Sei sulla pagina 1di 83
The 2020 Olympic games will be in … Officials make their choice. NATION & WORLD,
The 2020 Olympic
games will be in …
Officials make their choice. NATION & WORLD, 4A

SAVE $149.95 with coupons in today’s paper

INSIDE

$ 4 77 WithWith YourYour Gold Card
$
4 77
WithWith YourYour Gold Card

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE A-11!

Coke

20 pk cans

All Varieties

AVAILABLE THRU SEPTEMBER 14th. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.

We Reserve The Right to Limit Quantities.

SUPPLIES LAST. We Reserve The Right to Limit Quantities. LOOK HERE EVERY WEEK FOR MOM’S DEALS

LOOK HERE EVERY WEEK FOR MOM’S DEALS AND PROMOTIONS!

LOOK HERE EVERY WEEK FOR MOM’S DEALS AND PROMOTIONS! WILKES-BARRE, PA timesleader . com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

WILKES-BARRE, PA

timesleader.com

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013

$1.50

FLOOD OF 2011: TWO YEARS LATER

River still devouring homes

The water has receded, but the flood is changing the landscape along the Susquehanna

JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES

jandes@timesleader.com

On this date two years ago, residents along the rising Susquehanna River were col- lectively braced in a state of fear and anxiety. In the morning they learned they were about to be dealt a river almost as high as it was in the devastating 1972 Agnes

EDITOR’S NOTE: First of a two-part series examining how Luzerne County communities have coped since the 2011 flood.

Flood, which caused $1.038 billion in damage. By the afternoon, they were informed the river crest was arriving sooner and upped to 41 feet, exceeding the 40.91- foot Agnes. While 65,000 residents pro- tected by the Wyoming Valley Levee evacuated to shel-

ters, hotels and the homes of friends and family on higher ground throughout the day, those in properties with no levees scrambled to elevate and grab what they could. So me in We st Pittston, Plains To wnship, Exeter and other areas lost all belongings because they already had sev- eral feet of water gushing into their structures by the morn- ing. With the memories of Agnes still fresh in many minds, resi- dents and officials were on pins and needles waiting to see if the levee would stay

strong and be high enough. Cracks and boils in the levee and leaks in Market Street flood gates increased tension throughout the day. The levee was designed to hold 41 feet, but it held thanks to an additional three-foot top board added to handle waves and debris. Officials didn’t learn until the next day that a faulty flood gauge threw off readings, and the river was actually cresting at a new record 42.66 feet. The new record flood,

See FLOOD | 16A

record 42.66 feet. The new record flood, See FLOOD | 16A Clark Va n Or den

Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader

As guests wait for the doors to open at the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen on Jackson Street, in Wilkes-Barre, Monsignor Donald McAndrews talks about the history of the program he helped to establish 30 years ago.

Kitchen still serves after 30 years

‘If you’re hungry, you eat’ remains motto at St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen

BILL O’BOYLE

boboyle@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — Sister Lucille Brislin said a remark- able group of area residents recognized in the fall of 1982 there was a need for a program to feed the hungry and began to hold meetings. Out of those meetings was born the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen on East Jackson Street, where the mantra is this: “If you’re hungry, you eat.” The kitchen opened in 1983 and is celebrating its 30th anniversary this month. It has never missed a day of serving meals to the hungry.

Members of the founding committee included Monsignor Donald McAndrews, Stan Hamilton, the Rev. Jule Ayers, Rabbi Arnold Shovlin, the Rev. Ken Carpenter, Monsignor Thomas Bannick, the Rev. Charles Gommer, Sister Mary Eleanor Thorton, the Rev. Anita Ambrose of the Council of Churches and others. They were determined to establish a kitchen where people in need could get a warm meal. Brislin was named the kitch-

en’s first on-site coordinator in

1983.

“(The late) Stan Hamilton was operating his Shepherds of the Streets program and he said he was going to start giv- ing out soup and sandwiches at a downtown church,” Brislin said. “He told us he would keep

See KITCHEN | 15A

said. “He told us he wo uld keep See KITCHEN | 15A Fred Ad ams |

Fred Adams | For The Times Leader

Sister Lucille Brislin, who in 1983 served as the kitchen’s first coordinator, looks over a photo album charting the program’s history. From the beginning, she says, all patrons were referred to as ‘guests.’

all pa trons were refe rred to as ‘g ue sts.’ Clark Va n Or den

Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader

Beverly and Ray Condo stand in the remodeled kitchen of their home on Robert Street in Plains Township. The Condos had five feet of water on the first floor of their home during the 2011 flood.

Pope leads massive peace vigil for Syria

Vatican event belie ve d to be one of the largest rallies against proposed U.S.-led military action

NICOLE WINFIELD

Associated Press

VATIC AN CITY — Te ns of thous ands of people answered Pope Francis’ call for a four-hour Syria peace vigil in St . Peter ’s Square late Saturday, joining Christians and non-Christians alike in similar vigils around the world. About 70,000 people, according to an estimate by the

Vatican, were present at the st art of the vigil. It was believed

to be one of the large st ra llies in the We st against proposed

U.S.-led military action against the Syrian regime follow- ing the Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack near Damascus. Francis spent most of the vigil in silent prayer, but during his speech he issued a heartfelt plea for peace, denouncing those who are “captivated by the idols of dominion and power” and destroy God’s creation through war. “This evening, I ask the Lord that we Christians, and our brothers and sisters of other religions and every man and woman of good will, cry out forcefully: Violence and war are never the way to peace!” Rainbow “Peace” flags fluttered in the evening breeze

See POPE | 15A

Syria tops lawmakers’ lengthy to-do list

As their summer break ends, congressional members will confront Mideast and domestic matters

ANDREW TAYLOR and DONNA CASSATA

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Congress returns to work facing

a momentous vote on whether the United States should

attack Syria, a question that overshadows a crowded and contentious agenda of budget fights, health care, farm pol- icy and possible limits on the government’s surveillance of millions of Americans. Back Monday after a five-week break, many lawmakers stand as a major obstacle to President Barack Obama’s promised strikes against Syria amid fears of U.S. involve- ment in an extended Mideast war and public fatigue after more than a decade of conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Obama insists the world must act. He blames Syrian President Bashar Assad for gassing his own people, killing 1,429 civilians, including 426 children. The Syrian govern- ment has denied responsibility for the Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack outside Damascus, and blames rebels.

See SYRIA | 15A

6

0 9 8 1 5 1 0 0 7 7
0 9 8 1 5
1 0 0 7 7

INSIDE

A NEWS:

Local 3A Nation & World 4A Obituaries 14A

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 4A Obituaries 14A SU ND AY EXTRA: 1B

SUNDAY EXTRA: 1B Birthdays 6B Movies 7B Puzzles 8B, 11B

Comics 9B, 10B

Stocks 3D

SPORTS: 1C

Editorial 6D

Outdoors 11C BUSINESS: 1D

CLASSIFIED: 1E

September 21- 28, 2013

6D Outdoors 11C BU SINE SS : 1D CLASSIFIED: 1E September 21- 28, 2013 visit us
6D Outdoors 11C BU SINE SS : 1D CLASSIFIED: 1E September 21- 28, 2013 visit us
6D Outdoors 11C BU SINE SS : 1D CLASSIFIED: 1E September 21- 28, 2013 visit us
6D Outdoors 11C BU SINE SS : 1D CLASSIFIED: 1E September 21- 28, 2013 visit us
6D Outdoors 11C BU SINE SS : 1D CLASSIFIED: 1E September 21- 28, 2013 visit us
visit us online at bloomsburgfair.com
visit us online at bloomsburgfair.com

PAGE 2A Sunday, September 8, 2013

NEWS

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

W-B employee claims retaliation by city

JERRY LYNOTT

jlynott@timesleader.com

SCRANTON — A Wilkes- Barre paramedic said the city “fabricated” a disciplinary hear- ing against him in retaliation for his suing to expose what he considers insider trading in the sale of city properties and ethics violations. Tyler Hammond filed a sec- ond lawsuit Friday in U.S. Middle District Court, saying the actions of the city and Mayor Tom Leighton are meant to deter him from exercising his constitu- tional right to access the courts and engage in free speech.

Hammond and his wife Antonia sued the city in 2009, alleging the mayor, who also is a real estate agent, had access to and free use of confidential city information about properties in Wilkes-Barre, including the for- mer Old River Road Bakery. The city approved — and later terminated — a deal to sell the property to Leo A. Glodzik III, who had the exclusive towing contract with Wilkes-Barre until theft charges were filed against him in May. The property was sold, and Harrold’s Pharmacy is in the process of relocating there. According to the latest suit,

To re ad the la ws uit , v isit timesleader.com.

the Hammonds have truthfully testified in depositions and refused to drop the first suit, leading to retaliation by the city. The couple’s minor children also have been deposed, the latest suit said. Hammond got short notice of his disciplinary hearing sched- uled for 10 a.m. Friday, a time when he would be sleeping because he worked the previous midnight shift, according to the suit. The reason for the hearing,

“Any member of the public can form opinions, create and post information on a public official and his governance.”

Text of Hammond’s laws uit

the suit alleges, was the mayor’s incorrect belief that Hammond created a satirical website of Leighton. Even if Hammond created the site, it was protected speech under the Constitution “since any member of the public can form opinions, create and post infor- mation on a public official and his governance, which is clearly covered by the public’s desire to self-govern and engage in democ-

racy,” the lawsuit stated. The hearing was scheduled to conflict with depositions Hammonds’ attorney, Cynthia Pollick, was to take of city per- sonnel, the suit said. Hammond is seeking an end to the retaliatory conduct, unspeci- fied damages and a jury trial, according to the suit. Attempts on Saturday to reach Pollick and Leighton were unsuc- cessful.

Marching to the Colonel’s beat

were unsuc- cessful. Marching to the Colonel’s beat Bill Ta rutis | Fo r The Time

Bill Ta rutis | Fo r The Time s Le ader

The Wilkes University Colonel leads members of the student body along the River Common in Wilkes-Barre Saturday to the Ralston Athletic Complex in Edwardsville for the university’s football game against Morrisville State College. Students earlier participated in a spirit contest and other activities during what’s called the Colonel’s March.

Misericordia senior spends ‘break’ in science lab

ANDREW M. SEDER

aseder@timesleader.com

DALLAS TWP. — While some col- lege students spent summer soaking up some rays, interning or traveling, Misericordia University senior Amelia Poplawski was doing all three. The Plains To wnship re sident , and 2010 Coughlin High School graduate, was one of 16 students to participate in an elite National Science Foundation internship at the University of California’s Irvine campus. The biochemistry major spoke gid- dily as she detailed her summer, spent using the “Gaussian computational chemistry program to build virtual molecules and compounds, and per- forming calculations on energy, fre- quency and optimizing the structure.” That might be a hard phrase for non- science types to say, much less com- prehend, but her enthusiasm makes it sound fun. “Computational chemistry allows you to investigate properties of a com- pound that could not be done in a wet laboratory because they are too unsta- ble,” she said. “The more theoretical information we compile on a molecule, the more it helps us determine the mechanism behind the molecule and what makes it work.” The daughter of Denise and Richard Poplawski, Amelia traces her love of science back to her days at Coughlin High School. Specifically she cited biology teacher Joan Blaum for ignit- ing her interest in biology during her freshman year and then Advanced Placement chemistry teacher Michael Cooney for sparking her appreciation of chemistry. “Amelia is one of those students you never forget … one who makes you happy to be a teacher,” said Blaum, now retired. “Even as a freshman, she was an exceptional student, a hard worker. She is definitely one of the

student, a hard wo rker. She is definitely one of the Amelia Poplaws ki, a Plains

Amelia Poplawski,

a Plains Township

resident and

a senior at

Misericordia

University, was one of 16 students who participated in an elite National Science foundation internship at UC Irvine in California this summer.

Clark Van Orden | Times Leader Photo

“Amelia is one of those stu- dents you never forget one who makes you happy to be a teacher. She is definitely one of the most dedicated students I ever had.”

— Joan Blaum, Biology teacher

most dedicated students I ever had.” Once Poplawski got to Misericordia, her interests in multiple branches of science were able to be combined when she opted to major in biochem- istry. It’s a field in which women have made increasing strides. Poplawski said she gets puzzled looks when she tells some people her major, but she said it’s a sign of the times and notes she will graduate with a math minor, too. But general science is one thing, computational chemistry is another. Poplawski said thanks to technol- ogy and medical breakthroughs over the past generation, computer-based research is quickly becoming a norm

in the field and, while not as glamor- ous as working with microscopes or vials, it is just as important. Anna Fedor, an assistant professor of chemistry at Misericordia, traced Poplawski’s interest in pursuing research in computational chemistry, in part, to her time in one of the uni- versity ’s physical chemistry classes. By having applied for and been accepted to what Fedor called one of “the elite internships in the nation,” Poplawski has shown the type of research and education being undertak- en at Misericordia, the professor said. Poplawski said the research she’s doing combines “my curiosity and pas- sion of knowledge and science coupled with my compassion toward people. This is the perfect marriage.” The idea that she could be part of the cutting-edge of medical research, though she’s only 21, makes all the hours in the lab worth it. “It may take decades of research, but the idea of finding a biochemical reac- tion related to diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer ’s is something I hope to see in my lifetime,” Poplawski said. “If it happens, I know that my time in the lab will have been well spent.”

