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It’s a small world

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it’s a small world tabloid edition unfolds the exhibition from above and beyond.

it’s a small world is an international travel exhibition organised in a collaboration between Danish Design Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architecture Centre. The exhibition is initiated by the Danish Ministry of Economic and Business Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture.

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Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN
Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN
Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN
Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN

It’s a small world

CoPENHaGEN 2009

Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN

www.itsasmallworld.dk

Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN
Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN
Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Culture. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world CoPENHaGEN

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CoNtENt

3

Preface

4

Presentation

ExHIBItIoN INtroduCtIoN

It’s a small world

6

Four themes

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Sustainability

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Human Scale

12

New Craftsmanship

14

Non-Standardised Praxis

ExHIBItIoN sCENarIos

16 Six Scenarios

18 We’re so normal

19 Expanding tradition

20 It’s your turn

21 I’m so special

22 Linking behaviours

23 Processing experiments

ExHIBItIoN struCturE

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26 Implementing digital crafting

Curator PaGEs

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Design diversity, Tina Midtgaard

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Craft progress, Karen Kjærgaard

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Architecture tomorrow, Kjersti Wikstrøm

PErsPECtIvEs

34 Design and/or chemistry

Interview: William A. McDonough and Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle

36 Design Systems – not objects!

38 Design

39 Soul Wash

40 We are Family

Changes Interview: Design agency Hatch & Bloom

Interview: Ceramist Ole Jensen and Design Engineer Claus Mølgaard

42 Extraordinary ordinary

Interview: Landscape Architect Kristine Jensen

43 SunTiles Interview: Textile Designer Astrid Krogh

It’s a small world

Global

challenges

Everybody can look forward to the danish travel exhibition it’s a small world, which is presented for the first time during the Copenhagen design week 2009. the exhibition presents danish design, craft and architecture and shows which role design plays as a means of solving problems in a world with global challenges.

danish design, craft and architecture build on a proud tradition. through decades danish design icons such as arne Jacobsen’s the Egg, the porcelain from royal Copenhagen and Jorn utzon’s famous opera House in sydney have caused international recognition.

But times are changing.

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Photography Helle moos.
Photography Helle moos.

today, design, craft and architecture are no longer just about styling but also about adding new solutions to complicated problems of society. In a globalised world the focus is on how design, craft and architecture can contribute to new technologies, consumption and sustainable solutions.

Globalisation also brings increased competition. as in many other businesses increased competition is present in the creative industry. that is why it is important to promote international awareness of denmark as a country with a strong creative environment if we continuously want to strengthen our reputation as an international design nation.

the exhibition is jointly initiated by the ministry of Economic and Business affairs and the ministry of Culture as part of the Government’s strategy for branding denmark as a design nation. the exhibition is created in cooperation between danish design Centre, danish Crafts and danish architecture Centre.

It is my hope that the exhibition it’s a small world will show the world how new danish design, craft and architecture can contribute to the global issues on sustainability.

Enjoy!

Lene Espersen Minister for Economic and Business Affairs August 2009

to the global issues on sustainability. Enjoy! Lene Espersen Minister for Economic and Business Affairs August
to the global issues on sustainability. Enjoy! Lene Espersen Minister for Economic and Business Affairs August

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PrEsENtatIoN

It’s a small world

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We are proud to present the exhibition it’s a small world. Through Danish design, craft and architecture this exhibition searches for new meaning and global relevance in future design praxis.

The participants turn the conventional notion of Danish design upside down by confronting and pushing the boundaries of experimental approach and industrial process.

Design, craft and architecture together form a core of creativity in the shaping of our future society. Hence it has been an inspiring journey and collaboration of the three Danish institutions to establish an exhibition that forms an open interdisciplinary platform for a new design debate. It is our hope that the exhibition will inspire its visitors and influence the definitions of design towards a sustainable future.

Christian Scherfig CEO, Danish Design Centre

Birgitte Jahn CEO, Danish Crafts

Kent Martinussen CEO, Danish Architecture Centre

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ElmGrEEN & draGsEt. Elevated Gallery / Powerless structures, Fig. 146, 2001. Courtesy: Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin.
ElmGrEEN & draGsEt. Elevated Gallery / Powerless structures, Fig. 146, 2001. Courtesy: Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin.

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It’s a small world

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Four tHEmEs

it’s a small world focuses on danish design, craft and architecture in relation to a new international design agenda.

It’s a small world

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Sustainability

Human Scale

New Craftsmanship

Non-Standardised Praxis

are the four main themes of the exhibition. The intention is to initiate a dialogue about the expectations to and ambitions for a world where the concept of sustainability has taken on new meaning.

Tina Midtgaard Curator, Danish Design Centre

Karen Kjærgaard Curator, Danish Crafts

Kjersti Wikstrøm Curator, Danish Architecture Centre

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1

It’s a small world

Sustainability

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it’s a small world explores sustainability and sustainable design. The debate concerning the impact of climate changes on human well-being and survival is more urgent than ever. Growing global consensus that the cause and effect is largely man-made has led to widespread debate. Despite this emerging awareness as to why we should embrace sustainable living and develop sustainable design, we have not yet defined exactly how.

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It’s a small world

defined exactly how . ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world 9 / 48 s(c)austall,

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s(c)austall, Courtesy: Naumann architekten. Photography Zooey Braun.
s(c)austall, Courtesy: Naumann architekten. Photography Zooey Braun.

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It’s a small world

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Kristine Jensens tegnestue. Event Public space. Photography simon Høgsberg.
Kristine Jensens tegnestue. Event Public space. Photography simon Høgsberg.

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2 Human Scale

The exhibition discusses inclusion and diversity for the individual as well as for the community. it’s a small world encourages us to think small as well as big – on a human scale. In relation to sustainability, it might seem more manageable to reduce existing practices than to create and implement new strategies, which could initiate long-term changes in professional, social and cultural contexts.

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3

It’s a small world

New

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Craftsmanship

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The expectations to future design and the demands for sustainability pose a challenge to our tradition and our cultural self-perception. While craft traditionally employs classic tools and implies concern for people and the environment, New Craftsmanship adds new facets to the concept. Contemporary craft and design is characterised by digital tools, conceptual thinking and new developments in craft techniques.

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spun, chaise longue in carbon-fibre. design: mathias Bengtsson. Photography Phillips de Pury.

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It’s a small world

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4

laser cutter printer. Photography martin tamke, CIta, Centre for Information technology and architecture.
laser cutter printer. Photography martin tamke, CIta, Centre for Information technology and architecture.

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Non-Standardised

Praxis

How can new design practices be adapted to accommodate individual preferences, collective demands and climate challenges? Non-Standardised Praxis is about developing new mindsets in a society that is saturated with standardised design and processes that have proved profitable but not sustainable. Advanced technology enables new production methods, the possibility of individual customisation and the freedom to experiment.

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It’s a small world

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Six Scenarios

it’s a small world is staged around six interdisciplinary scenarios, each introducing

a unique concept based on the

four main themes: Sustainability, Human Scale, New Craftsmanship and Non-Standardised Praxis. The scenarios explore cultural

trends from an individual as well as a collective point of view, in

a local and a global perspective.

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perspective. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world 17 / 48 the six scenario structures
perspective. ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world 17 / 48 the six scenario structures

the six scenario structures are developed by CIta, Center for Information technology and architecture.

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It’s a small world

sCENarIo 1

Participants:

Katvig aps – organic children clothing company suP dEsIGN/molgard aps – designer/design Engineer arkitekt Kristine Jensens tegnestue – architects

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Katvig. Photography søren solkær starbird. rights: Katvig aps, 2006.
Katvig. Photography søren solkær starbird. rights: Katvig aps, 2006.

We’re so normal is about design for all; it raises our daily routines above the mere satisfaction of needs and focuses on human values. Playfulness and community are the driving forces behind the recasting of everyday design and common design praxis.

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sCENarIo 2

It’s a small world

Participants:

Hatch & Bloom a/s – Idea and design agency studio/ louise Campbell – designer lundgaard & tranberg architects – architects

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louise Campbell ‘Blah, blah, blah’, site-specific installation at Kunstforeningen Gammel strand, 2008. Photography
louise Campbell ‘Blah, blah, blah’, site-specific installation at Kunstforeningen Gammel strand, 2008. Photography thomas Bentzen.

Expanding tradition implies a redevelopment and reinterpretation of tradition; it illustrates the source of inspiration and the effects on contemporary design processes. New knowledge and traditional craft techniques go hand in hand in digital processes and production.

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sCENarIo 3

Participants:

raCa – social designers Cecilie manz / – designer astrid Krogh – textile designer KollIsIoN – architectural bureau

It’s a small world

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raCa. Bssd – Brooklyn street star department. Brooklyn NY, 2006. Photography Pejk malinowski.
raCa. Bssd – Brooklyn street star department. Brooklyn NY, 2006. Photography Pejk malinowski.

It’s your turn examines the motivation behind design and presents a number of ideological mindsets. Immaterial experiments, conceptual thinking, dialogue and critical assessment turn established design praxis upside down.

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sCENarIo 4

It’s a small world

Participants:

vibskov emenius – designers/artists steen Ipsen – Ceramist BIG, Bjarke Ingels Group – architects

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Project 7, Fringe Projects by vibskov emenius. Photography vibskov emenius.
Project 7, Fringe Projects by vibskov emenius. Photography vibskov emenius.

I’m so special explores the relationship between ethics and aesthetics in relation to the ego. what if self-dramatisation and extravagance are not exclusively negative symptoms of our modern lifestyle but drivers of change? If desires, yearnings and autonomous living are constituting creative tools?

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sCENarIo 5

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Participants:

Goodmorning technology – strategic design agency ole Jensen and molgaard aps – Ceramist and design Engineer dorte mandrup architects, schmidt hammer lassen architects and mutoPIa – architects

Bicycle track. Photography Kajsa Plum wirell.
Bicycle track. Photography Kajsa Plum wirell.

