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OIL FALLS: IS THE BUBBLEBURSTING? BUSINESS PAGE 11 TIMETABLETALK BUSH,IRAQ PM AGREE TO SET A

OIL FALLS: IS THE BUBBLEBURSTING?

BUSINESS PAGE 11

OIL FALLS: IS THE BUBBLEBURSTING? BUSINESS PAGE 11 TIMETABLETALK BUSH,IRAQ PM AGREE TO SET A WITHDRAWL

TIMETABLETALK

BUSH,IRAQ PM AGREE TO SET A WITHDRAWL WINDOW

WORLD PAGE 14

MCCAIN PLEDGES TO HELP AUTO INDUSTRY

NATION PAGE 47

PAGE 14 MCCAIN PLEDGES TO HELP AUTO INDUSTRY NATION PAGE 47 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008

Weekend July 19-20, 2008 Vol VIII, Edition 289

www.smdailyjournal.com

Murder suspect arrested

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Millbrae police arrested a 25- year-old murder suspect late Thursday in Redding where author- ities say he’d been staying since allegedly shooting his friend multi- ple times in the head and leaving the victim’s car and body in a residen- tial Burlingame neighborhood. Millbrae police and Redding

tial Burlingame neighborhood. Millbrae police and Redding Teyseer Zaid Najdawi SWAT members cers and ran back

Teyseer Zaid

Najdawi

SWAT members

cers and ran back inside but was eventually persuaded to surrender. Najdawi did not make a statement to police and was transferred back to San Mateo County by Friday morning. He will appear in court Monday afternoon on charges of murder and the use of a rearm in the July 8 death of Jack Chu. Chu, 27, of Millbrae, was found slumped in a car in a Burlingame neighborhood north of Broadway

early July 10. Police quickly con- nected the car in which Chu was found with a early morning shooting reported Tuesday in Millbrae. As first reported in the Daily Journal, Millbrae police received calls of a shooting at Lincoln Circle and reports of a person being pushed into a white car. Shortly after 9 a.m. Thursday, a woman found a dead body in a white car at the intersection of Chula Vista and

Sanchez avenues. The vehicle matched the description of the car seen at the Millbrae shooting. Chu reportedly had been in the driver’s seat when shot nearly a dozen times in the head. Authorities assume the shooter pushed Chu’s body aside and drove the car away. It is unclear when the car was left in Burlingame.

surrounded the

Redding

Inn

Thursday and

arrested Teyseer

“Terry”

Zaid

Najdawi without

incident.

Najdawi report-

edly

left

his

motel

room,

 
 

spotted the of-

See MURDER, Page 37

  spotted the of fi - See MURDER , Page 37 PETER MOOTZ A San Mateo

PETER MOOTZ

A San Mateo Fire Department firefighter removes burnt debris from a storage container that caught fire at Hillsdale High School in San Mateo, early Friday morning. The storage contained the high school drama department’s supplies.

Drama props, costumes burned

By Dana Yates

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Someone with a are for drama and destruction set ablaze a storage locker at San Mateo’s Hillsdale High School Friday, destroying the- ater props and costumes. A single re engine responded to the report of a smoking storage locker at 3100 Del Monte St. at approximately 5:48 a.m. Friday. Responding re ghters immediate- ly called for backup when they determined the contents of the 40- foot metal storage locker were fully engulfed, said San Mateo fire Battalion Chief Mike Borean.

“It’s definitely suspicious,” Borean said. The re started in a speci c loca- tion near the storage locker nowhere near a heat source. There was no signs of oily rags or similar combustibles near the lock- er. The re can’t be deemed an arson without investigators knowing speci cally how it started, but it’s clear it didn’t start by accident, Borean said. Borean estimates damages at $15,000. However, it’s hard to place a value on the many handmade props and costumes that were either burned or damaged by smoke, Borean said.

The storage locker was located on the southern side of the school near the auto shop and old softball eld. Firefighters immediately extin- guished the re, but remained on scene to remove items from the locker and ensure no additional

are-ups, Borean said. A custodian called 911 to report the re. He was on campus early along with construction workers developing the school’s new foot- ball eld, Borean said. Representatives from the school’s drama boosters were aware of the re, but were still in the process of gathering information about the damage as of yesterday afternoon.

Cargill Saltworks counter initiative could see ballot

Open space advocates call it unnecessary

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Changing the Redwood City char- ter to allow voters to decide only what is built at the Cargill Saltworks site is a “weak” alter- native to a broader pending ballot initiative which, if passed, requires a vote for all develop-

ment on open space, accord- ing to advocates of that proposal. The draft counter initiative com- ing before the City Council Tuesday night could give voters a say on the Cargill site — a possibility that typ-

voters a say on the Cargill site — a possibility that typ- Rosanne Foust ically only

Rosanne Foust

ically only happens with a voter ref- erendum and which ofcials believe is better than requiring an election for every development project. Proponents of the so-named Open

Space Vote — the measure for which the city is suggesting the counter initia- tive — argue the Cargill-specific alternative removes the “public’s right

to vote” on all development and claims their effort is sufcient. “There is no need for any other ballot measure,” said David Lewis,

no need for any other ballot measure,” said David Lewis, David Lewis See CARGILL , Page

David Lewis

See CARGILL, Page 37

Murderer pleads guilty

Jury to decide hospitalization or incarceration

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A 28-year-old man who fatally stabbed a San Bruno resident in broad daylight four years ago plead- ed guilty to second-degree murder and carjacking but a jury is left to decide if he is insane and should be hospitalized rather than incarcerat- ed. Brandon Louis Gill, of King City, has spent nearly two years in a state mental hospital after court-appoint-

two years in a state mental hospital after court-appoint- Brandon Gill ed doctors found him incompetent

Brandon Gill

ed doctors found him incompetent to stand trial for the death of Romero Lansang. In February, Napa State Hospital doctors found him mentally t

and sent him back to San Mateo County to face

See GILL, Page 37

Napa State Hospital doctors found him mentally fi t and sent him back to San Mateo
Napa State Hospital doctors found him mentally fi t and sent him back to San Mateo
Napa State Hospital doctors found him mentally fi t and sent him back to San Mateo
Napa State Hospital doctors found him mentally fi t and sent him back to San Mateo

2 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Quote of the Day

2008 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Quote of the Day “We’re not just hangers up

“We’re not just hangers up there, we don’t just sit and smile—even though that’s a common misperception.”

— former model Iman

“Not just a pretty face: Models get head for business,” see page 35

Local Weather Forecast

Saturday: Widespread low clouds and fog in the morning then mostly sunny. Highs in the 60s to 70s. Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming mostly sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 50s to upper 70s. Monday: Widespread low clouds and fog in the morning then mostly sunny. Highs in the mid 50s to upper 70s. Tuesday through Friday: Areas of low clouds and fog. Highs in the mid 50s to lower 80s. Lows in the 50s to lower 60s.

in the mid 50s to lower 80s. Lows in the 50s to lower 60s. Lotto July

Lotto

July 16 Super Lotto Plus 10 12 19 22
July 16 Super Lotto Plus
10
12
19
22
35 16 Mega number
35
16
Mega number

July 15 Mega Millions

19
19
24
24
34
34
45
45
51
51
40
40
 

Mega number

Fantasy Five

 
15
15
19
19
27
27
32
32
36
36
Daily 4 Lotto 0 7 0 3 Daily three midday 5 2 1
Daily 4 Lotto
0
7
0
3
Daily three midday
5
2
1
Daily three evening 3 2 8
Daily three evening
3
2
8

The Daily Derby winners are Money Bags, No. 11, in first place; Solid Gold, No. 10, in second place;and California Classic,No.5,in third place. The race was clocked at 1:43.56.3 Daily three midday 5 2 1 Daily three evening 3 2 8 State . .

third place. The race was clocked at 1:43.56. State . . . . . . .

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Publisher Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

Editor in Chief Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

Phone:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290

To

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Classieds:

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Events:

calendar@smdailyjournal.com

News:

news@smdailyjournal.com

Delivery:

circulation@smdailyjournal.com

Career:

info@smdailyjournal.com

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. SCEAT
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SCEAT
©2008 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
KAQUE
SCYTIK
www.jumble.com
NESSUC
Reserved. KAQUE SCYTIK www.jumble.com NESSUC “ ” A: TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion

A:

TO

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters
TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters
TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters
TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters
TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters
TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters
TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters
TO THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

Jumbles:

Answer:

by the above cartoon. Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get
by the above cartoon. Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get
by the above cartoon. Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get
by the above cartoon. Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get
by the above cartoon. Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get
by the above cartoon. Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get
by the above cartoon. Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get

(Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get without a lot of trouble — A LOT OF TROUBLE

Answer: (Answers Monday) ABOVE TOOTH PLURAL TARTAR Easy to get without a lot of trouble —

Snapshot

get without a lot of trouble — A LOT OF TROUBLE Snapshot REUTERS A boy jumps

REUTERS

A boy jumps into the Yangtze River to cool down in the Wuhan, Hubei

province of China.

Inside

to cool down in the Wuhan, Hubei province of China. Inside Agreement coming Not happy progress
to cool down in the Wuhan, Hubei province of China. Inside Agreement coming Not happy progress

Agreement

coming

Not

happy

progress

everyone

see

to

See page 27

Preparing

for battle

Bulldogs gear up for playoffs

See page 15

This Day in History

1848 On July 19, 1848, a pioneer women’s rights convention convened in Seneca Falls, N.Y.

In 1553, 15-year-old Lady Jane Grey was deposed as Queen of England after claiming the crown for nine days. King Henry

VIII’s daughter Mary was proclaimed Queen. In 1870, the Franco-Prussian war began. In 1943, allied air forces raided Rome during World War II.

In 1944, the Democratic National Convention convened in Chicago with the renomination of President Franklin D. Roosevelt considered a foregone certainty. In 1969, Apollo 11 and its astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins, went into orbit around the moon. In 1975, the Apollo and Soyuz space capsules that were linked in orbit for two days separated. In 1979, the Nicaraguan capital of Managua fell to Sandinista guerrillas, two days after President Anastasio Somoza had ed the country. In 1984, U.S. Rep. Geraldine A. Ferraro, D-N.Y., won the Democratic nomination for vice president by acclamation at the party’s convention in San Francisco. In 1989, 111 people were killed when a United Air Lines DC-10 crashed while making an emergency landing at Sioux City, Iowa; 185 other people survived. In 1993, President Clinton announced a policy allowing homosexuals to serve in the military under a compromise dubbed “don’t ask, don’t tell, don’t pursue.”

Thought for the Day

“I always turn to the sports page rst. The sports page records people’s accomplishments; the front page nothing but man’s failure.” — Earl Warren, Chief Justice of the United States (1891-1974).

Birthdays

Actor Pat Hingle is Movie director Actor Jared 84. Atom Egoyan is 48. Padalecki is
Actor Pat Hingle is Movie director Actor Jared 84. Atom Egoyan is 48. Padalecki is
Actor Pat Hingle is Movie director Actor Jared 84. Atom Egoyan is 48. Padalecki is

Actor Pat Hingle is

Movie director

Actor Jared

84.

Atom Egoyan is 48.

Padalecki is 26.

Former Sen. George McGovern is 86. Actress Helen Gallagher is 82. Country singer Sue Thompson is 82. Country singer George Hamilton IV is 71. Actor Dennis Cole is 68. Singer Vikki Carr is 67. Country singer-musician Commander Cody is 64. Actor George Dzundza is 63. Rock singer-musician Alan Gorrie is 62. Rock musician Brian May is 61. Rock musician Bernie Leadon is 61. Actress Beverly Archer is 60. Movie director Abel Ferrara is 57. Actor Peter Barton is 52. Rock musician Kevin Haskins is 48. Actor Campbell Scott is 47. Actor Anthony Edwards is 46. Country singer Kelly Shiver is 45. Actress Clea Lewis is 43.

Country singer Kelly Shiver is 45. Actress Clea Lewis is 43. Scolionophobia is a fear of

Scolionophobia is a fear of school. *** Iconic author Norman Mailer (1923- 2007) stabbed his wife at a party in their Manhattan home in 1960. The knife nar- rowly missed her heart, but she recov- ered and did not press charges. *** The lifespan of a amingo is 25 years on average in the wild. In captivity,

amingos can live as long as 50 years. ***

In the United States, Arizona has the highest number of high school dropouts, followed by Nevada, then Colorado. *** Do you remember which young lover

in “Romeo and Juliet” (1595) was the

rst to die? Do you remember how they

each brought on their own deaths? See answer at end.

