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Weather

134rd Year, No. 137


Aniyah Hairston
Kindergarten, New Hope
High 85 Low 69
Chance t-storms
Full forecast on
page 2A.
Five Questions
1 Who received U.S. Secret Service
protection longer than anyone else in
history?
2 What ear condition comes from the
Latin word for ringing?
3 What Istanbul landmark was
stripped of its famous golden mosaics
in the 1204 Sack of Constantinople?
4 Whats the name for the stopper
used to seal a barrel?
5 Whats the name of the aft mast on
a ketch or yawl?

Answers, 6B
inside
Classifeds 5B
Comics 4B
Obituaries 5A
Opinions 4A
LocaL FoLks
Lakenya King is the community
leader at Mississippi School
for Mathematics and Sciences
Frazier Hall.
caLendar
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
established 1879 | Columbus, mississippi
CdispatCh.Com 50 NewsstaNd | 40 home deliverY
moNdaY | august 19, 2013
Friday and Saturday,
Aug. 23-24
Roast-n-Boast: The Kansas
City Barbeque Society-sanctioned
Mississippi Barbeque Cooking
Championship at the Columbus
Fairgrounds boasts $13,000 in
prizes, live music, food vendors
and a Peoples Choice Tent. For
more information, visit roastn-
boast.com or contact Mike Law,
662-549-5054.
Tuesday, Aug. 27
Ellis Island documentary:
The Columbus Arts Council
presents a free screening of the
PBS documentary Forgotten
Ellis Island, at 5:30 p.m. at the
Rosenzweig Arts Center, 501
Main St., Columbus. For informa-
tion, call 662-328-2787.
Friday, Aug. 30
Howlin Wolf Festival: Mark
Muleman Massey Blues Band
with Bill Earheart, Ben Prestage,
Homemade Jamz and Bryan
Lee and the Blues Power Band
highlight the 18th annual Howlin
Wolf Memorial Blues Festival at
Mary Holmes College Auditorium
in West Point. Doors open at 6
p.m.; music begins at 7 p.m.
Tickets are $15 in advance at
the Rosenzweig Arts Center in
Columbus, Jack Forbus Insurance
in Starkville, Culin Arts in West
Point or online at wpnet.org/
Howlin_Festival.htm. For more
information, contact Richard
Ramsey at 662-605-0770 or
rramsey@wpms.net.
Win $2,300! Play CASHWORDS, See page 5A
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
Columbus councilmen will
determine Tuesday which ar-
chitectural/engineering frm
will renovate the Trotter Con-
vention Center and how much
money theyll receive to do the
project.
As of press time, Trotter
committee offcials could not
confrm who would be award-
ed the contract, but commit-
tee member and
councilman Bill
Gavin said in
recent conver-
sations hes had
with other mem-
bers, the frm
selected would
receive about fve
percent of the projects estimat-
ed $2 million cost, or $100,000.
J5/Broaddus, the frm the city
recently picked for project
management services, would
receive six percent, which
amounts to $120,000. Anoth-
er two-to-three percent would
need to be factored in for bond
attorneys, Gavin said. In total,
that would add 13-to-14 percent
to the initial project cost.
Bryan Brown & Associates,
the frm initially selected to do
the work, has withdrawn from
the project.
Chief operations offcer Da-
vid Armstrong said he needed
to discuss the contract with
councilmen before he could re-
veal the frms identity or fnan-
cial details of the contract.
The committee has made
Councilmen to approve Trotter contractor
Lowndes County fre station
demolition estimates sought
AP-NORC Poll:
Demographics
divide views
of schools
Minority and low-income
parents are more likely
to see serious problems
in their schools
BY JENNIFER AGIESTA
ANd PHILIP ELLIOTT
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON Minority and
low-income parents are more likely
to see serious
problems in their
schools from
low expectations
to bullying to out-
of-date technolo-
gy and textbooks
than those
who are affuent or white, according
to an Associated Press-NORC Center
for Public Affairs Research Poll.
Overall impressions of the nations
schools and teachers are similarly
positive among all groups of parents,
but deep demographic differences
emerge in the details of how parents
see teachers, schools and even their
own roles in their childrens educa-
tion.
The divisions fall along the famil-
iar fault lines of income, education
and race that drive so much of Amer-
ican life. In many cases, its as though
parents are looking at two very differ-
ent sets of schools in this country.
Most parents say the school their
child attends is high-quality and rate
their childrens teachers positively.
White parents are only slightly more
likely than others to give their childs
school high marks, and parents of
Son follows father through pilot school
BY WILLIAM BROWNING
wbrowning@cdispatch.com
He crossed the stage inside the Kaye
Auditorium at Columbus Air Force Base
just like his classmates, but 2nd Lt. Jon
Koritz did something special Friday.
When Koritz, a 27-year-old from
Chapel Hill, N.C., became one of the 23
newest pilots in the U.S.
Air Force, he followed in
his fathers footsteps lit-
erally.
Maj. Tom Koritz grad-
uated from the Special-
ized Undergraduate Pi-
lot Training program at
CAFB in 1982.
Its a special moment crossing that
stage, Jon Koritz said. Its pretty neat
to be crossing the same stage 30 years
later.
Koritz had eight family members in
town for his graduation. His father was
not among that group, though.
Less than a decade after leaving
CAFB, Tom Koritz was killed in action
during Operation Desert Storm in 1991.
In 2008, at CAFB where Jon Ko-
ritz has spent the last year earning his
pilot wings the Koritz Clinic was re-
named in honor of his father, who was a
pilot-physician.
Jon Koritz didnt take to the sky in
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
The county
is moving
ahead with
plans to
replace
the old fre
station on
Jess Lyons
Road. The
cost of the
project is
estimated
between
$170,000
and
$210,000.
Gavin
J5/Broaddus project management fees likely
to eclipse amount paid to architect
onLine:
AP-NORC Center
for Public Affairs
Research: apnorc.
org
See SCHOOLS, 6A
Searching by Segway
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Ray Moore scans yards in east Starkville Thursday for signs of gas leaks with his Remote Methane Leak Detector. Moore is from
Starkville and works for Atmos Energy. He is one of six employees who travel the state, traversing every community, in his case,
by Segway, looking for gas leaks. Each city is visited in rotation every fve years.
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
Supervisors gave Lowndes
County Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment the OK on Thursday to
begin the process of building
a new station
on Jess Lyons
Road.
The frst
step will be to
solicit estimates
on having the
current one de-
molished before
seeking bids on a contractor
to build the new station on the
same site.
new facility planned
for same location on
Jess Lyons road
See DEMOLITION, 6A
koritz will fy F-15s like his
late father
Koritz
See PILOT, 6A
See TROTTER, 6A
Fondren
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 2A Monday, august 19, 2013
DiD you hear?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
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HOW DO I ...
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Sunday
High/low ..................................... 78/67
Normal high/low ......................... 93/70
Record high .......................... 106 (1954)
Record low .............................. 62 (1958)
Sunday ............................................ 0.07"
Month to date ................................. 2.41"
Normal month to date ...................... 2.38"
Year to date .................................. 45.34"
Normal year to date ....................... 36.23"
Tuesday Wednesday
Atlanta 82 71 t 85 71 t
Boston 87 69 s 89 71 s
Chicago 88 70 s 88 70 s
Dallas 98 73 pc 99 77 pc
Honolulu 90 71 pc 88 76 pc
Jacksonville 88 73 pc 91 73 pc
Memphis 88 71 t 93 73 t
90
71
Tuesday
An afternoon
thunderstorm
91
70
Wednesday
Clouds and sun with
a t-storm
91
69
Thursday
Periods of sun with
a t-storm
93
70
Friday
A thunderstorm
possible
Aberdeen Dam 188' 163.10' -0.22'
Stennis Dam 166' 136.68' -0.22'
Bevill Dam 136' 136.28' -0.13'
Amory 20' 11.50' +0.06'
Bigbee 14' 3.79' -0.02'
Columbus 15' 6.09' -0.24'
Fulton 20' 7.40' -0.11'
Tupelo 21' 0.00' none
First
Sep. 12
New
Sep. 5
Last
Aug. 28
Full
Aug. 20
Sunrise ..... 6:19 a.m.
Sunset ...... 7:36 p.m.
Moonrise ... 6:25 p.m.
Moonset .... 4:38 a.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Major ... 11:59 a.m.
Minor ..... 5:45 a.m.
Major ................. ----
Minor ..... 6:12 p.m.
Major ... 12:26 a.m.
Minor ..... 6:39 a.m.
Major ... 12:52 p.m.
Minor ..... 7:05 p.m.
Tuesday Monday
Tuesday Wednesday
Nashville 86 69 t 91 70 t
Orlando 92 75 t 92 75 t
Philadelphia 89 70 s 90 71 pc
Phoenix 109 90 s 108 88 pc
Raleigh 88 69 t 89 70 t
Salt Lake City 94 71 t 92 69 t
Seattle 76 55 s 80 55 pc
Tonight
A thunderstorm in
spots
71
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A ThousAnd Words
AP Photo/Mary Altaffer
Challie Stillman, left, speaks to Yolanda Concepcion in the kitchen area during the Making Room: New Models
for Housing New Yorkers, exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, Saturday. Stillman and her partner,
Lina Franco, are spending 24 hours in the 325-square-foot micro-unit apartment.