POLICE BLOTTER

WILKES-BARRE — City police report- ed the following:

• A We st Wyoming man wa s arrested

around 2:30 a.m. Saturday after an officer working a security detail at Hardware Bar, South Main Street, allegedly saw him hit another man several times. John D. Sepkoski, 23, was taken to police

headquarters, cited for public drunkenness and disorderly conduct and released to a sober adult, police said.

• A 17-year-old boy was reportedly drunk

and harassing his mother shortly after midnight Friday at a home along Simpson

Street, police said. Officers discovered the juvenile was wanted by the Luzerne County Juvenile Probation office. He was locked up

in the Luzerne County Correctional Facility.

• A North Main Street apartment was

reportedly robbed of cash between 1 and

2:40 a.m. Saturday. Officers found the back door window was smashed with a rock; money was taken from a bedroom, police said.

• A McCarragher Street woman told

police an unidentified burglar entered her home around 7:15 a.m. Saturday through the bathroom window and left through the

back door with her purse and mobile phone.

• Ta mila Bu rton wrote numerous checks

on an account from Choice One Federal Credit Union knowing the account had insufficient funds to cover the checks, police said. Burton told them she did this to fuel a crack habit, police said. • Richard Haeseker was medically

cleared from Wilkes-Barre General Hospital on Friday and was asked to leave, but he refused, police said. Haeseker was advised by the hospital’s attorney that he was no longer wanted there, and police removed him from the hospital. About 10 minutes later, an ambulance was summoned and Haeseker requested to be transported back to Wilkes-Barre General, where he was again medically cleared and, upon refusing to leave, was arrested on criminal trespass charges, police said.

• It was reported Friday that someone

stole a refrigerator from the back porch of

a residence in the 300 block of Blackman

Street. • Police on Thursday arrested Eric

Christopher Ya le at a Mill Street property on a warrant issued by their department on

a burglary charge.

• Police filed drunken-driving charges

against Jo hn P. Gildea, of Cotton Av enue, Hudson, after investigating a crash at Scott

and Knight streets just before 3 a.m. Friday. Gildea tested positive for alcohol impair- ment in breath tests administered at the scene and also at police headquarters, police said. HAZLETON — City police reported the

following:

• A Hazleton woman was arrested Friday

on charges relating to her pending trial for allegedly stealing $1,000 from three city residents in May, police said. Jenny Shafer, 31, was also wanted for leaving a work-release program with the Luzerne County Correctional Facility. Shafer was locked up at the prison.

• Police are investigating criminal tres-

pass and illegal dumping in the 300 block of South Church Street that occurred on

Tu esda y and We dnesda y. Tw o white males were seen at in a blue and tan Ford Ranger pickup at the scene.

• A resident of the 100 block of South

Wyoming Street reported that someone entered his residence and stole a laptop

computer and his car keys sometime in the early morning hours Thursday.

• Police are investigating a burglary in

the 400 block of Thirwell Avenue sometime between Sept . 1 and Thursday. Anyone with information about any of these incidents should contact Hazleton police by dialing 911. AVOCA — The st at e police Bu re au of Liquor Control Enforcement reported it recently cited Brown’s Social Club Inc., 1543 Dawson St. with operating on July 10 without a valid health permit or license, which expired on Jan. 16, 2000.

THE TIMES LEADER

WALT LAffERTY

Regional Business Development Director & General Manager (570) 970-7158

wlafferty@civitasmedia.com

DENISE SELLERS

VP/Chief Revenue Officer (570) 970-7203 dsellers@civitasmedia.com

A CIvITAS MEDIA company

JIM McCABE

Circulation Manager (570) 970-7450 jmccabe@civitasmedia.com

JEff TINNER

Production Director (570) 829-7172 jtinner@civitasmedia.com

DETAILS

LOTTERY

Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 4-4-3 Monday: 4-0-2 Tu esd ay : 8-8-1 Wednesday: 9-8-5 Thursday: 6-2-4 Friday: 6-9-9 Saturday: 3-9-9 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 4-6-2-8 Monday: 6-1-4-4 Tu esd ay : 6-0-4-7 Wednesday: 1-0-8-5 Thursday: 0-1-7-6 Friday: 8-6-7-8 Saturday: 7-5-3-6 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 4-9-4-8-2 Monday: 0-6-2-2-8 Tu esd ay : 8-6-0-4-8 Wednesday: 8-1-5-7-5 Thursday: 6-9-4-9-3 Friday: 6-5-0-2-1 Saturday: 2-4-9-6-0 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 07-12-13-15-18 Monday: 07-10-18-20-25 Tu esd ay : 10 -1 3-18-19- 28 Wednesday: 03-5-15-17-30 Thursday: 20-23-26-27-28 Friday: 13-20-24-27-28 Saturday: 03-10-14-24-25 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 2-6-1 Monday: 8-8-7 Tu esd ay : 0-4-1 Wednesday: 1-6-1 Thursday: 9-4-3 Friday: 9-7-7 Saturday: 7-6-6 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 0-1-1-0 Monday: 6-5-0-3 Tu esd ay : 7-7- 2-1 Wednesday: 4-5-6-3 Thursday: 7-2-4-1 Friday: 3-5-5-9 Saturday: 9-7-0-3 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 7-8-3-1-3 Monday: 9-1-5-5-3 Tu esd ay : 3-6- 2-9-1 Wednesday: 1-2-5-6-9 Thursday: 2-3-3-4-3 Friday: 3-4-7-5-0 Saturday: 7-5-3-6-4 Cash 5 Sunday: 06-16-19-26-35 Monday: 27-28-31-34-40

Tu esd ay : 10 -2 1- 22- 25- 29 Wednesday: 02-04-22-32-43 Thursday: 03-10-13-34-40 Friday: 11-29-30-40-43 Saturday: 19-23-25-29-30 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 01-04-20-33-43-47 Thursday: 02-04-10-21-26-

49

Powerball Wednesday: 02-09-26-45-47 powerball: 11 Saturday: 2-19-22-26-45 powerball: 24 Mega Millions Tu esd ay : 04-13 -14- 28-4 1 MegaBall: 28 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 02-16-17-22-41 MegaBall: 31 Megaplier: 04

OBITUARIES

Antall, David Jr. Bartnicki, Anna Grey, Linda Morio, Michael Orkwis, Kenneth Rome, Rose Shoemaker, Paul Uzdella, Alfred

Page 14A

WHO TO CONTACT

Missed Paper

829-5000

Obituaries

970-7224

Advertising

970-7101

Advertising Billing

970-7328

Classified Ads

970-7130

Newsroom

970-7242

BUILDING TRUST

The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

an issue more thoroughly, call the newsro om at 829- 72 42. +(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

2013-251

Issue No. 2013-170

Newsroom

829-7242

jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com

Published daily by:

– 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com Published daily by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

Impressions Media

15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing offices

Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLC

Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per week Mailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday $6.92 per week via USPS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

IN BRIEF

BUTLER TWP.

THON Tournament to help fight cancer

Penn State-Hazleton THON will sponsor a golf tournament and family luncheon at Sand Springs Country Club on Oct. 6 as part of Family Weekend for students and family members. The tournament is open to anyone interested in golfing and helping students raise money to combat pediatric cancer. Check-in for the tournament will be from 7 to 8 a.m., with a shotgun start at 8:15 a.m. The format is a two-person scramble. The $60 per-person registra- tion fee includes cart rental, greens fee, hot dog and beverage at the turn, prizes, and a luncheon immediately following the tournament. Visit www.hn.psu.edu to download a registration form and register by mail or call the Office of Student Affairs at 570-450-3160. Registration deadline is Sept. 27. Committee members also are seek- ing hole sponsors and prizes. Contact Ryan Aten, Penn State Hazleton student activities coordinator, at 570-450-3478 or email rta10@psu.edu for more infor- mation. Proceeds benefit the Penn State IFC/ Panhellenic Dance Marathon, THON for short, the world’s largest student-run philanthropy, which raises money for the fight against pediatric cancer at Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital. Last year, Penn State students raised more than $12 million.

WHITE HAVEN

Bicycle excursions planned for Sept.

Beginning cyclists, people who want to “get back on their bikes” and families are invited to take part in a Y Cycle Sunday event sponsored by the Wilkes-Barre YMCA. Each Sunday in September, an organized ride will begin at 2 p.m. at a different trail head. Rides will last about 90 minutes to two hours and will be cancelled in the event of rain. Riders should wear comfortable clothing, bring water and wear a bicycle helmet. Children who are comfortable riding a two-wheeler must be accompa- nied by an adult. Younger children are welcome in tag-alongs, child bike seats or bike trailers. The rides will be 8-10 miles long on trails separated from traffic, unless oth- erwise indicated. Today, the group will meet in White Haven at the Lehigh Gorge south trail- head, on Main Street, off Route 940 and continue to the Lehigh Tannery area. On Sept. 15, the ride will take place at the Greater Hazleton Rail Trail on Route 93, just past the hospital in Hazleton. On Sept. 22 the ride will take place at the D&L Black Diamond Trail from White Haven north to the reconditioned trail bridge. The meeting place is off Susquehanna Street past Towanda Street. On Sept. 29 the ride will be a Pittston/West Pitttston Loop Trail, meeting at the Pittston YMCA parking lot, 10 W. Main St., Pittston. For more information, contact Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA front desk at 823-2191 or Michele Schasberger at

714-1953.

WILKES-BARRE

Crime watch groups to meet this week

• State Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski

is to be the guest speaker at noon Tuesday for the Crime Clinic of Greater Wyoming Valley. The group is meeting over lunch at

The Uptown along North River Street.

• Ashley Crime Watch is to meet

at 7 p.m. Monday in St. Leo’s/Holy Rosary where Kori Britton from Wyoming Valley Alcohol and Drug Services will be the guest speaker.

PITTSTON

Pittston Library plans fundraisers, events

• The Friends of the Library Fall

Festival is to be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. There will be a flea mar- ket, a book and bake sale. At 11:30, there will be a children’s program “Dig into being Healthy.”

• A raffle to win tickets for a week-

end of football continues. One $10 tick-

et offers a chance to see Pitt vs. Notre Dame on Nov. 9 and the Pittsburgh Steelers vs. Buffalo Bills Nov. 10. Grand prize includes travel, hotel stay and tickets to both games.

• The Greater Pittston Charity

Train Ride to Jim Thorpe is planned for 9 a.m. Sept. 15. Tickets cost $65 each. Sign-up forms are available at the Greater Pittston YMCA or the library.

LOCAL

Sunday, September 8, 2013 PAGE 3A

Volunteers spruce up Pittston cemetery

Work will continue today and during three weekends later in the year

JOE HEALEY

jhealey@civitasmedia.com

Early Saturday, there were unsettling noises coming from the Pittston City Cemetery. No, this isn’t the beginning of a ghost story. The noises emanated from lawn mowers, weed trimmers and chainsaws as more than 50 volunteers aided in the first of three cem- etery cleanups. Weeds, trees, vines, grass and downed limbs have over- taken parts of the cemetery, prompting Pittston native Ron Faraday, a member of the Greater Pittston Historical Society, to organize this year ’s effort. “The deplorable condition of the Pittston City Cemetery was recently brought to our attention and we’ve decided to do all we can to get the ceme- tery back into shape,” Faraday said. “There are some graves that are literally in the woods.

Animals have burrowed down right near some headstones.” The first weekend cleanup will continue today at 9 a.m., and volunteers can donate as little as an hour or work the entire day. Three additional volunteer work weekends are planned: Oct . 5-6, Nov. 9-10 and Dec. 7-8. Faraday made a map for the volunteers and divided the cemetery into eight sections:

the North corner, the South corner, the Hill section, the Jewish section, the Bank, the Hewitt, Jones and Holvey sec- tions, the latter named after large families whose relatives are buried there. The goal is to eventually have the historical society provide walking tours of the cemetery with re-enac- tors in costume, Faraday said. Despite the name, the graveyard is not owned by the city ’s government . It’s owned by the Pittston Cemetery Association, a group that has dwindled to a handful of members. The cemetery was opened in the mid-1800s by members of the Odd Fellows So ciety and has Civil Wa r

veterans buried there. Plots are still available in the newer section, but the older section is in disarray. Joan Sylvester, and her son, Seth, and Donna Yentz were cutting grass and rak- ing leaves and debris in the Holvey section. “My brother is buried here,” Yentz said. “We’ve been coming here for years, and it’s just a mess. It needed some care. But in just a half day, you could see the difference already.” In addition to muscle power, lawn equipment is needed. Workers are asked, if they can, to bring weed trim- mers. Also needed are chain- saws, lawn mowers, rakes and shovels. Members of the nearby American Legion Post 477 hosted a cookout lunch for the volunteers. Pittston Councilmen Joe McLean said the city crews volunteered and are using four city pick- ups, a dump truck and back- hoe. “It’s gratifying to see all these volunteers come out,”

gratifying to see all these vo lunteers come out,” Joe Healey | The Times Le ader

Joe Healey | The Times Leader

Se th Sy lveste r, his mo ther, J oa n and Do nna Ye ntz, all of Pit tsto n, wo rk in the Pittston City Cemetery on Saturday as part of a volunteer cleanup crew. ‘ In just a half day, yo u co uld se e the dif fe re nc e alrea dy,’ Ye ntz sa id.