*** When Edmund McIlhenny (1815-

1890) first started bottling Tabasco Sauce for his friends and family he used discarded cologne bottles. In 1868, when he started selling the spicy sauce to the public, he bottled it in new cologne bottles.

*** Secret brand deodorant added new scents to their product line in 2001 called Ambition, Genuine and Optimism. ***

Judy Blume is one of the most banned children’s authors in America. Her c- tion books for young adults, such as “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret” (1970) and “Forever” (1975), treat ado- lescence realistically and frankly discuss teenage sexuality. ***

One of the requirements to become a Rockette is height — a potential chorus line dancer must be between 5’6” and

5’10.” The 36 women that perform in the chorus line all look the same height; an illusion made by putting the tallest dancer in the center of the line and decreasing the height with the shortest women at either end. *** In the song “A Bicycle Built for Two”

(1892), written by Harry Dacre (1860- 1922), Henry asks Daisy to marry him but he can’t afford a carriage for the marriage so they will need to ride a bicycle built for two. She says no. ***

Russian ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov (born 1948) defected from Russia to the United States in 1974. *** At an average of 10 to 12 feet long the King Cobra is the largest venomous snake in the world. It is also the only snake that builds a nest for their eggs. *** Traditional Japanese haiku poetry has three lines of lyric verse that do not rhyme. The rst and third lines have ve syllables each, the second line has seven syllables.

*** The world’s rst atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima in 1945 by a plane called the Enola Gay. The pilot Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr. (born 1915) named the plane after his mother Enola Gay Tibbets (1893–1983). *** Answer: Romeo. He thought that Juliet was dead so he killed himself by drinking poison. His last words were “O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.” Juliet, upon see- ing Romeo dead, stabs herself with his dagger. Her last words were “This is thy sheath; there rest, and let me die.”

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the weekend and Wednesday editions of the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? E- mail knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-5200 x114.

Wednesday editions of the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? E- mail knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-5200 x114.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

3

Something for everybody at Festa Italiana

By Michael Erler

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Stop the presses! Parking will be hard to find in downtown San Mateo this upcom- ing Sunday; surely a staggering development to all who live and work in the area. OK, so Second Avenue will be congested, like always. However, for once, there will be a worth- while reason, as the 22nd annual Festa Italiana street fair once again returns to San Mateo, begin- ning at 10 a.m. and lasting until 6 p.m. One of the most popular annual events in San Mateo, the community street fair provides people of all ages the opportunity to shop for art and handmade goods in over 200 arts and crafts booths, sample Italian cuisine and barbecue, listen to live music from local bands such as The Refugees, San Franz and The Rodeo Clowns; and marvel at the annual chalk art gallery. The street fair, which is organ- ized by the Festa Foundation, will feature booths from all manner of vendors and folks will be also be able to taste the fare from Pasta Primavera, meat from B Street Rotisserie, steak sandwiches from the San Mateo Elk’s Lodge, barbe- cue from the San Mateo Kiwanis Club and hot dogs grilled up by San Mateo firefighters who’ve proudly served as volunteers for Festa Italiana in the city for 15 years. Pat Giosso, who has been affili- ated with Special Needs for over 40 years and serves on the Festa

with Special Needs for over 40 years and serves on the Festa FILE PHOTO Festa Italiana

FILE PHOTO

Festa Italiana features a sidewalk full of chalk drawings.

Foundation Board of Directors, explained why the festival is the ultimate summer win-win. While there will be a seemingly endless

arsenal of sights, sounds and smells to entertain one and all, it’s important to have perspective on why hundreds of volunteers

donate their time and effort to put it on in the first place. “The Festa Foundation was established five years ago. The foundation was set up to support different Bay Area groups that support adults and children with developmental disabilities like autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and other neuro- logical diseases. All proceeds will benefit the Festa Foundation and everyone working there will be a volunteer,” she said. The Festa Foundation funds numerous services for needy fam- ilies, including providing afford- able housing, independence train- ing for adults, childcare, support groups for families, playground equipment and children for chil- dren, medical expenses or in-home care for the sick and new clothes for job seekers. The foundation hosts several charity events in the Bay Area every year, such as the Festa Golf Tournament, held at the San Francisco Olympic Club, site of the 1998 U.S. Open, the Giro di Peninsula, a fully-supported bicy- cle ride with a lunch and raffle at Bay Meadows race track in San Mateo, and the Bella Sera Wine Event at the Peninsula Italian American Social Club in San Mateo. However their biggest money raiser is the street fair, where last year’s event drew more than 50,000 participants. Giosso was particularly excited about this year’s lineup of musical acts and vendors and promised that the festival would provide an afternoon of fun to one and all and

that anyone who decides to make a day of it will not be sorry. “It’s a community street fair, a family event. We’ll offer music, performing arts, a Bocce Ball tournament, a classic car show, arts and crafts, and food and bev- erages for sale,” she listed cheer- fully, before adding that, “There will be three stages for music, and a medal presentation for the Bocce Ball tournament at two o’clock, where San Mateo Mayor Carole Groom will give medals to the winners. People can sign up to sponsor an athlete for $250, which is all going to go toward the cost of putting on the event. We’ll also have a car show with over 60 clas- sic cars lined up on 1st Avenue and on the Trag’s grocery store parking lot.” Admission to the street fair will be free and open to everyone, but no outside food or beverages can be brought in and pets will not be allowed. In addition to proceeds from sales and sponsorships, there will be a booth set up where people will be able to learn more about the charitable works of the Festa Foundation and donate money directly. The street fair will start at 10 a.m. with a parade that will travel down B Street to the main stage in front of the Peninsula Italian American Social Club. More information about the street fair and the Festa Foundation itself can be found on its Web site, www.festafounda- tion.org .

Obituary

Elizabeth June Friley

Elizabeth June Friley, late of Millbrae and San Mateo County resident for 15 years, died at her home after an eight-year valiant strug- gle with breast cancer. She was the beloved wife of Steven Friley and loving mother of Madison and Adara Friley. She was the cherished daughter of John Stephens and Danna Grochol and dear sister of John Eldon Stephens II. She is also sur- vived by her many family members and friends who loved her dearly.

by her many family members and friends who loved her dearly. at Vandenberg Air Force Base,

at

Vandenberg Air Force Base,

California, age 46 years. A Celebration of Life Service will be on Saturday, July 19, 2008 beginning at 1 p.m. at Calvary Chapel, Bayview Building, 2121 South El Camino Real, Suite 200,

San Mateo, Calif. 94403. Her family appreciates donations to a special fund for her daughter Madison: The Madison Friley Fund, C/o First National Bank, 1551 El Camino Real, Millbrae, CA 94030.

Elizabeth Friley

She

was

born

Police reports

Hot seat

A men’s toilet was lit on re on the 4000 block of Casanova Drive in San Mateo before 9:52 p.m. Thursday, July 17.

SAN MATEO

Disturbance. Two men were punching each other along the train tracks on the rst block of North B Street before 9:31 p.m. Thursday, July 17. Found property. $250 was found in a parking lot on the 100 block of De Anza Boulevard before 4:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 16. Theft. A laptop was stolen from a vehicle on the 1900 block of Alameda de las Pulgas before 5:16 p.m. Wednesday, July 16. Residential vandalism. A large metal frog was thrown through the front window of a res- idence on the 1600 block of Marina Court before 1:20 a.m. Tuesday, July 15. Animal complaint. A residence on the 100 block of Prague Street was reported to be

housing roosters before 1:27 p.m. Tuesday, July 15.

MENLO PARK

Fraud. A female on the unit block of Gloria Court reported someone fraudulently cashed one of her checks before 10:40 a.m. Tuesday, July 8. Suspicious person. A suspicious male on the 700 block of Santa Cruz Avenue possibly attempted to take property before 12:01 a.m. Tuesday, July 8.

BURLINGAME

Unwanted subject. A man asked for money, urinated on a building, and refused to leave on the 1400 block of Howard Avenue before 3:19 p.m. Wednesday, July 16. Fireworks violation. A man was throwing

reworks into a canyon on the 3000 block of

Arguello Road before 6:43 p.m. Wednesday, July 16. Threats. A threatening note was left on the windshield of a purple Honda on the 1000 block of El Camino Real before 8:17 p.m. Wednesday, July 16.

note was left on the windshield of a purple Honda on the 1000 block of El
note was left on the windshield of a purple Honda on the 1000 block of El

4

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

THE DAILY JOURNAL

4 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 THE DAILY JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

5

Local briefs

Gang member gets six years prison for teen rape

A 26-year-old gang member accused of inebriating and rap-

ing a 13-year-old girl at a Menlo Park party last summer plead- ed no contest to forcible sexual penetration was sentenced Friday to six years prison. Jose Martin Lopez has approximately four years left of the sentence with credit for time served. Sexual assault convicts must serve 85 percent of the term before being eligible for parole. Lopez pleaded no contest in April after the court trimmed the eight-year maximum sought by the District Attorney’s Ofce down to a six-year cap.

n return for the no contest plea, prosecutors also dropped

other sexual assault charges. According to the District Attorney’s Ofce, on June 29, 2007, the victim and a friend went to the party in Menlo Park at the urging of a third friend. At the party, the girl reportedly

began drinking and Lopez continued pouring her drinks until she was woozy.

Former dispatcher guilty of theft

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The former San Carlos police dispatcher accused of using

credits cards stolen from friends on a shop- ping spree of meals, medicine, spa treat- ments, clothing and room service pleaded no contest to two felonies in return for no prison and a possible sentence of residen- tial treatment. Carolyn Jean Crowley, 37, changed her plea to no contest on one count of felony identity theft and one count felony burgla- ry. Prosecutors dismissed other charges of felony grand theft and second-degree bur-

glary and agreed not to seek prison. Crowley faces up to a year in jail when sentenced Aug. 19 but the court has the discretion to consider a residential treatment program instead.

to consider a residential treatment program instead. Carolyn Crowley If tried and convicted of the original

Carolyn

Crowley

If tried and convicted of the original charges, Crowley faced up to 58 months in prison. According to the District Attorney’s Ofce, Crowley called several friends for help after becoming addicted to drugs. The friends allowed Crowley to stay at their homes for a few days each. Prosecutors claim Crowley stole credit cards before leaving each friend’s home and used them for 20 unauthorized pur- chases, including stays at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu of $300,00 bail.

Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu
Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu
Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu
Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu
Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu
Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu
Crowne Plaza Hotel in Foster City, prescription medicine and meals. Crowley remains in custody in lieu

6 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

6 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL The “My School is Cool” pro-

The “My School is Cool” pro- gram is a special,

community-

driven pro- gram com- mitted to building relationships with local schools by providing cash incentives to them, while enticing shoppers to shop at The Shops at Tanforan. Participating schools earn rewards for their school based on the receipts from Tanforan, school involvement in community goodwill and opportunities for extra credit. Marci Revelo, a Lomita Park School par- ent, began this yearlong commitment last August by registering the school as a partici- pant. The PTA, under the direction, dedication and creativity of Revelo, organized a school and community effort to collect receipts to earn points for a quarterly award of $500 and a cumulative award of $500 to $10,000. With the support of the entire Millbrae School District — Green Hills, Meadows, Spring Valley, Taylor and Mills High and

schools, the District Ofce and many family and friends — Lomita Park School was awarded the $10,000 rst prize. The school plans to use the much-needed funds to purchase new technology and inves- tigate the possibility of adding a new comput- er based math program to its curriculum. Lomita Park will also make a donation to the Millbrae Schools Foundation to benet all students within the district. *** One hundred and fty San Mateo County children will go on a private shopping spree Saturday courtesy of Mervyn’s stores and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

Mervyn’s stores and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul . Lomita Park Elementary School earned

Lomita Park Elementary School earned $10,000 through The Shops at Tanforan’s ‘My School is Cool’program.