Monday
Say What?
This place is very special. It is near and dear to my heart. I
was always waiting for the right opportunity to give back...
Former Mississippi State University quarterback Sleepy
Robinson, who has joined Dan Mullens coaching staff as a
recruiting specialist. Story, 1B.
Duck Dynasty star greets
camo-clad wedding couple
The AssociATed Press
MARS, Pa. A camou-
fage-clad bride and groom
got a little advice from a be-
whiskered witness on their
wedding day: Duck Dynas-
ty star Willie Robertson.
WTAE-TV reports Rob-
ertson told the couple to
always love and forgive one
another as they were wed
Saturday morning at a Field
& Stream store near Pitts-
burgh.
Robertson popped in
for the nuptials of Mehgan
Cook, who sported a cam-
oufage sash on her dress,
and Charlie Miller, who was
completely clad in camo
gear.
The two hadnt planned
on marrying at the store but
Cook said they were eager
to meet Robertson.
I was going to cancel the
wedding cause I heard Wil-
lie was coming, Cook told
KDKA-TV.
Instead, Cook said, her
mother came up with the
idea of a wedding at the store
and they got a surprise
when Robertson appeared
during the ceremony.
Thats a frst for me, its
good to be a part of that,
Robertson said. They look
like my kind of folks with the
camoufage . that was cool.
On the Duck Dynasty
Season 4 premiere, which
aired Wednesday, family
members threw a surprise
wedding for patriarch Phil
Robertson, wearing a black
jacket over camoufage
garb, and his wife, Miss Kay.
AP Photo/Gareth Patterson
Willie Robertson, Duck Commander CEO and star of the
reality television series Duck Dynasty, speaks to the
6,000 domestic Walmart shareholders at Bud Walton
Arena in Fayetteville, Ark., Wednesday, June 5, 2013.
NYC museum exhibit shows
virtues of living small
By KAreN MATTheWs
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Many New York-
ers live in small apartments, yet
most of them dont camp out in a
micro-unit at a museum in order to
demonstrate the virtues of living in
tight spaces.
Challie Stillman and Lina Fran-
co arrived at the Museum of the
City of New York at 6 p.m. Friday
for a 24-hour stay in a studio apart-
ment thats part of an exhibit called
Making Room: New Models for
Housing New Yorkers.
The exhibit, which runs through
Sept. 2, also features designs that
were submitted to a small-apart-
ment competition announced by
Mayor Michael Bloomberg last
year.
Stillman and Franco normal-
ly live in a 650-square-foot apart-
ment in the Williamsburg sec-
tion of Brooklyn. The museums
325-square-foot studio is half that
size but seems spacious because
of the specially designed furniture
and appliances.
The murphy bed includes a
couch that slides under when the
bed is out of the wall. A chair con-
verts to a stepladder for reaching
storage spaces.
The kitchens under-the-counter
refrigerator, freezer and dishwash-
er leave ample work space. Stillman
and Franco invited six friends for
dinner Friday, but they had food de-
livered because the appliances are
not hooked up.
Everyone had a place to sit, had
a place to eat, and it worked out
perfectly, said Stillman, who is the
design director for Resource Furni-
ture, the distributor of the furniture
in the apartment.
Stillman said it would be pos-
sible for two people to live in the
apartment for real.
Youd have to edit your belong-
ings, defnitely, she said. And also,
you have to be neat. Everything has
to have its place, and if its not in its
place, and its messy in here, youre
going to start to get agitated.
Her partner, Franco, a lawyer,
couldnt quite see living in the mi-
cro-apartment.
We would need a little more
closet space, she said. Were both
girls and we have clothes. And
shoes.
Visitors to the exhibit Saturday
said they were impressed.
I would totally live in that apart-
ment if I were on my own, said
Rebecca Hersh of Highland Park,
N.J., who was accompanied by her
mother, Pam, and her two children,
ages 6 and 4. Its all about good de-
sign.
Museum-goer Gloria Feibus
said she has an actual 300-square-
foot Manhattan apartment and its
fne.
The only thing I dont have is a
dishwasher, and Im a built-in dish-
washer, she said.
Specially designed
apartment totals
325-square feet
The AssociATed Press
OAK BLUFFS, Mass.
President Barack
Obama hit the links on his
Marthas Vineyard vaca-
tion with comedian Larry
David.
The president played
fve hours of golf Saturday
in an unlikely foursome
that included the Curb
Your Enthusiasm star, for-
mer U.S. trade representa-
tive Ron Kirk and business-
man Glenn Hutchins, a
part owner of the Boston
Celtics.
Obama spent a couple
hours Saturday morning
with his wife and daugh-
ters on a private beach on
the islands south shore.
The frst family went out
for dinner Saturday night at
The Boathouse Restaurant,
which overlooks the har-
bor in historic Edgartown.
The president has kept a
low profle during his stay
and spent most days golf-
ing. He spoke out publicly
only once, to condemn es-
calating violence in Egypt.
Obama golfs with Larry David on last vacation day
AP Photo/Steven Senne
President Barack Obama, right, waves to a crowd of
onlookers while driving a golf cart with businessman
Glenn Hutchins, behind, as they golf at Farm Neck
Golf Club in Oak Bluffs, Mass., on the island of
Marthas Vineyard, Saturday.
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Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports
@
Monday, august 19, 2013 3A
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Columbus Machine & Welding
Since 1967
By EMILy WAGSTER PETTUS
The Associated Press
JACKSON Funding for edu-
cation versus funding for prisons
its a constant source of ten-
sion when Mississippi lawmakers
write an annual budget.
Now, Republican Gov. Phil
Bryant says hell push to increase
the prison budget as he seeks to
focus on public safety during the
2014 legislative session.
It is unfortunate, but Correc-
tions is something were going to
have to put more money in, if we
are going to keep the really bad
people off the streets, Bryant
told reporters during an Aug. 1
interview at the Neshoba County
Fair.
The U.S Department of Justice
said in late July that Mississippi in
2012 had the second-highest in-
carceration rate in the nation, only
behind neighboring Louisiana.
The Mississippi Department of
Corrections budget increased 7.3
percent from fscal 2013, which
ended June 30, to fscal 2014,
which began July 1. Spending on
K-12 schools increased by 2.1 per-
cent during the same period. The
overall state budget increased 2.3
percent.
Bryant said the abuse of pre-
scription drugs is a huge prob-
lem, and the state might need
to consider treatment options for
nonviolent offenders who have
used, but not sold, illicit drugs.
During the past decade, Missis-
sippi has established an extensive
network of drug courts, which fo-
cus on rehabilitating, rather than
locking up, people who use illegal
substances.
We are going to have to fnd
that line where we say who needs
to go to prison because of that and
who needs treatment and who
needs to go to the drug court sys-
tem, Bryant said.
The governor also said the
state might consider whether
its cost-effective to have some
low-security inmates serve time at
home, monitored by ankle brace-
lets. This is less expensive than
traditional incarceration.
Im open to those discussions,
for nonviolent offenders, particu-
larly female, Bryant said. Tak-
ing that mother out of the home,
incarcerating her away from the
children, has obviously a detri-
mental effect on
her family.
The Depart-
ment of Correc-
tions publishes a
monthly fact sheet
on its website. The
most recent one
shows that as of
Aug. 1, Mississip-
pi had 26,274 inmates, of which
22,521 were in custody in state-
run or privately run prisons. The
rest were in other categories:
3,229 in community corrections
or medical leave, 483 in other
custody, 32 listed as escapees or
walk-aways and nine hospitalized.
The Aug. 1 inmate fact sheet list-
ed 23,904 men and 2,371 women.
The total is higher than on Aug.
1, 2012, when the state had 25,649
inmates, with 21,962 in custody in
state-run or privately-run prisons.
Bryant said hes interested
in ideas presented by Right On
Crime, an initiative supported by
prominent national conservatives
including former Florida Gov.
Jeb Bush and former U.S. House
Speaker Newt Gingrich. Among
other things, its website says that
for a prison to be considered suc-
cessful, it must reduce recidivism.
Bryant said he advocates a
larger role for prison ministries,
including one started by the late
Chuck Colson.
Prison Fellowship was found-
ed by Chuck Colson, President
Nixons hatchet man, in 1976,
the groups website says. After
he served time in a federal prison
camp, Chuck felt led by God to
honor a promise he made to re-
member prisoners and their fam-
ilies. That promise grew into the
worlds largest family of prison
ministries.
Gov. Bryant focusing on prison policy in 2014
Department of Justice says Mississippi has
second-highest incarceration rate in U.S.
Bryant
Suspicious smell
William Browning/Dispatch Staff
Fairview Elementary students were evacuated from the building early Monday morning for suspicion of a gas leak.
Columbus Fire and Rescue responded to the scene and discovered the leak coming from a stove in the kitchen
that had not lit properly. The building was aired out and students returned to their classrooms by 8 a.m.
ThE ASSocIATEd PRESS
HATTIESBURG The Common
Core State Standards tests will be both
less expensive and better than Missis-
sippis own tests, state education off-
cials say.
