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CMBS Quarterly Insights: Spanning The CMBS Globe, Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Primary Contacts:

CMBS Quarterly Insights:

Spanning The CMBS Globe, Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist

Primary Contacts:

Larry Kay, New York (1) 212-438-2504; larry.kay@standardandpoors.com Arnaud Checconi, London (44) 20-7176-3410; checconia@standardandpoors.com Yuji Hashimoto, Tokyo (81) 3-4550-8275; yuji.hashimoto@standardandpoors.com Narelle Coneybeare, Sydney (61) 2-9255-9838; narelle.coneybeare@standardandpoors.com

Secondary Contacts:

Maria Rabiasz, Toronto (1) 416-507-2542; maria.rabiasz@standardandpoors.com Jason J Lami, New York (1) 212-438-6519; jason.lami@standardandpoors.com Tamara A Hoffman, New York (1) 212-438-3365; tamara.hoffman@standardandpoors.com

CMBS Surveillance:

Barbara A Hoeltz, Analytical Manager, New York (1) 212-438-3621; barbara.hoeltz@standardandpoors.com

CMBS:

Peter J Eastham, Analytical Manager, New York (1) 212-438-5908; peter.eastham@standardandpoors.com

Investor Relations:

Ted J Burbage, New York (1) 212-438-2684; ted.burbage@standardandpoors.com Ernestine Warner, New York (1) 212-438-2633; ernestine.warner@standardandpoors.com

Table Of Contents

U.S.

As Clouds Appear, CMBS Issuance Slows

Real Estate Recovery Migrates To Secondary Markets

For Future Loan Maturities, Interest Rates Might Not Be As Forgiving

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Table Of Contents (cont.)

CANADA

Strong Property Markets And Collateral Performance

EUROPE

New Issuance Is Focused On Stable, Performing Assets

CRE Capital Values Are Still At A Significant Discount From Their Peak

CMBS Loan Refinancing Remains Challenging

JAPAN

CMBS Market Slows, Bank Lending Busy

CRE Prices Have Bottomed

AUSTRALIA AND SINGAPORE

Stable Market Conditions, But No New Issuance

RELATED RESEARCH

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Spanning The CMBS Globe, Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist

(Editor's Note: This is the feature portion of the second-quarter 2013 CMBS Quarterly Insights report. The second part, titled "U.S. CMBS Credit Vehicle Hits On All Eight Cylinders In The Second Quarter," focuses on delinquency trends, loan maturities, and quarterly rating actions. For detailed information on second-quarter rating activity, see "North American CMBS And Re-REMIC/CRE CDO Secondary Market Rating Activity: Second-Quarter 2013.")

As economic growth varies by region, so does the commercial mortgage-based security (CMBS) recovery.

Year-to-date through June, the U.S and European CMBS markets were already ahead of 2012 CMBS issuance levels.

However, other reporting regions--including Japan, Canada, Australia, and Singapore--have had limited to no issuance

so far in 2013. In the first-half of 2013, U.S. CMBS accounted for 90% of total global CMBS. This compares to 2006, a

significant issuance year that we consider to be a comparable period of time for issuance among all regions. The U.S.

captured approximately 72% of global CMBS issuance in 2006, while Europe and Japan picked up another 24%. And

while most regions are rebounding from trough issuance levels, a nascent recovery across the CMBS globe still persists

(see Charts 1 and 2).

Chart 1

the CMBS globe still persists (see Charts 1 and 2). Chart 1 WWW.STANDARDANDPOORS.COM/RATINGSDIRECT AUGUST 21, 2013

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Chart 2

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 2 Property prices remain soft--and still well below peak

Property prices remain soft--and still well below peak levels--in Europe and Japan. Capital values in major European commercial real estate (CRE) markets declined sharply in 2007/2008, followed by a rebound, though mostly in the primary markets. Continued softness continues in the other noncore markets. In Japan, property prices are recovering but are still about 22% lower than peak levels. In the U.S., property prices have recovered more quickly, with current pricing close to or exceeding trough levels, depending on property type and market. In the Canada, Australia, and Singapore markets, property fundamentals have generally been stable to strong.