Accompanied by SVdP volunteers, each of these underprivileged children will go on a $100 back-to-school shopping spree for new clothes and shoes — a childhood tradition their families would otherwise not be able to afford in these difcult economic times. The children will each receive backpacks outfitted with school supplies thanks to Mervyn’s team members. They will also be treated to a carnival with popcorn, cotton candy and receive hand decorated T-shirts. Shopping sprees will be taking place from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Mervyn’s at the Serramonte Shopping Center and the Millbrae location. *** Freedom Alliance is extending the applica- tion deadline for its Freedom Alliance Scholarship Fund in hopes of providing schol- arships to as many students as possible. To be eligible, an applicant must be the

dependent son or daughter of a U.S. soldier, sailor, airman, Marine or Guardsman, who was killed or permanently disabled as a result of an operational mission or training accident, or who is currently classi ed as a prisoner of war or missing in action. The student must also be a high school senior, high school graduate or registered as a full time under- graduate student and under the age of 26. For more information, and to apply, visit www.fascholarship.com or call (800) 475- 6620. The deadline is Aug. 1. *** The Sequoia High School Alumni Association is hosting its second annual pic- nic on Saturday, Aug. 16 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the Sequoia campus, 1201 Brewster Ave. in Redwood City. Alumni, their friends and family, past and current teachers, staff and administrators, students and their parents,

school -afliated groups and the general pub- lic are invited. Funds raised benet the associ- ation, which in turn helps support the students and the school with grants, scholarships and funding for programs and projects beneting the school. “Celebrate Sequoia: Remember the Past Look to the Future,” is the theme. Attendees will look forward to a delicious barbecue lunch, music, a tour of campus, a performance by the Sequoia cheerleaders, meeting old friends and more. “Golden Grads,” those celebrating their 50th anniver- sary of graduating from Sequoia, will be hon- ored. Purple Patriot Awards will be present- ed to Principal Morgan Marchbanks and retiring math teacher Wilma Hoffman for their outstanding service providing signicant benet to Sequoia. The cost is $25 early and $30 the day of the even. Children 10 and under are $15. Tickets should be reserved by Aug. 5. Make checks payable to SHSAA and mail to: Celebrate Sequoia c/o Sally Newman, 106 Iris St., Redwood City, CA, 94062. If an alumni, note your graduation year, spouse’s name, and, if alumna, note your maiden name *** Nationally renowned art therapist and watercolorist, Cay Drachnik, will display her latest work alongside the creations of NDNU art therapy students, faculty and alumni at the university’s “Annual Art and Art Therapy Exhibit,” through Aug. 8 at the Wiegand Gallery located on the Notre Dame de Namur University campus at 1500 Ralston Ave. in Belmont. Free. Gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. For more information e-mail arttherapy@ndnu.edu or call 508-3556.

Class notes is a weekly column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.

by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at

THE DAILY JOURNAL

FAMILY

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

7

Enjoy fun time with mom, dad or your favorite grown-up. The across clues are for
Enjoy fun time with mom, dad or your favorite grown-up. The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for adults.
It’s All White With Me
Kids Across
12.
White dairy drink that
2.
1.
Tiny white cereal-
builds strong bones
Grain that goes great
with gumbo
sweetening crystals
13.
White stuff sprinkled
4.
3.
President’s place: The
White
to keep a baby’s
bottom dry
E.B. White’s mouse
tale (2 wds)
6.
Windy home of the
5.
Frozen skating
14.
rink
What 5A becomes as
the weather gets
White Sox
surface:
7.
6.
Giant white puffs in
the sky
warm
The Ugly Duckling,
post-transformation
This Week’s Solution
16.
White bird that gives a
8.
8.
Detergent’s helper
that makes white
clothes brighter
“hoot”: snowy
“Great White”
boulevard
17.
What a hen lays
9.
Swirling snow
18.
Fluffy white animal a
13.
Fax machine filler
10.
Soft white balls you
might find in a
doctor’s office
magician pulls out of
his hat
14.
Disney, who filmed
“Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs”
11.
Favorite flavor of
many ice cream
lovers
Parents Down
1. Bernaise, bechamel
and mornay
15.
Dust-buster used
before the white glove
test
kris@kapd.com
7/20/08
© 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by
Tribune Media Services, Inc.
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,
the white glove test kris@kapd.com 7/20/08 © 2008 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services,

8 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

8 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Sales tax favored but ballot date

Sales tax favored but ballot date unclear

San Carlos voters will likely be asked to pass a half-cent sales tax aimed at raising $3 million annually for 10 years and preventing an equal amount of cuts to critical city serv- ices like police, re and parks. The unknown is if the question will be posed on the November bal- lot or in 2009. Revenue measures for general purposes, like the one proposed, can be passed with a majority vote only if held during an election in which councilmembers are up for re-election. Otherwise, a

two-thirds majority is needed for approval. Councilman Matt Grocott made no secret he would not support a s- cal emergency declaration, throwing into question whether the city can act sooner rather than later. The estimated $3 million per year generated by a sales tax would let the city avoid a projected $1.3 mil- lion in cuts in 2009-2010 and $1.45 million in cuts the following scal year. The funds would also enable the city to restore $1 million each year to the general capital projects fund. The city could raise the same amount of money through a 5 per- cent utility users tax — levied on telecom, electricity, gas and cable TV services — but the community survey showed much less support than for the sales tax proposal. The survey showed that 66 percent sup-

ported a sales tax measure with a 10-year sunset compared to 54 per- cent for the utility users tax.

School district in favor of parcel tax

A $78 annual parcel tax could go before voters in the Belmont- Redwood Shores Elementary School District after a survey found strong support for a second levy. Talks of a parcel tax began within the district in May resulting in an opinion poll, the results of which will be shared with the Board of Trustees during a special meeting tonight. A $78 annual parcel tax lasting under nine years generated the best support, according to a study done by Godbe Research. A tax was supported by 72 percent of the 450 polled — with 69 percent supporting a nine-year period and

78 percent in favor of a ve-year duration. Such a measure would require a two-thirds yes vote to pass. Voters were given 16 potential programs to be funded by tax-gener- ated revenue and asked which would make them more likely to support the measure. Maintaining math and science programs; retain- ing teachers; enhancing math and writing instruction; maintaining small math classes; keeping music programs; retaining reading special- ists; maintaining special education assistance; and upgrading and sup- porting technology gained the most support.

Auto shop owners banned from work

The auto body repair shop owner accused, along with her husband, of

defrauding car owners and insur- ance companies by faking rodent damage is banned from conducting any auto-related business and must inform any future employers in the industry of the charges. The state Attorney General’s Office sought the prohibition against Bita Imani, 35, and her hus- band, Mehran Baranriz, 45. Both were ordered back to court Nov. 3 for a preliminary hearing with a two-week estimate. During that time, according to the ban, the cou- ple cannot perform any auto repairs or be involved in any auto-related Imani has no problem with the order because the business has already been shut down, said her defense attorney, Geoff Carr. The couple owns and operates Group Specialist in Redwood City, an auto body shop specializing in Mercedes and BMW vehicles.

couple owns and operates Group Specialist in Redwood City, an auto body shop specializing in Mercedes
couple owns and operates Group Specialist in Redwood City, an auto body shop specializing in Mercedes
couple owns and operates Group Specialist in Redwood City, an auto body shop specializing in Mercedes
couple owns and operates Group Specialist in Redwood City, an auto body shop specializing in Mercedes
couple owns and operates Group Specialist in Redwood City, an auto body shop specializing in Mercedes
couple owns and operates Group Specialist in Redwood City, an auto body shop specializing in Mercedes

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

9

Kreitman’s confusion

M r. Don Havis wrote a perceptive “letter to the editor” about my col-

umn of July 12, “The American Centurions.” But what appeared to him that I’m “confused” is more that I have very mixed emotions about the Iraq incursion. He revealed the horns of my dilemma. First, I wish to make it clear that from the outset I was dead against the Iraq operation, not out of sym- pathy for that S.O.B. Saddam Hussein, but for humane reasons regarding the lives and welfare of

our American troops.

I was convinced there would ulti-

mately be, and did turn out to be, a slaughter and crippling of our troops if we lingered after deposing Saddam and continued to imbed them in such a hostile environment

of hundreds of millions of Muslims. But, then, the administra- tion led me to believe there would be a quick and convenient exit. Less emotionally, I began to reconsider the situation and came to realize that, largely because of

the absence of any realistic energy planning for the weaning off of imported oil by any U.S. adminis- tration, Democratic or Republican, this had really become a matter of national interest and security. So I began looking at the poten- tial consequences if we do not remain and became very torn between morality, legality and “realpolitic.”

I was beaten up by reader criti-

cism when I applauded Bush, the father, Jim Baker and Colin Powell for not getting sucked into going after Saddam Hussein after the rout of Iraq troops in Kuwait during the Persian Gulf War. They perceived accurately that deposing Saddam and breaking up his military would result in the worst possible conse- quence, that Iran, the remaining major power in the area, and with three times the population of Iraq, would move into vacuum and threaten to control the entire Middle Eastern pool of oil. At that time, knocking off Saddam was looked upon as not such a good idea. Then during the Bush, the son’s administration, it began to look like a good idea, but for different rea- sons. But, it was the “Bush league” fashion with which it was handled that created the confusion that still haunts the dialogue and debate over our remaining presence. Instead of some sort of candor, it chose to justify the invasion by

Less emotionally, I began to reconsider the situation and came to realize that, largely because of the absence of any realistic energy planning for the weaning off of imported oil by any U.S. administration, Democratic or Republican, this had really become a matter of national interest and security.

lying, lying and lying: The 9/11 incident, which for seven years I have argued would not likely occur

again, the weapons of mass destruction lie, invoking a “war on terrorism” while striking at the least likely home for the al Quida organization in the Middle East and stirring up the absurd myth that there is a viable Muslim Jihad in action which, even if true, has no more chance for success than the survival of a snowball in hell. What these lies did accomplish is to obscure the true issue and lead to endless debates and comments about the obvious the deceptions and legality of the incursion, which, unfortunately, included me. However, these lies did get them carte blanche to operate and multi- billions of dollars to do what they really intended to do in the rst place, create a permanent presence on Iraqi soil. It had become clear, the adminis- tration, and now John McCain, has

no intention of leaving Iraq, ever. The proof was so obvious. In 2005, I met a battalion commander who told me he had already been assigned for a tour in 2009 and then 2011 and although it has been widely reported we have been building permanent bases in Iraq, almost no one knows that the United States has just nished building in this small land the largest embassy in the world, almost the size of the Vatican, a walled fortress complete with apartment housing, full shopping and city amenities at the cost of $750 million. And collaterally, the indictments for the billions of dollars of corrup- tion by the civilian contractors engaged by this administration will be mounting and, likely, swamp a new Department of Justice, if we can just get the current one out of ofce. But, since our administrations continue to drop the ball on alter- nate energy, I began looking for realistic, alternative options.

This administration’s naïve con-

ceit in the long run, perhaps even in the short run, is it may be deceiving itself. We may not even

have the “stay” option at all.

all, the peoples and tribes of Iran and Iraq have been neighbors for over a thousand years and Iraq surely realizes that after the U.S. troops depart, whenever that is, their combined hundred million will still be neighbors, needing to

deal with each other for, perhaps, another thousand years. So, how long could one believe we would continue to be welcome to remain after that reality begins to sink in, even if couched in the unlikely pos- sibility that Iraq would develop into

a western style democracy? This country may be paying a heavy price for those two “oil cow- boys” having been twice able to be elected to control our foreign poli- cy and divert our “national des- tiny.” And if removed from Iraq, the only dependable ally we have going in the Middle East is Israel in a setting of oil producers who, like leaches, are bursting at the seams from the blood money they are sucking from the wealthy industrial countries of the world. Economists are calling this phe- nomenon the greatest transference of the world’s wealth in history. So, I do sometimes need to stie

a chuckle when I read and listen to

After

the nit-picking, endless debate about our government’s support of Israel, as if there is a choice. I will state atly, If there was no so-called Jewish lobby, Israel was being proven of human rights vio- lations and every man, woman and child and Administration ofcial in our country was anti-Semitic and not fond of Israel, the U. S. would still need to support and prop up Israel, because, except for our air- craft carrier eets and nuclear sub- marines, in the current competition for oil among the emerging powers of the world, that is all we can depend upon to accommodate our

Letters to the editor

Leave fate to the jury

Editor,

I wanted to respond to Michael

R. Oberg’s letter “Appreciating the right of free speech” in the Wednesday July 16 edition of the Daily Journal as follows: Mr. Oberg should not believe every- thing he reads in the newspapers. Although usually accurate, the reporters do not often get the story completely correct. Maybe Mr. Oberg should leave Mr. Burns’ fate in this case to the jury and hopeful- ly Mr. Oberg will nd something more productive to do with his life.

