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Hourly Analysis Program Version 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar Copyright

Hourly Analysis Program

Version 4.4

Hourly Analysis Program Version 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar Copyright Carrier

Advanced Training Seminar

Hourly Analysis Program Version 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar Copyright Carrier
Hourly Analysis Program Version 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar Copyright Carrier

HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar

Program Version 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar Copyright Carrier Corp. ©
Program Version 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar Copyright Carrier Corp. ©

Copyright Carrier Corp. © 2008

Carrier Corporation 6304 Carrier Parkway P.O. Box 4808 Bldg TR-4, Room 400A E. Syracuse, NY 13057 Phone 800.253.1794 Fax 315.432.6844 e-mail: software.systems@carrier.utc.com ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereon may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means— graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, Web distribution or information storage and retrieval systems—without the written permission of Carrier Corporation.

For permission to use material from this text, contact us by Tel (800) 253-1794 • Fax (315)432.3871 e-Mail software.systems@carrier.utc.com

Fax (315)432.3871 e-Mail software.systems@carrier.utc.com HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 2 Copyright Carrier
Fax (315)432.3871 e-Mail software.systems@carrier.utc.com HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 2 Copyright Carrier
Fax (315)432.3871 e-Mail software.systems@carrier.utc.com HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 2 Copyright Carrier
Fax (315)432.3871 e-Mail software.systems@carrier.utc.com HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 2 Copyright Carrier

Table of Contents

EARNING CEU CREDITS FOR SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THIS TRAINING

4

COURSE LEANING OUTCOMES

4

WELCOME TO HAP 4.4

5

WORKBOOK ORGANIZATION

5

PROJECT DATA MANAGEMENT

5

PROJECT DEFINITION AND OUTLINE

9

WORKSHOP # 1 - PROJECT CREATION AND WEATHER DATA

16

WORKSHOP # 2 – EDITING SCHEDULES

24

WORKSHOP # 3 – WING D AIR SYSTEM INPUT 4PFCU

32

WORKSHOP # 4 – WING D AIR SYSTEM INPUT–PACKAGED ROOFTOP UNIT

47

WORKSHOP # 5 – MODELING CHILLERS, BOILERS, & TOWERS

68

WORKSHOP # 6 – FINALIZING CHILLER AND BOILER PLANTS

94

WORKSHOP # 7 – DEFINING AND SIMULATING BUILDINGS

119

WINDOWS SOFTWARE BASICS

164

USING HAP 4.4 FOR SYSTEM DESIGN LOADS

169

APPENDIX “C”

176

THE SIZING DILEMMA

176

WHICH SIZING METHOD TO USE?

177

PUTTING LOAD CALCULATION METHODS IN PERSPECTIVE

179

THE BENEFITS OF THE TRANSFER FUNCTION / HEAT EXTRACTION LOAD CALCULATION METHOD

182

DIAGNOSING THE “THERMOS BOTTLE EFFECT

183

USING OUTDOOR VENTILATION CONTROL OPTIONS

188

DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION CONTROL

189

UNDERSTANDING ZONE LOADS AND ZONE CONDITIONING

192

PITFALLS OF ECONOMIZER OPERATION

195

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PEAK COIL LOAD CFM, MAX BLOCK CFM, SUM OF PEAK ZONE CFM

198

SELECTING EQUIPMENT WHEN COIL CFM (L/S) DIFFER

201

HOW VENTILATION LOADS ARE CALCULATED IN HAP

202

SYSTEM BASED DESIGN LOAD CALCULATIONS

204

APPENDIX “D”

212

NOTES

224

For Technical Support Please contact Software Systems Network at 1.800.253.1794 or e-mail:

software.systems@carrier.utc.com

For additional information and Program Downloads visit us at: www.commercial.carrier.com

Earning CEU Credits for Successful Completion of this Training

E20 software training as part of Carrier’s Technical Training Center has been reviewed and approved as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET). IACET's mission is to promote and enhance quality in continuing education and training through research, education, and standard setting. IACET Authorized Providers undergo a strict evaluation of their educational processes according to the IACET Criteria and Guidelines, including two reviews by IACET's Commission and a site visit by an IACET Commissioner. Members of the organization are the educational professionals that strive to provide the highest quality in continuing education and training.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