Standard & Poor's Ratings Services believes that the recovery in property prices has benefited U.S. CMBS issuance and, in turn, the success in refinancing loan maturities. In addition to rising prices, low interest rates and the dominance of seasoned 2003 vintage maturities in the U.S. contributed to a very strong fixed-rate payoff rate of 88% in the first half of 2013. However, the largest concentration (78%) of outstanding maturities occurs in 2015 through 2017, when interest rates might not be as forgiving. In Europe, 2013 and 2014 are the largest maturity years due to shorter-term loans. Of Europe's scheduled maturities in the first half of 2013, 39% were fully repaid. Japan also has relatively short note terms (typically three to five years), and most of Japan's CMBS maturities occurred in 2009-2011. From third-quarter 2008 through the end of 2012, Japan's maturity payoff rate was 39%. In Canada, more than 80% of CMBS outstanding will come due by 2016. In Australia, 80% matures in 2015, and 73% comes due in Singapore in

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2014.

We expect that the slow job recovery in the U.S. (coupled with rising interest rates) and Europe's weak economic outlook will likely keep CMBS issuance at a cautious pace. For the Asia-Pacific region, Japan's economy has been recovering in part due to the Bank of Japan's monetary easing policies. However, transaction sales volume remains low, and limited acquisition funding has hampered CMBS issuance. Australia and Singapore are likely to feel the effects of a slowdown in China, and we expect that any activity in the medium term will come from the refinancing of existing programs. Canada, which has been hindered by slow global growth and reduced demand for resource production, however, has exhibited strong market and collateral performance. For Canada, we believe this is partly due to the positive attributes of recourse lending, and we are forecasting higher CMBS issuance levels in 2013 than in 2012.

U.S.

As Clouds Appear, CMBS Issuance Slows

CMBS spreads have been exhibiting signs of stabilization after the Federal Reserve said there is no preset timeline for tapering down the purchasing of government bonds. However, the overarching message that the U.S. central bank still expects to start scaling back its massive bond purchase program (depending on economic circumstances) will likely continue to scare the market. We expect that following the summer slowdown, new issuance will show renewed life in the fall--but at a cautious pace. We are forecasting that CMBS private-label new issuance could add another $20 billion in the second half of 2013, with issuance ending 2013 totaling approximately $65 billion. According to Commercial Mortgage Alert (CMA) releases, this would be one-third higher than the 2012 full-year total ($48.4 billion) and about where the market was in 2001 when pulling out of the recession (see Chart 3). Government-sponsored agency issuance through the first half of 2013 was about $33 billion and has exceeded private-label CMBS issuance over the last four years. Based on year-to-date levels, it is unlikely to repeat that for a fifth year.

There have been 25 major loan contributors and 11 B-piece buyers active in the U.S. CMBS market so far in 2013, according to CMA. B-piece buyers--in addition to being able to appoint the special servicer for the purchased transaction--have a say as to which loans may be kicked out due to unfavorable characteristics. With more B-piece buyers entering the marketplace in 2013 (there were eight in 2012), increased competition could limit their influence.

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Chart 3

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 3 Real Estate Recovery Migrates To Secondary Markets Despite

Real Estate Recovery Migrates To Secondary Markets

Despite a slower-than-normal real estate recovery, property fundamentals and prices continue to improve. Overall demand is increasing, reflecting job growth and confidence that the economic picture is brightening. Completions have been low, and we believe that supply should remain constrained--at least in the near term. The major exception has been the multifamily sector, where construction has ramped up in various markets amid strong demand for rental housing.

CRE prices are recovering from their recessionary lows. Based on sales activity data from CoStar Group, overall prices are still off by about one-third from peak levels, but they are 5% above their trough. This varies by property type, with office still searching for a bottom and multifamily about 33% higher than its year-end 2009 low (see Chart 4).

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Chart 4

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 4 Retail has shown signs of improvement as the

Retail has shown signs of improvement as the wealth effect of rising home prices and stock market gains has bolstered consumer spending. Property prices declined slightly year-over-year through March 2013, but they are close to 2% above their bottom. Online competition will continue to plague the sector.

The office sector continues to lag behind in the recovery, though there has been some modest improvement from historically high vacancy rates. Limited job growth, space overhang from the recession, and reductions for square footage per office worker has kept property fundamentals in a slow-growth mode. Of the major property types, office prices are still off the most (about 40%) from peak levels.