Donald L. Galine, Esq. San Mateo

Mistaken Omer accounts

Editor,

I have just done a search on the

New York Times site for Mohammed Omer, and there is no

article about him within the last 90

days. I Googled him and went to his various sites and did not nd any detailing of his supposed suf- fering at the hands of Israeli border guards. I have read on other sites that he has some illness when he was coming through the border and was treated by emits. The main point that I am conveying is that nothing justies the wonton ram- page by the tractor driver in Jerusalem. Terrorism is evil. Israel does not occupy either Gaza or the West Bank. Why don’t we hear proposals for development, medical care, better schools, agricultural production instead of rabid calls for the destruction of a neighboring state.

Jon Levinson

San Carlos

Noble purposes behind graphic posters

Editor, In response to Lash Stevenson’s letter in the July 2 edition of the Daily Journal:

As usual, his letter was negative and very judgmental. He starts off by saying that Planned Parenthood is an important part of any commu- nity. Yes, it would be if it did not provide abortion, the killing of tiny, innocent and defenseless babies who have the God-given right to life. Then he says that Ross is only doing his negative display for his own ego. No Lash, I am only dis- playing the reality and truth about the cruel, violent and sub-human act of abortion. Lash, I assure you that display- ing my graphic posters at the abor- tion clinic have not been negative, but positive. I have had a number

have not been negative, but positive. I have had a number troops on land and leverage

troops on land and leverage our military power in Middle East. Of course, this is not the idealism for which we yearn. This is the real world. This is “realpolitik.” At this point in our history, without oil our nation would grind to a halt. So, no! I’m not confused, Mr. Havis. I’m pretty clear-headed about the mess our national leader- ship has let us slip into. Oil from Alaska? Forget it. It would need to be brought to the mainland through 900 miles of rusted old pipes, mostly above ground and incredibly vulnerable to continuous sabotage. There have already been cases where a drunk- en Canadian farmer shot a hole in the line unintentionally and another

man was caught as he was prepar-

ing to blow up the pipeline at dif- ferent points in order cash in on oil futures. It would be nothing for ter- rorists to be own onto the frozen tundra to cut off that lifeblood. From the coastal waters? Just wait until one well blows and cor- rupts hundreds of miles of coastline and priceless ecological sites and costs billions of dollars to clean up. Open more wells in the United States? My son, who is in research and development with Shell Oil and conrmed by other responsible analysts in oil tells me that bring- ing it up would cost more for that it could be sold. Assured oil supply from Russia? Dream on.

How much oil do you think we will get from Chavez of Venezuela who, even if he liked us, would have the benet of a bidding war from other oil thirsty lands of the world? So, you see, what I have is not “confusion” Mr. Havis, but mixed emotions about the good, the bad and the ugly. What I don’t have is an answer, moral, legal or strategic. Suggestions welcomed!

Keith Kreitman has been a Foster City resident for 22 years. His col- umn runs in the weekend edition.

of women came back to me many years later, with their babies, thanking me and telling me that it was because of the graphic posters that made them change their minds about having an abortion. Also, I have had a number of women stop at the clinic and tell me that if they had seen my graphic posters, they would not have had an abortion. Lastly, I have been doing pro-life work for 18 years for only noble purposes. I go to the abortion clin- ic, for a charitable service at my own expense and time, to inform, educate and counsel women, who are not fully informed about the negative affects of abortion: The physical, psychological and emo- tional health factors that include breast, liver and cervical cancer, heart attacks, blood clots and even death.

Ross Foti

Belmont

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10 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Satellite radio saga takes a Sirius turn

By John Dunbar

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — During his tenure at the Federal Communications Commission,

Jonathan Adelstein has been a erce critic of government policies that allow big media companies to get bigger. So it came as a surprise when the Democratic commissioner put forth

a proposal that would allow the

nation’s only two satellite radio companies to merge. Adelstein, the potential deciding vote, told the Associated Press on Thursday that he would support

Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.’s $3.1 bil- lion buyout of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. if the companies agree to a six-year price cap and make one-quarter of their satellite capacity available for public interest and minority programming, plus other conditions. It may be that the commissioner, a seasoned political operator who spent 15 years as a Senate staffer, recognized a limited window of

opportunity. Thus far, two of the five mem- bers of the commission have voted to approve the satellite radio deal, one vote shy of a majority. All eyes have been on Republican

Deborah Taylor Tate, who is expected ultimately to vote in favor of the deal, but as a friend to the broadcast industry that oppos- es it, has been under intense pres- sure to reject it. Her reluctance to cast the decid- ing vote created an opportunity for Adelstein to extract further condi- tions from the companies. “It’s critical that if we’re going to allow a monopoly, that we put in adequate consumer protections and make sure they’re enforced,” Adelstein told the AP on Thursday. Adelstein is seeking stronger con- cessions than the companies offered

voluntarily one month ago. That offer led to FCC Chairman Kevin Martin’s recommendation that the deal be approved. Robert McDowell, also a Republican, has voted in favor, too. Democrat Michael Copps is expected to be a “no” vote. Commissioners are able to vote on items “on circulation,” meaning by way of computer, rather than at a public meeting. Those votes are generally not made public until all have been cast. Following Adelstein’s offer, Martin, Tate and both companies all declined to respond to requests for comment.

California unemployment rate rises to 6.9 percent

By Elliot Spagat

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — California’s unemployment rate reached 6.9 per- cent in June, matching its highest

level in nearly ve years as job loss-

es spread across the economy, state

ofcials said Friday. The June gure represents a small increase from 6.8 percent in May but a signi cant jump from 5.3 per-

cent in June 2007, the Employment Development Department said. The numbers indicate that weak consumer spending is emerging as the major drag on employment, wrote Stephen Levy, senior econo- mist for the Center for Continuing

Study of the California Economy. Rising energy prices and sharp losses in home and stock values — along with the deteriorating jobs picture — indicates California has

entered a mild recession, he said. As an example of retail weakness, he noted that 88 of the roughly 600 stores that Starbucks Corp. plans to close are in California. The state’s jobless rate has increased 1.2 percentage points since February to approach its high- est level since November 1996, when it hit 7 percent. It last stood at 6.9 percent in October 2003. The number of Californians look-

ing for work approached 1.28 mil- lion last month, up 19,000 from May and up 310,000 from June 2007. Some 473,400 people had been laid off, while 103,900 left their jobs voluntarily. The rest were either temporarily employed or new job seekers. More than 15.1 million people in California held payroll jobs last month. Total employment topped 18.4 million.

Sunday news shows

Ch. 7 ABC’s “This Week” — Pre- empted by coverage of the British Open golf tournament. 8 a.m.

*** Ch. 5 CBS’“Face the Nation” — Treasury Secretary Henry Paul- son.8:30 a.m. ***

Ch. 11 NBC’s “Meet the Press”— Former Vice President Al Gore.8 a.m.

“Late

Secretary of

Con-

*** CNN’s

Edition”

State

doleezza

Rice;

of Con- * * * CNN’s Edition” State doleezza Rice; Condoleezza Rice House Speaker Nancy Pelosi,

Condoleezza

Rice

House

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.; Rep. Roy Blunt, R- Mo.;Paulson. 3 p.m.

*** Ch.2“Fox News Sunday”— Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Sens. Joe Lieberman, I-Conn., and Evan Bayh, D-Ind. Earl Morse, founder of Honor Flight,a program of free flights for World War II veterans.8 am.

program of free flights for World War II veterans.8 am. Houses of Prayer Houses of Prayer

Houses of Prayer

Houses of Prayer

War II veterans.8 am. Houses of Prayer Houses of Prayer Baptist PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH Dr. Larry

Baptist

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor (650) 343-5415 217 North Grant Street, San Mateo

Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am Sunday School at 9:30 am

Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org

LISTEN TO OUR RADIO BROADCAST! (KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial) Every Sunday at 5:30 PM

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH

Rev. Lonnie R. Wallace, Pastor

(650)343-4610

27 S. Fremont St. San Mateo, CA 94401 Sunday Worship Service @ 11 am Sunday School @ 9:15 am Wednesday Bible Study @ 6:15 - 7 pm Prayer Service @ 7 -8 pm Everyone is Welcome!

Baptist

WESTERN HILLS CHURCH “The Positive Place on the Peninsula” 3399 CSM Drive

(Across from College of San Mateo)

Sunday Worship Service 10:30am Bible Study 9:15am

(650) 574-4881

Church of Christ

CHURCH OF CHRIST 525 South Bayshore Blvd. San Mateo (650) 343-4997 Bible School 9:45 AM Services 11:00 AM and 2:00 PM Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 PM Minister J.S. Oxendine

www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

PM Minister J.S. Oxendine www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm Houses of Prayer Houses of Prayer Congregational FOSTER CITY

Houses of Prayer

Houses of Prayer

Houses of Prayer Houses of Prayer Congregational FOSTER CITY ISLAND UNITED CHURCH Foster

Congregational

FOSTER CITY ISLAND UNITED CHURCH

Foster City's only three-denomination Church Methodist, Presbyterian (U.S.A.), and United Church of Christ

1130 Balclutha Drive (at Comet)

Worship/Child Care/Sunday School at 10am All are Welcome! Call (650) 349-3544

• THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF SAN MATEO - UCC 225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr. (650) 343-3694 Worship and Church School Every Sunday at 10:30 AM Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM Nursery Care Available www.ccsm-ucc.org

Lutheran

HOPE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo

Pastor Eric Ackerman

Summer worship schedule:

One worship service on Sunday at 9:30 AM (Childcare available)

Hope Lutheran Preschool admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.

License No. 410500322.

Call (650)349-0100

for information

Methodist

CRYSTAL SPRINGS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday Worship 10:00 AM

Sunday School • Childcare • Drama Choir • Handbells • Praise Band 2145 Bunker Hill Drive (Near Polhemus Rd.) San Mateo • (650)345-2381 www.csumc.org

Non-Denominational

Church of the Highlands

“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive (corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno

(650)873-4095

Adult Worship Services:

Friday: 7:30 pm (singles) Saturday: 7:00 pm Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am, 5 pm Youth Worship Service:

For high school & young college Sunday at 10:00 am Sunday School For adults & children of all ages Sunday at 10:00 am Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

REDWOOD CHURCH

Our mission

To know Christ and make him known.

903 Madison Ave., Redwood City

(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM www.redwoodchurch.org

Non-Denominational

Non-Denominational

Sunday Service 9am & 11 am
Sunday Service 9am & 11 am
Sunday Service 9am & 11 am

Sunday Service 9am & 11 am

Sunday Service 9am & 11 am
Sunday Service 9am & 11 am
Sunday Service 9am & 11 am
Sunday Service 9am & 11 am

Presbyterian

First Presbyterian Church Of Burlingame

Sunday Worship

8:15 am Chapel 9:30 & 11:00 am Sanctuary

Sunday School at 9:30 am

Childcareavailable! Visit our website

www.burlpres.org 1500 Easton Drive at El Camino

(650) 342-0875

TRINITY

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

1106 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Carlos at Brittan & Alameda

(650)593-8226

Summer Worship & Sunday School 9:30 a.m. All Are Welcome! www.trinity-pres.org

Science of Mind

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL GROWTH

Belmont Senior Center 20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont

Teen Youth Group

Noon-1pm

(408) 569-4387

Jacqueline Chohan, Pastor Email: chohan@pacbell.net

Synagogues

PENINSULA TEMPLE BETH EL

1700 Alameda de las Pulgas San Mateo at Hwy 92 (650) 341-7701

Friday Shabbat Services 1st & 2nd Fridays of month 6:15pm 3rd, 4th & 5th Fridays of month 7:30pm We offer Tot Shabbat, Family Services, Adult Education and a Full Religious School Join Us! Serving the Peninsula for over 50 years A member of the Union for Reform Judaism

Visit our website www.templebethel.org

PENINSULA TEMPLE SHOLOM

A Reform Congregation (Member UAHC)

1655 Sebastian Dr, Burlingame

(650)697-2266

Fri. Shabbat Services: 7:30pm First Friday of month: 7:00pm Saturday Lay Minyan: 9:30am

Dr, Burlingame (650)697-2266 Fri. Shabbat Services: 7:30pm First Friday of month: 7:00pm Saturday Lay Minyan: 9:30am