The 20-state consortium develop-
ing the tests recently said theyll cost
$29.50 per student, and include two
tests a year for both English and math.
Mississippis test costs $30 per subject
area plus $17 for Mississippis MCT2
test more than $80 a year for a typi-
cal 10th grader.
The new tests will also give teachers
more information about their students,
said Stacey Pace, Lamar County School
District assistant superintendent.
It will tell us what students know
and make them think instead of guess-
ing at an answer, she told The Hatties-
burg American. The type of questions
that will be asked will not be your typ-
ical multiple choice question. The stu-
dents will have to actually tell how they
got their answer.
Richard Bailko, with the Mississippi
Department of Educations Offce of
Student Assessment, agrees that the
test being developed by the Partner-
ship for Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers will test greater
depth of knowledge.
The questions from the MCT2 and
the Subject Area Tests are all multiple
choice and have only one answer per
item, he wrote in an email. The ques-
tions from the PARCC assessments
provide a wide span of items. To many
of the problems, there will be more
than one answer. Some questions will
say select all that apply or which four
answer choices out of seven are cor-
rect?
Mississippi educators give new tests an A
Common Core State
Standards tests will be
less expensive
AREA ARRESTS
The following arrests
were reported by the Lown-
des County Sheriffs De-
partment and the Colum-
bus Police Department:
n Orlando Charvez Har-
ris, 38, of 1517 Fifth Ave.
S., was arrested at 606 15th
Ave. S., by CPD Aug. 18
and charged with aggravat-
ed assault with a weapon to
produce death and violation
of parole. He has not been
released.
n Marcus Larico Hodg-
es, 32, of 6212 Highway
50 E. #5, was arrested on
Highway 182 by LCSO Aug.
15 and charged with grand
larceny-more than$500. He
was released the next day
on a $1,500 surety bond.
His court date has been
scheduled for Nov. 12.
n Javaris Decedric John-
son, 29, of 508 Lehmberg
Road Lot #80, was arrested
at 107 22nd St. S. by CPD
Aug. 17 and charged with
contempt of court, pos-
session of more than one
ounce of marijuana and pos-
session of a stolen frearm.
His court date has been
scheduled for Sept. 4.
n Kimberly Denise
Norton, 37, of 7768 Barton
Ferry Road, was arrested
on Waverly Ferry Road by
CPD Aug. 16 and charged
with public drunkenness
and violation of probation.
Her court date has been
scheduled for Sept. 4.
n Kelvin Demario Ro-
land, 23, of 2407 23rd Ave.
N. was arrested on 14th
Ave. N. by CPD Aug. 17
and charged with providing
false information, posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance and violation of pro-
bation. His court date has
been scheduled for Sept. 4.
n Cynthia Gayle White,
38, of 850 Gunshoot Road,
was arrested by MDOC
Aug. 16 and charged with
violation of parole.
Hodges Harris
Norton Johnson
White Roland
Cheap thrills.
Go for a walk.
4A Monday, august 19, 2013
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
from our website
voice of the people
Stop making excuses
Things I learned from the
town meeting regarding the
railroad crossing closures:
Safety is very important to
Kansas City Southern and
to MDOT. So important
that after all this time with
no safety features, they are
fnally going to do something
about it. Except, darn it, they
cant afford to make these
safer if they dont save some
money by closing the other
crossings.
I am having a hard time
following the logic behind
this move, so please allow
me to break this down by
what was said at Thursday
nights meeting. With the new
industries moving into town,
there has been an increase
in rail traffc, and it could get
busier. Okay, sounds great
for the railroad. More traffc
means an increase in revenue
for them, correct? If they are
making more money, why
can they not afford to main-
tain the tracks now? And the
million-dollar question is this:
Why are they so concerned
with getting safety features
at the other crossings now?
After all, Kevin Stafford said
the population of Columbus
has been declining. So are you
saying that safety at the cross-
ings was not as important in
the 1950s, when my parents
moved to Ninth Avenue South,
and it was much busier?
This is such a blatant
money grab from the railroad
that as a town we should all
be insulted. Trust me, if they
werent going to make money
off of these closings, they
would not be doing it. Safety
has absolutely nothing to
do with this, no matter how
many times they make these
claims. They are benefting
from this, and we all lose. Oh,
I know that those few people
who showed up to talk about
the horns and the quality of
life on Southside will get the
noise-free zone, but at what
cost to the rest of us? I hear
the horns, too. Its a small
price to pay for living in an old
house on Southside. But to
allow the railroad to arbitrari-
ly close roads that people have
lived on all of their lives is just
wrong.
I urge EVERYONE to call
their councilmen and pro-
test, even if you dont live on
Southside. This is an issue
that will affect all of us in one
way or another. The railroad
owns this property, and they
should be made to maintain
it, just like small business
owners like myself maintain
our property. Stop making
excuses about why you cant
fx these crossings and fgure
out a solution that does not
involve closing streets.
Helen Pridmore
Columbus
Reader
comment
The following is an edited selection of reader
comments posted at the end of stories and columns
published on-line. More can be found at www.cdis-
patch.com.
Local voices: A letter from the mayor
Slim Burks: The mayor doth protest too much,
methinks, to also borrow from Shakespeare. I
think he did more damage to his case than any
letter writer could, capping it off with a very thinly
veiled threat to one of his constituents. And his ar-
gument that his son doesnt work for the company
getting the contract is almost funny. Right, Mayor,
there is absolutely no way J5 GBL is in any way
connected to J5/Broaddus and the two companies
are totally separated. Sure. We believe you.
08RoadKing: To me the problem is not your son
working for your former campaign managers com-
pany, which he does. The problem is your former
campaign managers company landed a lucrative
contract with the city and the fact that you see no
problem with this. Nice letter, but please under-
stand that there are some people here that are too
smart to drink of your kool-aid.
Supes explore new approaches to litter control
Mike Rathbone: There are certain areas prone
to having litter thrown in them around town. The
section of street between my house and Alabama
St. is one of those areas. Some of the pigs who vis-
it/live on my street toss their beer cans and food
bags out the window before they go home because
as we all know, it is so hard to have a small plastic
bag in your car for trash that you can dispose of
properly.
A solution would be to have citizens call in to
inform the city of those hot spots and quietly put
a camera there to watch for the offenders. Once
spotted, track them down and hand them a nice
fat ticket that will really put a dent in their wallet.
Rinse, lather, repeat.
Just to spice things up a bit, after the third ticket
is issued to you, you go to jail and get another fat
ticket. Each time after that, you go to jail and get
yet another fat ticket until your stupid self learns.
As for me on my street, dont think I wont chase
you down and get in your business about dumping
trash on my street when I see you do it. It wouldnt
be the frst time Ive done it.
A good night for the city of Columbus - The
Dispatch
Amy: So you think this was a good night for the
city? This city council has lost it. Mr Gavin is the
only one that is showing any man hood in this bad
movie. The railroad has an agreement with the city
to keep these crossing in good repair. This quick
easy money will be gone by the end of 30 days and
the city will not be able to reopen the streets. Lets
have some farsighted plans for a change. Take a
good look at who is making these decisions for the
citizens of Columbus. Can we not do better? If the
answer is no, cut your loses and move.
mississippi voices
Dogs shouldnt ruff it, satellite TV
provider says
OXFORD This is
too easy.
A satellite TV
channel for dogs was
launched this month.
Not about dogs.
For dogs.
To watch.
For $4.99 (plus tax)
per month (in addition
to basic fees, other
charges).
Im sure theyve al-
ready hired a director
of program develop-
ment, but just in case,
some ideas:
Game Show:
How High Can You
Go? Male contestants
only. To be recorded
on a set with ample
trees, preferably with bark that
shows moisture well.
Superhero: Cat Stalker.
The protagonist/star responds
to the desperate woofs of fellow
canines whose lives are being
complicated by overly wiley
felines. In each episode, the star
innovates creates a household
mess for which the cat is sure to
be blamed.
Documentary: Great trees
of America. This will be an
homage to well-placed, conve-
nient trees without a lot of pesky
undergrowth or fencing at their
bases. It should only be shown
in selected markets. (Would be
too nerve-wracking for dogs who
live in the desert, plains or other
treeless regions.)
Comedy: Hey, Thats Not A
Tree. Home video clips of dogs
(mostly male) making urinary
miscalculations.
Educational: Training Your
Human. A wide-ranging series
offering tips and techniques to
convince your people that it is OK
to sleep on their beds, chew on
their shoes, explore their garbage
and, perhaps most importantly,
dine at their tables.
Mystery: Whats That
Smell? or, alterna-
tively, Is That You?
Based loosely on
Whats My Line?
from the 1950s,
blindfolded dogs take
turns identifying sub-
stances or other dogs
they have previously
encountered.
Action: Smash
That Cat. Part horror,
part James Bond. In
each episode a variety
of cats expend their
ninth lives in a series
of brutal mishaps. Spe-
cial episodes feature
squirrels instead of
cats. (Mature audienc-
es only.)