One (1) IACET CEU is equal to ten (10) contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction. After successfully completing this training, the student will receive an appropriate number of CEU’s based on the classroom contact time. In addition, the student should feel very comfortable using the E20 software to enhance their HVAC related job responsibilities.

to enhance their HVAC related job responsibilities. Course Leaning Outcomes As part of this software training,

Course Leaning Outcomes

As part of this software training, each student will learn how to use the Hourly Analysis Program (Energy Simulation) by completing a series of hands-on project exercises. These exercises are intended to confirm the student’s ability to understand the course learning outcomes. These are:

Define and input the following

o Energy simulation weather data, internal load schedules including profiles used for energy analysis, unitary packaged equipment power requirements, water chillers, boilers, cooling towers, hydronic distribution systems, electric and fuel rate structures, miscellaneous building energy use

Generate and interpret simulation reports for air systems and plants

Generate and interpret diagnostic reports for air systems and plants

Trouble shoot air systems and plants

Generate and interpret annual cost reports for a base and alternate design case

Determine best practices from energy simulation reports

• Determine best practices from energy simulation reports This Symbol is used throughout this manual and

This Symbol is used throughout this manual and represents required learning outcomes. Each student is expected to comprehend the subject content and successfully demonstrate competency in these areas.

Welcome to HAP 4.4

T his manual was created for the engineers and designers using the Carrier Hourly Analysis Program v4.4 for calculating commercial building cooling and heating loads and energy simulation. This manual is a companion to the hands-on training for the

Hourly Analysis Program Basic Training course facilitated by Carrier Software Systems Network. This manual includes all class exercises and workflow tips. The goal of this manual is to make each student comfortable and familiar with the input routines and the

calculated results of the HAP design loads and energy simulation.

Workbook Organization

The intent of the sections in this manual is to follow the logical process of the hands-on workshops and workflow. We cover the common process and special features of the Carrier HAP program.

We arranged the topics of discussion in the same order as our hands-on training classes. The first two sections address the program installation, basic system requirements and general housekeeping. We also highlight and discuss the program interface and functionality.

The remaining sections follow the logical path of the program’s modules including detailed discussions and examples of the workflow process used to create a complete HAP data set. This includes detailed discussions of the input forms, editing, document outputs and more.

This manual also includes three appendixes. Appendix A consists of detailed schematics of all air system types in the HAP program. Appendix B, includes a discussion on basic HAP and Windows program functions Appendix C includes detailed discussions of common questions about the HAP program. Appendix D includes several white papers discussing the advantages of the HAP program.

Project Data Management

This topic discusses projects and the management of project data. What is a Project? All the data you enter and calculate in HAP is stored together within a "project.” A Project is simply a container for your data. However, a project can hold data for other programs as well as HAP. For example, if you create a project for a building design job, it might contain load estimating and system design data from HAP, air handler selection data from the Carrier AHU Builder program, and air terminal selection data from the Carrier Air Terminal Selection program. Keeping this data together in a single container is often more efficient than keeping the data in several separate locations.

Using Projects. HAP provides a variety of features for performing common tasks with projects. You can:

Create a new project by using the New option on the Project Menu.

Edit data in an existing project by using the Open option on the Project Menu

Save changes in a project by using the Save option on the Project Menu

Save changes to a new project using the Save As option on the Project Menu

Delete an existing project using the Delete option on the Project Menu

Edit descriptive data for the project, such as the project name, using the Properties option on the Project Menu

Archive project data for safe keeping using the Archive option on the Project Menu

Retrieve data that you earlier archived using the Retrieve option on the Project Menu

Convert data from a previous version of HAP using one of the Convert HAP Data options on the Project Menu

Import data from another project into the current project using the Import Data option on the Project Menu

How Project Data is Stored. When a new project is saved for the first time, you designate the folder that will hold the project files (either by accepting the default folder \E20-II\Projects\ProjectName or by specifying a folder yourself). This folder is the permanent storage location of project data. When you open the project to work with its data, temporary copies of the project’s data files are made. As you enter data, make changes and perform calculations, all this data is stored in the temporary copy of the data files. Only when you use the Save option on the Project Menu, are the changes you have made copied to permanent storage. Therefore, if you ever need to undo changes you have made to a project, simply re-open the project without saving the changes you have made. When you re-open the project, the changes stored in the temporary copy of the data files are discarded, and data from your last project/save is restored.