McLean said. “They grabbed their weed whackers and lawn mowers and put them to good

use. We’re all working toward

a common goal. It’s really a

great community effort.” A contingent from the Naval Reserve stations in Avoca and the Lehigh Valley also helped. The hilly 50-acre cemetery sits on the corner of Swallow

and Vine streets, across from West Park. Some not able residents buried there are World War I veteran Albert

West , former Pittston Mayor John J. Allardyce, three vic- tims of the Avondale mining disaster in Plymouth in 1869 and 15 victims of the Eagle Shaft Disaster in the Pittston Junction in 1871.

One final road trip — in style

Junction in 1871. One final road trip — in st yle Fred Ad ams | Fo

Fred Adams | For The Times Leader

A motorcycle-pulled hearse takes the remains of Lillian and Butch James on one final ride Saturday on Hazle Street in Ashley.

Lillian and Butch James loved Harleys. So their daughter honored their memory with a last ride

JON O’CONNELL

joconnell@timesleader.com

HANOVER TWP. — Michelle Hurysh wanted her parents to get one last ride through town. Hurysh, part of a family of motorcycle enthu- siasts, honored her parents’ memory Saturday with a one-of-a-kind funeral procession. Hurysh’s mother, Lillian James, 66, died in May and her father Butch James, 65, passed a few weeks ago, both of natural causes. The two spent many of the best moments of their lives together on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle, Hurysh said. Lehman Funeral Home on Hazle

Street, Wilkes-Barre, began offering a motorcycle-pulled hearse service this summer for the families it serves. Hurysh’s parents cremains were fas- tened inside the custom-built hearse and pulled by a 2013 Harley-Davidson Road King trike along some of their frequented roads. The trike pulls the casket aboard a fifth-wheel trailer. Funeral Director Pat Lehman wanted the ensemble to resemble a Victorian horse-drawn hearse like those pulled a century ago. It’s trimmed with brushed, silver- colored lanterns and rolls on tall wheels. It was built by Tombstone Hearse Co. in Bedford County to match the Lehmans’ specifications.

The side walls are made of glass with ornate trim. Lehman said it was built with windows with veterans in mind — to display the American flag draped over the casket. “Maybe they were a veteran or a first-responder, or maybe dad was just not a Cadillac guy,” Lehman said. “We just had this built to offer it to our families at no additional charge — just another way to honor their loved ones.” The ride was very special for Hurysh, who rode with her husband, something she never does. There’s nothing like a road trip, riding as a pack with her family, she said. Her first bike was a Suzuki, a good ride for

a student, but she longed for the sig- nature rumble of a Harley-Davidson — the kind her parents always rode. She remembers a Christmas when she was a child and her dad parked the motorcycle in the living room, a common practice for riders who didn’t have a warm place to store and work on their bikes in winter. “When you didn’t have a garage, that bike came in the house,” she said. She remembers decorating his bike along the Christmas tree. Butch left his last motorcycle, a 1990 Harley- Davidson Softail, to Hurysh. “I haven’t ridden it yet,” Hurysh said. “He would flip if nobody rode it. They’re not made to sit.”

Borough rallies for recently appointed ailing councilman

We st Wyoming re sident Ralph Confletti, 59, recently was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer

CAMILLE FIOTI

Times Leader Correspondent

WEST WYOMING — Only one month after being appointed to fill a vacant seat on borough council, Ralph Confletti, 59, received the news that he had pancreatic cancer. As the highest vote-getter in the May primary election, Confletti was appointed in June to replace Gil Atherholt, who resigned in May. “He impressed people in town with his will to pitch in and his community spirit,” said

HOw TO CONTRIBuTE

• Yo u ca n help to off se t Ra lph Co nfle tt i’s medic al-relat ed expenses by sending checks or money orders to:

Rallyin’ 4 Ralph, 1st National Community Bank, 1625 Wyoming Ave., Exeter, PA 18643.

• For more information, visit www.rallyin4ralph.com.

council president Eileen Cipriani. “No sooner did we put him on in June, he started having pains in his stomach.” Members of the commu- nity gathered at the We st Wyoming Hose Company No. 1 on Saturday for a fundrais- er called “Rallyin’ 4 Ralph” — an event intended to help Confletti with mounting med- ical, hotel and transportation costs. The event featured live entertainment, raffles and a buffet. “He started losing weight

within the last two months,” said his brother Doug, add- ing that Ralph is undergoing an aggressive, six-week treat- ment plan in Philadelphia. “He was going once a week for three weeks but now he has to go six days a week for six weeks while he gets a combination of chemo and radiation,” he said. Ralph Confletti is on medi- cal leave from his mainte- nance position at Core-Pak, Doug added. Supporters aim to allevi-

ate Confletti’s immediate financial concerns, allowing him to focus on regaining his health. “We have all seen the effects that cancer can have on anyone suffering from the disease, including fam- ily members,” said Cipriani. “Confletti is a United States

veteran, and a genuine friend

to many. Our hope is to less-

en the financial burden and

to allow the family to concen-

trate on fighting this battle.” Ralph’s daughter, Yvonne

Ta gnini, re called ho w her

father ran a Christmas char- ity for years, collecting toys for disabled children, refer- ring to him as her “glue.” Her father is very grateful for the outpouring of love and support during this difficult time, Ta gnini sa id.

“Ralph was always active in the community, back to his days helping out with the Little League,” said longtime friend Jimmy Dennis. “He is very kind-hearted and would do anything for anybody, that is why this event is such a big success.” Archie Eshelman, a friend and one of the fundraising event’s organizers, echoed Dennis’ sentiments: “I have known Ralph my whole life. He is a great guy.” Cipriani said she and other council members are look- ing forward to working with Confletti again soon. “The outpouring of support for the fundraiser is a testament to how well-respected and loved Ralph is by his family, friends, coworkers and the entire community.”

PAGE 4A Sunday, September 8, 2013

NatioN & World

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

IN BRIEF

& World www.timesleader.c om THE TIMES LEADER IN BRIEF AP photo The bovines are ba ck

AP photo

The bovines are back in town A decorated cow makes its way back to a farm Saturday in St. Martin near Lofer in the Austrian province of Salzburg. After spending the summer up on alpine pastures, farmers celebrate the traditional return of the cattle to their farms.

BOSTON

$20M in cocaine seized on boat

Federal prosecutors in Boston say two men face drug charges after the Coast Guard allegedly found them transporting about $20 million in cocaine on a sailboat in international waters about 400 nauti- cal miles east of the U.S. The U.S. Attorney ’s office said 27-year- old Hicham Ramzi Nahra of Canada, and 49-year-old Benjamin Celma-Sedo of Spain, were charged in a criminal com- plaint Friday with possession of cocaine with intent to distribute. Prosecutors say the men had about 621 kilograms on the boat Callisto, bound for Montreal. It’s not immediately known if the men have attorneys. The Coast Guard Cutter Dependable found the 49-foot boat, carrying the name Elegrance and flying a Canadian flag, on Monday.

MOGADISHU, SOMAlIA

Restaurant blast leaves 15 dead

Somali militants attacked a restau- rant near Mogadishu’s seat of govern- ment for the second time in less than a year on Saturday, detonating two large blasts that killed at least 15 people and wounded nearly two dozen, police said. Officials said the attack included a car bomb blast and a suicide bomber who entered The Village eatery. The second blast was caused by a suicide bomber posing as a first responder after the car bomb exploded, the African Union mili- tary force in Somalia said in a statement. Capt. Ali Hussein, a senior police offi- cial, put the death toll at 15 and said at least 20 had been wounded in the blasts.

BETHlEHEM, PA.

3 women burned at food festival

Three women serving Malaysian cui- sine were burned Saturday in a cooking accident at a street festival in eastern Pennsylvania. The women were working in a food tent at VegFest in Bethlehem when a fire broke out, setting the tent ablaze. Witnesses described hearing what sounded like a gunshot before seeing flames shoot 12 feet into the air. “We saw a woman go running by. She had flames on her shirt,” Ty Carpenter, who was staffing the beer tent on the opposite side of the food court, told The Express-Times of Easton. The women were taken to a burn center for treatment of first- and second- degree burns.

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

Lobstermen cope with shutdown

Connecticut lobstermen have survived storms and struggled with poor prices, die-offs and a prolonged plunge in the population that they count on for a liveli- hood. Now the dwindling ranks of aging, full-time lobstermen are removing their traps to comply with the first seasonal shutdown on Long Island Sound. The closure, which begins today and lasts through Nov. 28, aims to reduce the total lobster harvest by 10 percent this year to give the sound’s depleted lobster population a chance to rebuild. Amid skepticism it will reverse their fortunes, lobstermen are tightening their belts, shifting to other fishing, laying off crews, thinking about jobs on shore and won- dering how they’ll survive The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission required New York and Connecticut to take steps to reduce the total lobster harvest by 10 percent in 2013. The timing was requested by lobstermen to coincide with a drop in wholesale prices to minimize the harm.

Tokyo awarded 2020 Olympics

The city defeated Istanbul 60-36 in Saturday’s final round of secret voting

STEPHEN WILSON

Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES, Arge ntina — To kyo wa s awarded the 2020 Olympics on Saturday, capit alizing on its reputation as a “safe pair of hands” and defying con- cerns about the Fukushima nuclear crisis. To kyo defeated Ist anbul 60-36 in the final round of secret voting Saturday by the International Olympic Committee. Madrid was eliminated earlier after an initial tie with Istanbul. To kyo , which hosted the 1964 Olympics, billed itself as the safe and reliable choice

at a time of global political and economic uncertainty. “Tokyo can be trusted to be the safe pair of hands and much more,” bid leader and IOC member Ts uneka zu

Ta ke da sa id in the final pre-

sentation. “Our case today

is simple. Vo te fo r To kyo and you vote for guaranteed

de liv ery. … To kyo is the right

partner at the right time.” To kyo had been on the defensive in the final days of the campaign because of mounting concerns over the leak of radioactive water from the tsunami-crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. In the final presentation before the vote, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

gave the IOC assurances that the Fukushima leak was not

a threat to To kyo and took

personal responsibility for keeping the games safe. “Let me assure you the sit-

uation is under control,” Abe said. “It has never done and will never do any damage to To kyo .” Abe gave further assuranc- es when pressed on the issue by Norwegian IOC member Gerhard Heiberg. “It poses no problem whatsoever,” Abe said in Japanese, adding that the contamination was limited to a small area and had been “completely blocked.” “There are no health relat- ed problems until now, nor will there be in the future,” he said. “I make the state- ment to you in the most emphatic and unequivocal way.” To kyo Electric Po we r Co., Fukushima’s operator, has acknowledged that tons of

radioactive water has been seeping into the Pacific from the plant for more than two years after the March 2011

from the plant for more than two years after the March 2011 AP photo International Olympic

AP photo

International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge shows the name of the city of Tokyo elected to host the 2020 Summer Olympics as Tokyo’s delegation celebrates in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday. Tokyo defeated Istanbul in the final round of secret voting by the International Olympic Committee.

earthquake and tsunami led to meltdowns at three of its reactors. Recent leaks from tanks storing radioactive

water used to cool the reac- tors have added to fears that the amount of contaminated water is getting out of hand.

the amount of contaminated water is getting out of hand. AP pho to An unmanned Minota

AP photo

An unmanned Minotaur rocket on Friday lifts off with NASA’s newest robotic explorer, the LADEE spacecraft, which is charged with studying the moon’s atmosphere and dust.

NASA launches robotic explorer to moon from Va.