Linking behaviours explores the ability of the design object to stimulate and generate trends, customs and cultures. what are the impacts and the potentials of the cultures that have emerged around design objects? and what does this imply for future human behaviour – for the individual and for the community?

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sCENarIo 6

Participants:

oticon a/s – Hearing aid company Bengtsson design ltd – designer 3xN – architects

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North sails flexible production of sails for america’s Cup. Photography Kasper Guldager Jørgensen, 3xN.
North sails flexible production of sails for america’s Cup. Photography Kasper Guldager Jørgensen, 3xN.

Processing experiments revolves around experimentation and innovation, emphasising process rather than product. Interdisciplinary collaboration, research and technology give rise to new forms of design, craft and architecture. Can new industrial processes match the complex challenges we face?

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ddC/ daC / dC ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world 25 / 48 Exhibition

Exhibition Structure

Non-Standardised Praxis

visualisation of exhibition structure for it’s a small world, CIta, Centre for Information technology and architecture.

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It’s a small world

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Implementing digital crafting

– developing the architectural structure for it’s a small world

By Mette Ramsgaard Thomsen, MAA, PhD, Associate Prof., Head of CITA, Centre for Information Technology and Architecture. Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture.

The exhibition design for the exhibition it’s a small world explores how non-standardised design practices can make new use of old materials. Developing bespoke interfaces for digital design and fabrication, the exhibition design investigates how these techniques allow us to rethink the traditional boundaries between architect and builder, designer and craftsman.

digital media are often seen as a way to abstract the world. But in design and fabrication digital tools allow for a new closeness between design and making. as manufacturing becomes increasingly computer- controlled, and as better and more solid interfaces between the design space and fabrication mature,

a more integrated working practice arises. to enter

into this practice, and to make use of its knowledge sharing and its ability to create new more sustainable building practice that lie outside the mass produced and the standardised, it is necessary to integrate this

new practice into architectural thinking, designing and making. digital fabrication reintroduces a material nearness into our practice. How do we engage with this material sense? How can better crafts knowledge challenge our design paradigms, and what happens when the architect becomes a tool builder, defining individualised design tools for non-standardised making? the challenge for the design of it’s a small world was to respond to the varying scales of the exhibited objects. the exhibition brings together the scales of architecture (landscape, city, building) with the scales of the object (furniture, garment, jewellery). our scope has been to develop a design that can negotiate these scales while maintaining the focus and attention of the audience.

our solution has been to develop a generative design system. the system is parametrically controlled, and by defining the variables of the design setups the structure ‘grows’ in response to the particular needs of each exhibited object. like a crystal, the exhibition design is defined by a particular underlying logic that frames the structure and sets the core architectural tendency and expression.

the generative system is developed on a hexagonal

grid. Exploring packing principles we have developed

a dynamic matrix. the matrix uses a fractal logic

to pack diamonds of different scales. this allows us

to change the scale of the exhibition design locally, while maintaining the possibility to grow yet an island or a wall and to expand and contract the designed structures.

the hexagonal grid is used to define a substructure of cassettes. using the commonplace building material dibond, a composite of aluminium and plastic, our aim is to explore how new digital crafting techniques can allow us to redefine the structural properties and uses of the material. the cassettes make use of aluCarbon’s quite singular property of folding. By scoring the material, we can place crease lines and fold each cassette accordingly. the folding makes use of the material’s inherent strength, allowing us to optimise the material use, as well as respond to weight concerns regarding freight and transportation.

the design system grows each cassette as a singular object with a particular size, height, off-cut and slide. we have developed our own interfaces with the manufacturer allowing us to generate the production drawings directly from the design environment. this linkage by file and factory allows us to mass- customise the elements as a bespoke specification. all details and numbering are included into this process, facilitating the assemblage of the structure.

CITA is an innovative research environment exploring the emergent intersections between architecture and digital technologies. Identifying core research questions into how space and technology can be probed, CITA investigates how the current forming of a digital culture impacts on architectural thinking and practice. CITA examines how architecture is influenced by new digital design and production tools as well as the digital practices that are informing our societies culturally, socially and technologically. Using design and practice- based research methods, the aim is to explore the conceptualisation, design and realisation of working prototypes. www.cita.karch.dk

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CIta studio. Photography martin tamke, CIta, Centre for Information technology and architecture.
CIta studio. Photography martin tamke, CIta, Centre for Information technology and architecture.

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Design

diversity

It’s a small world

By Tina Midtgaard, Curator, Danish Design Centre, Project Manager, it’s a small world.

during recent years the attempt to define design has proven problematic. there is an ongoing search to find a single definition that will perfectly satisfy this myriad and continually mutating concept. From being used to principally describe industrial design, it is now as a discipline and way of thinking pursued in ever more fields: politics, information technology, genetics etc. designers and design products are no longer easy to classify. It is a hyper complex activity, and eventually the attempt to define quietly fades out.

rather than thinking in terms of a single all- encompassing definition, it may be more useful to consider design as multiple strands of activity and practice. some have similarities, others appear to operate in opposition.

One way of mapping design today is to look at its extremes—at designers and practices that touch the edges of ‘design space’. Here are the wildest tendencies, the most extreme personal visions and indulgent behaviour. Yet the extremes also include the most ‘normal’, the supernormal if you will, and also the most social designers who act as catalysts and drivers for change. The extremes define the space, but do not limit it. As designers continually push the envelope, design culture mutates and reforms.

Numerous factors influence these changes. the digital revolution creates a new freedom for the designer and supports design thinking at all stages of the process. No longer limited to visualisation and technical aspects of a project, digital processing now directly impacts on strategies and supports creativity. likewise, a growing focus on community, common values and collective needs in a sustainable context creates opportunities for designers to liberate themselves from traditional method and use their competences in larger creative structures. Formerly a discipline in which designers tended to operate as individuals, it is now a discipline where designers choose to work in multidisciplinary environments and not just with other designers. the realisation that problems cannot be solved in isolation creates a tendency to experiment with new coalitions and hybrids of design, science, politics, activism and technology.

these tendencies in design culture take the designer into ever-expanding areas of practice and into ever-deeper contact with new interfaces. Consequently, when we talk about design and its methods, we no longer speak of potential but of actual effects.

The transformation of New York

In 2008, New York City dot (department of transportation) released the world Class streets report, a 50-page report that presents new policies for the function and design of New York’s streets. the cities that formed the research base for the project included Copenhagen as an example of

a society with a targeted policy to create better conditions for bicycling, which has sustained

a high level of personal mobility.

“the times are changing, from the problem of global warming to worldwide competition among cities, and our streets need to change along with them,” said transportation Commissioner Janette sadik-Khan.

“until now, New York has not embraced a broad strategy for developing and caring for the public realm, but today the world’s best cities are strongly focused on quality of life. designing streets as great

places for people, and not just as utilitarian corridors for vehicles takes full advantage of New York’s density and vibrancy.”

the report begins with an analysis of the city’s public realm by renowned danish urbanist and architect Jan Gehl. where many cities have enlisted Gehl to provide an outsider’s perspective as they contemplate possible new directions, NYC dot has used Gehl’s work to directly inform the implementation of new policies and projects.

world Class streets is intended as a companion volume to the city’s new street design manual. the manual will set forth technical details for city streets under the policies described in the report and will guide not only the work of dot, but other city agencies in all future work on the streets of New York.

“New York is moving much faster and more thoroughly than many cities around the world that have acknowledged the need for sustainability and a high-quality public realm,” said Jan Gehl.

dot has identified areas in the New York street network where improvements are needed. For example, some of New York’s busiest streets are unattractive environments for both young and senior pedestrians, or are areas in need of better or newly designed public space. By following PlaNYC (a comprehensive sustainability plan for the City of New York’s future) and the dot strategic Plan, dot is moving forward with its multi-faceted street design program.

GMTN

Interview with Ida Marie Nissen and Mads Kjøller Damkjær, Partners, GMTN. By Dominic Balmforth.

One day when Ida was cycling around New York it occurred to her that New York City lacked a city bike system, like the one we have in Copenhagen. Her timing was right, the World Class Streets project was in process, and so, inspired by the Copenhagen city bike system, GMTN started to work on a way to devise a new mode of transport for New York City. During the process of trying to establish whether any organisations would be interested in supporting the idea, The Department of Parks and Recreation expressed an interest.

What does it take for this project to become an integral part of the movement infrastructure for New York and avoid being just a big idea? after we had discovered that our idea was a good idea, we also discovered that there were a variety of people interested in it. the New York City department of Parks and recreation showed interest in the project. If the project was just an idea, we would not have put so much effort into really understanding the needs and wishes of the people who would use and run the citybike system. we conducted a lot of research, we looked into tourist movements in the city, and we engaged city residents and authorities in the process to establish their needs. In this sense, I don’t think that it will ever just be an idea. the idea will either be launched and adopted by New Yorkers and work really well, or it will not be adopted. But even if not realized, our proposals would still create insight into an alternative mode of urban mobility for New Yorkers and visitors to the city; it will offer a different viewpoint on how to enjoy and move about in New York’s urban environment.

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How is the project organised? From CPH to New York? From concept to reality? we have teamed up with the design studio Nr2154. they are a danish company, that have set up in New York and share our vision for a citybike system for the city. their involvement is vital in that they are in situ in New York and provide a direct link to the different authorities and are able to conduct field research. they have developed a good relationship with other influential

partners such as the architecture firm diller scofidio which

is very influential with regards to the development of New

York City. we realised from the beginning that a project such as this required a team and network of partners who could each bring different insights and skills. this is not new for us; we are just extending our own multi- disciplinary working culture.