THE DAILY JOURNAL

BUSINESS

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

11

Wall Street edges lower

By Joe Bel Bruno

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Wall Street edged lower Friday as disappointing earnings from technology companies like Google Inc. and Microsoft Corp. offset upbeat results from Citigroup Inc. Stocks pulled back slightly after a huge two-day rally lifted the Dow Jones industrials by more than 480 points. Investors were concerned about earn- ings; though Citi’s loss was less than analysts had forecast, the market was clearly let down by the tech reports. Google’s results were lower than expected, the result of the weakening economy hurting advertising revenue, while Microsoft missed forecasts by a penny. Also, Advanced Micro Devices Inc.’s chief executive stepped down after the chip maker posted a wider-than- expected loss. Citi reported a $2.5 billion second- quarter loss due to write-downs tied to deteriorating credit markets. The results surpassed projections, and helped to mit-

Wall Street

igate some of the market’s concerns fol- lowing a big loss from Merrill Lynch & Co. reported late Thursday. Meanwhile, oil prices rose as news of an output cut in Nigeria helped to halt the sharp decline in prices that began three days ago. A barrel of light, sweet crude tacked on $1.03 to $130.32 on the New York Mercantile Exchange. “Considering the strength we had in the past few days, the market is handling

itself quite nice and trying to hold on to the gains,” said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at New York-based brokerage house Avalon Partners. “Investors are also positioning ahead of

a barrage of earnings and economic

reports due next week.” In midday trading, the Dow fell 10.18,

or 0.09 percent, to 11,436.48. Broader stock indicators also fell. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 6.28, or 0.50 percent, to 1,254.04, and the Nasdaq composite index dropped 38.05,

or 1.65 percent, to 2,274.25. Bond prices were little changed Friday. The yield on the benchmark 10- year Treasury note, which moves oppo- site its price, rose to 4.08 percent from Thursday’s 4.00 percent. The dollar was mixed against other major currencies, while gold prices fell. With no economic data slated for release Friday, investors were basing their decisions on the week’s stream of earnings reports. Google fell $50.37, or 9.4 percent, to $483.07 after it posted disappointing results late Thursday. Microsoft dropped $2.02, or 7.4 percent, to $25.49, while AMD fell 61 cents, or 11.7 percent, to

$4.68.

Financial stocks were mixed after

Citi’s results. Merrill shed 81 cents, or 2.7 percent, to $29.90, while Citi added $1.77, or 9.8 percent, to $19.74. Honeywell International Inc. fell 2 cents to $50.90 after it reported second- quarter earnings rose 18 percent and sur- passed forecasts. The aerospace compa- ny also boosted its 2008 forecast.

The aerospace compa- ny also boosted its 2008 forecast. Dow 11,496.57 +49.91 10-Yr Bond 4.0810% +0.0430

Dow

11,496.57

+49.91

10-Yr Bond 4.0810% +0.0430

Nasdaq 2,282.78

-29.52

Oil (per barrel)

$128.88

S&P 500 1,260.68

+0.36

Gold

$957.30

Oil falls again: Is the bubble bursting?

By Adam Schreck

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The price of oil recorded its biggest weekly drop ever, and a gallon of gas nally pulled back from its record high. So is it time to declare the energy bubble popped? Experts won’t go that far just yet. “It’s too early to say we’ve seen the worst of it,” said Tom Kloza, publisher and chief oil analyst of the Oil Price Information Service in Wall, N.J. “We would be Pollyannish if we believe one week represents a trend.” Still, with oil recording yet another drop on Friday, some industry experts who just days ago thought there was more juice left in oil’s meteoric run are reconsidering. “If this is not the bubble’s implosion, than it’s a reasonable facsimile,” analyst and trader Stephen Schork said in his daily market commentary. “Time will

tell. Nevertheless, for the time being we

no longer care to hold a bullish view.”

Light, sweet crude for August delivery

fell 41 cents Friday to settle at $128.88 on the New York Mercantile Exchange

— well below its trading record of more

than $147 a week earlier. The average price of a gallon of regu- lar gas fell about a penny for the day, to $4.105, according to auto club AAA, the Oil Price Information Service and Wright Express. Diesel prices dipped three-tenths of a cent to $4.842 a gallon. Some analysts said a nationwide aver- age of $4 or even lower could be in the ofng — almost unthinkable in a sum- mer when there has seemed to be no relief at the pump — although they cau- tioned that there is no guarantee prices

will stay low. “We’re going to see some relief from that relentless march higher,” Kloza said. Gas may be getting just a bit cheaper, but major changes in how Americans

live and drive are already in motion. Car buyers have been eeing to more fuel-efcient models. U.S. sales of pick- ups and sport utility vehicles are down nearly 18 percent this year through June,

while sales of small cars are up more than 10 percent. While slashing production of more- pro table trucks and SUVs, automakers have been scurrying to build their most fuel-efcient models faster. Toyota Motor Corp., which hasn’t been able to keep up with demand for its 46-miles-per-gallon Prius hybrid, said last week it will start producing the Prius in the U.S. and suspend truck and SUV production to meet changing consumer demands. Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. also have announced plans to increase small car production, and GM has said 18 of the 19 vehicles it is launching between now and 2010 are cars or crossovers.

Google shares plummet after low earnings

By Michael Liedtke

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Google Inc. shares plunged nearly 10 percent Friday after the Internet search leader’s second- quarter earnings missed analysts’ expec- tations. Management said economic turmoil in the United States and parts of Europe appears to be causing consumers to click less frequently on the ads that generate virtually all its prots. That unnerved already jittery investors, although Google managers said they expect the Mountain View- based company will thrive even if the economy weakens further. Google’s stock price dropped $52.12,

weakens further. Google’s stock price dropped $52.12, or 9.8 percent, to fi nish at $481.32, leav-

or 9.8 percent, to nish at $481.32, leav- ing it below $500 for the rst time in three months. The red ags raised after the bell Thursday included a dramatic slowdown

in the company’s hiring pace and Google

Chairman Eric Schmidt’s description of the economy as “challenging.” Google’s chief economist, Hal Varian, even partic- ipated in the company’s conference call for the rst time to discuss business con- ditions. “That was a tip-off,” said Cantor

Fitzgerald analyst Derek Brown. “Economic sluggishness has entered the discussion at Google, more so than we have ever heard.” Google earned $1.25 billion, or $3.92 per share, during the three months ended

in June. That represented a 35 percent

increase from net income of $925 mil- lion, or $2.93 per share, at the same time last year. If not for costs incurred for employee

stock compensation, Google said it would have earned $4.63 per share. That

gure missed the average earnings esti-

mate of $4.74 per share among analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial. Google’s second-quarter revenue fared slightly better than earnings, rising 39 percent to $5.37 billion from $3.87 bil- lion at the same time last year.

fared slightly better than earnings, rising 39 percent to $5.37 billion from $3.87 bil- lion at
fared slightly better than earnings, rising 39 percent to $5.37 billion from $3.87 bil- lion at
fared slightly better than earnings, rising 39 percent to $5.37 billion from $3.87 bil- lion at

12 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

THE DAILY JOURNAL

1 2 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 THE DAILY JOURNAL
1 2 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 THE DAILY JOURNAL
1 2 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 THE DAILY JOURNAL
1 2 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 THE DAILY JOURNAL
1 2 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 THE DAILY JOURNAL
1 2 Weekend • July 19-20, 2008 THE DAILY JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

13

Across the nation

Jury rules Bratz dolls conceived at Mattel

LOS ANGELES — Barbie and Bratz dolls are sisters, a jury has decided in a major victory to Mattel Inc., the world’s largest toymaker, in its copyright infringement lawsuit against rival MGA Entertainment Inc. The federal jury decided Thursday that the designer of MGA’s Bratz characters conceived the idea for the dolls while working for Mattel — a ruling that could mean millions of dollars for the Barbie maker when the jury consid- ers possible damages during a sepa- rate proceeding. Mattel filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Riverside against MGA, which began marketing the hugely popular Bratz line of sassy urban dolls in 2001. Mattel has claimed it owned the rights to the Bratz line because its creator, Carter Bryant, came up with the concept while working for El Segundo-based Mattel. Analysts estimate Bratz has made

MGA more than $500 million a year. The jury also ruled that MGA and its CEO Isaac Larian were liable for converting Mattel property for their own use and intentionally interfer- ing with the contractual duties owed by Bryant to Mattel. “MGA and Isaac Larian took what did not belong to them,” John Quinn, a lawyer for Mattel, said during a conference call detailing the verdict. Larian said in a prepared state- ment that MGA will prevail in the upcoming damages phase of the case or possibly in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. “This is because it is undisputed that MGA — not Carter Bryant — independently created the Bratz dolls,” Larian said. “Carter Bryant did not have anything to do with the many Bratz-related products we cre- ated, such as Bratz Babyz, Lil’ Bratz and Bratz Kidz.” The statement pointed out that jurors must still decide if Mattel owns any copyrights involving Bryant’s drawings. If so, the jury must rule on whether the dolls infringe on those copyrights.

Body found adds mystery to purchased baby story

By Dan Nephin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WILKINSBURG, Pa. — A body with its hands bound was found Friday at the apartment of a woman who showed up at a hospital with a newborn she falsely claimed was her child but later said she had obtained for $1,000, authorities said. The body was found in the home of 38-year-old Andrea Curry- Demus, police said. Authorities would not say whether it was male or female. Wilkinsburg Police Chief Ophelia Coleman said the body was found lying face down. She said she didn’t know how long it had been there. Police visited the building Thursday night but did not go into that apart- ment, Coleman said. Instead, a rela- tive of Curry-Demus led them to another apartment, she said. Earlier Friday, police said they were concerned that the infant’s real mother — described as a thin, black

female in her 20s or 30s named Tina — might be in danger, or need med- ical attention. The description was provided by Curry-Demus but authorities aren’t sure how reliable it is because she “has a history of emotional prob- lems,” Coleman said earlier Friday. Curry-Demus pleaded guilty in 1991 to aggravated assault after stabbing a Wilkinsburg woman in an alleged plot to steal the woman’s infant. Curry-Demus, then known as Andrea Curry, was sentenced to 10 years’ probation. Allegheny County homicide detectives have taken over the inves- tigation, but Allegheny County Police Assistant Superintendent James Morton declined to comment at the scene Friday night. The mystery started when Curry- Demus showed up at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh on Thursday with a newborn baby, police said. Tests later proved she was not the mother — despite her claims to the

contrary, police said. Curry-Demus was arraigned Friday on a child endangerment charge and jailed until she posts $10,000 bond and undergoes a psy- chiatric exam. “I didn’t do nothing,” Curry- Demus told reporters as she was put into a police car Thursday. The baby’s umbilical cord was still attached when Curry-Demus arrived at West Penn, but tests proved she was not the mother — despite her claims to the contrary, police said. Curry-Demus then told police she miscarried in June and didn’t want to upset her own mother by telling her she had lost the baby. Curry- Demus said she befriended a preg- nant woman and discussed buying her child when it was born, accord- ing to the criminal complaint. Curry-Demus told police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they don’t know how she got the baby.

police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they
police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they
police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they
police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they
police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they
police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they
police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they
police she paid a woman named Tina $1,000 for the baby, but authorities have said they

14 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

WORLD/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Bush drops refusal to talk about Iraq timetable

By Terence Hunt

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Bush and Iraq’s prime minister have agreed to set a “general time hori- zon” for bringing more U.S. troops home from the war, a dramatic shift from the administration’s once-iron- clad unwillingness to talk about any kind of deadline or timetable. The announcement Friday put Bush in the position of offering to talk with Iraqi leaders about a polit- ically charged issue that he adamantly has refused to discuss with the Democratic-led Congress at home. It also could complicate the presidential campaign argu- ments of Republican John McCain and Democrat Barack Obama who have staked out starkly opposite stands about the unpopular war. What’s changed? The sharp reduction in violence in Iraq — to the lowest level in four years — has made the country’s leaders increas- ingly con dent and more assertive about its sovereignty, giving rise to demands for a specific plan for American forces to leave.

to demands for a specific plan for American forces to leave. Iraq has lever- age because

Iraq has lever- age because the White House is struggling to sal- vage negotia- tions for a long- term agreement covering U.S. military opera- tions there. The

White House said its goal is to conclude that deal by the end of this month. Bush and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki talked about the stalled negotiations during a secure video conference on Thursday, agreeing “on a common way for- ward to conclude these negotiations as soon as possible,” a White House statement said. The two leaders agreed that

improvements in security should allow for the negotiations “to include a general time horizon for meeting aspirational goals, such as the resumption of Iraqi security con- trol in their cities and provinces and the further reduction of U.S. combat forces from Iraq,” the White House said.