Industrial has benefited from increasing demand and little supply. Growth prospects appear favorable, as higher levels of retail, auto, and Internet sales increase the need for warehouse space. Industrial prices have increased by about 4% since bottoming one year ago.

It is our view that modest economic growth and low supply additions should provide for lodging to generate revenue per available room (RevPAR) growth of 4%-6% this year. As with multifamily, lodging prices bottomed in December 2009. Since then, lodging property prices have increased by 17%.

With strong competition in core primary markets, capital has moved to the secondary markets for yield and

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investment opportunities. Following capital flows, CMBS liquidation activity in secondary and tertiary markets picked up in the second quarter. This investment activity should continue to benefit CMBS collateral, which is more dominant in the non-primary markets. In the first quarter, secondary/tertiary markets accounted for about 63% of total liquidations, increasing to 68% in the second quarter. In the first half, the loss severity rate was 44.6% for secondary/tertiary assets and 38.2% in the primary markets. We expect to see the loss severity rate improve in these non-primary markets as capital investment supports higher prices. In addition, with the bulk of this year's and next year's maturities coming from the 2003 and 2004 vintages, property liquidations from these seasoned vintages should also help to lower the rate.

Continuing job growth should sustain the real estate recovery. And unless the economy strengthens significantly, interest rates might not rise much further in the near term. As a result, CRE should continue to benefit from rates that remain low by historical standards.

For Future Loan Maturities, Interest Rates Might Not Be As Forgiving

Through the first half of 2013, maturity loan payoffs have been strong at 87.65%. We believe this reflects the effects of recovering property prices and fundamentals, low interest rates, and the high 91.18% payoff rate of the 2003 maturing loans (68% of first half maturities). We expect this positive trend to continue into 2014, though the recent rise in interest rates could complicate the refinancing of marginally performing loans. However, looking beyond 2014, as the next major wave of maturities comes due in 2015 and continues through 2017 (77% of remaining maturities, $295 billion), the prospects might not be as bright (see Chart 5). As these vintages were characterized by highly leveraged loans and underwritten close to or at peak rent levels, market dynamics might not be as forgiving. By 2015, we expect that most likely there will be less liquidity because of the drawdown of the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing. Unfavorable loan characteristics--coupled with less liquidity and expected higher interest rates (which typically cause a compression in capitalization rates)--could outweigh any value enhancement from improving property cash flows, thereby limiting refinancing prospects.

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Chart 5

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 5 CANADA Strong Property Markets And Collateral Performance

CANADA

Strong Property Markets And Collateral Performance

Canada, which has been hampered by sluggish global growth and reduced demand for resource production, has nonetheless experienced strong property fundamentals and collateral performance. Both office and industrial sector fundamentals are among the strongest globally, and these sectors are enjoying relatively low vacancy rates. Multifamily has remained strong, reflecting both favorable demographics and investment demand, while retail has posted strong sales per square foot levels that have attracted foreign retailers.

The Canadian CMBS delinquency rate as of June 30, 2013, was 0.47%, which pales compared with the U.S CMBS delinquency rate of 8.89%. We believe that the strong property markets--coupled with Canadian mortgage loan financing, which usually provides the lender with recourse to a guarantor with tangible assets--support collateral performance. It is our view that this provides a strong incentive for borrowers to avoid loan defaults.

Yet even with this strong performance, Canadian CMBS issuance has been very slow. Volume peaked in 2006 at C$4.7

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billion then fell to C$3.5 billion in 2007. Since then, there has been very little issuance, with only two transactions totalling C$0.5 billion issued in 2012. Year-to-date through June 30, 2013, C$250.4 million of CMBS has been securitized in one transaction. Mortgage loan collateral has been primarily from secondary and tertiary markets, originated by non-bank sponsors. While conduit spreads have been tightening, they still remain above pre-crisis levels.

As of June 30, 2013, Standard & Poor's had ratings outstanding on 23 Canadian CMBS transactions with an aggregate loan balance of approximately C$4.9 billion. More than 80% of that amount will come due by the end of 2016, with one-half of it maturing in 2016, reflecting a large issuance year and 10-year term maturities (see Chart 6).