Instructional:
Dog Food? Im Not Eating Dog
Food. Episodes center on tricks,
tips and hints to elicit invitations
to the dinner table. The teacher
starts each episode by saying,
They say Im a member of the
family, but they dont eat out of a
bowl on the foor, do they?
Inspirational: Magic
Words. Offers advice on how to
motivate someone to say those
wag-inducing words, Good Dog!
Competition: Dogs Playing
Poker. Hint: The dog without a
tail always wins.
Sitcom: My 13 Puppies.
A romp. Follows the daily antics
of a mom and her frustrations in
coping with the wily antics of her
latest litter. The runt, of course, is
the shows star.
Competition: Howl Off.
Each week, a feld of contes-
tants chosen in local auditions
all across America is slowly
narrowed to a champion. Three
wolves sit as a panel of judges.
Sports: NASCARCHAS-
ING. Some shows dont end well,
but, honestly, thats why many
members of the audience tune in.
As Louis Armstrong sang so
well, it is a wonderful world.
Curious, too.
Think about it.
Special television programs
for children Sesame Street,
The Electric Company start-
ed a long time ago. Those early
programs have expanded into
entire channels for children. For
the most part, theyre free or
included in basic cable or satellite
packages.
Not so for dogs. TV for them
will be a premium purchase.
It wasnt that long ago that
hardware stores in most Missis-
sippi towns would have a pet
supply rack. Worm medicine.
Collars. A couple of brushes. Gro-
ceries had cans and sacks of dog
food. Three brands, maybe four.
Larger towns might have had
actual pet shops. But they were
always small. Never really busy.
Usually run by retirees.
Contrast that to todays big box
stores with multiple aisles stacked
wide and high with varieties of
pet cuisine and supplies. Special-
ized store chains now cater to the
pet trade. Some even have ftting
rooms for trying on pet costumes
and clothing in appropriate pri-
vacy.
In the olden days, animals
were taken to the veterinarian if
sick or hurt. Todays vets are on a
frst-name basis with their clients.
Owners receive texts when its
time for a physical or wellness
check.
Things have gotten better in
the world of pets.
Its not as ruff as it used to be.
I hear a cat channel is next.
It will be simpler.
Just a camera focused on a
tank of tropical fsh.
Cats are easy.
Potential pitfall? Football sea-
son is beginning. If the dog comes
in during an SEC contest and
whines to watch, Hey, Thats Not
a Tree, Im thinking the plug will
be pulled on pet programming.
There are limits.
Charlie Mitchells e-mail ad-
dress is cmitchell43@yahoo.com.
things have
gotten better
in the world of
pets.
Charlie Mitchell
EDITOR/PUBLISHER
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PHILADELPHIA No one
may ever know Barbara Manci-
nis intentions when she alleged-
ly handed her dying 93-year-old
father a bottle of morphine at his
central Pennsylvania home.
Did she want to relieve his
pain? Help him end his life? Both?
Joe Yourshaw died four days
later at a hospital. That was after
a hospice nurse making a call to
check on Yourshaw arrived at the
home a short time later and called
911, despite a Do Not Resuscitate
order. In the interim, Yourshaw
was given a drug antidote, awoke
agitated over his hospitalization,
and became upset when told his
daughter might be in trouble, ac-
cording to Mancinis supporters.
Dont hurt Barbara, he cried,
according to Compassion &
Choices, a Denver-based group
that supports death with dignity
laws and has advocated for Manci-
ni since her arrest in June.
A trim, silver-haired hospital
nurse from Philadelphia, she is
just the latest person caught in the
crosshairs of the nations assist-
ed-suicide debate.
While Oregon, Washington,
Montana and Vermont allow
at least some types of assisted
suicide, and another half-dozen
states have considered it, most
states ban the practice, and a small
number of people are prosecuted
in the U.S. each year.
She told me that her father
wanted to die and she gave him
the morphine, Pottsville Police
Capt. Steve Durkin testifed at
Mancinis preliminary hearing
this month.
Advocates rally around Pa. assisted suicide case
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Mitch Templeton
SULLIGENT, Ala.
Charles Mitch Tem-
pleton, 50, died Aug. 15,
2013, at his residence.
No services are
planned.
Mr. Templeton was
born Aug. 24, 1962,
in Muskogee, Okla.,
to Carolyn McMillian
Templeton Rogers of
Sulligent and the late
Bobby Templeton. He
was a veteran of the
Alabama Army National
Guard. He was formerly
employed as a super-
visor in the Pressing
Department at McCoy
Manufacturing and at
NACCO.
In addition to his
mother, survivors
include his wife, Cher-
yl Cox Templeton of
Sulligent; stepfather,
Williams Rogers of
Sulligent; stepmother,
Beverly Templeton
Cathey of Oklahoma;
daughters, Cheryl Lynn
Templeton and Kelsey
Markley, both of Sul-
ligent; stepdaughters,
Stacey Brown of Bea-
verton, Ala., and Cayla
Kivette of Sulligent;
brother, Billy Rogers of
Sulligent; sister, La-
Wanna Canterbury of
Sulligent; half-brother,
Marcus Templeton of
Oklahoma; stepbroth-
er, Jeremy Fischer of
Oklahoma; and six
stepgrandchildren.
Memorials may be
made to Hospice of
Northwest Alabama,
P.O. Box 126, Winfeld,
AL 35594 or Lamar
County PAWS, P.O. Box
534, Vernon, AL 35592.
Denton Roberts Jr.
ABERDEEN Den-
ton Green Roberts Jr.,
74, died Aug. 17, 213, at
Baptist Memorial Hospi-
tal Golden Triangle.
Services are Tuesday
at 11 a.m. at Beeks Cem-
etery Pavilion with John
Lockridge, Joe Dan Rob-
erts and Chuck Wale
offciating. Visitation is
today from 4-6 p.m. at
Tisdale-Lann Memorial
Funeral Home.
Mr. Roberts was born
June 26, 1939, to the late
Denton Green Roberts
Sr., and Mamie Kelso
Roberts. He was owner
of Roberts Contract-
ing Inc., and he was a
Christian.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded
in death by his brother,
Gene L. Roberts.
Survivors include his
wife, Barbara Totten
Roberts of Aberdeen;
daughters, Kathy Mc-
Gee of Houston, Texas,
Jan Bowen of West
Point; Jennifer Smith
and DeAnna OHara,
both of Loganville, Ga.;
sisters, Nina Morgan
and Becky Worlow,
both of Aberdeen and
Mary Ann Pope of
Amory; brothers, Joe
Dan Roberts of Kodiak,
Alaska and David Rob-
erts of Aberdeen; eight
grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
Memorials may be
made to Beeks Cem-
etery Care Fund, c/o
Becky Worlow, 502 Bell-
view Drive, Aberdeen,
MS 39730.
Thomas Green III
MEMPHIS, Tenn.
Thomas Elmer Green
III, 43, died Aug. 15,
2013, at his residence.
Celebration of Life
services is Tuesday
from 4--6 p.m. at his
mothers house, 273
Highway 9 N., Pontotoc.
Mr. Green was born
Aug. 19, 1969, to Sue
Green and the late
Thomas Elmer Green
II.
Memorials may be
made to the Humane
Society of Memphis,
935 Farm Road, Mem-
phis, TN 38134.
Brenda Faine
COLUMBUS
Brenda Faine, 64, died
Aug. 19, 2013, at Aurora
Health and Rehabilita-
tion.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Memorial
Funeral Home.
Willet Faulkner
COLUMBUS
CMSGT (Ret) Willet D.
Faulkner, 82, died Aug.
15, 2013, at his resi-
dence.
Services are today
at 2 p.m. at Dowdle Fu-
neral Home in Millport,
Ala. Burial will follow in
Memorial Gardens.
Mr. Faulkner was
born Oct. 6, 1930, to the
late Henry F. and Mar-
tha McGee Faulkner.
He was a 1948 graduate
of Millport High School
and a veteran of the
U.S. Air Force. He was
a member of Millport
Church of Christ.
In addition to his
parents, he was preced-
ed in death by his wife,
Nicolle Faulkner; and
son, Michael Anthony
Faulkner.
Survivors include his
sons, Phillip N. Faulk-
ner of Savannah, Ga.,
and Timothy Faulkner
of Columbus; sister,
Teva Kay Faulkner of
Millport; brother, F.
Banks Faulkner of Mill-
port; fve grandchildren
and eight great-grand-
children.
Pallbearers are
Matt Faulkner, Mark
Faulkner, Jon Faulkner,
Thomas Faulkner, Larry
Leonard and Adam
Leonard.
Walter Ray
WEST POINT
Walter Vernon Bone-
head Ray, 84, died.
Visitation is Tuesday
from 4-7 p.m. at Calvert
Funeral Home.
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 6A Monday, august 19, 2013
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T
h
e

D
is
p
a
t
c
h
Schools
continued from Page 1a
all races give their local
schools similar ratings
for preparing students for
college, the workforce,
citizenship and life as an
adult.
A majority of parents
say their children are
receiving a better educa-
tion than the one they re-
ceived, but blacks and His-
panics feel more strongly
than whites that this is the
case. The poll also shows
minorities feel they have
a greater infuence over
their childrens education.
