
5.5
Possum
H
11.7
4.9
Echidna
MH
11.7
5.0
Potoroo
MH
11.8
5.0
Yallara
H
11.7
5.1
No. trials
5
15
3
1 Grain hull lignin is scored depending on colour development when a
phloroglucinol based solution is added to the grain.
L = low lignin, MH = moderately high lignin, H = high lignin
pLANT CHArACTerISTICS
Mitika is a dwarf oat, 5cm shorter than Echidna and
Possum. It is early maturing and heads at the same time as
Potoroo, 1 day earlier than Possum and 5 days earlier than
Echidna. Mitika has similar straw strength and standing
ability compared to Echidna and Possum and is similar to
Possum for shattering with both being slightly more prone
to shattering than Echidna.
DISeASe reSISTANCe
Mitika is an improvement compared to other milling
varieties for stem rust, leaf rust and bacterial blight
resistance. It is no improvement compared to Echidna and
Possum for barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) and septoria
resistance, or CCN resistance and tolerance. It is inferior to
Echidna for stem nematode tolerance and red leather leaf
resistance.