George W.Bush

Bush repeatedly has vetoed legis- lation approved by Congress setting deadlines for American troop cut- backs. Friday’s White House statement was intentionally vague and did not specify what kind of timelines were envisioned. That allows Iraqi of-

cials, who are facing elections in the fall, to argue they are not beholden

to Washington or willing to tolerate

a permanent military presence in

Iraq. For Bush, it points the way toward a legal framework for keep- ing American troops in Iraq after a U.N. mandate expires on Dec. 31. “The agreement will look at goal dates for transition of responsibili- ties and missions,” said Gordon Johndroe, spokesman for Bush’s

National Security Council. “The focus is on the Iraqi assumption of missions, not on what troop levels will be.” As for the campaign to elect a new commander in chief, McCain firmly opposes any withdrawal timetable while Obama pledges to pull out combat troops within 16 months. By talking about a “time horizon,” Bush appeared at odds

with McCain and could make his own GOP administration a tougher target for Obama’s anti-war barbs. McCain issued a statement say- ing, “Progress between the United States and Iraq on a time horizon for American troop presence is further evidence that the surge has succeed- If we had followed Sen. Obama’s policy, Iraq would have

descended into chaos, American

casualties would be far higher, and the region would be destabilized.” However, Ben Rose, a senior adviser to Obama, said, “It’s anoth- er indication that the administration

Sen. Obama’s

position on negotiating the removal of our forces as part of our ongoing discussions with the Iraqi govern- ment.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Bush wasn’t going far enough. “After rejecting 18 months of attempts by the Democratic majori- ty in Congress to adopt redeploy- ment timetables, the president now proposes a vague general time hori- zon that falls far short of a commit- ment to ending our involvement in Iraq,” she said.

is moving toward

Democratic Rep. William Delahunt of Massachusetts, who has led House hearings on the planned agreement with Iraq, said the “time horizon” cited by the White House was “very vague and nebulous.” He also said the agreement taking shape seemed “far less grandiose than what was initially articulated.” Iraq has proposed requiring U.S. forces to fully withdraw ve years after the Iraqis take the lead on security nationwide — though that condition could take years to meet. Iraq’s national security adviser, Mouwaffak al-Rubaie, said this month that Baghdad would not accept any security deal unless it contained speci c dates for U.S. troop withdrawals. So far, the United States has handed control of 10 of 18 provinces to Iraqi officials. “Obviously, if Iraqis are assuming more missions, then you need less American troops,” Johndroe said. The White House sought to make a distinction between talking with Iraqis about withdrawals and attempts by Congress to force cut- backs.

Crane collapses at Houston refinery, killing 4

By Monica Rhor

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — The largest mobile crane in the nation collapsed at a Houston oil re nery Friday, killing four workers and injuring six others in the latest of several fatal acci- dents that have raised concerns about the safety of construction cranes.

The crane, capable of lifting 800,000 pounds, fell over at a LyondellBasell renery in southeast Houston about 2 p.m., said Jim Roecker, the company’s vice presi- dent for re ning. The massive, deep red crane lay on top of a smaller, bright yellow crane on the grounds of the re nery. Ambulances and re trucks were lined up outside.

The casualties were in the area of the crane, but ofcials still aren’t certain whether they were on the crane or under it, Roecker said. Three of the injured were treated and released at the scene, said Houston Fire Department Assistant Chief Omero Longoria. Two severe- ly injured workers were taken by helicopter to Memorial Hermann- Texas Medical Center hospital and

the other injured worker was taken to a hospital by ambulance. The crane, whose exact dimen- sions were not immediately avail- able, belonged to Deep South Crane & Rigging. Roecker described it as the nation’s largest mobile crane. The crane had not been scheduled to do any work Friday, but Roecker said its engine was idling after it hit the ground.

“This is a traumatic experience for all of us. We have to focus on the safety and health of our employees,” Roecker said. Deep South spokeswoman Margaret Landry issued a statement from the company’s headquarters in Baton Rouge, La., saying it was investigating “to determine the root cause, correct it and ensure that this type of tragedy does not occur again.”

was investigating “to determine the root cause, correct it and ensure that this type of tragedy
Shark sighting 53-year-old Greg Norman comes out of nowhere and is in contention at the
Shark sighting
53-year-old Greg Norman comes
out of nowhere and is in contention
at the British Open Championship
SEE PAGE 16
in contention at the British Open Championship SEE PAGE 16 DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE San Mateo

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

San Mateo pitcher Matt Nichol is just one of the many reasons why the Bulldogs are poised for a deep run at the upcoming Area tournament.

These Bulldogs have bite

By Emanuel Lee

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo American Legion Post 82 Bulldogs coach Silvio Rocha said he spends upwards of 90 minutes to ll out a lineup card the night before a game. “We have so many good players it’s hard to put together a lineup because you know good players are being left out,” he said. “A lot of people tell me I’m crazy for taking that long of a time lling out a lineup. It’s a great prob- lem to have.” Of that, there is little doubt. The 17-and- under Bulldogs (24-7 overall, 13-2 in league) are loaded, once again elding another com- plete team. This might be the best squad Post 82 has elded at the junior level, but in order for it to earn that designation it will have to win the upcoming Area 2 tournament. The

Bulldogs won the event last year for the rst time in program history, coming through the loser’s bracket and clinching it in spectacular fashion. The program has been a rousing success since its inception eight or nine years ago. It not only wins but develops players to feed into Post 82’s senior legion team. The staples of the program include solid fundamental play, sharp defense and above all else a cohesive- ness between the players. “Chemistry is very important to the makeup of our club,” Rocha said. “The coaching staff will easily watch over 40 games during fall ball and the high school season, and you look for players who you know will be a good t. Fortunately it’s been a reloading year every season.” So far there haven’t been too many bumps in the road in the Bulldogs’ quest to repeat as Area champions. With six games left in the

regular season, they’re on the verge of clinch- ing another league title. They’ve won two of the three tournaments they’ve played in, and the one they didn’t win was against 19-year- olds. Rocha doesn’t like to focus on speci c players because he said the success of the team truly has been an all for one, one for all effort. Rocha said his pitching staff has never been deeper. The pitchers include Johnny Lloyd, Kevin McIsaac, J.J. Kunkel, Matt Nichol, Nick Sanzeri, Brad Hill and Matt Page. A number of those players double as position players when they’re not pitching. Other key position players include Daniel Spaizman, Danny Littlejohn, David Mitchell, Pete Woodall, Chad Radcliffe, Zac Grimaldi, James Uroz and Julian Merryweather. Besides the top-notch talent, Rocha empha-

See LEGION, Page 19

Williams looks sharp in beating Schnyder

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STANFORD — Serena Williams spent more time waiting for her quarternal match to start than she did on the court against Patty Schnyder. Neither activity proved to be too stressful for the top seed. Williams advanced to the seminals of the Bank of the West Classic with little trouble Friday, beating the fth-seeded Schnyder 6-3, 6-1 in just 54 minutes. The match began more than an hour later than scheduled because Ai Sugiyama needed 2 hours, 44 minutes to win her quarter nal

over Dominika Cibulkova 6-7 (4), 7-6 (5), 5-3 (retired). Cibulkova stopped playing because of cramping in her left leg with Sugiyama serving at 40-0 for the match. But that extra delay proved to be no trouble for Williams. “No one can kill time the way I can,” she said. “I’m a professional time killer. I can sit for three hours and I couldn’t tell you what I did. If it was an Olympic sport I’d be a 20- time gold medal winner.” Schnyder had won three of ve meetings against Williams, including a match in Zurich last year when Williams retired after losing the rst nine games. But Schnyder was unable

to nd her groove against Williams this time and went down meekly. Williams will take on the winner of a later match between qualier Aleksandra Wozniak and lucky loser Samantha Stosur in the semi-

nals on Saturday. Stosur made the tourna-

ment despite losing in qualifying to Wozniak because Lindsay Davenport withdrew with a right knee injury. Williams opened the match with three straight forehand winners, and the result was never really in doubt despite Williams hitting four double faults in her rst two service games and ve overall. “I don’t think I served well,” she said. “I

See TENNIS, Page 17

Quakes still in scoring slumber

By Michael Erler

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

It is often said that the hardest thing to do in sports is to hit a round ball with a round bat squarely. In fact, Mike Krukow, the color man for the San Francisco Giants, is fond of uttering that axiom at least once a week. Setting aside for the moment the redundancy of describing a ball as round, (as opposed to what, a triangu- lar ball?) the pressing question of the day has to be if Krukow has ever watched a soccer game in general and a San Jose Earthquakes game in par- ticular. For your basic run-of- the-mill soccer teams kick- ing a round ball into a net protected by a goalie and a

horde of other defenders is

very, very difcult. When it comes to the Earthquakes, however, the task has proven nearly impossible. After last Saturday's 1-1 home draw against the Colorado Rapids, where San Jose came from ahead to tie, the expansion squad has now accounted for 11 goals in 16 games, a his- toric pace for futility. The club appeared poised for their second home win of the season after Ryan Johnson snuck behind his marker to head home Ramiro Corrales’ curling freekick in the 62nd minute, only to see the Rapids level the game on a header of their own eight minutes later when Conor Casey appeared to jump on the back of Earthquake defender Jason Hernandez to de ect the ball into the net of stunned San Jose keeper Joe Cannon. Coach Frank Yallop went Mount St. Helen’s on referee Hilario Grajeda afterward and was promptly ejected, having to watch the nal 20 minutes of the match from atop the broadcast tower, alongside general manager John Doyle. As a punishment, he’ll miss the next game as well, barred from the sidelines. While clearly upset with the ofciating, Yallop was equally perturbed with his team’s offense, or lack thereof. “Again we showed that we can shut a team down,” he said. “Joe [Cannon] only had two shots to save. If we can get the other half of the game sorted out, we’ll be a good side. On set plays we’re good. On set plays we’re con dent and Ryan [Johnson] is a brave man and Ramiro puts a great ball in and it’s a great n- ish. “ It’s a free play that has been our downfall all season. We’re not dangerous, not creative. We’re not con dent. You can make the guys work as hard as you want in practice, you can't make them condent.” Meanwhile, Cannon was a bit more blunt, as is his custom. “I thought we played terrible today in the rst half. We picked it up a little bit in the sec- ond half but if we played good, played our game, we wouldn’t have to worry about any calls. I can’t think of any good chances we created today. We didn’t do anything in this game. San Jose created more opportunities and outplayed its opponents, as it has in every home game at Santa Clara University’s Buck Shaw Stadium. The Conor equalizer, in addition to being

Clara University’s Buck Shaw Stadium. The Conor equalizer, in addition to being Frank Yallop See SOCCER

Frank Yallop

See SOCCER, Page 19

16 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Choi to the world: K.J. atop Open board

By Doug Ferguson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTHPORT, England — Tiger Woods on crutches was supposed to be a chance for someone else to seize the spotlight at the British Open. Greg Norman wasn’t the guy anyone had in mind. Neither was David Duval. Indeed, Royal Birkdale proved to be fertile ground for fairy tales on Friday. K.J. Choi rolled in a 25-foot birdie on the

nal hole for a 3-under 67 in more gloom and

wind along the Irish Sea, giving him his rst lead in a major championship. It will be the second straight year he plays in the nal group at the British Open going into the weekend. But the biggest surprises were right behind him, starting with a pair of British Open champions who once were No. 1 in the world. Norman barely touched a club in the month leading up to his 26th appearance in golf’s oldest championship. The 53-year-old mar- ried tennis great Chris Evert three weeks ago, and a trip to England counts as the tail end of his honeymoon. He wound up renewing his love affair with links golf, delivering great escapes over his nal three holes for an even- par 70 that put his name atop the leaderboard for most of the afternoon until Choi birdied the nal two holes. Choi was at 1-under 139, one shot ahead of Norman. “My expectations were almost nil coming in, to tell you the truth,” Norman said. “My expectations are still realistically low, and I have to be that way. I can’t sit here and say, ’OK, it’s great. I’m playing well and I’m doing it.’ I am playing well. I am doing it. But I still haven’t been there for a long time.”