Recommended Project Management Practices. Project data represents an important investment of your time and effort. And, as the saying goes, ‘time is money’. Therefore, it is important to safeguard your investment in project data. We recommend adopting the following practices when working with projects:

Create a separate project for each job you work on. It is usually more efficient to keep data for separate jobs in separate projects. It is also safer to store data in smaller, focused units. If you keep data for all jobs in a single project, and this project becomes damaged, your data loss will be greater than if you keep data for separate jobs in separate projects.

Use a descriptive name for the project so you can quickly recognize what it contains, both now and when you need to refer to the project in the future. Because the selection list for projects is arranged alphabetically, it is useful to use a consistent naming convention. Many firms begin the project name with their internal project number followed by descriptive text (e.g., P2002-47 Lincoln School).

Save early and often. While entering data, changing data and generating reports, save the project periodically. This practice is useful in the event that you make a mistake and need to undo changes. If the last time you saved the project was 15 minutes ago, undoing your mistake will only cause you to lose 15 minutes of work. On the other hand, if the last time you saved the data was 4 hours ago, undoing a mistake may cause you to lose 4 hours worth of work.

Archive your data periodically for safekeeping. These days, data on hard disks is relatively safe. However, it is still possible for hard disk drives to become damaged, or for files on the hard disk to be damaged or erased. Therefore, it is a good practice to periodically archive your project data. Data can be archived to a separate location on

your hard disk, to a different hard disk drive or to removable media such as a compact disk, zip drive or floppy disks. For example, if you archive data for a large project at the end of each day and your hard disk drive fails, at most you will have lost one day’s worth of work. On the other hand, if data for the same large project was never archived and your hard disk drive fails, all the project data would be lost.

What is New in HAP 4.4?

This topic describes enhancements in HAP v4.40. It is intended for readers who have upgraded from HAP v4.34 to v4.40. Most of the enhancements made in v4.40 relate to two major themes:

1. Theme 1 – Using HAP for LEED Energy and Atmosphere Credit 1 Analysis.

HAP was modified to streamline steps in performing a LEED EA Credit 1 analysis making it faster and easier to perform. Specific modifications include:

LEED NC 2.2 EA Credit 1 Summary Report. This new report provides data found in sections 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8.1, 1.8.1b, 1.8.2 and 1.8.2b of the LEED NC 2.2 EA Credit 1 on-line submittal template and imitates the format of the submittal template. This report eliminates the tedious work of assembling submittal template report data from multiple HAP reports.

Duplicate Building with Spaces and HVAC Eqpt option. This new option automatically duplicates a HAP building and all the systems, plants, spaces, chillers, cooling towers and boilers it contains in one-step. This option is useful when starting definition of the Baseline building based on a duplicate of data for the Proposed Building. More importantly, it facilitates placing Proposed and Baseline buildings in a single project so the Credit 1 Summary Report can be generated.

Perform LEED (90.1 PRM) Rotations option. This new option automatically makes three copies of the "Baseline 0 Degree" building and all of its systems, plants, spaces, chillers, cooling

towers and boilers. In the three copies, spaces are rotated 90 deg, 180 deg and 270 deg respectively.

This provides a rapid way to generate the three rotations of the Baseline building. It also makes it

efficient to place all Proposed and Baseline buildings in a single project so the Credit 1 Summary Report can be generated.

Autosizing for DX and Plant Equipment. This feature allows you to specify that equipment

gross capacity be automatically determined as peak load plus a specified percent oversizing factor.

For example, peak cooling load + 15%.

Input DX Equipment Performance as EER or COP. This feature allows you to specify

DX equipment as EER for cooling or COP for heating. The software then automatically

decompiles the EER or COP to determine compressor kW for use in the simulation.

All Terminal Units Use Same Settings. When defining equipment performance for DX fan coils, WSHP, GWSHP or GSHP equipment, this new option allows you to specify one set of EER or COP performance values to apply to all zone terminal units in a system. This saves you from having to define compressor kW for each zone fan coil or heat pump separately.

Baseline Fan kW Calculated per ASHRAE 90.1 Appendix G section G3.1.2.9. When defining air systems for a Baseline building, you have the option of defining supply fan performance be automatically calculated per the equation in section G3.1.2.9. This equation sets the total fan kW for the system.