Chart 6

year and 10-year term maturities (see Chart 6). Chart 6 We expect that CMBS Canadian issuance

We expect that CMBS Canadian issuance could reach C$1.0 billion in 2013 but don't see significant activity returning to this sector in the near future. In the office and industrial sectors, there could be some pressure in both demand (due to economic developments) and supply (reflecting increased development). Multifamily is expected to remain healthy, though increasing home ownership is an obstacle. Retail will continue to be affected by online sales and will be tested by Target's entrance into the Canadian market with the scheduled opening of more than 100 stores.

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EUROPE

New Issuance Is Focused On Stable, Performing Assets

Cautious optimism prevails in the European CMBS primary market. European CMBS issuance through the first half of 2013 was €5.4 billion, which was already about two-thirds higher than full-year 2012's €3.2 billion. Total CMBS issuance and CMBS as a percentage of total securitized product (about 6%) are at their highest since 2009. Peak issuance occurred in 2006, when volume was approximately €69.0 billion and accounted for 12.1% of total securitized issuance (see Chart 7).

Chart 7

12.1% of total securitized issuance (see Chart 7). Chart 7 The primary focus of CMBS new

The primary focus of CMBS new issuance has been on loans that have demonstrated stable performance and strong fundamentals. These newly issued transactions have mainly concentrated on loans that have low leverage, strong underlying assets, and granular cash flows.

German multifamily has dominated recent issuance and appears to appeal to investors. Legacy multifamily CMBS has lent itself to CMBS refinancing, as the asset class has generally exhibited stable cash flow performance and reasonable

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leverage levels.

In 2013, already two large CMBS multifamily portfolios were refinanced: German Residential Funding and Taurus 2013 (GMF 1). Both were issued at the tight end of pricing guidance and widely oversubscribed.

Although German multifamily refinancings have been strong, only about a fifth of our rated CMBS universe fits the profile of recently securitized loans. As such, we expect that the vast majority of legacy loans are unlikely to be refinanced through the CMBS market. Maturing legacy loans will continue to face long-term refinancing and repayment issues and borrowers will likely continue to look to traditional bank financing to refinance, in our view.

The absence of a normalized commercial real estate lending market could also constrain potential CMBS volumes in the near to medium term. As a result, we expect limited issuance for the rest of the year, with an estimate of €6.5 billion, just slightly above current levels.

CRE Capital Values Are Still At A Significant Discount From Their Peak

The European CRE market is fragmented--both by nation and even regionally within the countries with the largest markets. In addition, differences in terms of demand, occupancy rates, capital value volatility, and access to financing delineate a polarization between prime and non-prime properties.

Local, regional, or even global supply and demand shape each market and could affect the property assets performance as well as their funding. For instance, a city such as London has characteristics appealing to a potential global base of investors and is less sensitive to local factors.

While it would be misleading to assume that all individual European CRE markets move in perfect sync, the latter were all severely affected by the adverse macroeconomic conditions prevailing during the great recession; this trend still holds true in peripheral countries. The economic integration and interdependency among European countries as well as the mobility of capital and banks' cross-border activities increased the correlation between their CRE markets' behaviors. All major CRE markets saw a sharp fall in capital values during 2007/2008 followed by a rebound that occurred mostly in the primary markets. Soft conditions continue in the non-core markets (see Chart 8).

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Chart 8

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 8 Since late 2009, a few markets have seen

Since late 2009, a few markets have seen a notable bottoming-out in capital values and an associated fall in yields. This occurred mainly in prime segments of core European markets such as Germany, France, the U.K., Switzerland, and Scandinavia. German real estate values have been particularly strong, and in core markets such as Paris and London, values have stabilized.

However, values are still declining in markets considered peripheral and for non-prime properties. Capital values in weaker markets--such as Ireland, Spain, and Greece--are either stagnating or recording a sluggish growth. The combination of an ongoing severe recession, banking sector difficulties and, in some cases, sovereign problems has put further downward pressure on capital values.

The U.K. is by far the largest European CRE market with an invested stock in excess of €600 billion. According to CBRE data, the Central London office capital values fell 67% from the mid-2007 peak to third-quarter 2009 then rose by 71% until third-quarter 2012 but have since slipped 1.5%; they remain 45% below the 2007 peak. Furthermore, these data are somewhat biased toward investment property in primary locations. There appears to have been little or no recovery in U.K. secondary and tertiary property values, which likely remain at least 40% below their 2007 peak. Outside of Germany, we do not expect prices to improve in the short term.