How does concept design relate to the realities of urban life; city politics, city maintenance etc.? we contacted adrian Benepe, New York’s Commissioner for Parks and recreation, after reading in the danish newspaper, Børsen about his visit to Copenhagen last year. He saw Copenhagen’s bicycle-friendly environment as an inspiration. we felt that we could offer a unique insight. although it is a concept at this stage, it is grounded in our experience of using bikes as an everyday part of our life. so we understand the realities both from personal experience and through the research and observational skills we have as designers. we knew that the project was not just about designing a nice bike, it had to deliver a new, easy and enjoyable way of getting around New York. It has to support a new quality of life for New Yorkers and offer a rewarding experience for visitors to the city. we have proposed a whole system ranging from a website to rental locations to support centres. It has been devised with the people of New

York and will, if realised, become part of life in the city. From the user perspective, the city bike should be

a carefree way to travel around and explore the city.

From an operational point of view, the system should be efficient, cost-effective and easy to maintain. we have spent a lot of time considering the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the scheme to make sure it could be implemented in reality.

What is the status of this project? What is the likelihood of it being realised? we are confident that New York will introduce a city bike

system. as well as our report, New York has conducted research into the feasibility, constraints and possible applications for the city bike concept. the project will now be put to public tender and we will be on an equal footing with the other companies that may bid. we have also been invited to participate in the 2nd annual summer streets event. For three consecutive saturday mornings this august, NYC department of transportation is closing the streets to vehicles and opening them up to people to bike, walk and play. Billed as ‘part bike tour, part block party’, the event gives us the chance to introduce

a city bike system to the people of New York. Even if our

project is not selected, we believe that our input is likely to shape the debate around sustainable urban mobility for New York, and we have already gained a lot through our work. we are doing a number of projects to support cycling for the City of Copenhagen and we have developed new bike components which have generated worldwide demand.

Goodmorning Technology (GMTN) is based in Copenhagen and is a strategic design agency founded by four partners: Ida Marie Nissen, Nille Halding, Lars Thomsen and Mads Kjøller Damkjær. They head a multidisciplinary team of people with professional backgrounds in product design, digital design, graphic design, social anthropology, architecture, business, communication and strategy. www.gmtn.dk

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GmtN. Goodmorning technology/Nr 2154.
GmtN. Goodmorning technology/Nr 2154.
weekend pedestrian streets. NY City dot.
weekend pedestrian streets. NY City dot.

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very round by louise Campbell. Produced by Zanotta. Photography thomas Bentzen.
very round by louise Campbell. Produced by Zanotta. Photography thomas Bentzen.

Craft progress

Interview with Louise Campbell, Designer. By Karen Kjærgaard, Curator, Danish Crafts.

Craft is about research. In a very hands-on sense! Louise Campbell practises and switches elegantly between new materials, traditional craft techniques and digital design processes – in a universe of New Craftsmanship.

How do you define craft, and what is the future role of craft and the craftsman? the role of craft and the craftsman is the same as it always has been and always will be. slow work. Building something up from the beginning, with the materials and techniques available in our time. thus, craft is a crystal-clear mirror of the period within which it is being produced, and of course of the producer.

You are exhibiting in a scenario entitled ‘expanding tradition’. What is the origin of your dedication to craft and design? Craft and design is my life. and has been for more than twenty years now. simple as that.

You are developing ideas with diverse manufacturers like HAY, Royal Copenhagen, Zanotta and Louis Poulsen. How does interdisciplinary approach influence your work? the variety is very important to me. It keeps me on my toes and keeps me inspired. It ensures that part of me always feels like a beginner. a fruitful emotion, as it leaves me both humble and fascinated.

Do you see a relationship between research, craft and business? Craft is all about research. on a very hands-on level. Business is something altogether different. Craft and business CaN fuse, indeed very productively, but that requires clear game rules, focus and the ability to collaborate with an open mind – from both participating parties.

How can craft be sustainable? I design with the intent of only producing long-lasting products. I am a very great fan of Iittala’s saying:

‘against throwawayism’. I think it says everything.

You are a craftswoman first, designer second. You solve problems with your hands and intuition. You not only craft the object, but craft the process. Computers realise your creations. Is this approach by any means sustainable? I use my hands first, and don’t let the machines enter the process before I myself am in control of it. If by your question you mean: is designing with and for machines by any means sustainable, then the answer is: not in itself. Committing to machinery and thus industry requires a strong sense of responsibility. the designer can be ambitious and insistent, but in the end, the final call is in the hands of the manufacturer. all the designer can supply is the essence of the work. and of course a careful choice of partnerships within the industry.

The greatest risk for craft is the pace at which the world is moving. This is, however, also the reason why craft today is more important than ever before. Someone has to keep walking with wide open senses, whilst everyone else is running.

Louise Campell, designer

What is the opportunity and capacity of craft in the design process? Endless!

What is your purpose or intent as a craftsman? Endless, along an extremely winding road, apparently.

New Craftsmanship is the combined effort of hand and mind, where the classic tools are replaced by processual competencies, conceptual visions and a rediscovery of craft techniques. Does this impact the development of Danish design in an ever- changing world? the greatest risk for craft is the pace at which the world is moving. this is, however, also the reason why craft today is more important than ever before. someone has to keep walking with wide- open senses whilst everyone else is running.

You are part of an interdisciplinary project, ‘China Town’, supported by Danish Crafts, which aims to explore the possiblities for exchanging ideas and know-how. How is this encounter between Danish and Chinese craft and tradition working out? Craft is a language that knows no borders. It is very beautiful to experience how easy it is to communicate with other craftsmen, no matter where in the world the dialogue takes place. we share the same interests and focus on the same priorities: quality, level of expression, form, and, most importantly, the process.

a thing of beauty – and a process of working with

beauty – fascinates, no matter from where – or why –

it originates. working in China emphasises this for me. our cultures could not be more different. Yet, when

it comes to working with craft on a hands-on level,

we seem to understand one another perfectly. Having said that, moving on to production in China is an extremely complicated process. But that is another story.

Louise Campbell (b. 1970), designer, graduated from the London College of Furniture and The Danish Design School. She works in a wide field of craft and design for companies like Louis Poulsen, Hay, Royal Copenhagen, Holmegaard, Kähler and Zanotta. Louise Campbell has received numerous prizes and awards and is represented and has exhibited worldwide. Incorporating the potential of tradition into her process, she explores the new Craftsmanship in Danish design. www.louisecampbell.com

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Being a Craftsman means being skilled! As a poet, a potter or a philosopher! Craftsmanship is when you allow yourself to go into and beyond material,

time and place to reinvent

reinterpret things that New Craftsmanship
reinterpret things that
New Craftsmanship

and

were already there.

And

is not only a necessary,

identity-forming cultural

tool, but just as much a

source for understanding,

challenging and developing tradition.

Karen Kjærgaard, Curator, Danish Crafts

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Architecture tomorrow

By Kjersti Wikstrøm, Curator, Danish Architecture Centre.

By Kjersti Wikstrøm, Curator, Danish Architecture Centre. Automorphic Strand Tower (detail) – 2006 © tEsta &

Automorphic Strand Tower (detail) – 2006 © tEsta & wEIsEr INC, los angeles. 20 story Environmental Envelope / robotically Pultruded Basalt Fiber; an environmentally sensitive construction system based on the self-organising properties of extreme fibre networks. design Principals: Peter testa, devyn weiser. tEsta & wEIsEr’s work with digitally generated and optimised forms has been a source of inspiration for 3xN’s research and development work.

Architecture is constantly changing, and currently perhaps at a faster rate than ever before. On the brink of a new era, we’re not only experiencing a shift in generations, but also a paradigm shift; continuously searching for new answers to what architecture can and should encompass.

In opposition to the conventional understanding of the ‘master architect’, the contemporary architect is rarely a sole practitioner, but a ‘social agent’ operating in teams. – Both within the context of the design profession, and in the ever more complex processes of project realisation. the architecture of tomorrow is being defined by architects who refuse to allow themselves to be limited by a rigid ideological divide from other disciplines but rather broaden our understanding of its practice by including tools, methods, and knowledge from other fields.

In fact, a dynamic, sustainable and forward-thinking architectural discipline depends on its ability to remain tolerant towards a constant state of change – continually questioning, including, experimenting, adapting and collaborating towards new ideas, new technology, new processes and new outcomes.

The age of digitisation

at the core of this exchange, an innovative digital discourse arises that offers potent new conduits to the designing of architecture. we all know that the information revolution has totally transformed society.

architecture is no exception; just as radically as during the industrial revolution, we are now not only being challenged on how to design buildings but also on how to construct and manufacture them.

In this budding ‘age of digitasation’, new tools and software are turning into platforms from where the activity surrounding complex projects can be articulated, managed, and built. digital tools and methods are no longer limited to three-dimensional drafting or excessive presentations; they have become tools that assist design thinking – paving the way for entirely new architectonical possibilities, as well as pioneering sustainable solutions.

looking as how 3xN’s recent work and research is characterised by its aptitude for utilising emerging technology and their development of smart components for even smarter sums – evidently the only limit for today, is our ability to imagine tomorrow.

Towards a sustainable future

through Kollision’s innovative and user-designated approach, drawing on the traditional methodological

focus where thorough mapping comes prior to any architectural response, it also becomes evident that architecture carries the potential to operate as interface between physical and virtual lives.

Not only are Kollision’s experiments relevant in understanding how digital communication might incorporate with the buildings or cities of the future but also in showing how architecture and design are in a position to make clear connections between theory and practice.

architecture by its nature has to do with everyday relationships of human beings. without a clear relation to the user it is worthless. Knowledge and skills are accumulated and passed on through social interaction. In paving the way for user-oriented design approaches, innovative and digitised communication tools can play a significant role in establishing common ground; equal understanding and exchange of knowledge, needs and values crucial to the development of more sophisticated architectural responses – sustainable outcomes designed with, for and by society.

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3XN

Interview with Kim Herforth Nielsen, Creative Principal Architect, 3XN. By Sidsel Regina Forchhammer/Kjersti Wikstrøm.