But the lADEE spacecraft quickly ran into equipment trouble

MARCIA DUNN

AP Aerospace Writer

NASA’s newest robotic explorer rocketed into space late Friday in an unprecedented moonshot from Virginia that dazzled sky watchers along the East Coast. But the LADEE spacecraft quickly

ran into equipment trouble, and while NASA assured everyone early Saturday that the lunar probe was safe and on

a perfect track for the moon, officials

acknowledged the problem needs to be resolved in the next two to three weeks. S. Peter Worden, director of NASA’s Ames Research Center in California, which developed the spacecraft, told reporters he’s confident everything will be working properly in the next few days. LADEE’s reaction wheels were turned on to orient and stabilize the

spacecraft, which was spinning too fast after it separated from the final rocket stage, Worden said. But the computer automatically shut the wheels down, apparently because of excess current. He speculated the wheels might have been running a little fast. Worden stressed there is no rush to “get these bugs ironed out.” The LADEE spacecraft, which is charged with studying the lunar atmosphere and dust, soared aboard an unmanned Minotaur rocket a lit- tle before midnight from Virginia’s Eastern Shore. “Godspeed on your journey to the moon, LADEE,” Launch Control said. Flight controllers applauded and exchanged high-fives following the suc- cessful launch. “We are headed to the moon!” NASA said in a tweet. It was a change of venue for NASA, which normally launches moon mis- sions from Cape Canaveral, Fla. But

Egypt

launches

offensive

against

militants

The country’s prosecutor general filed new charges against deposed President Mohammed Morsi

ASHRAF SWEILAM and MAGGIE MICHAEL

Associated Press

CAIRO — Egyptian helicop- ter gunships and tanks pounded suspected hideouts of Islamic militants in the northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, in what officials described as a major new offensive in the insurgent strong- hold. Residents who witnessed winding columns of trucks and

armored vehicles pour into the area said the operation was one of the largest there in years. Meanwhile, the country’s pros- ecutor general filed new charg- es against deposed President Mohammed Morsi, accusing him

it

provided a rare light show along the

of

insulting the judiciary — a crime

East Coast for those blessed with clear

in

Egypt punishable by up to six

skies.

months imprisonment.

NASA urged sky watchers to share

 

A security official said “dozens”

their launch pictures through the web-

of

insurgent suspects were killed

site Flickr, and the photos and sighting reports quickly poured in from New York City, Boston, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, New Jersey, Rhode Island, eastern Pennsylvania and Virginia, among other places. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer or LADEE, pro- nounced “LA’-dee,” is taking a round- about path to the moon, making three huge laps around Earth before getting close enough to pop into lunar orbit. Unlike the quick three-day Apollo flights to the moon, LADEE will need

a full month to reach Earth’s closest

neighbor. An Air Force Minotaur V rocket, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., prov ided the ride from NA SA’s Wa llops Flight Facility. LADEE, which is the size of a small car, is expected to reach the moon on Oct. 6.

and wounded in the Sinai offen-

sive, which comes two days after

a failed suicide bombing target-

ing the country’s top policeman

in Cairo. Smoke could be seen ris-

ing from the towns of Rafah and Sheikh Zuweyid, and troops set up a cordon to prevent militants from escaping as others combed the area, he said. The northern Sinai, which adjoins Israel and the Palestinian Gaza Strip, has long been a haven for militants including al-Qaida- inspired groups. Attacks have spiked in the area since Morsi’s July 3 ouster, prompting the latest army offensive. Egypt’s official news agency MENA reported that six military helicopters were used to strike weapons caches and militants’

vehicles in seven villages, as part of what it described as a “campaign to wipe out terrorist hideouts.” The army had jammed some communications in the area, and security forces took control of two telephone exchanges in order to disrupt communications between suspected militants, it added. The security official also said troops had arrested an unidentified number of suspected militants but others managed to escape to moun- tainous areas in central Sinai. In the past, militants used a vast network of underground tun- nels linking Egypt with Gaza as

a way to escape security crack-

downs. However, over the past two months, the military has destroyed more than 80 percent of them, stemming the flow of weapons, militants and goods into Gaza, a territory under an Israeli-imposed blockade. The government says it is wag- ing a “war on terrorism” against both the Sinai militants and sup- porters of Morsi, whose Muslim Brotherhood has organized street demonstrations to protest his over- throw and government assaults on protest encampments.

Sept. 11 museum nears completion

Hallowed artifacts testifying to the 2001 terrorist attacks to be on display in spring

MEGHAN BARR

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Far below

the earth where the twin tow- ers once stood, a cavernous museum on hallowed ground

is finally nearing completion.

Amid the construction machinery and the dust, pow- erful artifacts of death and destruction have assumed their final resting places inside the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. A vast space that travels down to the bedrock upon which the towers were built, the museum winds its way deeper and deeper under- ground, taking visitors on a

journey to the very bottom. Already on display are sev- eral pieces of mangled steel and metal recovered from the World Trade Center towers, each one telling a different story of the terror attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people. The first relics that visitors will see are two massive piec- es of structural steel that rose from the base of the North Tower. Now the rusty red col- umns soar above ground into

the sunlit glass atrium that encloses the entrance to the museum. Down a long ramp, visitors will peer down to glimpse the last piece of steel removed from ground zero in 2002, which sits inside a gaping silvery chamber that drops to the lowest level of the muse- um. Further down the ramp, vis- itors will discover a mangled and twisted piece of steel that

will discover a mangled and twisted piece of steel that AP photo A visitor to the

AP photo

A visitor to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum takes in the sight as he walks past the museum Friday in New York. Construction is racing ahead inside the museum as the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks draws near.

Daniels calls “impact steel.” That’s because this piece of the building was actually destroyed by the impact of Flight 11 slamming into the North Tower.

“You can see how, at the bottom, the columns are bent back,” Daniels said. “That’s because Flight 11’s nose, when it pierced the building, it bent steel like that.”

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Sunday, September 8, 2013 PAGE5A

“Health Care Reform is here and it ’s never been easier to go with Blue.”
“Health Care Reform
is here and
it ’s never been easier
to go with Blue.”
Denise Cesare, President and CEO
Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania

If you’re an individual looking for comprehensive and affordable insurance, we have a health plan that works for you. If you’re a large or small employer and want to stay with or switch to Blue Cross, it’s easier than ever. Call, shop online, or visit our retail stores.

. Call , shop online , or visi t ou r retail stores. 1.866.632.7209 | BlueCrossNEPAstore.com
. Call , shop online , or visi t ou r retail stores. 1.866.632.7209 | BlueCrossNEPAstore.com
. Call , shop online , or visi t ou r retail stores. 1.866.632.7209 | BlueCrossNEPAstore.com
. Call , shop online , or visi t ou r retail stores. 1.866.632.7209 | BlueCrossNEPAstore.com

1.866.632.7209 | BlueCrossNEPAstore.com

Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ® Registered Mark of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

PAGE 6A Sunday, September 8, 2013

NEWS

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Ship wreck surrenders a pirate’s booty

Dive discovers treasure-laden ship might hold as many as 400,000 coins

JAY LINDSAY

Associated Press

BOSTON — Fog was swallowing his ship’s bow, the winds were picking up and undersea explorer Barry Clifford figured he needed to leave within an hour to beat the weather back to port. It was time enough, he decided, for a final dive of the season over the wreck of the treasure-laden pirate ship, Whydah, off Cape Cod. That Sept. 1 dive at a spot Clifford had never explored before uncov- ered proof that a stagger- ing amount of undiscov- ered riches — as many as 400,000 coins — might be found there. Instead of packing up for the year, Clifford is plan- ning another trip to the Whydah, the only authen- ticated pirate ship wreck in

the Whydah, the only authen- ticated pirat e ship wreck in AP photo Explorer Barry Clifford,

AP photo

Explorer Barry Clifford, left, reviews an X-ray image showing a cannon ball and coins that diver and conservator Chris Macort, right, had recorded in Brewster, Mass. The treasure was recovered around the wreck of the Whydah, a pirate ship that sank during a ferocious storm off Cape Cod in 1717.

U.S. waters. “I can hardly wait,” he said. The Whydah was built as a slave ship in 1716 and captured in February 1717 by pirate captain “Black Sam” Bellamy. Just two months later, it sank in a ferocious storm a quarter mile off Wellfleet , Mass., killing Bellamy and all but two of the 145 other men on board and taking down the plunder from 50 ves-

sels Bellamy raided. Clifford located the Whydah site in 1984 and has since documented 200,000 artifacts, includ- ing gold, guns and even the leg of a young boy who took up with the crew. He only recently got indica- tions there may be far more coins than the rough- ly 12,000 he’s already doc- umented. Just before his death in April, the Whydah project’s

late historian, Ken Kinkor, uncovered a Colonial-era document indicating that in the weeks before the Whydah sank, Bellamy raided two vessels bound for Jamaica. “It is said that in those vessels were 400,000 pieces of 8/8,” it read. The 8/8 indicates one ounce, the weight of the largest coin made at that time, Clifford said. “Now we know there’s an additional 400,000 coins out there somewhere,” he said. The final dive may have provided a big hint at where. Diver Rocco Paccione said he had low expectations when Clifford excavated a pit about 35 feet below the surface and sent him down. But his metal detector immediate- ly came alive with positive, or hot, readings. “This pit was pretty much hot all the way through,” he said. The most significant artifact brought up by Paccione was an odd- shape concretion, sort of

We don’t offer gimmicks or gas cards just highest cash paid plain & simple! We
We don’t offer gimmicks or gas
cards
just
highest cash paid plain &
simple! We wi ll give you more cash.
RECEIVE YOUR BEST OFFER
AND COME SEE US!!!
Scrap Your Unwanted Jewelry or
Coins For Cash!!
GUARANTEED!
Monday - Friday 10-6 • Saturday 10-3
476 Bennett St.
Luzerne
www.campasjewelers.com
570-288-1966
80070869
80016197
GET YOUR ROOF ON BEFORE WINTER BEFORE SHINGLE PRICES INCREASE 80020122
GET YOUR ROOF ON BEFORE WINTER
BEFORE SHINGLE PRICES INCREASE
80020122
funded Custom loans for large and small businesses. When you need to borrow money at
funded
Custom loans for large and small businesses.
When you need to borrow money at competitive rates and flexible
terms, make us your first choice. National Penn business advisors
will help you choose the best loan or line of credit. And we’ll come
to you. Book a free lunch or breakfast meeting with us at
mysmallbizbank.com.
It’s not revolutionary. It’s the way lending should be.
1.800.822.3321 | www.mysmallbizbank.com
Equal Opportunity Lender
BANKING
INSURANCE
INVESTMENTS
TRUST

Family of sunken sub captain found boat, closure

Brothers mounted two expeditions to Bering Se a to lo cate World

War II-era vess el.

JANET McCONNAUGHEY

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — In July 1942, about two months after Japan invaded the Aleutian Islands, a U.S. submarine on patrol near Kiska attacked and dis- abled the armed Japanese merchant ship Kano Maru. But the USS Grunion never returned. An account by the Kano Maru’s military command- er states that the Grunion sank after an 80 mm shell hit near its conning tower. He continued, “We saw the swell of heavy oil. All crews

shout ‘BANZAI!’” But many question whether that anti-aircraft shell would have sunk the sub. A malfunctioning tor- pedo or other equipment problems are suspected, but why the Grunion was lost might never be known with certainty. For 64 years it lay lost with 70 men, including

the captain, Lt. Cmdr. Mannert “Jim” Abele. After years of searching for information about their father, Boston Scientific co-founder John Abele and his brothers mounted two expeditions to the

Bering Sea. The first, in 2006, found something at the bottom. The second, in 2007, proved it was the Grunion. John Abele and Mary Bentz, a crewman’s niece, will talk about the search Wednesday at the National World War II Museum. It’s a story of far-flung collaboration and wild improbabilities, Abele said. What Abele calls “the improbables” include find- ing a Japanese researcher through a brother’s son’s girlfriend’s boss; locat- ing the boat’s bell in the Greenville, Miss., welcome center — where it’s still displayed; and contacting the mother and sons of a Japanese captain whose submarine chaser was sunk by the Grunion before the sub attacked the Kano Maru. Abele’s brothers, Bruce and Brad, were 14 and 9 years old when the Grunion sank. John Abele was 5, and barely remem- bers him. “He was away a lot of the time. That’s the Navy,” he said. “I remem- ber I got pennies for brush- ing my teeth.” He said Brad Abele began research in the 1990s, talking to retired Navy men who had known their father or were in the 14-month campaign to recover Attu and Kiska islands from the Japanese.

ART APPLIANCE REPAIR - 570.639.3001 - • Experienced • Repairs Guaranteed • Local • Servicing
ART
APPLIANCE REPAIR
- 570.639.3001 -
• Experienced
• Repairs Guaranteed
• Local
• Servicing All Major Brands
80007948

a rocky mass that forms

when chemical reactions with seawater bind metals together. X-rays this week

revealed coin-shaped mass- es, including some that appear to be stacked as

if they were kept in bags,

which is how a surviving Whydah pirate testified that the crewmen stored their riches. Clifford doesn’t sell Whydah treasures and said he would never sell the coins individually because he sees them as histori- cal artifacts, not com- modities. But he has given coins away as mementos. Two have been sold at the Daniel Frank Sedwick LLC auction house in Florida, with the highest going for about $11,400. The price per Whydah coin would plummet if tens of thou- sands hit the market, but a

retail price of $1,000 each

is a reasonable guess, said

Augi Garcia, manager at the auction. Ed Rodley, who studied Whydah artifacts during graduate studies in archae- ology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, said the Whydah site keeps producing treasure decades after its discovery

partly because it’s so tough

to work.

Get The Benefits Yo u Deserve!

Social Security Disability

Claimants represented by attorneys are more successful in obtaining benefits. Call me for a FREE CONSULTATION. I can help.