Fan Performance Defined as W/CFM. When specifying fan performance for fan powered mixing box terminals, performance can be input as W/CFM (W/L/s). The program will then automatically derive the fan watts from the design CFM for the box.

ASHRAE 90.1 Appendix G VAV Fan Part-Load Curve. VAV fan part-load performance can be modeled using the VAV fan curve found in Appendix G Table G3.1.3.15.

Water Flow Rate Inputs as gpm/Ton or Delta-T. New options allow water flow rates to be defined in terms of gpm/Ton (L/s/kW) or delta-T in addition to gpm.

Water Pump Performance as W/gpm or kW. New options allow water pump performance to be defined in terms of W/gpm (W/L/s) or kW in addition to the existing specification of pump head.

2. Theme 2 - Adding Features for Preliminary or Schematic Design. Throughout its

history, HAP has focused on system design and energy analysis tasks typically occurring in the detailed design phase of a project. These tasks involve detailed definition of the building envelope, layout and HVAC equipment, and require time-consuming data entry to create a suitably detailed building model. When performing energy analysis in the preliminary or schematic design phase of a project, the objective is to quickly and roughly compare a large set of design alternatives to identify the most promising designs. This work typically does not require as detailed a definition of the building and its HVAC equipment. To make HAP more efficient for performing these types of analyses, new Wizard features have been added to allow users to rapidly generate input data for an analysis. This work builds on the Building Wizard feature offered in HAP v4.3. Specific enhancements include:

New Wizards Menu. Provides options for running Building Wizard or Equipment Wizard alone, and for running an integrated session linking Building and Equipment Wizards together.

Building Wizard Option. The Building Wizard option on the Wizards Menu can be used to rapidly generate space data for a building. The Building Wizard has been revised and upgraded for HAP v4.4.

Equipment Wizard Option. The Equipment Wizard option on the Wizards Menu can be used to rapidly generate HVAC equipment for a building - specifically all of the air systems, plants, chillers, cooling towers and boilers, as applicable.

Full Wizard Session Option. The "Full Wizard Session" option on the Wizards Menu allows you to run the Building Wizard and Equipment Wizard in tandem. In as single Wizard session you can generate space data and data for multiple equipment designs. This essentially creates 95% of the input data for an energy cost study in minutes rather than hours or days. Only weather and utility rate data must be added before running calculations.

Project Definition and Outline

Our project for this hands-on training is a small private school building constructed in St. Louis, MO. There are eight separate workshops with numerous work sessions in each of the workshops requiring use and understanding of all modules in the HAP program.

The first uses includes updating the weather data by adding the simulation weather data set to the project folder. This step also includes defining annual holidays.

The second workshop requires updating of the fractional schedules and their assignments.

In the third workshop, we define a new air system type for Classroom wing “D,” calculate the design and energy simulation and; discuss the results.

Workshop # 4 is an alternate air system for the Classroom Wing “D” that utilizes Packaged Rooftop Units with different capacity controls for each workshop.

In workshop # 5, we retrieve a second archive that brings in all air systems required for the different case studies. Additionally, we will add chillers, towers and boilers to our project library.

Workshop # 6 links our chillers, towers and boilers to the building’s plant type. We then simulate the different plant case studies and compare operating characteristics.

In workshop # 7, we will add the utility rates to the project library. This workshop looks at simple and complex rate structures for electric and natural gas. We also look at the Utility Rate Time of Day schedule. We then defining the different building case studies, perform the energy simulation and compare the results; thus enabling us to offer the best solution to the building owner and decision makers.

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Workshop # 1 Inputs HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 15 Copyright Carrier Corp. ©

Workshop # 1 Inputs

Workshop # 1 Inputs HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 15 Copyright Carrier Corp. © 2008

This Page is Intentionally Left Blank

Workshop # 1 – Create New Project and Enter Weather Data

Our first workshop focuses on expanding an existing design load analysis to include a complete energy simulation. We will retrieve an archived system design load project developed in the HAP Basic Training Seminar. The retrieval of this project includes all spaces, air systems and library items so we can focus on the additional input requirements for completing an energy analysis. Take the following steps to get started in this workshop.

Take the following steps to get started in this workshop. WEATHER DATA PROJECT DATA Launch HAP

WEATHER DATA

PROJECT DATA

Launch HAP on your training laptop. On the project menu bar, select “Project/Retrieve.