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CMBS Loan Refinancing Remains Challenging

Two of the heaviest vintage maturity years, particularly in Germany and the U.K., are 2013 and 2014. By contrast, the U.S. has its CMBS loan maturity profile skewed during the 2015-2017 period, as U.S. CRE loans tend to have longer maturities (about 10 years) than their European counterparts (five to seven years). By asset class, office has the largest amount of loans maturing over the next couple of years, followed by retail and multifamily.

In the first half of 2013, 105 loans were scheduled to mature in the European CMBS transactions that we rate. Only 41 (39%) repaid in full, 32 (31%) defaulted/repaid at a loss, and 12 were extended (11%). The remaining 20 (19%) are either in standstill (five), were restructured (one), or we are awaiting information on their status (14). We anticipate that the loans in standstill will be further extended or will default, depending on servicers' decisions.

European CMBS loan maturities refinancing will remain challenging in the short term, as funding remains scarce due to stricter underwriting standards and reflecting the large number (€9.7 billion) of maturing loans in 2014 (see Charts 9 and 10). As a result, we expect loan performance to continue to come under pressure in the second half of the year, as loans near their maturity dates and interruptions to cash flow and margin mismatches become more pronounced.

Chart 9

flow and margin mismatches become more pronounced. Chart 9 WWW.STANDARDANDPOORS.COM/RATINGSDIRECT AUGUST 21, 2013 14

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Chart 10

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 10 JAPAN CMBS Market Slows, Bank Lending Busy Japan's

JAPAN

CMBS Market Slows, Bank Lending Busy

Japan's CMBS market saw a high level of new issuance from 2005 to 2007, peaking in 2007 with ¥2.17 trillion in new CMBS issuance out of total securitizations of ¥8.42 trillion (25% of new structured finance issuance). New issuance of Japanese CMBS has been subdued since 2009, following the onset of the global financial crisis, and has yet to show signs of a recovery. For the six months ending June 30, Japanese CMBS new issuance was ¥31.4 billion, which was a little less than 2% of total Japanese securitizations for the first half of 2013 (see Chart 11).

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Chart 11

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 11 Issuers of Japanese CMBS have been mainly international

Issuers of Japanese CMBS have been mainly international investment banks. Borrowers have been primarily opportunistic/value-add CRE funds--both international and domestic--that tended to hold assets for shorter terms (about three years). As a result, the tenor of the loans they borrowed were also shorter (three to five years) with prepayment options.

Although, the CMBS new issuance market is very slow, Japanese banks are quite aggressive in making new loans. As major banks in Japan are utilizing the Internal Rating Based (IRB) method under Basel II (which allows banks to rate loans themselves and calculate risk weight based on their internal ratings), they do not need ratings from the rating agencies. Because implementing an IRB process is relatively difficult for smaller banks, such banks need ratings for the purpose of calculating asset risk.

Therefore, there are cases in Japan where borrowers get financing from banks while senior loans are extended by major banks without external ratings. Because the size of mezzanine loans tends to be small, they usually require one rating, typically from a local agency.

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CRE Prices Have Bottomed

The historical pattern of new issuance in Japanese CMBS has followed a similar trajectory as CRE prices in Japan. The ARES Japan Property Index (AJPI)--an index of appraised values for CRE included in the portfolios of listed Japanese REITs (J-REITs) and unlisted core funds--peaked in 2008. Since then, the total property index has had consecutive quarterly declines, and through first quarter 2013 was 22% lower than peak levels. All major property types are still below peak levels, with office lower by 27%, retail by 19%, and residential by 18% (see Chart 12).

In Standard & Poor's view, CRE prices in Japan have bottomed out, and the risk of a further decline in value for the remainder of 2013 is limited. In fact, the total acquisition amount of J-REITs increased by about 45% in 2012, according to the Association for Real Estate Securitization (ARES). Tokyo's office market took in a large supply in 2012, which caused vacancy rates to rise above 9% compared with 2.5% in 2007 and led to a decrease in rents. Given that the supply is being absorbed, rents for class A Tokyo office properties grew by 2% in the first quarter 2013, according to Colliers International.

The Japanese CRE market has been recovering in part due to the Bank of Japan's monetary easing policies. However, Japan, which has jumped from recession to one of the fastest growing economies, could see its rate of economic growth slow. The International Monetary Fund in its July 2013 World Economic Outlook lowered its economic growth forecast by 0.3 points in 2014 to 1.2%, which could temper demand for tenant space.