Member of the National Organization of Social Security Claimants’ Representatives

Janet A. Conser

Attorney At Law

Representatives Ja net A. Conser Attorney At Law 1575 Wyom ing Ave. , Fort y Fort

1575 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort

570-283-1200

Over 30 Ye ars Experience

UPCOMING RUTH’S CHRIS WINE DINNERS SEPTEMBER 16TH 90+Rated Wine Dinner OCTOBER 24TH Tr ump Wine

UPCOMING RUTH’S CHRIS

WINE DINNERS

SEPTEMBER 16TH

90+Rated Wine Dinner

OCTOBER 24TH

Trump Wine Dinner

90+Rated Wine Dinner OCTOBER 24TH Tr ump Wine Dinner NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH 7 DAYS A

NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH

7 DAYS A WEEK

NOW BOOKING

• Holiday Parties (book by Nov. 1st for discount) • Business Luncheons • Private Events • Wine Dinners • Cocktail Receptions for Fundraising Opportunities

• Cocktail Receptions for Fundraising Opportunities 570.208.2266 • RUTHSCHRIS.COM MOHEGAN SUN AT POCONO

570.208.2266 • RUTHSCHRIS.COM MOHEGAN SUN AT POCONO DOWNS, WILKES-BARRE

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Sunday, September 8, 2013 PAGE 7A

om THE TIMES LEADER Sunda y, Sept ember 8, 2013 PA GE 7A MEMBERSHIP OPEN PUBLIC
om THE TIMES LEADER Sunda y, Sept ember 8, 2013 PA GE 7A MEMBERSHIP OPEN PUBLIC
MEMBERSHIP OPEN PUBLIC FEES NO TO THE
MEMBERSHIP
OPEN PUBLIC FEES NO TO THE
Grillin' Se Grillin' Season www.MaineSource.net FRESH MEAT & PRODUCE
Grillin' Se
Grillin' Season
www.MaineSource.net
FRESH MEAT & PRODUCE
USDA USDA CHOICE CHOICE BLACK BLACK CANYON CANYON ANGUS ANGUS WHOLE WHOLE
USDA USDA CHOICE CHOICE BLACK BLACK
CANYON CANYON ANGUS ANGUS WHOLE WHOLE
STEAKS $3.99/LB.
STEAKS
$3.99/LB.

SIRLOIN TIPS 8- 10 LB. AVG.

$

2

FAMILY PACK $1.29/LB.
FAMILY PACK
$1.29/LB.
SIRLOIN TIPS 8- 10 LB. AVG. $ 2 FAMILY PACK $1.29/LB. FAMILY PACK STORE MADE GROUND
SIRLOIN TIPS 8- 10 LB. AVG. $ 2 FAMILY PACK $1.29/LB. FAMILY PACK STORE MADE GROUND
FAMILY PACK STORE MADE GROUND BEEF PATTIES $2.99/LB
FAMILY PACK STORE MADE
GROUND BEEF PATTIES $2.99/LB

FRESH ANGUS GROUND BEEF

10 LB. AVG.

$

2 39

/LB.

$2.99/LB FRESH ANGUS GROUND BEEF 10 LB. AVG. $ 2 39 /LB. FRESH BEETS, CARROTS OR

FRESH BEETS, CARROTS OR ONIONS

10 LB. BAG

$ 3 99

It's your turn to score!

MaineSource wants you to score some huge savings. From the kickoff to the last whistle,
MaineSource wants you to score some huge savings. From the
kickoff to the last whistle, we have everything to make your
party a winner — including party supplies, snacks and beverages.
USDA USDA CHOICE CHOICE BLACK BLACK
CORN CORN FED FED BONE BONE IN IN PORK PORK
CANYON CANYON ANGUS ANGUS
CHOPS OR ROAST
CHOPS OR ROAST
CANYON CANYON ANGUS ANGUS CHOPS OR ROAST CHOPS OR ROAST BONELESS FLANK STEAKS $ 7 99

BONELESS FLANK STEAKS

$

7

99

/LB.

OR ROAST CHOPS OR ROAST BONELESS FLANK STEAKS $ 7 99 /LB. $ 2 49 /

$

2

49

/LB.

OR ROAST BONELESS FLANK STEAKS $ 7 99 /LB. $ 2 49 / L B .
OR ROAST BONELESS FLANK STEAKS $ 7 99 /LB. $ 2 49 / L B .
OR ROAST BONELESS FLANK STEAKS $ 7 99 /LB. $ 2 49 / L B .

WILD CAUGHT WARM WATER LOBSTER TAILS 2/8 OZ.

$ 18 99

FRESH ORCHARD RUN, PAULA RED, OR GINGER GOLD APPLES

99 ¢

/LB.

MAINES GRADE A EXTRA LARGE EGGS DOZEN

$

1 29

99 ¢ /LB. MAINES GRADE A EXTRA LARGE EGGS DOZEN $ 1 29 MUNDIAL MIXED PA
99 ¢ /LB. MAINES GRADE A EXTRA LARGE EGGS DOZEN $ 1 29 MUNDIAL MIXED PA
99 ¢ /LB. MAINES GRADE A EXTRA LARGE EGGS DOZEN $ 1 29 MUNDIAL MIXED PA

MUNDIAL MIXED PARING KNIVES

3 PACK

$ 8 99

FRESH NYS RED RIPE TOMATOES

1

$ 29

/LB.

COCA COLA SODA

ALL VARIETIES

20/12OZ CANS

$ 4

99

900 Rutter Ave. | Forty Fort, PA • 733 Davis St. | Scranton, PA

79

/LB.

FRESH YOUNG CHICKEN DRUMSTICKS OR BONE IN THIGHS 10 LB. AVG.

$

1 19

/LB.

FRESH PA FREE-STONE PEACHES

$

1 29

/LB.

FRESH CALIFORNIA

ROMAINE HEARTS

3 CT. PACKAGE

$

2 49

BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU
BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU
BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU
BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU
BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU
BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU
BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU
BEST BUY SLICED BA CON HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED BOUNTIFUL HARVEST EDYS ICE CREAM RAGU

BEST BUY SLICED BACON

HIDDEN BAY RAW PEELED

BOUNTIFUL HARVEST

EDYS ICE CREAM

RAGU PASTA SAUCES

GOLD MEDAL ALL PURPOSE

ZIPLOC STORAGE,

DART 6 IN FOAM PLATES OR

1 LB

AND DEVEINED SHRIMP

MANGO CHUNKS IQF

ALL VARIETIES

ALL VARIETIES

FLOUR

SANDWICH, OR FREEZER

12 OZ. FOAM BOWLS

26/30 CT

5 LB

48 OZ.

45 OZ.

10 LBS

BAGS

125 CT

2 LB

15-30 CT

$ 2 39

$

14 99 $ 10

49

$ 2 99 $

2 99 $

3 49

2 $ 5 FOR
2 $ 5
FOR

$ 1

99

FRESH GREEN PEPPERS KATY KITCHEN MAYONNAISE FROZEN CORNISH GAME HENS 1 GALLON 99 ¢ 5
FRESH GREEN PEPPERS
KATY KITCHEN
MAYONNAISE
FROZEN CORNISH GAME
HENS
1 GALLON
99 ¢ 5
$
99 $
1
99
/LB.
/LB.
HORMEL SLICED
PEPPERONI
BYRNE DAIRY COTTAGE
CHEESE
GREAT LAKES SHREDDED
CHEESE
1.5 LB
2
LB
WHITE CHEDDAR, YELLOW OR
MONETARY JACK
5 LB
$
5 99
$ 3
99
$ 11 99
TRIDENT ULTIMATE FISH
STICKS
KRUSTEAZ PANCAKES
MRS T'S POTATO AND
60
CT
4
LB
ONION PIEROGIES
4 LB
COUNTRY CREAM BUTTER
SOLIDS
1 LB
BOUNTIFUL HARVEST
BROCCOLI OR
CAULIFLOWER FLORETS
DIVO 90% SOY 10% OLIVE
OIL BLEND
$ 13 99
$ 5 99 $
7 49
128 OZ
2 LB
SUNBEAM KING OR RANCH
BREAD
ORTEGA
TACO DINNER KITS
$
1 79 $ 2 79
$ 6
99
LYNDEN FARMS STRAIGHT
FRIES, SHOESTRING OR
HASHBROWNS
22
OZ.
10-15.2OZ
4 LB
$ 2 49
3 $ 5
2 $ 3
FOR
FOR

BARILLA JUMBO SHELLS, MANICOTTI, OR LASAGNA 8-16 OZ.

$ 1 69

KRAFT SALAD DRESSING ALL VARIETIES 16 OZ.

2 $ 5 FOR
2 $ 5
FOR

POST HONEY ROASTED BUNCHES OF OATS 48 OZ.

BOUNTIFUL HARVEST LIGHT OR DARK RED KIDNEY BEANS 108 OZ.

OCEAN SPRAY CRANBERRY COCKTAIL JUICES ALL VARIETIES 64 OZ

$ 3 69 $ 4 49 $ 1 99

EMINENCE MARCAL BELLA DINNER NAPKINS 17 IN X 15 IN 100 CT.

4 $ 5 FOR
4 $ 5
FOR

GLAD KITCHEN TRASH BAGS 38-45 CT.

$ 5 99

Prices Effective Sun. 09/8/13 - Sat. 09/14/13 While supplies last. We reserve the right to

Prices Effective Sun. 09/8/13 - Sat. 09/14/13 While supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. MaineSource accepts EBT and Major Credit Cards. We are not responsible for typographical errors in ad copy.

PAGE 8A Sunday, September 8, 2013

NEWS

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

What’s ailing the US job market? It depends on where you look

Fed to weigh factors such as the long-term unemployed when making decisions this month

PAUL WISEMAN

AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON — Just how sturdy is the U.S. job market? That’s the key question the Federal Reserve will face when it decides later

this month whether to reduce its economic stimu- lus. The answer depends on where you look. The economy has added jobs for 35 consecutive months. Unemployment has reached a 4½-year low of 7.3 percent. Layoffs are

dwindling. Yet other barometers of the job market point to chronic weakness:

The pace of hiring remains tepid. Job growth is concentrated in lower- paying industries. The economy is 1.9 million jobs shy of its pre-recession level

DRIVE YOUR FUTURE FORWARD. Prepare for a new career with our Advanced Tractor Trailer Driving
DRIVE YOUR
FUTURE
FORWARD.
Prepare for a new career
with our Advanced Tractor
Trailer Driving Program.
166 Slocum St., Forty Fort
(Greater Wilkes-Barre Area)
(888) 788-2890
ACCSC Accredited
Flexible Class Schedules
Financial Aid Available for those who Qualify
Career Placement Assistance for all Graduates
For consumer information visit www.fortis.edu

— and that’s not counting the additional jobs needed to meet population growth. Nearly 4.3 million people have been unemployed at least six months. What’s more, employers have little incentive to raise pay. Many unhappy employ- ees have nowhere else to go. Still, when it meets Sept. 17-18, the Fed is expected to reduce its $85 billion a month in bond purchases by perhaps $10 billion. Its purchases have helped keep home-loan and other bor-

rowing rates low to try to encourage consumers and businesses to borrow and spend more. Here’s a look at the job market’s vital signs as the Fed’s decision nears:

Unemployment The unemployment rate slid in August to 7.3 percent, its lowest level since December 2008. Unemployment had peaked in October 2009 at 10 per- cent and has since fallen more or less steadily. Since then, the number of people who say they have jobs has risen by 5.7 million. And

New Fo r Fall! 80070397

New For Fall!

80070397
80070397

the number of those who say they’re unemployed has dropped by nearly 4.1 mil- lion. That’s the good news behind the tumbling unem- ployment rate. But the rate has been fall- ing, in part, for a bad rea- son: People are dropping out of the labor force. Once people without a job stop looking for one, the gov- ernment no longer counts them as unemployed. Job creation Since the Great Recession officially ended in June 2009, the American economy has added nearly 5.6 million jobs. Yet that hasn’t been nearly enough to fill the hole left by the recession. The United States still has 1.9 million fewer jobs than the 138

million it had when the recession officially began in December 2007. Low-quality jobs The jobs the economy is generating this year have tended to be low-paying, part-time or both. More than 654,000 — or 45 per- cent — of the 1.44 million jobs added this year come from three generally low- paying industries: depart- ment stores and other retail- ers; hotels and restaurants; and temporary services. Layoffs and hiring The American labor market is divided between haves and have-nots. If you have a job, your position is safer than it’s been in years. If you don’t have one and aren’t willing to settle for lower-wage work, the job search can be brutal.