The program will look in the default location for the archive file. Retrieve the archive “HAP 44 ADVANCED ARCHIVE 1 UNSOLVED.E3A.” After successfully retrieving the project, click on “Project, “Save as” to create a project folder. Use the default data path for the location of the project folder, and name the project.

Next, left click on “View/Preferences,” then in the General” tab check the option “Enable Energy Analysis Features.”

Review the already configured design weather data to insure that you are using default ASHRAE design weather data for St. Louis, MO.

In the simulation input form under the simulation tab, configure energy simulation data for the same city. Select simulation weather by left clicking on the “Change City” button and navigating to the USA_MISSOURI_ST. LOUIS.TMY2.HW1 file. This action will link the TMY-2 simulation weather data to the project. The first day of the year selection, (use the default day Wednesday) determines where the weekends occur.

The next step is to add the following dates to the Holidays List by double left clicking the date on the calendar:

January 1 April 18 May 26 July 4 September 1 November 27, 28 December 25, 26,29,30,31

4 September 1 November 27, 28 December 25, 26,29,30,31 HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 17

Note: Please remember to “save early and save often

Design and simulation weather reports are displayed on the following pages.

Weather reports are available by highlighting “weather” in the left tree then left clicking on “Reports” and choosing “Print/View Input Data”

or

“Reports” and choosing “Print/View Input Data” or right click on < Weather Properties> and choose

right click on < Weather Properties> and choose “Print/View Input Data”.

Select the weather reports shown below. “Design” weather data is used for peak heating and cooling load calculations and equipment sizing purposes. HAP uses 8760 hourly “Simulation” weather data to simulate building energy consumption and calculate an annual operating cost.

energy consumption and calculate an annual operating cost. HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 18 Copyright

Design Parameters:

Weather Reports

City Name Location Latitude Longitude

St. Louis IAP Missouri 38.8 Deg. 90.4 Deg.

Elevation

564.0 ft

Summer Design Dry-Bulb

95.0

°F

Summer Coincident Wet-Bulb

76.0

°F

Summer Daily Range

18.3

°F

Winter Design Dry-Bulb

2.0

°F

Winter Design Wet-Bulb

0.3

°F

Atmospheric Clearness Number

0.95

Average Ground Reflectance

0.20

Soil Conductivity

0.800

BTU/(hr-ft-°F)

Local Time Zone (GMT +/- N hours)

6.0

hours

Consider Daylight Savings Time Daylight Savings Begins Daylight Savings Ends Simulation Weather Data Current Data is Design Cooling Months

Yes April, 11 October, 24 St. Louis IAP (TM2) 2001 ASHRAE Handbook January to December

Design Day Maximum Solar Heat Gains

(The MSHG values are expressed in BTU/(hr-ft²) )