And the ways parents
assess school quality and
the problems they see
as most deeply affecting
their childs school vary
greatly by parents race,
education and income lev-
el.
Sean Anderson, 30,
whose children will be in
the third and ffth grades
in Waxahachie, Texas,
this fall, says their schools
are probably fne com-
pared with others near
him in Dallas, but he wor-
ries their education isnt
as good as it could be.
I dont know. Com-
pared to the kids in the
U.K.? Probably not, An-
derson said.
Among the fndings of
the AP-NORC poll:
Parents from wealthi-
er families were less likely
than those from less affu-
ent ones to see bullying,
low parental involvement,
low test scores, low ex-
pectations and out-of-date
textbooks as serious prob-
lems.
Parents with a col-
lege degree point to un-
equal school funding as
the top problem facing
education, while parents
without a college degree
point to low expectations
for students as the biggest
challenge.
Black and Hispan-
ic parents are more apt
than white parents to see
per-student spending, the
quality of school build-
ings and the availability of
support resources as im-
portant drivers of school
quality.
Schools in many
ways are being parents,
role models, providing
after-school care. Espe-
cially middle schools;
theyre babysitting be-
cause theyre providing
after-school care, said
John Dalton, a 49-year-old
father of two from Canan-
daigua, N.Y, who teaches
high school English.
Dalton acknowledged
his Finger Lakes-region
town is affuent and said
money isnt determining
whether the students suc-
ceed or fail. But he said
he would like his son Pat-
ricks public Canandaigua
Academy to spend more
time on rigorous studies.
The focus isnt real-
ly on learning, its on so
many different things, and
the social aspect has tak-
en over for so many of our
students, he said.
When asked about
problems facing students,
parents from households
earning less than $50,000
a year were more worried
than parents making more
than $100,000. For exam-
ple, among less affuent
families, 52 percent said
bullying was a problem
and 47 percent worried
about too little paren-
tal involvement. Among
wealthier parents, those
numbers were 18 percent
and 29 percent.
Responsibility falls
to the parents because
teachers arent doing their
jobs, said John Barnum, a
father of fve who lives in
Las Vegas.
The educators are
not there to participate.
Theyre there to do a j-o-b,
Barnum said. The teach-
ers are sending kids home
with so much homework.
Theyre being sent home
with homework to have
the parents teach them or
have to teach themselves.
Digging into these
numbers reveals another
wide gap based on race.
Fifty-four percent of His-
panic parents and 50 per-
cent of black parents think
they have a great deal or a
lot of infuence over their
childs education. Only 34
percent of white parents
share this view.
When asking about
school funding, artistic
programs and technology,
racial identities divided
perceptions.
Sixty-one percent of
black parents saw inequal-
ity in school funding as a
problem, compared with
32 percent of white par-
ents. Thirty-six percent
of black parents saw in-
suffcient opportunities
for musical or artistic pur-
suits, but just 21 percent of
white parents did. And 50
percent of Hispanic par-
ents said a lack of comput-
ers and technology was a
problem, while 34 percent
of black parents and just
16 percent of white par-
ents said the same.
Hispanic parents were
signifcantly more likely
than white parents to see
keeping good teachers
as a problem, by a 67 per-
cent to 24 percent margin.
Fighting, violence and
gangs were a serious con-
cern for 53 percent of His-
panic parents, but only 13
percent of white parents.
There also are clear so-
cio-economic divides on
what qualities parents see
in good teachers. Parents
with less formal education
or lower incomes are more
likely to emphasize teach-
ers academic credentials
and experience in the
classroom, as are black
and Hispanic parents.
The survey was spon-
sored by the Joyce Foun-
dation, which works to pro-
mote policies that improve
the quality of teachers,
including the development
of new teacher evaluation
systems, enhance early
reading reforms and en-
courage innovation in pub-
lic schools.
Demolition
continued from Page 1a
County fre services
coordinator Sammy Fon-
dren said hes not sure ex-
actly how old the current
one is, but its a lot older
than the countys practice
of keeping an inventory of
all its property and equip-
ment.
Between millage and
rebate money, LCVFD
has funds set aside for the
cost of removal and con-
struction, which should
be in the neighborhood of
$170,000-$210,000.
The building is clear-
ly aging and District 2 is
long overdue for an updat-
ed facility on Jess Lyons
Road, Fondren said.
The building itself has
deteriorated to where the
metal siding and the roof-
ing is so thin that were
having continuous roof
leaks. The station can
accommodate the equip-
ment thats in there, but
we do have some thats
double stacked, Fondren
said. What were wanting
to do is expand the size
of the building and make
sure weve got adequate
training space, restrooms
and showers. Were basi-
cally copying the newer
stations that are being put
in like in District 3 (the Bill
McCord station in New
Hope). Its just basically
updating to accommodate
the new and changing
world of frefghting.
This is one of now three
major overhauls LCVFD
is overseeing. In District
1, the county acquired
land for a new main fre
station in Caledonia that
would eventually relocate
the facility in a location
with less traffc and pro-
vide space for volunteers
to train and conduct hose
tests without a temporary
shutdown of the towns
water supply. Earlier
this year, supervisors ap-
proved LCVFD to start
work on a new fre house
in the Rural Hill communi-
ty in District 3.
Something new stirs
interest in the general
public, Fondren said.
We try to partner with
the community. We try to
get people to be involved.
The size of the building,
obviously because of the
industry standards with
the fre trucks, trucks are
no longer small and sleek.
Theyre more bulky be-
cause of all the standards
the federal government
places on this. The trucks
are getting larger but the
station is not getting larg-
er unless we build a new
station.
The new facility on Jess
Lyons Road will be a four-
bay station with training
space, an offce and break
room, Fondren said. If
there is a shortfall on
funding for construction,
the department will bor-
row money from the coun-
ty as in the past for trucks
and what is borrowed will
be placed back on a payout
schedule, he said.
I dont think were
going to have to go down
that road on this station,
Fondren said.
District 2 comprises
of two other fre stations
on Caledonia-Kolola Road
and Wolfe Road.
Calls to District 2 Fire
chief Andy Perkins for
comment were not re-
turned as of press time.
Pilot
continued from Page 1a
an effort to emulate his
father. He says he never
felt any pressure to join
the Air Force. It was only
a matter of pursuing his
passions.
Ive always been inter-
ested in aviation, he said,
adding that he began fy-
ing at age 16 and got his
pilots license when he
was 18.
On Friday, following
the graduation, Koritz
didnt want to draw at-
tention away from all the
graduates accomplish-
ments. He credited his
classmates and his family
for helping him through
pilot training school.
I wouldnt have been
out here without their
help, he said.
Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Thom-
as Travis, the Air Force
Surgeon General, was the
keynote speaker at the
graduation Friday. Like
the late Maj. Tom Koritz,
he, too, is a pilot-physi-
cian.
He also knew the el-
der Koritz. He said it was
incredible that his son
was now a pilot in the Air
Force.
It actually says a lot
about great Air Force
families, Travis said.
A lot of us, our parents
served in the Air Force
and their children served
in the Air Force, and that
is very true for the Kori-
tz family as well. I knew
Tom. Great pilot. Great
physician. Tragic that he
was killed. But as I men-
tioned today during the
graduation speech, he
would be so proud of his
son.
The next stop for Jon
Koritz is Seymour John-
son Air Force Base in
North Carolina. He will
fy F-15 Strike Eagles.
His father also few
F-15s.
Col. Howard
McArthur, 14th
Flying Training
Wing vice com-
mander, shakes
the hand of 2nd
Lt. Jon Koritz after
Koritz graduated
from the Special-
ized Undergradu-
ate Pilot Training
program at Co-
lumbus Air Force
Base on Friday.
Courtesy photo
Trotter
continued from Page 1a
a decision and we have
a proposal to make to
the council on Tuesday,
Armstrong said.
Gavin, a drafting and
design instructor at East
Mississippi Community
College, said with the cur-
rent budget, its probable
the frm would not be able
to complete every item on
the citys list of desired
improvements, which in-
cludes installing a new
sound system, a new el-
evator from the Second
Avenue North entrance
and Wi-Fi access. The
list also included upgrad-
ing the restrooms and
lighting as well as outside
improvements including
new copper awnings, re-
strooms in the courtyard
and benches.
Its going to boil down
to the committee making
some decisions on some
certain things, he said.
I would go through and
do the inside renovations
frst. Id do the painting,
the carpet, the lighting
fxtures and redo the
bathrooms and plumb-
ing fxtures. Those are
things we could handle
in house. Then ...we could
do the new sound system,
and what we had left af-
ter we accomplished that
could give the city a bet-
ter guide of... can we do
the facade? Can we do the
exterior restrooms or the
elevator?
Funding for the project
comes from a 20-year in-
lieu tax agreement with
Columbus Light & Water.
The city will pay back
$200,000 a year for 20
years.
The council will meet
3 p.m. at the municipal
complex.
cdispatch.com
By AdAm minichino
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Cant is only a state of mind.
But when youre seriously
injured, the doubts can be as
big a hurdle to overcome as the
physical damage to your body.
John Long has faced the fear
and stared it down.