His last victory was 10 years ago in Australia at the Greg Norman Holden International. He hasn’t been this close to the lead at the halfway point of a major since he was leading the ’96 Masters. Duval knows that feeling. His last victory was the Dunlop Phoenix in Japan at the end of 2001, the year he won his only major at Royal Lytham & St. Annes. What followed was a mysterious slump that included a half-dozen

coaches, precious few rounds under par and an aloof player who found happiness in mar- riage and children. For those waiting for another collapse, Duval never showed a hint of it. He chipped in for birdie at No. 11, kept damage to only a bogey when he found a pot bunker off the tee on the 13th, and bounced back with another birdie on the par-3 14th. “I’ve been working toward greatness, not just getting back to making cuts and managing to play halfway decent,” said Duval, who had made only one cut in 11 starts this year before arriving at Royal Birkdale. “I’ve been trying to take the long route and the hard route and try to get back to greatness. “That story is yet to be told as to whether I can get back to that point or not,” he said. “But that’s what I strive for.” This wonderful story unfolding at Birkdale still has a long way to go. It starts with Choi, a 37-year-old from South Korea who didn’t think much of golf until a high school teacher handed him an instructional book by Jack Nicklaus. A seven- time winner on the PGA Tour — the most of any Asian player — he overcame a bogey on the rst hole to play awlessly in a steady 20 mph wind and occasional squirts of rain. “I think today was probably my best round I’ve ever played at the British Open,” said Choi, who trailed Sergio Garcia by two shots going into the third round at Carnoustie last year before nishing in a tie for eighth. “Everything worked the way I wanted it to.” The best nish belonged to Camilo Villegas of Colombia, whose lone victory came last year in Japan. A marketing dream, Villegas is known as “Spider-Man” for splaying his body horizontally to read putts at surface level. He made everything over the nal ve holes — all birdies — for a tournament-best 65 that left him two shots behind. “Let me tell you, when you get on the rst tee, you never think about a score,” said Villegas, who got into the British Open as an alternate when Kenny Perry decided not to come. “You just think about every single shot because you don’t know how bad it can get, when the weather is going to get like it was

bad it can get, when the weather is going to get like it was REUTERS South

REUTERS

South Korea’s K.J.Choi reacts after finishing second-round play in the British Open.Choi,who finished eighth in last year’s Open,vaulted to the top of the leaderboard and is at 1-under 139.

yesterday morning. So you’re just trying to grind every single shot. And that’s what I did.” Villegas was at 141. Duval and a half-dozen others were at 2-over 142, which is where more fairy tales in the making reside. Padraig Harrington normally wouldn’t fall into that category, but the defending champi- on injured his right wrist and wasn’t sure he could even tee it up Thursday. The Irishman said there was only a 50 percent chance he would nish his rst round. And the odds he would play his nal four holes in 4 under and shoot 68 and be three shots out of the lead? “As long as I could play, I was happy,” Harrington said. “The wrist injury took some

of the pressure off me, but it denitely was a nice distraction to have, assuming that I was going to go and play.” Now he’s in decent shape as he tries to become the rst European to win consecutive British Opens since James Braid in 1905-06. Others at 142 included former U.S. Open champion Jim Furyk, Robert Allenby, Graeme McDowell and Alexander Noren, a Swede who attended wind-blown Oklahoma State. Twenty players were within ve shots of the lead, a group that includes Jean Van de Velde, the Frenchman made famous by his follies on the nal hole at Carnoustie that led to triple bogey and cost him a claret jug. He was at 4- over 144.

A-Rod powers Yankees past A’s

By Mike Fitzpatrick

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Robinson Cano hit a three- run homer, Alex Rodriguez also connected and the New York Yankees made it an easy night for Mike Mussina in a 7-1 victory over the Oakland Athletics on Friday. Richie Sexson hit an RBI single in his rst at-bat with the Yankees, and Mussina (12-6) pitched six effective innings to tie Cleveland’s Cliff Lee and fellow All-Star Joe Saunders of the Los Angeles Angels for most wins in the AL. Mussina was left off the All-Star team for Tuesday night’s showcase at Yankee Stadium, but he’s certainly pitched like one of base- ball’s best this season. The 39-year-old right-hander allowed eight singles and a double, but did not walk a batter for the eighth time this year. Relying on pin- point control, he has 16 walks in 20 starts spanning 113 1-3 innings. Mussina gave up an RBI groundout to Ryan Sweeney in the rst, then settled in to nish with six strikeouts. David Robertson struck out all three hitters in the seventh, Edwar Ramirez worked a perfect eighth and LaTroy

Yankees 7, A’s 1

Hawkins tossed a 1-2-3 ninth as New York pitchers combined to retire their nal 14 bat- ters. Bobby Abreu added an RBI double for the Yankees and Rodriguez (three hits) had a run-scoring single off lefty Greg Smith (5-8), handed the ball when scheduled starter Joe Blaton was traded to Philadelphia on Thursday. The A’s, who won six of their pre- vious seven at Yankee Stadium, have lost three straight overall for the rst time since drop- ping four in a row May 28-31. New York, which began a stretch that includes 13 of 16 games at home, equaled a season high by winning its fth consecutive home game. Looking for another second-half surge to match last year, the Yankees improved to 10-3 against AL West teams. They hope Sexson can provide some pop from the right side against left-handed pitch- ing, and he delivered right away with a two- out RBI single in the rst that tied it at 1. Cano followed with a single to right and Rodriguez barreled into catcher Kurt Suzuki — a clean collision — while trying to score. Suzuki, however, held onto Sweeney’s strong throw for the third out.

CC shuts down Giants

By Janie McCauely

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — CC Sabathia pitched

a four-hitter to win his third straight start since joining Milwaukee and the Brewers beat the San Francisco Giants 9-1 on Friday night. It was Sabathia’s 21st career complete game and second straight. His lone blemish for much of the night was a leadoff ineld single in the rst inning by Fred Lewis. Prince Fielder hit a three-run homer in the seventh to help Sabathia’s cause, then Mike Cameron added a three-run shot in the ninth. Sabathia (3-0), pitching in his native Northern California for the rst time since the Brewers acquired him in a trade with Cleveland, retired 17 straight batters until Lewis reached on an error to start the seventh. Aaron Rowand homered leading off the eighth for the second hit off Sabathia to end the shutout bid. Sabathia struck out 10 and didn’t walk a batter in the 110-pitch effort. He dou-

bled in the third, his third hit in 10 at-bats this season. All are extra-base hits, including two home runs. He scored his team’s rst run on J.J. Hardy’s RBI groundout. Hardy doubled in

a run in the seventh. Sabathia outpitched Matt

Brewers 9, Giants 1

Cain (5-8) to improve to 2-4 on the road this season. Sabathia, the burly left-hander from nearby Vallejo, won in the Giants’ waterfront ballpark in June 2005. Giants manager Bruce Bochy was ejected for arguing a call during the fth inning. He came out of the dugout to complain after home plate umpire Jim Wolf ruled Ryan Braun safe at third after a triple to left-center. San Francisco third baseman Jose Castillo took the relay throw from shortstop Omar Vizquel and appeared to tag Braun, but Wolf — covering third when crew chief Ed Montague ran to the outeld to watch the hit — called Braun safe. Bochy and Braun engaged in a brief discus- sion and the Giants’ manager turned and began walking back to the dugout when he was tossed. Bochy then came back out to argue further. It marked the fourth time this season and the 37th time in his managerial career that Bochy has been ejected. Cain saw his winless stretch reach three starts with his second straight loss, and the Giants’ major league-worst home record fell to 17-29.

stretch reach three starts with his second straight loss, and the Giants’ major league-worst home record
stretch reach three starts with his second straight loss, and the Giants’ major league-worst home record
stretch reach three starts with his second straight loss, and the Giants’ major league-worst home record

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend July 19-20, 2008

17

Tour can’t get away from doping busts

By Jamey Keaten

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NIMES, France — Mark Cavendish wants to talk about his latest stage victory — not doping. British cyclist David Millar pleads with fans: “Please, don’t give up on us.” This may not be easy. This, after all, is the Tour de France.

Cavendish, a British sprint specialist on Team Columbia, captured the 13th stage Friday — the fourth stage he has won and sec- ond in a row. He prevailed over a 113-mile course on a hot and wind-swept day along the Mediterranean while Cadel Evans of Australia kept the yellow jersey. The drug use that is battering cycling’s image yet again is starting to weigh on the rid- ers’ minds. But for Italy’s Riccardo Ricco, who tested positive for the blood booster EPO, the consequences could be far more than psychological. French authorities led preliminary charges against him Friday. He could face two years in prison if convicted on charges of using toxic substances, a French prosecutor said. Ricco, who won two stages of this Tour, was red from his Saunier Duval team Friday,

a

day after he was kicked out of the race. He

is

the third rider to be ousted.

After his release from police custody, Ricco made no clear denials. Instead, he deantly said he wasn’t surprised by the team’s deci- sion to re him. “It’s the routine for the teams,” Ricco told Italy’s RAI state TV. “That’s what they have to do. I’ll be back. I’ll be back stronger than before.” Ricco’s teammate Leonardo Piepoli, who won the 10th stage, was also red for “viola- tion of the team’s ethical code.” A Saunier Duval spokesman declined to elaborate.

In any case, this was not something Cavendish cared to discuss.

“I’ve just won the stage, and I’ve just heard about that,” Cavendish said. “On another day,

I don’t want somebody else to overshadow my

victory again. So, please, no questions on that.” Evans said he cracked jokes with his closest rival, Frank Schleck of Luxembourg, during the ride Thursday after the Ricco bust. The Australian leads Schleck by one second.

every-

one needs friends in a race like this,” Evans said.

Christian Vande Velde of the United States is third, 38 seconds behind. Other riders Evans needs to watch: Denis Menchov of

“We’re rivals, but in a race like this

Denis Menchov of “We’re rivals, but in a race like this REUTERS Team Columbia rider Mark

REUTERS

Team Columbia rider Mark Cavendish of Britain,center,sprints to the finish line to win the 13th stage of the Tour de France.

Russia is fth, 57 seconds back, and Carlos Sastre of Spain is sixth and trails by 1:28. The race heads for another mostly at stage Saturday, a trip of more than 116 miles from Nimes to Digne-les-Bains. Then come three grueling stages in the Alps starting Sunday. The race ends July 27 in Paris. Few are certain the Tour will be doping free between now and then, and these days virtual- ly no competitor is entirely above suspicion. Spanish riders Moises Duenas Nevado and Manuel Beltran were also ejected from the Tour this year for using EPO. “I hope we’re not going to nd any more,”

said Pierre Bordry, the head of the French anti-doping agency that has been conducting the drug tests. Ricco, this year’s Giro d’Italia runner-up, was ordered not to speak to anyone from his team. Antoine Leroy, state prosecutor in the town of Foix, said Ricco had contested the claim that he had used EPO. A police search of a hotel room where the rider had stayed turned up medical equipment like syringes, catheters and medical bags — but no doping products, Leroy said. Bordry said that Ricco had tested positive for CERA, or continuous erythropoietin

receptor activator, an advanced version of EPO. Mircera, the brand name for CERA made by Swiss-based Roche Holdings, helps users produce more red blood cells, company spokeswoman Claudia Schmitt said. It received U.S. and European approvals last year as a treatment for anemia caused by kid- ney failure. The substance remains much longer in the body than regular EPO. Schmitt said Roche has provided informa- tion about the treatment to the World Anti- Doping Agency, which has banned EPO for use by athletes.

Sports Digest

Judge refuses to toss Graham’s conviction

A federal judge on Friday declined to toss

out track coach Trevor Graham’s conviction

for lying to federal investigators in a perform- ance-enhancing drug probe.

A jury convicted Graham in May of making

false statements during the investigation into whether sprinter Marion Jones and other ath- letes lied to authorities about their perform- ance-enhancing drug use. Authorities say Graham lied about his relationship to an admitted drug dealer who provided drugs to the coach’s athletes. Graham’s lawyers unsuccessfully argued Friday that the lies had no effect on the sports doping probe, an element prosecutors needed to prove to convict the track coach. The jury couldn’t unanimously decide two other false statement charges, and prosecutors

said Friday they will not seek another trial on those counts. Graham is scheduled to be sentenced Oct. 15 and faces up to a year in prison. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on Tuesday handed the disgraced coach a lifetime ban from most track and elds organizations, including the U.S. Olympics Committee. Graham was the second person from the scandal stemming from a performance- enhancing drug ring based at Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative to be convicted at trial. His trial featured a long parade to the witness stand of the coach’s former athletes who testied that he helped supply them with drugs. Federal investigators testied that Graham’s lies hindered their investigation into Jones’ drug use. Jones, who was coached by Graham, told a grand jury in 2004 that she never used drugs, but it wasn’t until 2007 that she was charged with lying and pleaded guilty.