Month

N

NNE

NE

ENE

E

ESE

SE

SSE

S

January

19.1

19.1

19.1

82.2

145.6

201.6

228.2

239.2

240.5

February

23.3

23.3

43.6

125.8

183.5

221.7

236.9

232.1

226.0

March

27.7

27.7

98.7

156.5

208.2

227.8

223.6

203.9

191.0

April

32.1

66.8

134.7

186.0

208.8

213.1

188.5

157.7

139.2

May

35.3

99.1

154.7

196.5

208.9

195.5

161.6

120.2

99.7

June

43.8

109.2

162.0

198.1

204.6

186.9

148.2

104.6

83.9

July

36.2

95.9

154.8

193.0

202.2

192.1

157.1

117.6

97.2

August

33.8

63.1

131.9

178.7

201.8

205.8

182.9

152.7

134.9

September

28.8

28.8

92.1

151.1

195.0

218.3

213.5

196.6

185.1

October

24.0

24.0

51.6

112.9

177.1

214.5

229.0

224.8

219.2

November

19.4

19.4

19.4

79.7

145.9

194.6

227.1

237.3

236.6

December

17.2

17.2

17.2

65.2

127.9

188.2

219.6

237.4

238.9

Month

SSW

SW

WSW

W

WNW

NW

NNW

HOR

Mult

January

241.1

231.3

197.5

149.1

80.5

19.1

19.1

132.0

1.00

February

231.7

236.6

223.7

183.6

120.5

53.3

23.3

176.0

1.00

March

202.8

221.2

229.0

203.3

162.6

97.2

27.7

215.0

1.00

April

157.6

188.4

213.1

209.1

186.0

134.5

67.1

240.1

1.00

May

120.6

161.0

196.0

208.2

196.6

155.6

98.4

252.3

1.00

June

103.9

149.0

186.0

205.4

197.6

160.5

110.1

254.3

1.00

July

116.1

158.1

190.4

205.1

192.6

151.6

99.2

249.8

1.00

August

152.0

181.6

205.4

201.8

179.7

130.6

66.6

236.3

1.00

September

197.2

214.7

216.8

197.4

147.9

92.1

28.8

207.5

1.00

October

224.8

228.4

213.6

175.5

120.6

42.7

24.0

172.8

1.00

November

235.4

224.2

197.9

142.8

80.8

19.4

19.4

131.3

1.00

December

237.6

219.2

188.2

127.4

65.3

17.2

17.2

111.8

1.00

Mult. = User-defined solar multiplier factor.

Table 1. Descriptive Parameters:

City Location

St. Louis IAP Missouri

Type of Data

(TM2)

Latitude

38.8 Deg.

Longitude

90.4 Deg.

Elevation

564.3 ft

Local Time Zone (GMT +/- N hours)

6.0

hours

Daylight Savings Begins

April, 11

Daylight Savings Ends

October, 24

Average Ground Reflectance

0.20

Table 2. Dry-Bulb Temperature Statistics ( °F ):

Month

Absolute

Average

Average

Average

Absolute

Maximum

Maximum

Minimum

Minimum

January

64.0

37.2

27.2

19.1

3.0

February

64.9

42.9

32.7

23.2

1.9

March

80.1

53.9

44.9

36.3

15.1

April

91.9

68.5

57.6

48.0

30.0

May

90.0

77.4

67.2

56.9

41.0

June

93.9

84.1

75.0

65.8

50.0

July

100.0

87.5

78.2

69.3

55.0

August

100.9

85.5

77.6

69.8

57.0

September

91.0

79.5

69.1

60.0

46.0

October

81.0

65.9

55.0

45.6

34.0

November

75.9

53.3

44.7

36.4

19.9

December

57.9

38.8

30.4

22.6

0.0

Table 3. Daily Solar Radiation Statistics:

 

Daily Total Solar on Horizontal ( BTU/ft² )

Daily Clearness Number (dimensionless)

Month

Maximum

Average

Minimum

Maximum

Average

Minimum

January

1051.6

687.6

358.9

0.697

0.483

0.277

February

1489.0

942.6

469.3

0.695

0.499

0.270

March

1950.1

1308.9

505.3

0.722

0.522

0.195

April

2201.3

1613.6

881.3

0.744

0.520

0.310

May

2555.8

1890.7

830.7

0.743

0.538

0.236

June

2684.7

2049.8

1106.1

0.727

0.557

0.302

July

2525.1

2024.7

1163.9

0.692

0.564

0.326

August

2362.8

1716.8

714.9

0.704

0.528

0.219

September

2072.7

1433.8

764.6

0.733

0.528

0.282

October

1691.7

1090.9

370.2

0.717

0.522

0.192

November

1159.8

724.4

350.5

0.668

0.469

0.249

December

945.2

576.0

313.4

0.700

0.449

0.235

Table 4. Time of Occurrence for Maximums and Minimums:

 

Month

Highest Dry-Bulb

Lowest Dry-Bulb

Maximum Total

Minimum Total

Temperature

Temperature

Solar

Solar

January

Jan 29, 1500

Jan 6, 0600

Jan 24

Jan 3

February

Feb 18, 1200

Feb 3, 0300

Feb 27

Feb 7

March

Mar 17, 1500

Mar 7, 0600

Mar 25

Mar 20

April

Apr 28, 1600

Apr 5, 0600

Apr 7

Apr 1

May

May 28, 1600

May 9, 0500

May 8

May 16

June

Jun 28, 1400

Jun 3, 0500

Jun 24

Jun 5

July

Jul 31, 1600

Jul 21, 0400

Jul 8

Jul 20

August

Aug 28, 1500

Aug 7, 0600

Aug 9

Aug 16

September

Sep 5, 1600

Sep 25, 0700

Sep 10

Sep 16

October

Oct 27, 1500

Oct 13, 0700

Oct 3

Oct 24

November

Nov 19, 1400

Nov 30, 0700

Nov 3

Nov 25

December

Dec 15, 1400

Dec 10, 0500

Dec 1

Dec 3

Table 5. Calendar Data:

 
 

Day of Week for January 1st

 

Wednesday

Holidays:

Jan

1

 

Apr

18

May

26

Jul

4

Sep

1

Nov

27

28

 

Dec

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Friday, August 1

Hour

Dry-Bulb

Wet-Bulb

 

Beam Solar

 

Total Solar

(

°F )

(

°F )

on Horiz.

on Horiz.