On Saturday, Long beat
that fear for the second time
in as many weeks and showed
he is an inspiration to athletes
everywhere by completing the
second annual Possum Town
Triathlon in Columbus.
Long, a C-7 complete quadri-
plegic from Louisville, received
assistance from friend John Ar-
nett and his brother, Tanner,
to fnish the 600-yard swim,
17-mile bike ride, and 3.3-mile
run in 2 hours, 59 minutes, 44
seconds.
When you frst get hurt,
you really dont have a lot go-
ing on, Long said. I knew
the sport would be tough, and
I wasnt sure I could do it. I saw
a YouTube video of a paraplegic
doing it and I realized it is pos-
sible. I started getting the gear
ready and progressed from
there. I started swimming and
everything I did was kind of
hard. I would start swimming
and think it was tough and end-
ed up pushing through it and
learning how to swim again. I
got a hand cycle and a racing
chair and learned how to do ev-
erything. I stay busy doing it.
It is like a full-time job for me,
and I am just starting out. I am
blessed to be able to do it again.
It feels good to get out there
and feel like an athlete, too, and
get to mix it up.
Long was injured Oct. 4,
2010, when the car he was rid-
ing in rolled over and struck a
culvert. Long said his friend
who was driving fell asleep.
Initially, Long said he couldnt
move his arms, but he returned
to the gym after he was dis-
charged from the hospital and
began building strength in
his shoulders and in his arms.
About six months after the
accident, he said he entered a
5-Kilometer race and compet-
ed in an every-day wheelchair.
Since then, Long has gradu-
ated to a hand cycle, which he
used Saturday to complete the
cycling portion of the sprint
triathlon, and a racing cycle,
which he used to complete the
run. He said he is still learning
and hopes he will be able to
compete in the Half Ironman
Triathlon next April in New
Orleans. Ironman Triathlons
feature a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-
mile bicycle ride, and a mara-
thon (26.2 miles).
The Possum Town Triath-
lon was the second triathlon
By chARLES odUm
The Associated Press
ATLANTA Julio
Teherans ability to work
through trouble im-
pressed manager Fredi
Gonzalez, who said its
more proof of the young
right-handers added ma-
turity in his breakout sea-
son.
Teheran made it
through six
s c o r e l e s s
innings and
a tired At-
lanta bull-
pen held on
Sunday for
a 2-1 victory
against the
Washington
Nationals.
The Braves won two
of three in the series and
stretched their NL East
lead over the second-place
Nationals to 15 games.
Both teams exhausted
their bullpens in the Na-
tionals 8-7 victory in 15
innings on Saturday night,
making it important for
the Braves that Teheran
protect Atlantas relievers
as long as possible. The
Nationals had two runners
with no outs in each of the
frst three innings, putting
a strain on Teherans pitch
count and making Gonza-
lez nervous in the dugout.
Im thinking hes right
at 60 pitches in three in-
nings and you know your
bullpen is spent, Gon-
zalez said. Youre think-
ing man, Oh man. He
did a nice job getting us
through the sixth. Once
he got us through six we
were thinking weve got a
shot here with the guys we
have.
Four Atlanta relievers
combined to preserve the
victory for Teheran (10-6).
Craig Kimbrel pitched
the ninth for his 39th
save. After Denard Span
reached on an infeld hit,
Kimbrel struck out An-
thony Rendon and Bryce
Harper.
The game ended when
third base umpire Marvin
Hudson ruled Harper went
around on an attempted
check swing.
It was another frus-
trating moment in a long
By noAh TRiSTER
The Associated Press
BROOKLYN, Mich.
Joey Logano gave Ford a
Sprint Cup sweep in Mich-
igan and enabled team
owner Roger Penske to
celebrate a victory in his
home state.
Now Logano can start
to envision
a happy fn-
ish to what
has been
an eventful
season for
the 23-year-
old driver.
We r e
close, were
close, Logano said.
What a great place to
win what a great time to
win, being in Fords back-
yard.
Logano boosted his
chances of reaching the
Chase for the Sprint Cup,
winning Sunday for the
frst time this season in a
fuel-mileage race at Mich-
igan International Speed-
way.
Logano and Kevin Har-
vick breezed past Mark
Martin with just over
three laps to go in the 400-
mile, 200-lap race. Martin
had been trying to stretch
fuel, but when he faltered,
Logano held off Harvick.
The victory put Logano
in 13th place in the stand-
ings. Hes seven points be-
hind Martin Truex Jr. for
the second wild card.
It has been an up-and-
down year for Logano.
He and teammate Brad
Keselowski were docked
25 points each after NA-
SCAR inspectors confs-
cated parts from the rear
suspensions of their cars
before the April 13 race at
Texas.
More recently, Logano
has had to recover from
back-to-back 40th-place
showings at Daytona and
Loudon, but hes in the
middle of a wild race for
the fnal Chase spots.
A roller coaster, to say the
By ScoTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE When vet-
eran Mississippi State University
public address announcer Hank
Flick called out a certain phrase,
everyone in the stadium noticed.
That was Sleepy! Flick
would say.
William Sleepy Robinson
was a three-year letterwinner
and one of MSUs most popular
quarterbacks. Leading the Bull-
dogs from 1990-92, Robinson was
known for his swift feet and abili-
ty to break long plays.
Perhaps the only player Flick
ever acknowledged by frst name
only, Robinson led the Bulldogs
to back-to-back seven-win sea-
sons and bowl appearances under
then-coach Jackie Sherrill. Twen-
ty-one years later, Robinson is
By The Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
University of Alabama cor-
nerback Geno Smith has
been charged with
driving under the in-
fuence.
The Tuscaloosa
County Sheriffs De-
partments online
records show the
sophomore for the
top-ranked Crimson
Tide was arrested
Sunday and jailed on $1,000
bond. He had not been re-
leased as of Sunday after-
noon.
Tuscaloosa police re-
ferred questions to spokes-
man Sgt. Brent Blankley,
who did not immediately
return a call.
Smith played in all
13 games as a freshman
during last seasons na-
tional championship
run, and his role on
the nations top de-
fense increased late
in the year.
He was expected
to compete for the
starting job vacated
by top-10 draft pick
Dee Milliner.
Crimson Tide coach
Nick Saban says in a state-
ment that he will handle it
appropriately once Ive had
a chance to review the in-
formation.
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2013
Smith
Teheran
INSIDE
n MORE BASEBALL: Major
League Baseball standings.
Page 2B
INSIDE
n MORE AUTO RACING:
Sprint Cup, Nationwide
Results. Page 2B
College Football
See ROBINSON, 3B
See LONG, 3B
See SPRINT CUP, 3B
Alabama DB Smith
arrested on DUI charge
Robinson working as specialist at MSU
Former Bulldog quarterback brings knowledge of area to recruiting role on Mullens staff
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Longtime high school football coach William Sleepy Floyd talks to
reporters last week at the Mississippi State University football teams
media day. Robinson, who played quarterback at MSU from 1990-
92, spent four years as football coach t East Oktibbeha County High
School. He is back as a recruiting specialist on Dan Mullens staff.
Auto Racing Possum Town Triathlon Baseball
Logano
Logano
holds off
Harvick
for win at
Michigan
See BRAVES, 3B
Teherans
six enough
for Braves
Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff
TOP: John Arnett, of McCool, left, crosses the fnish line with John Long, of Louisville, on Saturday
at the second annual Possum Town Triathlon in Columbus. Long was injured in 2010 when the
automobile he was a passenger in rolled over. He was paralyzed from the chest down and still has
some hand impairment. He said the biggest hurdle he had to overcome was the fear he wouldnt be
able to do anything. BOTTOM: From left: Arnett, Long, and Longs brother, Tanner, pose for a picture
after John Long received a Possum Town Triathlon plate for fnishing the race. Arnett and Tanner
Long assisted John in the transition areas between events, helping him change clothing and get
situated on the bicycles he used for the cycling and running portions of the race.
CANT ISNT IN LONGS VOCABULARY
Louisville man completes second annual sprint triathlon in less than three hours
Prep Football
Thursdays Game
Caledonia at Heritage Academy, 7 p.m.
Fridays Games
West Lowndes at Montgomery County, 7 p.m.
Starkville at Noxubee County, 7 p.m.
Shannon at Aberdeen, 7 p.m.
Potts Camp at Hamilton, 7 p.m.
Independence at Amory, 7 p.m.
Vardaman at East Webster, 7 p.m.
Louisville at Jim Hill, 7 p.m.
Victory Christian at Hebron Christian, 7 p.m.
Delta Academy at Immanuel Christian, 7 p.m.
Starkville Academy at Lamar School, 7 p.m.
Hartfeld Academy at Oak Hill Academy, 7 p.m.
Mt. Salus at Central Academy, 7 p.m.
Winston Academy at Sylva Bay Academy, 7 p.m.
Prep Soccer
Todays Matches
Madison-Ridgeland Academy at Heritage
Academy, 4 p.m.
Immanuel Christian at Manchester Academy, 4 p.m.
Tuesdays Matches
Starkville Academy at Madison-Ridgeland, 3 p.m.
Prep Softball
Todays Games
Hillcrest Christian at Starkville Academy (DH),
4 p.m.
Oak Hill Academy at Canton Academy, 4 p.m.