How do you define design, and what is the future role of design and the designer? design, as designing items, I define as “to make

something for a specific use.” the design process

is about creating something in a specific way, with

the goal of achieving a very specific and special performance. design and designers play an important role in the future, as things get more and more complicated. specific responses are greatly needed; just think of the challenges posed by climate change.

When we asked McDonough about New Craftsmanship and mass-customisation, he described these as tools not purpose. What are

your tools and purpose? our tools are different kinds of software. Besides that, we model a lot by hand, which is actually still a very important tool for us. also, we experiment in 1:1 with the designs to see how they perform. our research and development department is always interested in opportunities offered by new technology and materials, which is something we include in our processes. and repeatedly we learn that whenever we think we know everything, we don’t know everything at all. New products, ideas and knowledge arrive in the market every day, just as there are new challenges arising all the time. New problems replace other problems. still, what we do now we could not have done just 5 years ago. without the current technology and software it would not have been possible to develop or communicate the way we do, i.e. to show the builders how to build a very complicated whole just by splitting up and explaining its components. For us, the knowledge of what is possible often comes together in the design process, where we try to investigate, include and respond to all that is necessary to achieve a very specific response to the challenges posed in each project. therefore there can be no doubt that the design process is crucial to us. However, it can never be more important than the result. many architects and designers are very focused on their explorative processes, but they forget that the process is only a medium –

a way to get to the best result.

Kollision

Interview with Rune Nielsen, Partner, Kollision. By Dominic Balmforth.

What is the origin of your interest in design processes and user engagement? we approach design with a playful and curious outlook to the world. we have always been interested in the many opportunities, challenges and potentials that arise as a result of this outlook. the users for us are a natural and intrinsic part of the way we consider design and architecture. a building has everything to do with the user. we investigate new technology and new tools and bring them to each new situation and each new set of users. we enjoy exploring what happens when these two worlds come together.

When we asked William McDonough of Cradle to Cradle about New Craftsmanship and mass- customisation, he described these as tools not purpose. What are your tools and what is your purpose? Instead of presenting fixed models for how things should be from end to end, we prefer to seek and encourage different tendencies with the specific situation and tool set, we are working with. tendencies can stem from, for example, the users’ awareness, their reactions due to their own experiences. It is really important that the users are given an experience. this will encourage them to invest their time and energy and thereby contribute to the project. with each new tool we use, we try to introduce elements of learning which can in turn stimulate debate and influence the process of change and development. lately, we have been working with five stages in play:

What part does new technology play in your design process? architecture, design and technology are becoming very dependent upon each other. this relationship will only continue to develop, as the future holds endless possibilities for further interaction between the three. the emergence of new technology has major influence on design and designing. However, this works both ways. sometimes the needs of an architectural project are what lead to the invention of new technology as well. all in all, this is an accelerating interplay that goes faster and faster every day. what we will be able to do in 10 years time, we can’t even imagine – just like 10 years ago we wouldn’t believe it was possible to do what we are doing today. when we started our research and development department 3 years ago, it was because we often got second prizes in competitions, as we couldn’t prove how we would actually realise our proposed buildings. although fascinated, the clients thought them too complicated. research was our response. we wanted to prove that we could in fact manufacture these things as well.

How do you define the relationship between research, architecture, and business? when establishing our r&d department, we did this not only to improve the way we define our architecture, but also as a means of creating a business plan. In this sense, the two have become very connected. the results of our research are what we benefit from in our business ventures while applying the knowledge gained onto the buildings we create. Hence, achieving better and more specific architectural responses and attracting new clients and more profit due to our good results. an aim for the future is to become better at working with innovation as strategic business plans.

You are developing ideas with diverse material manufacturers, Technical University of Denmark, Innovation Lab and the Technology Institute. How do you value these multidisciplinary relations? we always try to find and cooperate with the best experts in specific fields connected to the challenges of our projects. sharing knowledge and opportunities, which I believe is beneficial for both parties and a very natural thing to do. these relationships are important to us, although not so unusual in regard to the way most architects work.

draw attention to oneself, create interest through novel experience, contribute with learning, understanding and meaningful influence, then follow this up with relevant actions. with regard to our tools, we attempt to reenact different means of communication in new and interesting ways. we use games and play as an event and a tool for dialogue. we devise scenarios which stage different variations of possible futures. we have found that this is an effective way of revealing the potential of a specific situation and group of users. we always try to find new driving forces for the development of public space.

Critics of a user-engagement approach to design say that you cannot design by committee. How would you respond to this? we would be cautious of replying generally, since design is such a big thing today. our field of work is often public urban space. as such, it is logical that user-engagement becomes a natural part of the process. we do not define user-engagement as one-way communication, it is not only about them or us applying ideas to a place but instead about us learning and discovering what the potentials and opportunities of a place are from the users’ perspective. It is not necessarily fruitful to involve the users in all phases of a project, but it can be extremely useful to have them involved in the early phases. the later phases are about evaluating and prioritising what is possible and what isn’t,

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Will the products and materials you’re currently developing replace or become the architecture? Or do you see these components themselves as architecture? Products can’t replace architecture; rather they are part of the architecture. architecture is a holistic thing that occurs when components, performance, functions and design intentions come together in a spatial way. and if it’s good architecture, it doesn’t only function but has a level above it. It becomes artistic. If you take the facade of the Horten domicile for instance, we have shaped the entire building to prevent the sun heating it up, instead of producing and adding products that could solve this issue. this is a holistic and sustainable way of thinking. when we design a building we try to focus on its overall performance, including the way it enables people to perform and act inside it.

Do you have a strategy to deal with Horten’s oblique windows if the future decides that the building needs to be changed or taken down? recycling is still a rather new way of thinking for us, but of course we have thought of this. up until recently, the architectural focus has mainly been on ‘how to make a building last’. the problem facing us now is that long-lasting materials are very often poisonous and difficult to destruct or recycle. Entering new projects, a major element in defining its materials is to do research into how they can be recycled or reused. the challenge of building sustainably is something we take extremely seriously. over the last 3 years we’ve put extensive research into e.g. new materials that can absorb and accumulate heat and cold. we’re working on a 20,000-square-metres building in Berlin, where we use phase-changing materials inside the glass walls to save 25% of the energy potentially used.

3XN is a Danish Architectural Company founded in 1986. Often working in the cross field of architecture, research and innovation, 3XN established a Research & Development department in 2007 focusing on green and digital architecture, new materials, technology, and working methods. The company has five partners: Kim Herforth Nielsen, Bo Boje Larsen, Jan Ammundsen, Michael Kruse and Tommy Brun.

www.3xn.dk

and then realising the project. Here, the design professions and the larger consultancy team are the best qualified to steer the process to completion.

How can / will technology influence the practices of architecture and urban development? Even though we confess to being very interested in new technologies, we have accepted that technology is just another form of material. we treat it on equal footing with concrete, glass and steel. technology is a part of the repertoire available when we design, shape things and make changes. the difference with technology is that it is dynamic and as such presents different challenges than static materials. this is why we always seek meaning from the situation and understand the given dynamics instead of forcing a new set of dynamics, to the situation via technology.

Kollision is a Danish architectural bureau which operates at the intersection of communication, interaction design, participation and architecture. The Bureau was founded in 2000 and consists of four partners: Andreas Lykke-Olesen, Tobias Løssing, Rune Nielsen and Thomas Fabian Delman. www.kollision.dk

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Design and /or Chemistry

Interview with Michael Braungart, Co-founder, McDonoughBraungart Design Chemistry (MBDC), Cradle to Cradle. By Dominic Balmforth.

How do you define design, and what is the future role of design and the designer? design is not just about making things look different or about beautifying things. design is about deciding how to design processes and material flows, and how to make things which are useful and which people can enjoy. these things should be built using renewable energy and designed to be a part of either technical or biological cycles. In the future, design is the key and it is about more than just aesthetics. let’s say design will be about holistic aesthetics or holistic beauty.

How can design be sustainable? First of all, sustainability is pretty boring. It does not really celebrate human creativity. design is never sustainable because in this case, it would not be new. design is always new. design, when it is good design, is always creative and is always making new situations. sustainability is about perpetuating what is already there, and this has nothing to do with creativity. we can take an example from the biological world: does design plant the same trees over and over again, no! design really celebrates new insights, it celebrates new ways to see things, it celebrates human creativity. sustainability is about perpetuating stuff, and for this, we have too many people on this planet. design needs to innovate and invent, the sustaining part comes in because design needs to be connected to things which really matter. design needs to support human rights, design needs to support bio-diversity, it needs to be built from renewable energy. we must focus on the holistic qualities of design. In this case, design can moderate and facilitate processes, processes about society. design can be the focus of society, design can be about things that really matter. In this way, design is about sustaining, not about sustainability. design is far more than sustainability.

You advocate doing more good instead of less bad. Over and above holding lectures at universities and design institutions, how do you think current minds and practices can be changed world-wide when the message of sustainability is still fighting strongly for reductionism? You can explain it out of history. Nature was not nice to us in history. the natural lifetime of a human should be about thirty years. the strongest carcinogens and the most toxic substances today are still natural substances. we needed to emancipate ourselves against nature and we did this in a very destructive way. Now we feel bad for that, we feel guilty. look from the northern perspective, very much further north than denmark. when you are in the tundra, your footprint always means destruction. Your footprint allows the wind to wash away the soil. a footprint in the tundra will be visible for the next fifty years. If you add religion to this notion, then what is generated is the feeling that we are a pain for this planet, the feeling that it would be better if we would not be here. this is why there are people today talking about zero emissions, zero waste and zero footprint. But when you make the same footprint in Italy and you walk through a meadow, then your footprint

means that the water stays longer in that meadow.