Our Lady of Victory HARVEYS LAKE Our Lady of Victory Harveys Lake continues to host
Our Lady of Victory
HARVEYS LAKE
Our Lady of Victory Harveys Lake continues to host the
Annual Six Month De vo tion to Our Lady of Fatima
Th is month’s ser vice will tak e place on FRID AY
This month’s s er vice will take place on THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 13TH AT 7:00PM , the Devotions will
JUNE 13TH AT 7:00 PM, the Devotions will continue to be
continue to be held on the 13th of each
held on the 13th of each month through October 13th.
month through October 13th.
The Devotions to Our Lady of Fatima consist of The Rosary,
The Devotions to Our Lady of Fatima consist of
The Rosar y, Beautiful Marian Hymns and Benediction.
Beautiful Marian Hymns and Benediction.
Complimentary Refreshments following the Service
All are welcome!
All are welcome!
For Further Information Call 639-1535
For Further Information Call 639-1535
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
Visit: CatholicsComeHome.org
& Access is Available Visit: CatholicsComeHome.org The Mattress Professionals ® Since 1957 Over 900 Stores
The Mattress Professionals ® Since 1957 Over 900 Stores LABOR DAY SALE Every Mattress In
The Mattress Professionals ®
Since 1957
Over 900 Stores
LABOR DAY SALE
Every Mattress In The Store!
excludes Tempur-Pedic, Serta iSeries & Cool Elegance
HELD OVER FINAL DAYS
SAVE 75 %
UP
TO
FREE
FREE
Cushion Firm or Firm
FREE
Boxspring
$ 399 99
UP TO
Queen
50"HDTV
Set
with any Serta iSeries or Serta Cool Elegance
mattress purchase. See store for details.
Mattress
List $1299
List $1599
Twin, Full & King available at similar savings.
with select Sleeping Beauty and
G.S. Stearns Life Technologies King
or Queen sets. See store for details.
Receive a free Twin
TEMPUR-Simplicity Mattress with
purchase of a Tempur-Pedic
mattress set. See store for details.
60 MONTH FINANCING
% INTEREST
NO MONEY DOWN AT SLEEPY’S!
On purchases of $3300 or more made between 8/22/13 and
9/14/13 with your Sleepy’s credit card. Equal monthly payments
required for 60 mos. † Other special financing available: 24
mos. on purchases of $999-$1799, 36 mos. on purchases of
$1800-$2400, 48 mos. on purchases of $2500-$3299. ††
† their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval. †† with any other offers.
their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval.
††
with any other offers.
Subject to credit approval. †† with any other offers. Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases.

Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases. No interest will be charged on promo purchase for 60 Months, and during promo period fixed monthly payments are required equal to initial promo purchase amount divided equally by 60. The fixed monthly payment may be higher than the minimum payment that would be required if the purchase was a non-promotional purchase. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases and, after promotion ends, to

promotional purchases. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for

Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See store for details. All models available for

purchase may not be on display. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Previous sales do not apply. Cannot be combined

1- 800-SLEEPYS (753-3797) or visit sleepys.com/laborday

We Deliver Nationwide!

Cape • Shore Mountains • Islands

DATE: Sunday 9-8-13

Client: Sleepy’s:

FILE: ADS: 2013:

ROP:

PUBLICATION: Times Leader 1/2 PG

11.54X10

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Sunday, September, 2013 PAGE 9A

om THE TIMES LEADER Sunda y, Sept ember , 2013 PA GE 9A to Savings 7
to Savings 7 GEORGE AVE. BOTH LOCATIONS (PARSONS SECTION) WILKES-BARRE • 270-3976 Prices Effective Sunday,
to Savings
7 GEORGE AVE.
BOTH LOCATIONS
(PARSONS SECTION)
WILKES-BARRE • 270-3976
Prices Effective Sunday, September 8,2013 thru Saturday, September 14, 2013
30 HAnovER St.
WILKES-BARRE • 970-4460
14, 2013 30 HAnovER St. WILKES-BARRE • 970-4460 GROCERy mEA T PROduCE California Cantaloupes franCesCo
GROCERy
GROCERy
mEA T
mEA T
PROduCE
PROduCE
California Cantaloupes franCesCo rinaldi pasta sauCe Sweet Large Size All Varieties , 16-24 oz. Jar
California Cantaloupes
franCesCo rinaldi pasta sauCe
Sweet Large Size
All Varieties , 16-24 oz. Jar
5/$ 5
$ 1 99
ea.
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
all Varieties
sHurfine pasta
fresH express Bagged salads
All Varieties except Lasagne • 12-16 oz. Pkg.
4.5 – 13.9 oz. Bag • Excludes Garden, Bowls, and Organic Salads
88 ¢
$ 1 99
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
Sweet Eating, Large Size California
CaMpBell’s soup
red, WHite or BlaCk
Exc ludes Tomato, Chic ken Noodle , Cream of Shr imp and
Oyster Stew • 10.5-11.5 oz. Can • Up to 57 Varieties on sale!
ShurSave Fresh
sanderson farMs
seedless grapes
85%leangroundBeef
grade “a” roaster CHiCken
$
1 99
5/$ 5
lb.
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
2 99
99 ¢
Hardy MuMs
Coke, diet Coke, or sprite
9 Inch Pot 8 Perfect with your Outdoor Fall Decorating
All varieties including Fanta, Seagram’s, Barq’s, Mello Yellow
Fuze or Minute Maid • 2 Liter bottle
Lb. with
Lb. with
GOLD CARD
GOLD CARD
3/$
5/$ 5
1
5
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
dAIRy/fROzEN
entenMann’s full line
dannon oikos, aCtiVia, or
All Varieties • Excludes Softee Bagged Donuts • 7.1 – 22 oz Pkg.
Buy 1 get 1 of
ligHt & fit greek yogurt
Sander son Farms Grade A All Natural Value Pack
MaMa luCia italian
All Varieties • 5.3 oz Cup
eQual or lesser
Boneless and skinless
10/$
Value free
style MeatBalls
10
CHiCken Breast tenders
with GOLD CARD
Turkey, Coc ktail or Regular
with GOLD CARD
Lesser amounts 2.79 lb.
Buy1
kell
ogg’s Cereal
2 49
Hot, lean or
Croissant poCkets
9 oz. Rice Krispies, 11 or 11.3 oz, Cocoa Krispies, 9.2 oz
Corn Pops, 8.7 oz. Apple Jacks or Froot Loops
get 1 free
All Varieties • 9 oz.
Lb. with
Must Buy 5, Lesser Quantities
$2.25 Each
$ 1 99
GOLD CARD
12 oz. Pkg. with
5/$
GOLD CARD
10
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
Bl
ue
Bunny iCe
CreaM
keeBler fudge sHoppe, el fudge
sandWiCH, or
CinnaMon roll Cookies
All Varieties • 1.75 Qt. Cont
Must Buy 2, lesser quantities $2.99 Each
All Varieties • 6.6 - 15 oz. pkg
2/$
2/$ 4
5
dELI LI
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
saHlen’s oVen roasted turkey Breast
oastst
Mrs.
t’s pierogies
tostitos tortilla CHips
6
99
All Varieties • 12.84 – 16 oz. Pkg
All Varieties • 9-13 oz bags
2/$
2/$ 5
4
with
Lb.
GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
sHurfine deli gourMet aMeriCan CHeese
urfineurf
etet
with GOLD CARD
BAkERy
3
99
post Cereal or Bar treats
first of tHe
season
10.5 oz. Sesame Street Strawberry, Banana or Apple, 11 oz. Fruity or Cocoa Pebbles.14.75 oz.
Golden Cr isp, 11.5 oz. Wa ffle Cr isp, 12.5 oz. Honeycomb, 20 oz. Raisin Bran or 6.2 oz. Fr uity
Pebbles Treats
with
Lb.
GOLD CARD
8 Inch Pumpkin Pie
2/$
5
$ 2 99
saHlen’s sMokeHouse HaM off tHe Bone
ene ’’
ousee
ea.
with GOLD CARD
4
99
with GOLD CARD
fol
gers Coffee
with
Lb.
raisin Bread
GOLD CARD
33.9 oz. Classic Roast • 27.8 oz. Black Silk • Gourmet Supreme
Colombian or Special Roast
29.2 oz. Breakfast Blend or Half Caffee or 22.6 oz. Decar
Baked fresH daily
HoMestyle CreaMy Cole
HoH
Creaea
slaW
$ 2 49
$
7 99
2
99
Loaf
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
with
Lb.
GOLD CARD
arM & HaMMer
steak roll
s
laundry dete
rgent
fresH froM tHe oVen!
Let Schiel’s Be Your Football Party Headquarters!
All Varieties • 45-50 Fl. Oz. Btl or
16 Ct. Crystal Burst Power Paks
6 Count Pkg
$
2 99
$
1
99
Super Party Deals
with GOLD CARD
with GOLD CARD
Shurfine Products Are
Follow Us On
FACEBOOK AND TWI TTER
DVD RENTAL & SELF-SERVICE COIN
COUNTERS AT BOTH LOCATIONS
5% SENIOR
DISCOUNT
ON TUESDAY
DOUBLE-YOUR-
CHECK OUT OUR LARGE ASSORTMENT
OF GLUTEN FREE PRODUCTS
MONEY-BACK
&
MONEY
GUARANTEED!
Quality Rights
Reser ved,
Not Responsible For
Typographical Errors
ORDERS
@SchielsMar ket & on the Web at
www.schielsmarkets.com
Scan this with
your smartphone
to visit our
website now!
AT OUR GEORGE AVE. LOCATION

PAGE 10A Sunday, September 8, 2013

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

NEW 2013 COROLLA LE Model #1838 Stock #49734 MSRP: $19,200 $ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NEW
2013 COROLLA LE
Model #1838 Stock #49734 MSRP: $19,200
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
$ 219 *
77
per mooo forforfor 363636 mos.,mos.,mos., 353535 paymentspaymentspayments rereremainingmainingmainin
OTHER UNITS
0
% APR
OR
AVAILABLE
$ 500 Customer
OR
for up to
60 mos. 1
Cash!**
NEW
2013 CAMRY LE
Model #2532 Stock #49037 MSRP: $24,124
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
$ 249 *
144
per mooo forforfor 363636 mosmosmos.,., 353535 paymentspayaymentsments rereremainmainmaininginging
0 % APR
PLUS
OR
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
$ 1,000 Customer
OR
for up to
$ 750 TFS
Cash!**
60 mos. 1
Finance Cash!**
NEW
2013 RAV4 LE AWD
Model #4432 Stock #49741 MSRP: $25,920
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
$ 299 *
168
per momomo forforfor 363636 mos.,mosmos., 353535 paymentspayaymentsments rereremainingmainmaining
0 .9% APR
1
.9% APR
2 .9% APR
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
OR
for up to
OR
for up to
48 mos. 3
OR
for up to
36 mos. 2
60 mos. 4
NEW
2013 TACOMA ACCESS CAB 4X4
Model #7554 Stock #50019 (V6, Automatic Trans) MSRP: $30,215
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
$ 399 *
MORE OF
pererer momomo forforfor 363636 mos.,mos.,mos., 353535 paymentspaymenpaymentsments rereremainingmainingm
45
2 .9% APR
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
OR
for up to
60 mos. 4
WHAT YOU
NEW
2013 HIGHLANDER V6 4WD
Model #6948 Stock #49970 MSRP: $33,144
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
WANT
$ 359 *
per momomo forforfor 363636 mos.,mos.,mos., 353535 paymenpaymentspaymentsments rereremainmaininging
63
0 % APR
OR
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
$ 1,000 Customer
OR
for up to
60 mos. 1
Cash**
NEW
• MORE Vehicles To Choose From!
2013 PRIUS TWO
Model #1223 Stock #48773 MSRP: $25,220
• MORE Discounts!
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
• MORE Award Winning Experience!
$ 279 *
• White Glove Service Treatment!
per momomo forforfor 363636 mos.,mos.,mos., 353535 paymenpaymentspaymentsments rereremainmainingma
ing
43
0
% APR
OR
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
OR
for up to
$ 500 Customer
60 mos. 1
Cash**
WHY?
NEW
2013 SIENNA LE FWD
Model #5338 Stock #49988 (8-Passenger) MSRP: $31,579
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
Because we’re MORE
than a dealership!
$ 359 *
per momomo forforfor 363636 mos.,mosmos.,., 353535 paymentspayaymentsments rereremainingmainmaininging
49
0 % APR
PLUS
OR
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
OR
for up to
$ 500 TFS
$ 1,500 Customer
OVER 900
60 mos. 1
Finance Cash!**
Cash!**
ALL NEW
2014 TUNDRA DOUBLE CAB 4X4
TOYOTAS
ALL
Model #8345 Stock #49999 (5.7L V8, Automatic Trans) MSRP: $34,449
NEW
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
MODEL!
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
TO CHOOSE
FROM! ***
$ 41
9 *
per mo. for 36 mos., 35 payments remaining
. .
for 36 mos., 35 payments remaining
for 36 mos., 35 payments remaining
1
.9% APR
2 .9% APR
OR
25
for up to
48 mos. 3
$ 500 Customer
OR
OR
from 49 to
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
72 mos. 9
Cash!**
NEW
2013 AVALON XLE PREMIUM
Model #3546 Stock #49193 MSRP: $34,215
$ 0 DUE AT DELIVERY
NO MONEY NEEDED LEASE SPECIAL!
$ 389 *
per momomo forforfor 363636 mos.,mos.,mos., 353535 paymentspaymentsments rereremainingmamainininging
28
0 % APR
0 .9% APR
1
.9% APR
OR
$ 500 Customer
OTHER UNITS
OR
for up to
OR
for up to
OR
for up to
60 mos. 8
AVAILABLE
36 mos. 5
48 mos. 7
Cash!**
For the past four years, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with the prestigious President’s Award for
excellence in each of a series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and Customer Service Satisfaction.
We Make
The Difference!