   

(

BTU/(hr-ft²) )

(

BTU/(hr-ft²) )

0000

76.3

66.4

 

0.0

 

0.0

0100

75.0

65.6

 

0.0

 

0.0

0200

72.9

64.4

 

0.0

 

0.0

0300

72.0

63.8

 

0.0

 

0.0

0400

70.2

62.6

 

0.0

 

0.0

0500

68.7

61.7

 

0.0

 

0.0

0600

66.0

60.4

 

0.5

 

11.0

0700

65.5

60.4

 

23.9

 

52.7

0800

66.9

60.5

 

83.7

 

120.2

0900

70.0

61.6

 

111.6

 

169.9

1000

73.0

63.2

 

166.2

 

217.2

1100

75.9

63.1

 

207.4

 

261.6

1200

77.0

62.4

 

189.7

 

260.7

1300

80.1

64.5

 

195.1

 

274.3

1400

80.1

63.5

 

153.4

 

221.6

1500

81.0

63.8

 

161.0

 

227.6

1600

82.0

63.8

 

126.3

 

186.8

1700

82.0

64.7

 

102.2

 

139.3

1800

81.0

64.8

 

44.0

 

71.9

1900

80.1

64.1

 

5.6

 

18.6

2000

78.1

63.4

 

0.0

 

0.6

2100

75.9

62.7

 

0.0

 

0.0

2200

73.9

62.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

2300

72.0

61.3

 

0.0

 

0.0

Saturday, August 2

 

Hour

Dry-Bulb

Wet-Bulb

 

Beam Solar

 

Total Solar

(

°F )

(

°F )

on Horiz.

on Horiz.

   

(

BTU/(hr-ft²) )

(

BTU/(hr-ft²) )

0000

71.1

61.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

0100

70.0

61.1

 

0.0

 

0.0

0200

70.0

60.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

0300

68.0

61.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

0400

68.0

59.9

 

0.0

 

0.0

0500

66.9

60.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

0600

66.9

60.6

 

1.0

 

9.6

0700

68.0

61.0

 

25.2

 

50.2

0800

70.0

61.6

 

28.8

 

84.0

0900

72.0

64.1

 

33.6

 

114.4

1000

78.1

65.5

 

19.9

 

97.2

1100

79.0

64.1

 

203.7

 

268.0

1200

82.0

66.1

 

257.3

 

282.3

1300

84.0

67.4

 

175.6

 

253.3

1400

86.0

69.0

 

127.7

 

234.2

1500

87.1

70.0

 

136.7

 

212.1

1600

87.1

70.0

 

134.9

 

180.2

1700

86.0

69.7

 

74.1

 

121.0

1800

87.1

70.0

 

52.8

 

74.7

1900

84.9

69.8

 

13.3

 

22.5

2000

82.9

69.3

 

0.0

 

1.0

2100

81.0

69.3

 

0.0

 

0.0

2200

80.1

69.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

2300

78.1

69.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Workshop # 2 Inputs HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 23 Copyright Carrier Corp. ©

Workshop # 2 Inputs

Workshop # 2 Inputs HAP V 4.4 Advanced Training Seminar 23 Copyright Carrier Corp. © 2008

This Page is Intentionally Left Blank

Workshop # 2 – Editing Schedules

SCHEDULES

Workshop # 2 – Editing Schedules SCHEDULES This workshop focuses on editing the schedules created for

This workshop focuses on editing the schedules created for our system design load. The following three schedules were created during the design load phase of the project and retrieved in the archive. Please add the following additional profiles to each schedule as noted:

LIGHTS – CLASSROOMS Profile #3 – Energy Weekday

00-06: 10%

07:

50%

08-11:100%

12:

00%

13-15: 100%

16:

50%

17:

20%

18-23:

10%

Profile #4 – Energy Weekend

Hours 00-23: 10%

18-23: 10% Profile #4 – Energy Weekend Hours 00-23: 10% On the assignments tab, assign Profile

On the assignments tab, assign Profile #3 to day types Monday Thru Friday in all months except July. Assign existing Profile #2 from the design load phase to day types Monday thru Friday in the month of July only.