Isn’t it nice to have a big footprint if you make it

a wetland? then you can be beneficial. If we only

concentrate on doing less bad, we omit the part of our contribution which can be beneficial for the environment. we only try to do less bad, and we are too many for that. we found out for example, that the biomass of all the ants on the planet is about four times bigger than that of human beings. Because they live much shorter than we do, and work physically a lot harder, then they equal about

thirty billion people in terms of calorie consumption. this makes it clear that we are not too many, but our design is just not good enough. this is why it is not enough to make the existing things less bad. when you do something wrong and make it perfect, then you make it only perfectly wrong. that’s why

it is about reinventing things to create more good

instead of creating less bad. Instead of minimizing your footprint, it is about making a big footprint, but make it in wetland so that nature can be happy that we are here. there are only about five ways

to control people to do less bad; there are millions of ways to support people to be good. this is why

it allows for so much more creativity.

Solutions which do good clearly require a shift in thinking within all sectors, from management to manufacturing to engineering to design. What implications does this have for design education and design practice?

First of all, what is needed is far more self-esteem from designers and architects. designers and architects are the group of professionals who necessarily need to think positively about the future, otherwise they don’t need to design it. But this positive thinking does not appear right now, we just try to be less bad. we strive to reduce the energy consumption of a building but don’t consider that the average indoor air quality in Copenhagen is three to eight times worse than the air quality outside the building. the first thing to ask is: what is the right thing to do, then you can optimize this in different ways. this requires a different way to manage economy; it requires a revision in systematic supply chain design. It requires designers who have knowledge of material flow management, and designers who are able to use the qualifications of engineers and scientists towards achieving far better design. design can not only be how things feel and how they look, it really needs to understand the essence of a product, of a material, of architecture. denmark is in a good position because danish design

is very famous. danish industrial designers are

amongst the leading industrial designers in the world. You have young designers in denmark who want to be proud of what they do. this context can make them proud of what they do. If they make a toy which

is toxic, it is not good design. If you design a space

with bad air quality, if you design a product whereby we lose rare metals or rare nutrients like phosphate, then the design is not good enough. so, it is about the holistic quality of design and the design provision of denmark is a very good start. denmark just needs to include other elements in the design process as well.

How can your ideas and practices make an impact beyond the private sector? What practical steps can be taken to begin shaping a new form of politics and an entirely new industrial system? If you really want to answer that, it could take about five pages! Herman miller, shaw, Nike, these companies worked on Cradle to Cradle because the government didn’t do anything. the government didn’t even pretend to do anything. the worst is a government which hides behind legislation, like the European union. the Eu has strict legislation on outdoor air quality but not on indoor air quality. For example, there is a ban on asbestos for brake pads, but a building can be full of antimonies, which are much more dangerous than asbestos, especially when inside a building we can inhale more concentrated amounts. In Europe, we import palm oil from Indonesia where one hectare of palm oil destroys rainforest which has seven thousand tons of carbon in it! we are facing a period of ecologism in Europe. like socialism was never social, ecologism is not really helping ecology. Ecologism keeps people busy and quiet. we are banning light bulbs in Europe instead of building systematic programs to rebuild soil. In denmark, you lose about 5,000 times more top soil than you make, per year. It is top soil not oil, which is the key carrier for carbon. In one year, we lose the top soil which has been built in 5,000 years.

Is it possible, in an agricultural economy like Denmark, to change that? Yeah, sure, we implement a series of programmes based on soil farming. this rebuilds soil agriculturally. so there are endless things to do, but the European union only pretends to do something. what we need is a government who really wants to do something and does it. so the worst is a government who pretends to do something and doesn’t do it. the second worst is a government which says openly and honestly: hey, we are idiots, and so we don’t do anything; at least this gives the people a clear picture of the situation and an indication of what they need to do. But the best is what we have in the Netherlands. the Netherlands is right now formulating long-term goals. For example, they have enlarged their public purchasing until 2012; fifty billion Euros of purchasing will be Cradle to Cradle. In five years they say, we will get all the phosphate back into agriculture because phosphate is far more valuable than oil. the Chinese for example are mining phosphate rock, which has half the phosphate of the dutch sewage sludge and we are burning the stuff and call it waste! Instead we need to get nutrients back into cycles and we need governments which make clear long term goals. In ten years, the indoor air quality in buildings in the Netherlands will be better than outdoor air. this will initiate a lot of innovation, and change will come from here. all the big landscape architects in the Netherlands are dedicated to Cradle to Cradle now. there are whole regions working with it, like the region of lindberg which hosts Floriade, the world flower olympics in 2012, these are all designed as Cradle to Cradle events. so this is pretty optimistic. after thirty years of blaming and shaming, we can focus on how to make positive change and then we can export what we have learnt to the key players of the world, to India and China and so on.

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Interview with William A. McDonough, Co-founder, McDonoughBraungart Design Chemistry (MBDC), Cradle to Cradle. By Dominic Balmforth.

How do you define design, and what is the future role of design and the designer? I see design as the first signal of human intention. How we design as a species effects the whole world. If the design intention is to make life better, then how can we do design which makes people sick? design is the opportunity to make life better. as designers, we should ask ourselves, how do we love all the children of all species for all time? If every component of a design is seen as a nutrient then the design can contribute positively to either a biological or technical life-cycle. this way of thinking requires that we can access the components or nutrients of any given design. designers can design for this from the outset.

The exhibition talks about New Craftsmanship and Non-Standardised Praxis, which allows for new software and technology to co-exist with the designer’s (and the consumer’s) desire for expression, personality and uniqueness. How do you think these themes relate to sustainable design and/or Cradle to Cradle design? mass-customisation is a tool. Cradle to Cradle is a principle. a tool only has value for the purpose to which it is put. a hammer is a good tool if it helps to build your house. It’s a bad tool if it hits you over the head! It is what we do with the tool which defines its value.

You advocate doing more good instead of less bad. Over and above holding lectures at universities and design institutions, how do you think current minds and practices can be changed world-wide when the message of sustainability is still fighting strongly for reductionism? this involves a combination of state and commerce. Changing the way we make things requires that both the guardian (state) and commerce lead the way to change. Cradle to Cradle protocol can also be adopted in communities. However, most of the world’s population live at a subsistence level. they have no time to think at a theoretical level because they are too busy surviving. People who have the time, resources and capital to think at a theoretical level can apply themselves to designing systems which work, that is, systems which do good without doing bad. I think that if development works, then we should allow it. with Cradle to Cradle we enable development to work, and we can offer this to both educators and consumers.

take the pen you are using, for example. as soon as it stops working, it is no longer useful to you or anyone else. You can’t put it into a plastic recycle bin because it will have ink traces which need to be cleaned out. the pen is too small to be effectively reprocessed and up-cycled as a new industrial component. as such it would be much better if all the materials of the pen could biodegrade. wouldn’t it be fantastic if you could just plant the pen in the ground or in a plant-pot once you’re done with it. You could then chew the end of it without worrying about eating cancer!

this way of consuming and disposing of products should become common practice. this should just become the normal way of being. all products should just be in this way!

Solutions which do good clearly require a shift in thinking within all sectors, from management to manufacturing to engineering to design. What implications does this have for design education and design practice? designers need to be engaged in the agenda. designers should recognise the opportunity to become multidisciplinary. today, we need all sectors to help with design. we should recognise the desire and opportunity inherent in multidisciplinary thinking.

How can your ideas and practices make an impact beyond the private sector? What practical steps can be taken to begin shaping a new form of politics and an entirely new industrial system? the writer and urban philosopher, Jane Jacobs talked about two drivers of change, ‘commerce’ and ‘the

guardian’. Commerce enables development to occur swiftly and directly whereas the guardian is slow and serious. therefore, we had to start with commerce.

It was our way of showing that our principles can

work by way of example, by way of real products,

which can do more good instead of less bad. there

is also a fundamental difference in the way in which

commerce and the guardian approach a problem. the guardian can tackle a problem without necessarily

solving the problem. when the guardian discovers

a problem with something it regulates it. In my view,

regulation is a signal of design failure. If something needs regulating, then there is something wrong with it. the public sector is catching up quickly however, and they are now asking us how to solve the problems. we have recently become more involved in engaging governments and other political bodies with Cradle

to Cradle.

What are the main difficulties you are presently encountering with your work? we are currently just trying to keep up with people who want to participate! michael and I didn’t invent Cradle to Cradle, we discovered it. we have used the last thirty years, creating a vast database of knowledge which we can now give away. michael and I are currently talking about how to do this. we need to figure out how to

release this gift to the world. It will probably happen

in the form of a non-profit venue, perhaps in California

and in collaboration with the government of California. we are in discussion with them presently.

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Cradle to Cradle Design MBDC is a product and process design firm dedicated to revolutionising the design of products and services worldwide. William McDonough and Dr. Michael Braungart founded MBDC in 1995 to promote and shape what they call the ‘Next Industrial Revolution’ through the introduction of a new design paradigm called Cradle to Cradle Design and the implementation of eco-effective design principles. Instead of designing products and systems based on the take-make-waste model of the last century (‘cradle to grave’), MBDC’s Cradle to Cradle Design paradigm is powering the Next Industrial Revolution, in which products and services are designed based on patterns found in nature, eliminating the concept of waste entirely and creating an abundance that is healthy and sustaining. Eco-Effectiveness is MBDC’s design strategy for realising these results by optimising materials to be food either for nature’s eco systems or for humans’ industrial systems— perpetually circulating in closed systems that create value and are inherently healthy and safe. www.MBDC.com

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Design Systems – not objects!

By Dominic Balmforth, Architect MAA, Co-Curator / Sustainability.

Design is not just about making things, but rather how we make things that fit harmoniously into an ecological, cultural, and moral context. It is therefore about systems, patterns, and connections.

David Orr, ‘Architecture, Ecological Design, and Human Ecology’

whilst sustainability demands that we live in a way that can be perpetuated, the means we have available to us were not designed to meet this end. our means of energy generation, material production and transportation were not designed to generate, stimulate and perpetuate ongoing life. when our means of living is destructive to the planet, then clearly it makes sense to tread lightly and reduce our human impact. But for how long is this strategy sustainable?