*All offers end close of business Monday, September 30, 2013 or while supplies last. All offers are for 36 or 60 months with $0 down and excludes 1st payment, tax, tags, $125 processing fee, no security deposit and $650 acquisition fee on lease offers. Quantities as of 09/06/13 and include both in-stock and incoming units for all model years and trim level for the series described. 1 0% APR for up to 60 months. 60 monthly payments of $16.67 for each $1,000 borrowed. 2 0.9% APR for up to 36 months. 36 monthly payments of $28.16 for each $1,000 borrowed. 3 1.9% APR for up to 48 months. 48 monthly payments of $21.65 for each $1,000 borrowed. 4 2.9% APR for up to 60 months. 60 monthly payments of $17.92 for each $1,000 borrowed. 5 0% APR for up to 36 months. 36 monthly payments of $27.78 for each $1,000 borrowed. 6 3.9% APR for up to 72 months. 72 monthly payments of $15.60 for each $1,000 borrowed. 7 0.9% APR for up to 48 months. 48 monthly payments of $21.23 for each $1,000 borrowed. 8 1.9% APR for up to 60 months. 60 monthly payments of $17.49 for each $1,000 borrowed. 9 2.9% APR from 49-72 months. 49 monthly payments of $21.69 for each $1,000 borrowed. 60 monthly payments of $17.94 for each $1,000 borrowed. 72 monthly payments of $15.16 for each $1,000 borrowed. All lease and APR offers require tier 1 plus credit approval through Toyota Financial Services. **Cash Back offers includes funds from Toyota of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services or Toyota Motor Sales. Vehicle must be in stock units. Bonus Cash, Lease Bonus Cash, Toyota Trade Lease Bonus Cash and Customer Cash must lease or finance with Toyota Financial Services. Conquest Cash is available on leases or purchases. Must trade any non-Toyota car, truck, van or SUV. See dealer for details. College grad and military rebates are not included. Prior sales excluded. With approved credit only. Some restrictions may apply. See dealer for details. ***Inventory is a combination of new and Certified Pre-Owned both instock and inbound as of 7/23/13. Pictures may not represent actual units. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. 2013 Impact Advertising 13TSS-NFC-WTL090813

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

NEWS

Pa. transit plan faces obstacles

Lawmakers return to Harrisburg in two weeks, perhaps reviving transportation debate

MARK SCOLFORO

Associated Press

HARRISBURG — It’s been more than two months since a proposal to raise billions to improve roads, repair bridges and support mass transit stalled amid the flurry of deal making that accompanies the Pennsylvania Legislature’s annual budget debate. Since then, the Transportation Department announced new weight restrictions on about 1,000 state and local bridges, and the Senate Transportation Committee has held a series of hearings around the state to warn of the dangers of inaction

on transportation infrastructure. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol from their summer break in two weeks, with the prospects of a deal as murky as ever. A $2.5 billion-a-year plan passed the Senate 45-5, while a $2 billion House proposal got out of commit- tee but has not had a floor vote. The big question this fall is what will happen in the House, where fis- cal conservatives who dominate the Republican majority are determined to avoid tax increases. The House Transportation Committee’s chair- man, Dick Hess, died on Friday, adding uncertainty amid the fund- ing debate.

PennDOT Secretary Barry Schoch said that major sticking points are the proper level of spending and how much money will be earmarked for mass transit. “If we’re going to have success on this and get it through both cham-

bers, we’re going to have to iron out those issues,” Schoch said. House Republicans plan to draft

a new approach this fall, although a spokesman would not say how much

it will cost.

“The one thing that truly seems to have been missing from this entire transportation funding debate is the effect on the people paying for it,” said House GOP spokesman Steve Miskin. “We’re thinking about dealing with the actual and critical needs, not necessarily an industry wish list.”

Fresh Air. Fresh Style. Northeastern Pennsylvania’s Premier Back to School Shopping Destination Exit 182A off
Fresh Air.
Fresh Style.
Northeastern Pennsylvania’s Premier
Back to School Shopping Destination
Exit 182A off I-81 | Montage Mountain Road
shoppesatmontage.com | 570.341.3271
| Montage Mountain Road shoppesatmontage.com | 570.341.3271 Sunday, Sept ember 8, 2013 PA GE 11A 69

Sunday, September 8, 2013 PAGE 11A

69 ¢ With Your Gold Card Powerade 32 oz All Varieties $ 1 99 With
69 ¢
With Your Gold Card
Powerade
32 oz
All Varieties
$ 1 99
With Your Gold Card
Gold Medal
Flour
5 lb
$ 1 99
With Your Gold Card
Mrs. T’s
Pierogies
16 oz
All Varieties
$ 1 99
With Your Gold Card
Shurfine
American
Cheese 16 oz
Individually Wrapped Slices
$ 6 99
With Your Gold Card
Green Mountain
Coffee K Cups
12 pk All Varieties
• KEYSER - OAK SHOPPING CTR., SCRANTON
347-0393
• S. MAIN AVE., SCRANTON
342-7103
• MEADOW AVE., SCRANTON
961-9030
• BIRNEY AVE., MOOSIC
963-7436
• 552 UNION STREET, LUZERNE
287-9677
• WYOMING AVE., WYOMING
283-5555
• 2280 SANS SOUCI PKWY., HANOVER TWP
735-1316
• 801 WYOMING AVE., WEST PITTSTON
654-3444
• THE SUMMIT SQUARE SHOPPING CTR., CLARKS SUMMIT
WWW.GERRITYS.COM
587-3800
SALE ENDS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.
TO ASSURE SUFFICIENT SUPPLY OF SALE ITEMS, WE MUST RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT THE PURCHASE OF SALE
ITEMS. EXCEPT WHERE OTHERWISE NOTED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
TYPOGRAPHIC ERRORS. ARTWORK FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY.

PAGE 12A Sunday, September 8, 2013

NEWS

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Debate over coal heats up in southwestern Pa.

President is such a staunch advocate for natural gas, some say he has declared a ‘war on coal.’

RICK SHRUM

(Washington) Observer-Reporter

WASHINGTON, Pa. — Coal accounts for more than one-third of national electricity generation, more than any other ener- gy source. It also is a polar- izing subject, staunchly defended on one side, con- demned on the other. Consider the stances of Dan Kane and Patrick

Grenter. “Coal can have a good future if we use our heads,” said Kane, international secretary-treasurer of the United Mine Workers of America. “It remains our most abundant resource and has been a stable resource in this country for over 100 years. It’s still one of our greatest sources of electricity.” Grenter has a different perspective. He is execu- tive director of the Center for Coalfield Justice, a watchdog organization in downtown Wa shington that addresses environ- mental issues related to fossil fuel extraction.

“Clean coal is a myth. It does not exist,” he said. “Coal companies say extracting coal is good for all of us. Again, I think that’s a myth.” A heating source for more than two centuries, coal continues to burn brightly in the region, in the nation and around the world. But because of increasingly stringent environmental regula- tions, the high cost of implementing emissions controls at older plants, and the rapid development of the shale gas industry, the flame is flickering a little. Just a few years ago, coal

Broadway Theatre League of NEPA and Albert Nocciolino present HELLOHELLOHELLO,,, DOLLDOLLDOLLY!Y!Y! starring SALLY
Broadway Theatre League of NEPA and Albert Nocciolino present
HELLOHELLOHELLO,,,
DOLLDOLLDOLLY!Y!Y!
starring SALLY STRUTHERS
“Sally Struthers, from All in the Family &
Gilmore Girls, shines in Hello, Dolly!”
OnSALE TOmORROw!
October11-13,2013•ScrantonCulturalCenter
BoxOffice • 800-745-3000 • BroadwayinScranton.com

SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE! CALL 570.342.7784

BoxOffice • 800-745-3000 • BroadwayinScranton.com SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE! CALL 570.342.7784
BoxOffice • 800-745-3000 • BroadwayinScranton.com SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE! CALL 570.342.7784

generated about 45 per- cent of U.S. energy, well ahead of other sources. It’s now 37 percent. Natural gas — with environmental issues less extreme than coal — is at 30 percent and closing rapidly. Yet, despite a reputation darker than a clump of the mineral substance itself, coal remains a vital source of employment and tax revenue in Greene County and, to a lesser extent, Washington County. “Our region is the largest coal-producing area in the state,” said state Sen. Tim Solobay, D-Canonsburg. “A lot of jobs are affected, directly and indirectly, by

what happens with the industry.” Pennsylvania, in 2011, was the fourth-largest coal-producing state with 57.4 million short tons, according to an Ernst & Young analysis commis- sioned by the National Mining Association. That was slightly more than half of what third-place Kentucky (103.3 million) yielded. We st Vi rg inia wa s sec- ond (131.2 million), amaz- ingly less than one-third of front-running Wyoming (437.8 million). So, yes, a lot of jobs within a 90-minute drive of downtown Washington

will be affected by what transpires in the world of energy generation. And those positions would not only be in the coalfields. Some companies have closed or plan to close coal-fired power plants. FirstEnergy Corp. announced in July that it plans to shut two in the area Oct. 9, impacting 380 employees: Mitchell Power Station in Union Township and Hatfield’s Ferry Power Station in Monongahela Township, near Carmichaels. Hatfield’s Ferry is in peril even though Allegheny Power, FirstEnergy ’s predeces-

80071444
80071444

sor, invested $650 million

there to install scrubbers to remove sulfur dioxide and mercury from the emissions. The scrubbers went online in late 2009. Tougher government regu- lations on emissions are anticipated, which would require further technology

at a greater corporate cost. President Barack Obama is such a staunch advocate for natural gas

that a number of observers

say he has declared a “war on coal.” Burning coal cleanly has been a longtime issue. The process today is as clean as the new technologies

allow, but it is not a per-

fect process.

“There’s no question coal is getting a lot of regulatory attention from the (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency),” said Steve Winberg, vice presi-

dent of research and devel- opment for Consol Energy Inc., the largest diversi- fied energy producer in the Appalachian Basin. Consol is prominent in the natural gas industry, work-

ing in the Marcellus and

Utica shales, and operates

the world’s largest under-

ground coal mine, Bailey Mine in Greene County. While touring the National Energy and Te chnology Laborat ory

in Morgantown, W.Va.,

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said last month that development of new technology for carbon storage and sequestration

probably will be the key to ensuring coal’s future. Carbon capture tech- nology is considered vital

to

reducing greenhouse

gas

released by coal-fired

power plants. Sequestration is a new, expensive technology that separates carbon from emissions and stores it deep beneath the Earth’s surface.

“I think it’s critical for

this country to continue to

improve clean initiatives, like carbon capture and sequestration, and develop other technologies that

can

help the environment

and

still leave coal in the

mix

in our economy,” said

Kane, a former miner who works at the UMWA head- quarters in Triangle, Va., but lives in Ebensburg, Cambria County. The importance of new technology might very well extend beyond the coal industry. It will likely have a worldwide impact. “Coal consumption is down right now, but its obituary shouldn’t be writ- ten,” Karen Alderman Harbert said at the fourth annual Washington County Energy Symposium on Aug. 1 at the Hilton

Garden Inn, Southpointe.

or Eat out Take in Grand Opening 7 Open days a week Diner & Deli
or Eat out Take in
Grand Opening
7 Open
days a
week
Diner & Deli
BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER
Featuring our HOMEMADE
and POLISH Dinner Items
Weekday Breakfast Special!
1 Egg, Toast, 1 Coffee $1.99 Check out our
daily specials
Sun-Thurs 6am-8pm • Fri & Sat 6am-10pm • Rt 29 • Lake Silkworth • 477-3003
on Facebook

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

NEWS

Sunday, September 8, 2013 PAGE 13A

Ross Twp. shooting victim: ‘I was never afraid’