Assign Profile #4 to day types Saturday, Sunday, and Holiday for all twelve (12) months.

PEOPLE - CLASSROOMS Profile #3 – Energy Weekday Hours 00-07: 00% Hours 08-11: 100%

Hour 12:

0%

Hours 13-15: 100%

Hour 16:

40%

Hour 17:

10%

Hours 18-23:

00%

Profile #4 – Energy Weekend Hours 00-23: 00%

00% Profile #4 – Energy Weekend Hours 00-23: 00% On the assignments tab, assign Profile #3

On the assignments tab, assign Profile #3 to day types Monday Thru Friday in all months except July. Assign Profile #2 to day types Monday through Friday for July only.

Assign Profile #4 to day types Saturday, Sunday, and Holiday for all twelve (12) months.

PEOPLE – CORRIDORS Profile #3 – Energy Weekday Hours 00-06: 00% Hours 07-16: 50% Hours 17-23: 00%

Profile #4 – Energy Weekend Hours 00-23: 00%

On the assignments tab, assign Profile #3 to day types Monday Thru Friday in all moths except July. Assign existing Profile #2 to day types Monday thru Friday for the month of July only.

day types Monday thru Friday for the month of July only. Assign Profile #4 to day

Assign Profile #4 to day types Saturday, Sunday, and Holiday for all twelve (12) months.

OCCUPIED (FAN/THERMOSTAT) SCHEDULE – CLASSROOM

Profile #3 – Energy Weekday Hours 00-05:

Hours 06-17:

Hours 18-23:

Unoccupied

Occupied

Unoccupied

Profile #4 – Energy Weekends = Unoccupied 00-23

Apply Profile #2 to the month of July only

Unoccupied 00-23 Apply Profile #2 to the month of July only Copies of workshop # 3

Copies of workshop # 3 schedule input forms are displayed below.

Lights – Classroom, Schedule Input Data

Lights - Classrooms (Fractional)

Hourly Profiles:

1:Design Day

 

Hour

00

01

 

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

 

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Value

10

10

 

10

10

10

10

10

10

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

30

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

2:Summer Shutdown De

 
 

Hour

00

01

 

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

 

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Value

0

0

 

0

0

0

0

0

0

60

60

 

60

60

60

60

60

60

60

0

 

0

0

0

0

0

0

3:Energy Weekday

 
 

Hour

00

01

 

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

 

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Value

10

10

 

10

10

10

10

10

50

100

100

100

100

0

100

100

100

50

20

10

10

10

10

10

10

4:Energy Weekend

 
 

Hour

00

01

 

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

 

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Value

10

10

 

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

 

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

Assignments:

 
   

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

 

May

Jun

Jul

 

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 
 

Design

 

1

1

 

1

1

 

1

 

1

2

 

1

1

1

 

1

1

 

Monday

 

3

3

 

3

3

 

3

 

3

2

 

3

3

3

 

3

3

 

Tuesday

 

3

3

 

3

3

 

3

 

3

2

 

3

3

3

 

3

3

 

Wednesday

 

3

3

 

3

3

 

3

 

3

2

 

3

3

3

 

3

3

 

Thursday

 

3

3

 

3

3

 

3

 

3

2

 

3

3

3

 

3

3

 

Friday

 

3

3

 

3

3

 

3

 

3

2

 

3

3

3

 

3

3

 

Saturday

 

4

4

 

4

4

 

4

 

4

4

 

4

4

4

 

4

4

 

Sunday

 

4

4

 

4

4

 

4

 

4

4

 

4

4

4

 

4

4

 

Holiday

 

4

4

 

4

4

 

4

 

4

4

 

4

4

4

 

4

4

People – Classroom, Schedule Input Data

People - Classrooms (Fractional)

Hourly Profiles:

1:Design Day

 

Hour

00

01

 

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

 

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Value

0

0

 

0

0

0

0

0

5

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

40

10