Nature doesn’t need to tread lightly, nature can always produce in abundance because nature’s design objective is to generate, stimulate and perpetuate life. what if this became the design objective for all man-made systems?

If this were to happen then sustainable design would no longer be about reducing material production, energy use and carbon emissions. design could instead introduce qualitative solutions to turn waste into resource, absorb carbon, cleanse air and water and harness renewable energy.

architect william mcdonough and chemist michael Braungart are pioneers of this approach. they say that the reason to design is not to do less bad but more good. 2 In their book, Cradle to Cradle, they argue that the only effective long-term strategy for preventing the effects of climate change is to target the cause:

to review, re-think and re-invent all systems which belong to the industrial era of consume, use and waste. mcdonough and Braungart propose replacing cradle to grave processes of produce, use and waste, with Cradle to Cradle processes which can sustain ongoing life.

Design systems

the design objective of nature is to support and sustain multiple forms of life. Nature does this by means of many sophisticated cycles for birth, growth, decay, consumption and rebirth. If our design objective is to sustain life, then we can begin to design in cycles, we can do metabolic design.

design can reclaim a pivotal role in enabling positive change and growth, making new industry, making new markets, making new systems. this is the main message of Cradle to Cradle. mcdonough and Braungart encourage us to design and generate

materials which never end as waste, but which are always nutrients for either technical or biological cycles. they tell us that there is no such thing as waste. waste can instead be food for the next system.

Designers can redefine design quality

design quality no longer only concerns the quality of the finished object. the effect of every new product is much bigger than the effect it has on whomever buys or uses it. when we talk about functional quality, we need also to talk about a product’s impact on its social and environmental context during each phase of its production, use, disposal and potential re-use. when we talk about consumption of design products, we can differentiate between the use or literal consumption of a material. this can help us to establish whether it is not in fact better for the consumer and the planet to pay for the service of using a product instead of owning it. an example Braungart uses is that we never actually consume

a television; therefore, in principle we don’t need

to own a television when we only want to watch tv. “In my analysis of what goes into a tv set, I identified 4,360 different chemicals. do you really want to own this chemical waste, or do you just want to watch tv?” 2

ways to deal with this issue could arise from the growing field of service design.

when we design clothes and textiles, let’s design them to be kind to our skin whilst we wear them, and be kind to our environment when we don’t want them anymore. most clothes contain chemicals which

at some point will cause a problem for one or both of

these hosts. Braungart says;

like louis vuitton, dolce & Gabbana and armani,

what comes out of the plant and goes into the shops

is just hazardous waste.” 3

if you look at brands

when we design buildings and cities, instead of only aiming to save energy or reduce Co 2 emissions, we can generate all the energy we need and more from renewable sources, and we can absorb Co 2 emissions by introducing vegetation as part of the architecture. Buildings can clean air and water, and they can be built of materials which never end up as waste but instead provide nutrients to other biological or technical systems.

1. Braungart, michael / mcdonough, william; Cradle to Cradle; Re-making the way we make things, pub.2002, North Point Press

2. Braungart, michael; Designing ‘Eco-Effective’ Solutions, Interview by shannon Hueckerhttp://www.emagazine.com/view/?3526

3. Braungart, michael; Designers don’t be shy! Interview by diana den Held, 02.05.09 http://gevleugeldewoorden.nl/michaelbraungart designers-are-way-too-modest-when-it-comes-to-cradle-to cradle/

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visualisation of future Carlsberg – our City. Credit Entasis.
visualisation of future Carlsberg – our City. Credit Entasis.

Our City

the current transformation of Carlsberg’s old brewery area in the middle of central Copenhagen is one of the largest ongoing sustainable urban development projects in denmark. as one of 221 entries, the Copenhagen-based architectural office Entasis won the international competition on the development of the old industrial plot in 2007. their winning project, our City, takes a serious approach to various aspects of urban sustainability in regards to both social and economical aspects as well as energy-friendly construction. the project is also a good example of how more and more architects are working in interdisciplinary teams or choosing to join forces with engineers at an early stage in order to incorporate innovative technical solutions into the architecture.

Carlsberg – our City is planned as a network of public spaces that offer themselves to users in the form of gardens, squares, axes, streets, alleys, passages and, last but not least, a number of privately owned but publicly accessible buildings. It is an ambition that so many of the existing buildings and all of the existing outdoor space should open up to public life. trying to achieve a harmonious balance between ecological, cultural and moral aspects of sustainability, the projects aim to establish a Co 2 neutral city without compromising the intention of designing a modern urban area or the significance of preserving the historic city. www.voresby.com www.entasis.dk

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Design

Changes

Interview with Michael Keissner, CEO, Hatch & Bloom. By Anne Mette Laursen.

How do you define design? And what is the future role of design and the designer? design is a way of thinking. It is a way of seeing, understanding and acting in order to design solutions that improve life. design is ultimately about creating meaning. Not just when we are designing a public welfare service, but also when we design commercial branded experiences and strategies. the future role of design will have a much stronger focus on human life, human experience and human emotion. the future role of the designer will be to design services that improve human life. Not just life in the serious sense when we need to go to the hospital, but also when we are having fun.

In what ways do your company relate to and expand the design tradition? we do not relate to the design tradition, and it is not on our agenda to expand the tradition either. we consider ourselves as part of a wider context. some of our strongest partners and allies involve business leaders, public administrators, doctors and nurses, programmers, artists, scientists and engineers. In this way, we are starting a new

tradition. at the end of the day it is not about being

a designer it is about changing larger agendas.

What are your methods, tools and purpose with regard to service design?

It is not about methods and tools, it is about people.

Hire the right people, and you can teach them any method in the world. the hard part is finding design- thinking people who can intuitively design immaterial services – and picture them just as concrete as physical products.

How can service design make a change in and for the world? – Can service design be sustainable? we have spent 1000 years on making industrial design

– and it did not lead to a sustainable world in any way,

quite the opposite, actually. service design is probably the only way to make a real change in the world, since service design deals with the interactive and collective reality that can unite people and empower them to contribute to a sustainable future. also, the mere fact that service design is immaterial makes it a very promising concept when you think about sustainability in a broad sense, environmentally, financially and socially. take the financial crisis as an example: we are quite sure that a financial system based on service design solutions would have given both experts and non-experts a much better chance of understanding that we were going in a wrong direction. the biggest problem was that almost nobody experienced that the system was too theoretical and cut off from real life.

As an idea and design agency you use a variety of skills and disciplines and work in larger multidisciplinary teams. What is the challenge of multidisciplinary work, and how can design professions be better at working together on multidisciplinary projects? there is no simple answer to that question. I would have to say that a great multidisciplinary team is based on great people who respect each other,

who bring specialist skills to the team and who share

a certain mindset. we simply do not believe in rigid process models. we believe in people who can think design.

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How do you define the relationship between research, design and business? design without research is meaningless.

design without business is even more meaningless. research and business without design is beyond

meaningless

I mean, it is like dancing without music.

Hatch & Bloom is an idea and design agency, based in Aarhus. The company is founded by Lotte Lyngsted Jepsen, Mette Theilgaard, Michael Keissner, and Jacob Holm Øe. Hatch & Bloom has three main business areas:

Insight, Innovation and Communication. Clients include private corporations, non-profit organizations and public institutions. www.hatchandbloom.com

Photography Haatch & Bloom.
Photography Haatch & Bloom.

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Fringe Project 10. Installation, Zeeuws museum, middelburg, 2009, mixed media, variable dimensions. Photography alastair
Fringe Project 10. Installation, Zeeuws museum, middelburg, 2009, mixed media, variable dimensions. Photography alastair wiper.

Soul Wash

Fringe Project No. 10. designers/artists Henrik vibskov and andreas Emenius move freely in the border land between design and art. In one of the six exhibition scenarios, ‘I’m so special’, visitors are offered a ‘soul wash’ as they move among the majestic, turbulent fringe columns in the installation ‘Fringe Project No. 10’, which deals with transformation and transition.

Designers/artists Henrik Vibskov and Andreas Emenius are both graduates from Central Saint Martins, Colleges of Art and Design, London. In 2007, they began working on ‘The Fringe Projects’ – ten works in form of installations, sculptures, performances, video and self-portraits, exploring illusion, surface, and movement. www.vibskovemenius.com

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We are

Family

The Capacity of Craft in the design process

dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
dC We are Family The Capacity of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview
Photography ole Jensen.
Photography ole Jensen.
of Craft in the design process Photography ole Jensen. Interview with Ceramist Ole Jensen. By Karen

Interview with Ceramist Ole Jensen. By Karen Kjærgaard, Curator, Danish Crafts.

How do you define craft, and what is the future role of craft and the craftsman? Craft is about working with one’s hands and the materials. an analogue and sensuous approach to work and development. largely, as it has always been. what’s new, is that today I work in parallel or in combination with digital techniques and many other specialties. Back when things always had to be higher, faster and cheaper, craft was cast in the role of the opposition. today, there is a different agenda and craft has every opportunity for going all the way. anchoring the concept firmly in the material is an attractive quality.

You are exhibiting in a scenario entitled ‘Linking behaviours’. In what way do you think we can make a change in and for the world? By promoting less decadence and individualism. and by encouraging more openness and community.

You are developing projects with engineers, technical specialists and business people using new materials. How does this interdisciplinary approach influence your work? Collaborating with other specialties means that one’s own work is challenged and meets a qualified counterpart. It also strengthens one’s awareness of one’s own unique competence: giving objects shape and a sensuous character.

Do you see a relationship between research, craft and business? Naturally, there is a connection between research, craft and business. I don’t think anyone can do it alone. sometimes, the groundbreaking developments come from research, at other times from creative artistic work – and, I suppose, sometimes from business savvy. But the field should not merge. the strongest platform is when specialists meet – and then part ways again.

How can craft be sustainable? Craft alone can’t save the world. But the craftsman’s ability to process and refine may help make things relevant and transparent.