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Chart 12

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 12 Due to their short note term, CMBS loan

Due to their short note term, CMBS loan maturities peaked in 2009-2011, with 2010 seeing the highest peak in maturities of about ¥1.2 trillion. As the typical loan term in Japanese CMBS is three to five years, almost all of the loans have matured. In the first half of 2013, two loans matured. Currently, there are only five loans with future scheduled maturity dates, with two scheduled to come due in the second half of this year. All of the other loans have already matured and either fully paid or defaulted.

From the third quarter of 2008, when the first Japanese CMBS transaction loan defaulted, through the end of 2012, the maturing loan default rate averaged about 47%. Compared with 2011, when 53% of the maturing loans defaulted, 2012 experienced improving conditions, as 43% defaulted, 52% repaid by their due date, and 5% extended (see Chart 13).

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Chart 13

Recovery Continues, But Regional Headwinds Exist Chart 13 By the end of 2012, servicers had completed

By the end of 2012, servicers had completed the recovery process for 82% of the defaulted loans. Of these, servicers

fully recovered 55% of the securitized principal amounts, and the remaining 45% incurred principal losses that

averaged 23% of the securitized principal amount.

Despite the stabilizing CRE market, we do not expect Japan's CMBS new issuance market to recover in the near term

for several reasons:

The volume of asset trading remains low, limiting a borrower's need for new financing.

Domestic banks have ample liquidity and are actively looking for opportunities to lend. As a result, the average spread on bank lending has tightened significantly, thus making securitization not economically viable for issuers.

Investors in Japanese CMBS are predominantly banks, which are expected to perform the same level of due diligence when they purchase CMBS as when they extend a loan directly. Thus, banks do not have an incentive to choose CMBS over lending.

AUSTRALIA AND SINGAPORE

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Stable Market Conditions, But No New Issuance

CMBS issuance in Australia peaked in 2006 with just over A$5 billion. Prior to that, it had averaged about A$2 billion a

year. Issuance dropped off significantly after 2006. We do not expect significant new issuance of CMBS in Australia or

Singapore, with any activity in the medium term most likely to come from the refinancing of existing programs.

In Australia and Singapore, single-borrower deals are the predominant securitized transaction type. CMBS collateral in

Australia and Singapore currently consists mostly of retail and industrial properties.

CMBS collateral principal balance in Australia and Singapore has decreased over the past four years. At present, three

publicly rated CMBS transactions remain in each market. They are performing within expectations, against a backdrop

of stable macroeconomic conditions and improving real estate markets. There have been no defaults on rated notes in

the sector in these markets. Refinance risk has eased in line with improvements in lending to the sector and general

trading conditions. However, it remains the key risk for the remaining transactions.

The retail property sector remains flat in Australia. Subdued consumer sentiment is the key challenge in the medium

term. Office markets are generally stable, with moderate supply pipelines. Office markets dependent on mining and the

resources sector currently face the greatest risk. The industrial and logistics property sector continues to be

characterized by stable demand and supply.

In Singapore, the retail property market remains tightly held. Office markets are generally stable, with moderate supply

pipelines. Demand and supply in the industrial and logistics property market remain stable.

The effects of a potentially worse-than-expected global economic outlook and uncertainty in the financial

sector--including slower-than-expected economic growth in China and further deterioration in the eurozone (European

Economic and Monetary Union)--are the key threats to our stable macroeconomic outlook.

RELATED RESEARCH

"U.S. CMBS Credit Vehicle Hits On All Eight Cylinders In The Second Quarter," Aug. 16, 2013

"European CMBS Monthly Bulletin (June 2013): Note-Level Defaults Double In The First Half Of The Year," July 11,

2013

"The Eurozone Economy Shows Signs Of Stabilization, But Recovery Is Still Some Way Off," June 26, 2013

"Japan CMBS: Servicers Completed Collections For 15 Defaulted Loans In Q4 2012," March 4, 2013

"Déjà vu: Canada’s Structured Finance Market In 2013 Will Likely Mirror 2012," Jan. 25, 2013

"2013: Another Year Of Managing The Legacy Of The European Commercial Real Estate Boom," Dec. 20, 2012

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