Madison-Ridgeland Academy at Heritage
Academy, 5 p.m.
Central Academy at Winston Academy, 5 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Canton Academy at Winston Academy, 4 p.m.
Hebron Christian at Calhoun Academy, 5 p.m.
Central Academy at Kemper Academy, 5:30 p.m.
Oak Hill Academy at Heritage Academy, 6 p.m.
Caledonia at Smithville, 6:30 p.m.
Hatley at Hamilton, 6:30 p.m.
Eupora at New Hope, 6:30 p.m.
Prep Volleyball
Tuesdays Matches
New Hope at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Starkville High at Heritage Academy (MUW),
6:30 p.m.
College Soccer
Fridays Matches
Mississippi State at South Alabama, 7 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette at Ole Miss, 7 p.m.
Southern Miss at Arkansas State, 7 p.m.
Junior College Soccer
Saturdays Match
Men: Wallace State-Hanceville at Itawamba, 1 p.m.
Today
BOXING
8 p.m. Middleweights, Daniel Jacobs (24-1-0)
vs. Giovanni Lorenzo (32-5-0), at New York, FS1
CYCLING
4 p.m. USA Pro Challenge, stage 1, at Aspen,
Colo., NBC Sports Network
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
11 a.m. World Series, consolation, Perth,
Australia vs. Corpus Christi, Texas, at South
Williamsport, Pa., ESPN2
1 p.m. World Series, elimination, Taoyuan,
Taiwan vs. San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico, at South
Williamsport, Pa., ESPN
3 p.m. World Series, elimination, Newark, Del.
vs. Nashville, Tenn, at South Williamsport, Pa.,
ESPN
5 p.m. World Series, elimination, Aguadulce,
Panama vs. Ottawa, Ontario, at South
Williamsport, Pa., ESPN2
7 p.m. World Series, elimination, Sammamish,
Wash. vs. Urbandale, Iowa, at South
Williamsport, Pa., ESPN2
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
9 p.m. Boston at San Francisco, ESPN2
NFL
7 p.m. Preseason, Pittsburgh at Washington,
ESPN
SOCCER
1:55 p.m. Premier League, Newcastle at
Manchester City, NBC Sports Network
Tuesday
CYCLING
3 p.m. USA Pro Challenge, stage 2, Aspen to
Breckenridge, Colo., NBC Sports Network
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon World Series, consolation, teams TBD,
at South Williamsport, Pa., ESPN
3 p.m. World Series, elimination, teams TBD,
at South Williamsport, Pa., ESPN
7 p.m. World Series, elimination, teams TBD,
at South Williamsport, Pa., ESPN2
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
6 p.m. Regional coverage, Arizona at
Cincinnati or Tampa Bay at Baltimore, MLB
6 p.m. Atlanta at New Your Mets, SportSouth
SOCCER
1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League, Maribor
at Plzen, Fox Sports Net
1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League, AC Milan
at Eindhoven, FS1
7 p.m. CONCACAF Champions League,
Houston vs. W Connection, at Marabella, Trinidad
and Tobago, FS1
WNBA
9 p.m. Los Angeles at Seattle, ESPN2
CALENDAR
oN ThE AiR
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 2B Monday, august 19, 2013
Auto Racing
Sprint Cup
Pure Michigan 400
Sunday
At Michigan International Speedway
Brooklyn, Mich.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Joey Logano, Ford, 200 laps, 136.3 rating,
48 points, $252,393.
2. (15) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 119, 42,
$180,731.
3. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 200, 122.8, 42,
$136,315.
4. (20) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 98.9, 40,
$143,486.
5. (11) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 200, 87.7, 39,
$140,293.
6. (26) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 200, 89.2, 39,
$123,399.
7. (31) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 94.4, 37,
$108,135.
8. (5) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 200, 101.2, 36,
$106,135.
9. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200, 109.6, 36,
$105,435.
10. (19) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 98.5, 34,
$127,110.
11. (6) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 200, 89,
33, $119,549.
12. (9) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200, 112, 33,
$139,151.
13. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 200, 86, 31,
$123,568.
14. (27) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 71.7, 0,
$131,510.
15. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 99.3, 29,
$124,676.
16. (17) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 200, 77.5, 28,
$119,535.
17. (13) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 200, 75, 27,
$130,346.
18. (14) Aric Almirola, Ford, 200, 74.9, 26,
$123,621.
19. (22) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 67.2,
25, $132,621.
20. (8) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 68.5, 25,
$103,460.
21. (18) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 66.7, 0,
$85,660.
22. (29) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 55.5,
22, $111,680.
23. (28) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 52.9,
21, $85,010.
24. (24) David Ragan, Ford, 200, 57.9, 21,
$110,868.
25. (33) Casey Mears, Ford, 200, 58.2, 20,
$109,043.
26. (36) David Stremme, Toyota, 200, 46.1, 18,
$98,093.
27. (4) Mark Martin, Toyota, 199, 80.7, 18,
$96,835.
28. (38) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 198, 47, 16,
$102,718.
29. (34) Timmy Hill, Ford, 198, 43.2, 15,
$89,932.
30. (42) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 197, 40, 14,
$81,785.
31. (10) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 197, 74, 13,
$125,568.
32. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 197, 37.5,
0, $80,060.
33. (39) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 196,
35.6, 0, $87,985.
34. (37) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 192, 32.6, 0,
$79,885.
35. (30) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 186, 47.4, 9,
$87,735.
36. (7) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 171, 89,
9, $97,685.
37. (23) David Gilliland, Ford, engine, 165, 52.2,
8, $79,616.
38. (25) David Reutimann, Toyota, 153, 25.9,
6, $74,825.
39. (40) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 56, 36.3,
0, $70,825.
40. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, engine, 54,
57.5, 5, $115,936.
41. (32) Scott Speed, Ford, vibration, 35, 31.7,
3, $62,825.
42. (41) Johnny Sauter, Ford, vibration, 34,
29.9, 0, $58,825.
43. (35) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, accident, 12,
29.3, 1, $55,325.
Nationwide
Nationwide Childrens
Hospital 200
Saturday
At Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course
Lexington, Ohio
Lap length: 2.258 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 94 laps, 150
rating, 0 points, $49,350.
2. (1) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 94, 122.5, 0,
$47,450.
3. (8) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 94, 120.2, 42,
$32,500.
4. (10) Max Papis, Chevrolet, 94, 107.5, 41,
$30,900.
5. (7) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 94, 100.6, 39,
$28,000.
6. (14) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 94, 89.7, 38,
$23,500.
7. (19) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 94, 97.7, 0,
$15,250.
8. (15) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 94, 92.9, 37,
$21,125.
9. (20) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 94, 74.9, 35,
$20,250.
10. (23) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 94, 70.1,
34, $21,200.
11. (17) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 94, 79.2, 33,
$20,900.
12. (12) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 94, 88.5, 32,
$19,825.
13. (9) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 94, 98.6, 31,
$19,725.
14. (4) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 94, 85.5, 30,
$19,600.
15. (6) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 94, 83.8, 29,
$20,500.
16. (16) Andrew Ranger, Dodge, 94, 77.1, 0,
$13,650.
17. (30) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 94, 55.3, 27,
$19,350.
18. (37) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 94, 55.2, 26,
$19,225.
19. (38) Tomy Drissi, Toyota, 94, 45.8, 0,
$19,150.
20. (39) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 94, 43.5, 24,
$19,775.
21. (13) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 94, 72.3, 24,
$19,025.
22. (21) Michael Annett, Ford, 94, 67.3, 22,
$18,985.
23. (3) Owen Kelly, Toyota, 94, 101.1, 21,
$18,950.
24. (24) Jeff Green, Toyota, 94, 58.6, 20,
$18,890.
25. (11) Ron Fellows, Chevrolet, 93, 71.3, 0,
$19,295.
26. (29) Kenny Habul, Toyota, 93, 44, 18,
$12,785.
27. (5) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, accident,
92, 93.6, 17, $20,750.
28. (34) Anthony Gandon, Ford, 91, 33.2, 16,
$18,720.
29. (22) Alex Kennedy, Toyota, 90, 38.8, 0,
$18,685.
30. (28) Chad Hackenbracht, Toyota, suspen-
sion, 85, 55.3, 0, $18,940.
31. (18) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 85, 63.4, 13,
$18,595.
32. (27) Kyle Kelley, Chevrolet, engine, 78,
49.6, 12, $18,550.
33. (32) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 77, 40.3, 11,
$18,520.
34. (36) Kevin OConnell, Chevrolet, engine,
69, 31.4, 10, $12,500.
35. (25) Stanton Barrett, Ford, engine, 67, 46.9,
9, $12,468.
36. (26) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, engine, 62,
54.1, 8, $17,655.
37. (31) Alx Danielsson, Chevrolet, suspension,
35, 35.4, 7, $11,635.
38. (33) Ryan Ellis, Chevrolet, brakes, 29, 30.5,
6, $11,616.
39. (35) Chase Miller, Toyota, vibration, 3, 30.8,
5, $11,475.
40. (40) Blake Koch, Toyota, vibration, 2, 29.2,
4, $11,338.