You are a ceramist. You are skilled. You create ideas with your hands and intuition using traditional and historical references. You not only craft the object but craft the process. Computers and machines realise your creations. How is your working method affected by the aim to encourage sustainable design and production?

In many respects, acting as a craftsman is a journey of discovery in the inherent nature of the materials. One pious hope might be that these are seen as good qualities, also when the agenda is about sustainable production.

Ole Jensen, ceramist

What is the opportunity and capacity of craft in the design process? Craft is usually practised by individuals or small enterprise. unlike the business giants, craft labs are more flexible and less sensitive to the volatility of the market place. Craft studies are carried out with a minimum of funding and no red tape. aspects that are immensely important when it becomes necessary to change course or explore new angles. turning thought and action into one single process is craft’s particular strong suit. an incredibly efficient and direct approach to development. many mistakes are made, and many

attempts need to be discarded. But what remains is usually both tangible and capable of communicating in a sensuous way. and suddenly, one has the ear of both the user and the manufacturer.

What is your purpose or intent as a craftsman and a designer? Encouraging a simple yet relatively cheerful life! If at all possible, in the company of others.

We are Family is supported by Danmarks Nationalbanks Jubilæumsfond af 1968.

Ole Jensen (b. 1958), ceramist, graduated from Designskolen Kolding and from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. He works for companies such as MUUTO, Royal Copenhagen and Normann Copenhagen. He is represented at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and is famous for his soft rubber washing-up bowl, which is in use at the restaurant of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Ole Jensen is a craftsman who is inspired by our daily life and adds new relevancy to craft and design. www.olejensendesign.com

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Conceptualised in a dialogue, shaped by a ceramist, calculated by an engineer, documented and analysed by technicians, produced partly in China and partly in Denmark. A close, interdisciplinary design process, searching for new ways of linking behaviours within the realms of craft and design.

the sofa Project is part of an interdisciplinary project, ‘China town’, where a group of craftspeople, supported by danish Crafts, travelled to China in order to find new ways of mixing competencies, skills and cultures. we are Family is developed in collaboration with dtu, the technical university of denmark, anji Bamboo technical Center, China, and the world’s largest futon producer, Innovation randers a/s, denmark.

Interview with Claus Mølgaard, Design Engineer Ph.D., Molgard aps. By Karen Kjærgaard, Curator, Danish Crafts.

How do you define craft, and what is the future role of craft and the craftsman? Craft is defined as a process where products are shaped directly in the final material – compared with design, where drawings or other technologies are used to create the product. often, craft is not 100% oriented toward industrial mass production. In the future, craft will be used to investigate new shapes, new functions, and the craftsman will do the pre-studies for industrial design.

the craftsman has an advantage in a changing world because of the speed of the process:

the craftsman works directly in the actual material, so products and items can be evaluated very quickly. Normally in design processes, drawings are made and discussed, prototypes are made and remade – it’s a long process, although the new rapid prototyping processes are speeding up the design process a lot.

You are exhibiting in a scenario entitled ‘Linking behaviours’. In what way do you think we can make a change in and for the world? People are behaving far too selfishly today. we consume too much, mostly to show off our spending capacity. I think we should make products that are more social – products that bring people together. to me, linking behaviour is about sustainability. we have to consider that our actions have an impact on our fellow humans today, as well as on future generations.

You are developing projects and work in an interdisciplinary collaboration with skilled craftspeople, combining your technological skills with their craft knowledge. How does this interdisciplinary approach influence your work? Interdisciplinary work is very important to me. I get bored very easily, so working in many different ways keeps it interesting. In the beginning of a collaborative effort, the working process is influenced by the

designer’s approach, but later it changes into a more or less standard developing system that we use. the most important thing for us is to adapt the design with respect to the essentials of the original design.

Do you see a relationship between technological research, craft and business? Not really. I see craft products as new items that indicate new ways of living. often, craft is very expensive and hence not economically interesting unless it is converted to mass-production. an example is ron arad who built his first Big Easy Chair himself in steel and later developed and, converted the chair into both an upholstery chair and a plastic chair.

How can craft be sustainable? I think craft is inherently sustainable. If sustainability is about environmentally sound products and social responsibility, craft lives up to that. Besides, craft is often hand-made and does little harm. But craft may be too much of a niche to really have an impact on the world.

You are an engineer. You work with software, facts and programs. Computers and machines realise your projects. Has working with designers and craftsmen changed your way of working?

Working with designers has changed my mind a lot. As a student I was very deterministic. I believed everything could be calculated and optimised. Working with artistic designers has taught me

that there is more to design than just optimising function – we also need beauty.

Claus Mølgaard, Design Engineer Ph.D.

What is the opportunity and capacity of interdisciplinary collaboration? Interdisciplinary work is very important. It’s not possible for one person or one discipline to command all the knowledge that is required. we do work where the designer is responsible for the product concept and shape, while we are responsible for the technical construction and manufacturing of the product. sometimes we are also involved in the concept phase. to optimise the process, it might be a good idea to include anthropologists and sociologists in the concept phase. they know a lot about the way products influence us. at the moment, this aspect is handled by the designer or craftsman, but it could be improved a lot – without losing the artistic dimension.

What is your purpose or intent as an engineer? to collaborate with designers in developing products with respect for the original idea. working with designers is a way to generate new ideas. we work with revolutionary processes compared to incremental processes where little things are improved. when you work with revolutionary processes you can’t draw on your experience – you have to base your work on basic physics, which I love!

Claus Mølgaard (b. 1965), Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Technical University of Denmark. He works mainly in plastic and develops ideas in close collaboration with designers. In an interdisciplinary collaboration between craft, design and new technology he is an important catalyst for the development of future design. www.molgard.dk

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Extra-

Interview with Kristine Jensen, Landscape Architect, Ph.D., Kristine Jensens Tegnestue. By Dominic Balmforth/Kjersti Wikstrøm.

ordinary ordinary

Designing for community

Renowned for combining architectural pragmatism with social consciousness and ample aesthetic flair, landscape architect Kristine Jensen approaches public space with a playful notion of the modern city’s potentials and capacities. With her prize winning project for the multidisciplinary culture centre Nicolai in Kolding, she re-links past and present with an architectural programme that at once contradicts and counteracts. Weaving with layers of hard and soft, both the finished project and its collaborative process address issues such as political entangle- ment, social organization, public use, openness and connectivity. Nicolai is in a sense organised, re- and disorganised at the same time – a place that counter- acts classical terms of beginnings and endings.

How do you define design, and what is the future role of design and the designer? working with design and architecture means working with a foundation that can develop with some form of aesthetic ability in order to become an aesthetic product. the future of design is to involve the challenge of sustainability so that it isn’t just an add-on or luxury option but becomes a necessity.

What is design in landscape architecture? there is a fundamental difference between architecture and design as I see it. I deal with architecture more than I do with design. architecture is three-dimensional, and because of this, it needs to be understood with respect to space. architecture is understood in terms of how it relates to the body and how it relates to all that is bigger than oneself, that is, landscape.

When we asked McDonough about New Crafts- manship and mass-customisation, he described these as tools not purpose. What are your tools and purpose with regard to landscape design? the intention lies in each task one starts. as architects, we don’t choose our tasks. we only make projects for others, so we need to find out what the clients’ and users’ intentions are. Each task involves a process of revealing what the contents of the task consists of. the architectural project is fundamentally about orientating us in the world. architecture is a tool or means by which we can orientate ourselves and understand the world. an intelligent way of, for example, navigating between the human scale and the all-encompassing scale of the landscape.

Public space is first created when we use it, when we express ourselves, play side by side, exchange our opinions, values, beliefs and dreams. We can increase the quality of everyday city life by creating collective activities within collective space. The exhibition scenario that includes your work, ‘We’re so normal’ makes the practice of everyday life as creative as the practice of design. How can the designer encourage people to spend time and interact in the public realm? I do this in a variety of ways. architecture, as I said before, first of all puts people in touch with where they are. It orientates us with respect to either the urban or natural environment. the Nicolai Cultural Centre in Kolding, which appears in the exhibition, was about making people feel present. the project speaks to the body via colours, interests, feelings. this place consists of two layers, the hardcore elements of the steel elements with its raw surface, and the softer elements of the magnolia trees, which blossom only once a year. It is both with respect to the architectural elements in the space and due to the different colours and texture that one is compelled to spend time in the space.

What role does the public domain have on our everyday lives? It is vitally important for our everyday lives and has a huge effect on us. Public space is the space of democracy. It is not a voting box, it is real space where we can look each other in the eyes. all spaces which are mono-functional – like the spaces of an airport or the space of a shopping street which are only commercial and have only one, almost spiritless function – these spaces are taken over by advertising as a form of happy stimulus such that we can only dream ourselves away from these places. Public space is vitally important. we should, in fact, develop much more visionary politics regarding public space in order to enable integration of different people.

Combining programme, economics and function seems to require a form of ‘public strategy’. What is your method for developing and managing these parameters within a design process and project? with landscape as our starting point, we work with combining the desired programme, the economic framework and everyday use with poetic quality. In the public sector, the programme is always much bigger than the budget. I have never experienced this not to be the case. therefore, one needs to be very clear with regard to what one wants to do. For example with Prags Boulevard; here we knew that the budget could never match the size of the space. It was all about discovering exactly what we wanted to do with the budget available. we involved the local residents as an additional resource.

What is this poetic surplus that you describe? How does this drive the design intention and what form does it take in reality? achieving poetic surplus is about daring. It is about daring to achieve something more than you intended or more than what was asked for. If you only fulfill the task which is assigned to you, if you only aim to satisfy your client, then you will bore yourself to death. For the Nicolai Cultural Centre, we introduced an element of humour.