Recovering from her leg wounds, Linda Kozic recounts night she lost her soulmate

JENNA EBERSOLE

Pocono Record

STROUDSBURG — They planned to go out together for ice cream after the Ro ss To wnship municipal meeting a month ago. Linda and Jerry Kozic picked up their friend and neighbor, Vinny LaGuardia, on the way to the Ro ss To wnship build- ing. Jerry was looking to make a run for township supervisor in the fall, and the three decided they would return for LaGuardia’s wife to go out for frozen treats after- ward. But 20 minutes into the evening meeting, a gunman opened fire. The three were sitting in the back row when Linda said she thought the halo- gen lights began making a popping noise. Her husband told her it was gunfire and to get down. The shooting eventu- ally left LaGuardia and Jerry dead, along with Chestnuthill Township Supervisor Dave Fleetwood, and Linda clinging to life. Linda, who grew up in Wilkes-Barre, rested last week in a wheelchair under the shade of a large oak tree in the yard of the house she shared with Jerry. Her left leg, wrapped in layers over the place two inches below her knee where a bullet entered, sat propped on a bench. The gunshot shattered both large bones in her leg. Linda said talking through what happened is helping her now. She often smiled and laughed, brushing back her long blonde hair as she explained who her hus- band was and described their musical performanc- es together, sometimes with their dog Fritz, who could bark “Jingle Bells.” Even during the horror of the evening of Aug. 5, Linda said she was calm. “I was never afraid,” she said. “I just was at peace.” The gunman, identi- fied by police as Rockne Newell, entered through the main entrance to the building then briefly moved back into the park- ing lot. LaGuardia rushed toward a side door exit, with Jerry pushing Linda behind LaGuardia. “We were like rats in a maze. How do we get out?” Linda said. As LaGuardia was jumping down the steps toward the woods, the shooter aimed and fired. “Vinny was gone very quickly,” Linda said. As the gunman then began to turn the corner, Linda’s leg was exposed and she said she saw the bullet enter, fired from close range. Jerry tried to tie a tour- niquet when she told him she couldn’t move, but a woman approached and said she would sit on the wound to try to stop the bleeding. “There’s so many people who were instrumental in this,” she said, naming medics, nurses and doctors who helped save her life. The gunman then approached, Linda said. “There was nothing in his eyes. He was as complete- ly devoid of humanity as anything I’ve ever seen,” she said, comparing them to a zombie’s eyes on TV. Linda said she was propped on her elbows, believing that if she laid down she would succumb to death. A witness told her later that the shooter was aim- ing for her head when her husband stepped into the

wa s aim- ing for her head when her husband stepped into the AP photo Linda

AP photo

Linda Kozic, injured during a mass shooting at the Ross Twp. municipal meeting last month, talks about how the pain in her leg takes on different forms as she recovers at her home in Saylorsburg.

way and was shot. Linda said she knew immedi- ately when Jerry was shot that he was dead, though someone performed CPR. “I knew he was gone, but you keep hoping against hope,” she said. Linda said amid her extreme pain and loss of blood, she heard the struggle that brought the gunman down. Then she caught the sound of a familiar voice — Pocono Mountain Regional Police Chief Harry Lewis, who was en route home and had responded to the scene. “I knew I was going to be all right when I heard Harry,” she said, whom she knows through her side work in web design. Linda said she lost at least two liters of blood, though a first responder took her blood pressure as a miraculous 120/70. She said she knew the young medics were see- ing something no one should have to see, and she relied on her charac- teristic humor in bad sit- uations to crack jokes. “I said, ‘Dang it, I’m going to make it.’” Linda said her pain was over 20 on a scale of one to 10, and the next thing she asked for was mor- phine as responders put her into a helicopter for transport to the hospi- tal. “I can handle a lot of pain,” she said. “This is the kind of pain that can kill you.” Doctors performed a CAT scan to ensure she had been struck by no other bullets. She remem- bers the next few days hazily. She had four surgeries, including one for skin grafts on her leg that now has a permanent rod and plate in place. Family and friends surrounded her over the next two weeks in the hospital and con-

tinue to support her.

“They were

there the whole time,” Linda said.

“God bless them.”

She left the hospital Aug. 16 but continues to have her bandages changed every day as the risk of infection contin- ues. For now, she said, her routine is doctors, then it will be rehab and more doctors over an esti- mated 16-month recovery. But moving forward without her husband, the breadwinner for the cou- ple and love of her life, will be most difficult. “I miss my husband deeply, but I know he’s here,” she said. Linda and Jerry met in the 1980s and started as friends before becoming something more, marry- ing and performing in con- certs together for years. “Our hearts were never more than six feet apart,” she said, calling Jerry her soulmate. She said Jerry was run- ning for supervisor after becoming more inter- ested in politics and, like

after becoming more inter- ested in politics and, like 6:00 PM (7:00 PM dinner) Hilton Hotel
after becoming more inter- ested in politics and, like 6:00 PM (7:00 PM dinner) Hilton Hotel
after becoming more inter- ested in politics and, like 6:00 PM (7:00 PM dinner) Hilton Hotel
6:00 PM (7:00 PM dinner) Hilton Hotel 100 Adams Avenue Scranton, PA 18503
6:00 PM (7:00 PM dinner)
Hilton Hotel
100 Adams Avenue
Scranton, PA 18503

his sister, a supervisor in To byhanna Township, was someone who refused to be complacent. “They are doers,” Linda said. “They’re people that look out for the underdog.” Linda said she intends to walk into the court- room when the time

comes, even if it is with some assistance, but refuses to speak the name

of the shooter. Whether he receives

a death sentence or life

imprisonment, she said she knows the right thing will be done and he will never walk the streets again.

Linda’s family and friends have also orga- nized the Help Linda Kozic fund, which by Friday had raised more than $10,000 toward her medical bills. She wore one of the wristbands being sold as a fundraiser, and said she is most over- whelmed by the support. “There are just no words to say the depths of

my gratitude,” she said.

no wo rds to say the depths of my gratitude,” she said. www.edwardjones.com Add an Important
www.edwardjones.com Add an Important Item to Add an Important Itemto Your Back-to-School List. Your Back-
www.edwardjones.com
Add an Important Item to
Add an Important Itemto
Your Back-to-School List.
Your Back- to-school List.
For parents, back-to-school season means it’s time to stock
up on school supplies. But it can also be a good time to think
about how to save for your child’s future education.
Developing a strategy for achieving your education savings
goal – or other savings goals – can help you stay on track.
To learn more about your education savings options,
call or visit today.
Eileen S Kim, AAMS®
Eileen S Kim, AAMS®
Financial Advisor
Financial Advisor
.
.
3 Public Square
3 Public Square
Wilkes Barre, PA 18701
Wilkes Barre, PA 18701
570-270-4423
570-270-4423
Member SIPC
1-855-WASHME2 BEFORE AFTER WWW.APEXROOFCLEANING.COM BEFORE AFTER Soft Wash
1-855-WASHME2
BEFORE
AFTER
WWW.APEXROOFCLEANING.COM
BEFORE
AFTER
Soft Wash

80027742

PAGE 14A Sunday, September 8, 2013

OBITUARIES

www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

LI NDA L. GREY,

of Dallas, passed away Friday evening in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Arrangements are pending from the Nulton-Kopcza Funeral Home Inc., 5749 state Route 309, (Beaumont), Monroe Township.

DAVID J. ANTALL JR., 67, of Swoyersville, passed away on Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains.

MICHAEL MORIO, of Springdale, Ark., and former- ly of Wilkes-Barre, died Aug. 31, 2013, at home. Arrangements are being finalized by the Lehman Family Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a memorial service to be announced at a later date. For more information, visit the funeral home website at www. lehmanfuneralhome.com.

funerAls

AnGelellA - Magdalene, funeral Mass 11 a.m. Sept. 21 in Prince of Peace Parish, St. Mary’s Church, West Grace Street, Old Forge. Friends may call 10:30 a.m. until Mass. kozemko - Dolores, funeral 8:45 a.m. Monday at Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, 226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. neAre - Ray Sr., memorial Mass 9:30 a.m. Saturday in St. Joseph Marello Parish, 237 William St., Pittston. rhoAds - Dorene, memorial services 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28 in Trucksville United Methodist Church. Friends may call 10 a.m. to services. schydlowski - Glenys, funeral 8:45 a.m. Monday at Bednarski Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in Holy Savior Worship Site of St. Andre Bessette Parish, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. swArtz - Richard, memorial service 7 p.m. today at William A. Reese Funeral Chapel, Rear 56 Gaylord Ave., Plymouth. Friends may call 5 p.m. to service. tyson - Donald, service 7:30 p.m. Monday at Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home, 465 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 6 p.m. to service. wAll - Harold Jr., memorial service 4 p.m. today in Centermoreland United Methodist Church, 17 Creamery Road, Centermoreland. Friends may call 3 p.m. to service.

oBituAry

Policy

The Times Leader publishes free obituaries,

which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph.

A funeral home

representative can call the obituary desk at 570- 829-7224, send a fax to 570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.

If you fax or email, please

call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number.

ST. MARY’S

MONUMENT CO.

Monuments - Markers - Lettering 975 S. MAIN ST. HANOVER TWP.

(570) 829-8138

829-8138

NEXT TO SOLOMON’S CREEK

www.stmarysmonumentcompany.com

AnnA BArtnicki

Sept. 3, 2013

Anna Bartnicki, 89, of Exeter, died at the Riverstreet Manor, Wilkes-Barre, on Tuesday of complications fol- lowing multiple heart attacks. She would have been 90 on Nov. 20. Born to the late Michael “Johns” Chiampi and Antoinette Carpenter Chiampi, Anna was the only girl of seven children. She graduated from Exeter High School, man- aged a local drug store and met her late husband, Edward Bartnicki, immediately before he served his country during

Wo rl d Wa r II. Up on his re turn, they married in 1946 and became an example to many for the next 62 years of what mar- riage, love, loyalty and close- ness of family truly mean. Only after raising her fam- ily, Anna returned to work as

a manager for Leslie Fay. She

gave up all work outside the home to care for her mother and soon after that, her hus- band. This care-giving went on for decades, and Anna never voiced a complaint about her personal sacrifice. During this time, she survived open heart surgery and cancer yet did not miss a step upon returning home to continue her service to her family. Even after being stricken with severe arthritis, she struggled to remain active and continued her encourage- ment of those in her care. Anna possessed an unflinch-

ing faith and did not hesitate to teach that faith to others by her simple example of prayer and complete trust in God. She was

a magnet to many children who

frequented her home from their infancy into adulthood. She enjoyed sewing and became the neighborhood seamstress dur- ing her later years.

A person who respected

life in all forms, Anna reveled in her own pets and did much animal rescue through her life. She leaves behind her beloved parrot, “Mr. B,” in whom she delighted. Anna was an avid follower of current events and could engage in the details of poli- tics and world news with great enthusiasm. Although so much of her life was spent in her hometown, she was wise and intuitive, thus making her advice sought throughout her lifetime. Even at 89, she con- tinued her role as confidante

Even at 89, she con- tinued her role as confidante but to be her pallbearer in

but to be her pallbearer in full military uniform. Her influ- ence on the lives of so many is reflected in many instances such as this. Anna never sought anything more than to be a good wife and mother. In both those capaci- ties she was unsurpassed. Preceded in death by her

beloved husband, Edward, in 2007, by her parents and by her brothers, she is survived by her daughter and son-in- law, Gloria and Joel Riegel, of Exeter. Along with many nieces and nephews, she is survived by her step-grandson, Brett Riegel and his family, Michelle Brown, Rachel Brown and Aidan Riegel. She will be sorely missed by her daughter and son-in-law with whom she maintained the closest of relationships and also by her especially support- ive nephew, Edward Ciampi and his wife, Fran, of Old Forge. Anna’s life was celebrated privately by family and close friends at the Gubbiotti

Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter, on Saturday. The Mass of Christian Burial was offered by her cherished and close friend, the Rev. Paul McDonnell, O.S.J., in the

Chapel of the Oblates of St. Joseph Seminary. Interment was in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Pallbearers were Brett Riegel, Joseph Bartnicki, Wa lter Kalinowski, Kevin Rogers, Kyle Rogers and Jason Rynkiewicz. Special gratitude is offered to Dr. James Bruno who was very instrumental in her surviving open heart surgery and cancer more than a decade ago. His kindness, gentle understanding and unfailing responsiveness will never be forgotten. Any contributions in her

to

many. A tribute to Anna that

memory may be made to the

is

an example of how loved she

Oblates of St. Joseph in care of

was is that Jason Rynkiewicz,

Father Paul McDonnell, 1880

a former neighbor who visited

the Bartnicki home since his birth, took leave from his posi- tion at the Pentagon with the Navy to come home not only to pay his last respects to Anna

Highway 315, Pittston, PA

18640.

To send the family an ex pres- sion of sympathy or an online condolence, please visit www. gubbiottifh.com.

kenneth A. orkwis

Sept. 6, 2013

Kenneth A. Orkwis, 64, of We st Va ughn Street , Kingston, passed away Friday at Hospice Community Care, Wilkes-

Barre, to his battle with cancer. Born on Dec. 18, 1948, he was the son of the late Frank Orkwis and Georgianna Geipel Orkwis of Dallas. Kenneth graduated from Central Catholic High School

in 1966. He then served in the Marine Corps during the Vi etnam Wa r. He had been employed by the State Correctional Institution at Dallas, and then he was employed by SCI Retreat for 26 years, retiring in 2001.

He was a member at St.

Ignatius of Loyola Church, Kingston, and always attended the 7 a.m. Mass Sundays at St. Ann’s Chapel. He was a 4th Degree member of the Knights of Columbus Assumpta Council No. 3987, Our Lady of Czestochowa, Luzerne. Kenneth loved golfing, bowl- ing, fishing, horse racing and

his cat, Misty, and his grand- dog, Caesar. He loved his war movies, with his favorite line “Dear, will you shut up and drive.” Kenneth was preceded in death by his father, Frank; and his maternal and paternal

grandparents