Former elite cyclist Tammy Thomas was found guilty in April of lying to a federal grand jury when she denied taking steroids. Eight others, including Jones and BALCO founder Victor Conte, have pleaded guilty to charges that stemmed from the September 2003 raid on BALCO headquarters in Burlingame. Major League Baseball home run record holder Barry Bonds is scheduled for trial in March for allegedly lying to a grand jury about his performance-enhancing drug use.

MLS members subdue passenger

An American Airlines ight from Boston to Los Angeles was diverted to Oklahoma City on Friday after a passenger stripped, put his clothes back on and then tried to open an emergency exit door before being subdued by members of a pro soccer team and others, the FBI said. American Flight 725, a Boeing 757 with 151 passengers and seven crew on board,

arrived in Oklahoma City at 1:35 p.m. CDT and was back in the air an hour later on the way to Los Angeles, said Tim Smith, a spokesman for American Airlines. The passenger was removed from the plane in Oklahoma City and was undergoing a psy- chiatric evaluation, FBI spokesman Gary Johnson said. Members of the New England Revolution of Major League Soccer were among those who grabbed the passenger near an exit door, Johnson said. Tie wraps were placed on the man, whose name was not immediately released, he said.

A message left with a team spokeswoman

Friday was not immediately returned. But Stacey James, a spokesman for the New England Patriots, which shares a common owner with the Revolution, said three Revolution staff members helped restrain the unruly passenger: Michael Burns, vice presi- dent of player personnel; assistant coach Gwynne Williams; and general manager Craig Tornberg.

TENNIS

Continued from page 15

don’t hit double faults as a rule. It was kind of weird for me to make all those double faults.

It was kind of frustrating.”

Williams broke Schnyder to take a 4-2 lead and then coasted to the opening set. Schnyder squandered a break point in the nal game of the set, before hitting three straight unforced

errors to lose it. Schnyder held serve to win the opening game of the second set before Williams rolled off the nal six games to advance to the semi nals in her debut at this tournament. Williams decided to come to Stanford because of the low stress level of this tournament. After losing the rst set of her opening match to Portugese qualier Michelle Larcher de Brito, Williams has had little stress. “To be honest, it’s an easy draw. It’s four matches if you get a bye,” she said. “It’s tough to come across a draw like that. Plus I’ve been

here before and I thought the facility was no nice, just so relaxing. It just feels like it’s such a relaxing tournament.” There was much more drama in the rst quarternal when Sugiyama overcame three match points in the second set before advanc- ing to play the winner of the match between defending champion Anna Chakvetadze, the second seed, and sixth-seeded Marion Bartoli in the seminals. Cibulkova won the rst set in a tiebreaker, 7-4, and led 5-2 in the second before faltering. Sugiyama held serve and then broke

Cibulkova to get back on serve. Sugiyama then fell behind 0-40 on her own serve in the 10th game before rallying to win ve straight points to even the set. She went on to force a tiebreaker and won 7-5 to force the third set.

“I still can’t believe I came back from that

position,” Sugiyama said. The nal game got interrupted by an injury timeout and then another delay when audio from a nearby fashion show was accidentally piped into the stadium, forcing the players to wait out the distraction.

18 Weekend July 19-20, 2008

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sports Brief

Turiaf becomes a Warrior

LOS ANGELES — With great reluctance, the Los Angeles Lakers decided at Friday’s deadline they wouldn’t match Golden State’s offer for Ronny Turiaf, meaning the for- mer second-round draft choice will move up the California coast to play for the Warriors. “There are emotional ties with Ronny that go beyond basketball,” Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak said on a conference call. “I think that makes it difcult. I think organizations that draft players who turn out to be good players, it’s hard for them to let go of those play- ers. And if you know Ronny, you know he’s a special kid.” The Warriors signed Turiaf, a restricted free agent, to a four-year, $17 million offer sheet last week. By rule, the Lakers had seven days to decide whether to match it. The three-year veteran from Gonzaga averaged 6.6 points and 3.9 rebounds in 78 games with the Western Conference champions last season, making 21 starts. The Lakers played much of last season without starting center Andrew Bynum, giving Turiaf the opportunity for more playing time than he would have had otherwise. But, Kupchak said, Bynum is expected to be healthy when training camp begins in early October, and Turiaf’s opportunities gured to be diminished signicantly. Kupchak said Bynum has been in New York and underwent physical therapy in 19 of the last 21 days and has been cleared to work out and play. “He’s basically on his own to begin conditioning and basketball activity, starting today,” Kupchak said. “It’s a process.”

 

SAT

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THUR

FRI

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

vs.Brewers

vs.Brewers

OFF

vs.Nationals

vs.Nationals

vs.Nationals

vs.Arizona

1:05 p.m.

1:05 p.m.

7:15 p.m.

7:15 p.m

12:45 p.m.

7:15 p.m.

CSN

CSN

CSN

CSN

NBC

NBC

@Yankees @Yankees @Rays @Rays @Seattle OFF vs.Rangers

@Yankees

@Yankees

@Rays

@Rays

@Seattle

OFF

vs.Rangers

10:05 a.m.

10:05 a.m.

4:10 p.m.

4:10 p.m.

7:10 p.m.

7:05 p.m.

CSN

KICU

CSN

CSN

KICU

CSN

July 19 Jul 24 July 27 Aug. 3 Aug. 16 Aug. 23 Aug. 30

July 19

Jul 24

July 27

Aug. 3

Aug. 16

Aug. 23

Aug. 30

@ Toronto

All Star

vs.N.Y.Red

vs.Galaxy

vs.New

@Chivas

vs.KC Wiz-

Noon

Game at

Bulls

@ Oakland

England

7:30 p.m.

ards

Toronto

noon

noon

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL CLEVELAND INDIANS—Recalled INF Asdrubal Cabrera from Buffalo (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Activated RHP Bobby Jenks from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP D.J. Carassco to Charlotte (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Signed 1B Richie Sexson. Optioned LHP Billy Traber to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).Transferred RHP Phil Hughes from the 15-day to the 60-day DL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Activated SS Bobby Crosby from the 15-day DL.Purchased the contract of LHP Lenny DiNardo from Sacramento (PCL).Op- tioned INF Gregorio Petit to Sacramento. SEATTLE MARINERS—Recalled INF Bryan LaHair from Tacoma (PCL). Optioned INF Tug Hulett to Tacoma.Agreed to terms with OF Julio Morban and RHP Francisco Valdivia. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Activated RHP Al Reyes from the 15-day DL. ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Acquired 1B Tony Clark from San Diego for RHP Evan Scribner.Placed OF Justin Upton on the 15-day DL. CHICAGO CUBS—Placed RHP Jon Lieber on the 15-day DL.Recalled INF Micah Hoffpauir from Iowa (PCL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled RHP Juan Mo- rillo from Colorado Springs (PCL).Designated LHP Mark Redman for assignment. FLORIDA MARLINS—Recalled RHP Jesus Delgado from Carolina (SL). Placed LHP Andrew Miller on the 15-day DL. ST.LOUIS CARDINALS—Activated LHP Randy Flo- res from the 15-day DL.Recalled RHP Kelvin Jimenez from Memphis (PCL).Optioned RHP Chris Perez and OF Joe Mather to Memphis. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Recalled RHP Clay Hensley from Portland (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Placed OF Wily Mo Pena on the 15-day DL.Activated C Johnny Estrada from the 15-day DL. BASKETBALL OKLAHOMA CITY—Signed G C.J.Miles to an offer sheet. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Signed F Marreese Speights. UTAH JAZZ—Signed G Deron Williams to a con- tract extension through the 2011-12 season. FOOTBALL ATLANTA FALCONS—Released WR Tony Gonza- lez. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Agreed to terms with S DaJuan Morgan on a three-year contract. NEW YORK JETS—Signed TE Dustin Keller to a mul- tiyear contract.Waived CB Jonathan Zenon. TENNESSEE TITANS—Agreed to terms with CB Cary Williams on a multiyear contract. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed WR Devin Thomas to a four-year contract.

MLS STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

W

L

T

Pts

GF

GA

New England

10

4

3

33

25

19

Columbus

8

5

4

28

27

25

Chicago

7

5

3

24

24

14

D.C.United

7

7

1

22

28

26

Toronto FC

6

6

3

21

19

20

Kansas City

5

5

6

21

17

21

New York

5

6

5

20

16

24

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 
 

W

L

T

Pts

GF

GA

Real Salt Lake

6

6

5

23

20

19

Los Angeles

6

6

4

22

34

31

CD Chivas USA

6

6

4

22

22

21

Colorado

6

8

2

20

25

21

Houston

4

4

8

20

17

19

FC Dallas

4

6

6

18

19

22

San Jose

3

9

4

13

11

22

NOTE:Three points for victory,one point for tie.

Thursday’s Game Kansas City 3,Columbus 3 Saturday’s Games San Jose at Toronto FC,12 p.m. Los Angeles at New York,3:30 p.m. Colorado at FC Dallas,5:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chicago,5:30 p.m. Tuesday,July 22 Houston at D.C.United,4:30 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

HOCKEY ATLANTA THRASHERS—Agreed to terms with F Angelo Esposito on a multiyear contract. BUFFALO SABRES—Signed G Ryan Miller to a five- year contract extension through the 2013-14 season. CALGARY FLAMES—Signed D Adam Pardy. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Agreed to terms with Michel Dumas,chief amateur scout,on a multiyear contract extension.

AL STANDINGS

AMERICAN LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Tampa Bay

56

39

.589

Boston

57

41

.582

1/2

New York

51

45

.531

5 1/2

Toronto

47

49

.490

9 1/2

Baltimore

46

49

.484

10

Central Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Chicago

55

40

.579

Minnesota

54

42

.563

1 1/2

Detroit

48

48

.500

7 1/2

Kansas City

43

54

.443

13

Cleveland

41

54

.432

14

West Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Los Angeles

58

38

.604

Oakland

51

45

.531

7

Texas

50

47

.515

8 1/2

Seattle

38

58

.396

20

Thursday’s Game Detroit 6,Baltimore 5

 

Friday’s Games

N.Y.Yankees 7,Oakland 1 Baltimore 7,Detroit 4 Tampa Bay 2,Toronto 1 Minnesota 6,Texas 0 Chicago White Sox 9,Kansas City 5 L.A.Angels 11,Boston 3 Seattle 8,Cleveland 2

Saturday’s Games Oakland (Gallagher 4-4) at N.Y.Yankees (Chamber- lain 2-3),1:005 a.m. Cleveland (Sowers 0-5) at Seattle (Washburn 4-8), 12:55 p.m. Boston (Beckett 9-5) at L.A.Angels (Saunders 12-5), 12:55 p.m. Toronto (Halladay 11-6) at Tampa Bay (Garza 7-5), 3:10 p.m. Detroit (Robertson 6-8) at Baltimore (D.Cabrera 6- 5),4:05 p.m. Kansas City (Meche 6-9) at Chicago White Sox (G.Floyd 10-5),4:05 p.m. Texas (Harrison 1-0) at Minnesota (Hernandez 9-6), 4:10 p.m.

Sunday’s Games Oakland at N.Y.Yankees,10:05 a.m. Detroit at Baltimore,10:35 a.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay,10:40 a.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox,11:05 a.m. Texas at Minnesota,11:10 a.m. Cleveland at Seattle,1:10 p.m. Boston at L.A.Angels,3:05 p.m.

NL STANDINGS

NATIONAL LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Philadelphia

53

44

.546

New York

52

45

.536

1

Florida

50

46

.521

2 1/2

Atlanta

46

50

.479

6 1/2

Washington

36

61

.371

17

Central Division W

L

Pct

GB

Chicago

57

39

.594

St.Louis

55

43

.561

3

Milwaukee

53

43

.552

4

Cincinnati

47

51

.480

11

Houston

45

51

.469

12

Pittsburgh

44

52

.458

13

West Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Arizona

47

48

.495

Los Angeles

46

49

.484

1

Colorado

41

57

.418

7 1/2

San Francisco

40

56

.417

7 1/2

San Diego

37

60

.381

11

Thursday’s Games N.Y.Mets 10,Cincinnati 8 St.Louis 4,San Diego 3 Colorado 5,Pittsburgh 3