You often work as part of larger design teams, or multidisciplinary teams. What is the challenge of multidisciplinary work, and how can the design professions be better at working together on multidisciplinary projects?

this depends on the project. with the Nicolai Cultural Centre, the entire project was about creating a unity between the architecture and the landscape. In this case, there was an exceptional collaboration between the architect and the landscaper, to such a degree that one can no longer tell who designed what. multi- disciplinary work means that you don’t start by dividing the work up but rather attempt to influence each other.

How do you define the relationship between research, architecture, and business? there is often an element of research in a project, but not always. I come from a research background. Bringing research into practice has always interested me. Not all projects hold the potential for research, and one shouldn’t force these projects to contain or be about research, otherwise one can’t make business out of them. we are very loyal to the programme which is developed for each project.

Are you familiar with the principles of Cradle to Cradle? How can landscape design adopt and put these principles into practice? the concepts have been familiar to us for several years. Before, we talked about cradle to grave but now we need to think of things in circular instead of linear movements. this will allow us to contribute to future generations. Consideration of which materials we use is fundamental to the concept. the success of the concept is dependent on economy. If we could stop using airplanes, if we could stop pouring roads with asphalt and driving cars on them, then we would come far in one day. landscape architec- ture quickly enters into the food chain when we talk about sustainability because it deals with both physical space and living elements which are constantly changing.

Arkitekt Kristine Jensens Tegnestue/ Architect Kristine Jensen Studio works visionary with landscape architecture, planning and urban design. The office was established by landscape architect Ph.D. Kristine Jensen in 2004. The strength of the office is an intense interest to work within urban and landscape contexts and solve the projects within a given economy and programme with an artistic insight. The office profile is based on innovation and continuous investigations into new programmes, strategies, spatial relations and building materials. www.kristinejensen.dk

architect Kristine Jensen. Nicolai Cultural Centre. Photography simon Høgsberg.
architect Kristine Jensen. Nicolai Cultural Centre. Photography simon Høgsberg.

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SunTiles

The new curtain is green

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Interview with Astrid Krogh, Textile Designer. By Anne Mette Laursen/Karen Kjærgaard, Curator, Danish Crafts.

astrid Krogh. suntiles. Photography torben Eskerod.
astrid Krogh. suntiles. Photography torben Eskerod.

SunTiles combines craft, function and decoration and demonstrates the potential of craft in the design process. SunTiles is the current result of an interdisciplinary collaboration initiated by Textile Designer Astrid Krogh.

How do you define craft, and what is the future role of craft and the craftsman? I define it as mastering a craft and being able to use the materials that are available in one’s own time. Craft and the creative process inherent in craftsmanship are absolutely essential for product development. one has to go through multiple processes; there are no shortcuts from the idea to the finished material. working as a craftsman today is an ongoing process of experimentation and material studies. that takes time and the willingness to take risks, but this process is indispensible if denmark is to be able to market itself as a creative nation.

You are exhibiting in a scenario entitled ‘it’s your turn’; in what way do you think we can make a change in and for the world? By changing people’s perception of familiar objects. For example the point that a curtain isn’t just a length of cotton hung in the window. a curtain may also be capable of storing and releasing energy. thus, the material is not necessarily cotton but maybe something else entirely, although the function is still more or less the same.

You are developing projects with engineers and other technical specialists using new materials. How does this interdisciplinary approach influence your work? In order to take craft beyond the ordinary, proper craftsmanship is essential. working with other professionals who also know their trade and possess specific expertise can make it really interesting. It’s an important part of my work to take an interdisciplinary approach with solar cell researchers, engineers or the guy who operates the knitting machine, and who knows exactly how thick the thread should be for the process to work.

Do you see a relationship between research, craft and business? Both a designer and a business must embrace research and must know what resources are required to develop new products. development processes take time, and the result is not necessarily an immediate success. It’s crucial that companies understand that creative processes take time and money.

How can craft be sustainable? By considering the choice of materials in the process – and by doing this from the outset.

You are a textile designer. You weave with fibres, light and new materials. You create ideas with your hands and intuition using traditional and historical references. You not only craft the object but craft

the process. Is this approach by any means sustainable? my working process is not deliberately sustainable, but the greater the emphasis on sustainability, the more this aspect is incorporated into the process.

What is the opportunity and capacity of craft in the design process? to a high degree: thorough knowledge of materials and the development of products that reach beyond themselves and can be understood in a larger context.

What is your purpose or intent as a craftsman? working with textiles and light… that’s my life.

SunTiles is developed in collaboration with Risø DTU, KVADRAT, schmidt hammer lassen architects and the consulting engineering firm Esbensen A/S.

Astrid Krogh (b. 1968), Textile Designer, holds a master degree from The Danish Design School. She has made several public decorations and installations, including assignments for the Danish parliament and for companies and hospitals in Denmark and abroad. She has received several prizes and awards. In the field of tension between craft and advanced technology Astrid Krogh explores the artistic potential of craft tradition to generate new products. www.astridkrogh.com

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What would be the most loving thing to do right now?

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Photography dorte Krogh.
Photography dorte Krogh.

Curators (from left) Kjersti wikstrøm, danish architecture Centre, Karen Kjærgaard, danish Crafts and tina midtgaard, danish design Centre.

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ColoPHoN

It’s a small world

EdItors anne mette laursen Karen Kjærgaard

EdItorIal Curators tina midtgaard, danish design Centre Karen Kjærgaard, danish Crafts Kjersti wikstrøm, danish architecture Centre

EdItorIal Co-Curator, sustaINaBIlItY dominic Balmforth

GraPHIC art dIrECtor homework

GraPHIC laYout susanne schenstrøm

PrINt one2one graphic production

IsBN 87-90904-57-5 Printed in denmark 2009
IsBN 87-90904-57-5
Printed in denmark 2009

541-231

Svanemærket tryksag

ExHIBItIoN It’s a small world is initiated by the Danish Ministry of Economic and Business Affairs and the Danish Ministry of Cultural Affairs. The exhibition is organised in a collaboration between Danish Design Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architectural Centre.

Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architectural Centre. It’s a small world ProJECt maNaGEmENt tina midtgaard,
Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architectural Centre. It’s a small world ProJECt maNaGEmENt tina midtgaard,
Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architectural Centre. It’s a small world ProJECt maNaGEmENt tina midtgaard,
Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architectural Centre. It’s a small world ProJECt maNaGEmENt tina midtgaard,
Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architectural Centre. It’s a small world ProJECt maNaGEmENt tina midtgaard,
Centre, Danish Crafts and Danish Architectural Centre. It’s a small world ProJECt maNaGEmENt tina midtgaard,

It’s a small world

ProJECt maNaGEmENt tina midtgaard, Project manager, danish design Centre Kristian Kastoft, danish Crafts anne Nørgaard Pagh, danish architecture Centre Kjersti wikstrøm, danish architecture Centre

Curators tina midtgaard, Project manager, danish design Centre Karen Kjærgaard, danish Crafts Kjersti wikstrøm, danish architecture Centre

Co-Curator sustaINaBIlItY dominic Balmforth

Pr aNd marKEtING Danish Design Centre:

Iben Højer Hansen mark stevens susanne søndahl wolff sidsel regina Forchammer Danish Crafts:

Bo Kolbye dorthe rud michaelsen Danish Architecture Centre:

line Juul Greisen

ProduCtIoN mag.art. anne mette laursen architect maa lise Kassow Graphic art director: homework Graphic layout: susanne schenstrøm Exhibition architecture: CIta, Centre for information technology and architecture. royal academy of fine arts, school of architecture. Implementation architect: lene tanghøj Engineer – statistics and sustainability: Claus mølgaard web: morten sørdahl Nielsen Graphic designer Kajsa Plum wirell Cand.mag. tine vindfeld Graphic designer Nicolai Fontain

traNslatIoN/ProoF rEadING dominic Balmforth mark stevens Christiane Bjørn weile dorthe H. silver Heidi Pedersen June-Catharina starling

it’s a small world also wIsHEs to tHaNK CIId wundergrund Ejnar Kanding

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Charlie Gaugler Kim Høgh mikkelsen obscura rebus Film lisbet Friis No Parking alumeco a/s signpartner a/s Petersen tegl a/s DAVINCI development skandinavisk glassystem aB Hs Hansen Facadeentrepenør Jørgen Christensen a/s Københavns Kommune/ Cykelsekretariatet Københavns Kommune/ teknik og miljøforvaltningen Instituttet for Fremtidsforskning mads Nybro, Beta Erhvervs- og Byggestyrelsen Holstebro Kommune HaY moomENt aPs Innovation a/s Kvadrat a/s risø dtu Esbensen rådgivende Ingeniører a/s Zanotta danmarks Nationalbanks Jubilæumsfond af 1968

PartICIPaNts 3xN architects arkitekt Kristine Jensens tegnestue astrid Krogh Bengtsson design ltd. BIG, Bjarke Ingels Group Cecilie manz dorte mandrup architects Goodmorning technology Hatch & Bloom a/s Katvig aps KollIsIoN lundgaard & tranberg architects a/s molgaard aps mutoPIa aps ole Jensen oticon a/s raCa schmidt hammer lassen architects steen Ipsen studio/ louise Campbell suP dEsIGN vibskovemenius

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louise Campbell suP dEsIGN vibskovemenius ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world dorte mandrup 47
louise Campbell suP dEsIGN vibskovemenius ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world dorte mandrup 47
louise Campbell suP dEsIGN vibskovemenius ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world dorte mandrup 47

It’s a small world

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dorte

mandrup

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ddC/ daC / dC It’s a small world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen

arkitekter

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Studio Steen Ipsen

world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid
world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid
world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid
world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid
world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid
world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid
world dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid

HS Hansenworld dorte mandrup 47 / 48 arkitekter Studio Steen Ipsen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design

hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk

Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ

Astrid Krogh Design

Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ

vibskov emenius

RAC A

CECILIE MANZ /

Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ
Steen Ipsen HS Hansen hansen facadeentreprenøren www.hsh.dk Astrid Krogh Design vibskov emenius RAC A CECILIE MANZ