Baseball
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 73 53 .579
Tampa Bay 70 52 .574 1
Baltimore 67 56 .545 4
New York 64 59 .520 7
Toronto 57 67 .460 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 73 51 .589
Cleveland 66 58 .532 7
Kansas City 64 59 .520 8
Minnesota 54 68 .443 18
Chicago 49 74 .398 23
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 71 53 .573
Oakland 70 53 .569
Seattle 57 66 .463 13
Los Angeles 55 68 .447 15
Houston 41 82 .333 29
Late Saturday
Cleveland 7, Oakland 1
L.A. Angels 6, Houston 5, 10 innings
Sundays Games
Detroit 6, Kansas City 3
Baltimore 7, Colorado 2
Tampa Bay 2, Toronto 1, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 5, Minnesota 2
Seattle 4, Texas 3
Houston 7, L.A. Angels 5
Oakland 7, Cleveland 3
N.Y. Yankees 9, Boston 6
Todays Games
N.Y. Mets (Gee 8-8) at Minnesota (Gibson 2-3),
1:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 6-5) at Baltimore (Tillman
14-3), 6:05 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 6-13) at Texas (Garza 2-1),
7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Salazar 1-1) at L.A. Angels (Weaver
7-6), 9:05 p.m.
Seattle (Harang 5-10) at Oakland (J.Parker
8-6), 9:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 10-7) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 6-12), 9:15 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Toronto (Rogers 3-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova
6-4), 12:05 p.m., 1st game
Tampa Bay (Cobb 7-2) at Baltimore
(Mig.Gonzalez 8-5), 6:05 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 9-7) at N.Y. Yankees
(P.Hughes 4-12), 6:05 p.m., 2nd game
Minnesota (Pelfrey 4-10) at Detroit (Porcello
9-6), 6:08 p.m.
Houston (Cosart 1-0) at Texas (Undecided),
7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-10) at Kansas
City (E.Santana 8-6), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 5-7) at L.A. Angels
(C.Wilson 13-6), 9:05 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 10-12) at Oakland (Gray
1-1), 9:05 p.m.
Boston (Peavy 9-5) at San Francisco
(Vogelsong 2-4), 9:15 p.m.
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 76 48 .613
Washington 60 63 .488 15
New York 56 66 .459 19
Philadelphia 54 69 .439 21
Miami 47 75 .385 28
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 72 51 .585
St. Louis 71 52 .577 1
Cincinnati 70 54 .565 2
Milwaukee 54 70 .435 18
Chicago 53 70 .431 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 72 51 .585
Arizona 64 58 .525 7
Colorado 58 67 .464 15
San Diego 56 68 .452 16
San Francisco 55 68 .447 17
Fridays Games
Chicago Cubs 7, St. Louis 0
Pittsburgh 6, Arizona 2
Colorado 6, Baltimore 3
L.A. Dodgers 4, Philadelphia 0
San Francisco 14, Miami 10
Atlanta 3, Washington 2, 10 innings
Milwaukee 7, Cincinnati 6
N.Y. Mets 5, San Diego 2
Late Saturday
Washington 8, Atlanta 7, 15 innings
San Diego 8, N.Y. Mets 2
Sundays Games
Miami 6, San Francisco 5
Arizona 4, Pittsburgh 2, 16 innings
Baltimore 7, Colorado 2
Philadelphia 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Atlanta 2, Washington 1
Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 1
St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 1
San Diego 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Todays Games
N.Y. Mets (Gee 8-8) at Minnesota (Gibson 2-3),
1:10 p.m.
Colorado (Manship 0-2) at Philadelphia
(E.Martin 1-2), 6:05 p.m.
Arizona (Delgado 4-3) at Cincinnati (Arroyo
11-9), 6:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 12-3) at Miami (Fernandez
8-5), 6:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 14-6) at Chicago
Cubs (Samardzija 6-11), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (S.Miller 11-8) at Milwaukee (Estrada
5-4), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 13-5) at San Diego
(Cashner 8-7), 9:10 p.m.
Boston (Lester 10-7) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 6-12), 9:15 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 12-6) at Philadelphia
(Undecided), 6:05 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 12-3) at Cincinnati (Cingrani
6-2), 6:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 10-11) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler
5-2), 6:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 4-6) at Miami
(Ja.Turner 3-4), 6:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 7-11) at Chicago Cubs
(Rusin 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 13-6) at Milwaukee (Lohse 8-8),
7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 5-8) at San Diego
(T.Ross 3-5), 9:10 p.m.
Boston (Peavy 9-5) at San Francisco
(Vogelsong 2-4), 9:15 p.m.
Little League World Series
At South Williamsport, Pa.
Double Elimination
UNITED STATES
GREAT LAKES, Grosse Pointe, Mich.; MID-AT-
LANTIC, Newark, Del.; MIDWEST, Urbandale,
Iowa; NEW ENGLAND, Westport, Conn.;
NORTHWEST, Sammamish, Wash.; SOUTH-
EAST, Nashville, Tenn.; SOUTHWEST, Corpus
Christi, Texas; WEST, Chula Vista, Calif.
INTERNATIONAL
ASIA-PACIFIC, Taoyuan, Taiwan;
AUSTRALIA, Perth; CANADA, Ottawa,
Ontario; CARIBBEAN, San Lorenzo,
Puerto Rico; EUROPE & AFRICA, Brno, Czech
Republic; JAPAN, Tokyo; LATIN AMERICA,
Aguadulce, Panama; MEXICO, Tijuana.
Thursday, Aug. 15
Aguadulce, Panama 9, San Lorenzo, Puerto
Rico 4
Sammamish, Wash. 8, Corpus Christi, Texas 4
Tijuana, Mexico 12, Perth, Australia 0, 4 innings
Westport, Conn. 3, Nashville, Tenn. 2
Friday, Aug. 16
Taoyuan, Taiwan 10, Ottawa, Ontario 2
Chula Vista, Calif. 3, Grosse Pointe, Mich. 0
Tokyo 7, Brno, Czech Republic 3
Newark, Del. 6, Urbandale, Iowa 3
Saturday, Aug. 17
San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico 4, Perth, Australia 0,
Perth eliminated
Nashville, Tenn. 10, Corpus Christi, Texas 2,
Corpus Christi eliminated
Ottawa, Ontario 4, Brno, Czech Republic 3,
Brno eliminated
Urbandale, Iowa 6, Grosse Pointe, Mich. 5,
Grosse Pointe eliminated
Sundays Games
Tijuana, Mexico 13, Aguadulce, Panama 0,
4 innings
Westport, Conn. 9, Sammamish, Wash. 7
Chula Vista, Calif. 15, Newark, Del. 3, 4 innings
Tokyo 3, Taoyuan, Taiwan 2
Todays Games
Consolation Perth, Australia vs. Corpus
Christi, Texas, 11 a.m.
Game 17 Taoyuan, Taiwan vs. San Lorenzo,
Puerto Rico, 1 p.m.
Game 18 Newark, Del. vs. Nashville, Tenn.,
3 p.m.
Game 19 Aguadulce, Panama vs. Ottawa,
Ontario, 5 p.m.
Game 20 Sammamish, Wash. vs.
Urbandale, Iowa, 7 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Consolation Brno, Czech Republic vs.
Grosse Pointe, Mich., Noon
Game 21 Game 17 winner vs. Game 19
winner, 3 p.m.
Game 22 Game 18 winner vs. Game 20
winner, 7 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Game 23 Tijuana, Mexico vs. Tokyo, 3 p.m.
Game 24 Westport, Conn. vs. Chula Vista,
Calif., 7 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Game 25 Game 21 winner vs. Game 23
loser, 3 p.m.
Game 26 Game 22 winner vs. Game 24
loser, 7 p.m.
Fridays Games
Rain day, no games scheduled.
Saturdays Games
International championship, 11:30 a.m.
U.S. championship, 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 25
At Lamade Stadium
Third Place
International runner-up vs. U.S. runner-up,
10 a.m.
World Championship
International champion vs. U.S. champion,
2 p.m.
Basketball
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Chicago 17 8 .680
Atlanta 13 9 .591 2
Washington 12 14 .462 5
Indiana 11 14 .440 6
New York 10 15 .400 7
Connecticut 7 17 .292 9
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 18 6 .750
Los Angeles 18 7 .720
Phoenix 13 12 .520 5
Seattle 11 13 .458 7
San Antonio 9 15 .375 9
Tulsa 8 17 .320 10
Friday, Aug. 16
Atlanta 88, Connecticut 57
Washington 66, New York 57
Tulsa 83, Minnesota 77
Los Angeles 94, Indiana 72
Saturday, Aug. 17
San Antonio 88, Phoenix 82
Seattle 77, Indiana 70
Sundays Games
Atlanta 76, Washington 58
Chicago 89, Connecticut 78
Minnesota 88, New York 57
Todays Games
No games scheduled
Tuesdays Games
Minnesota at Atlanta, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Tulsa, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Seattle, 9 p.m.
Football
NFL preseason
Friday, Aug. 16
Buffalo 20, Minnesota 16
New Orleans 28, Oakland 20
San Francisco 15, Kansas City 13
New England 25, Tampa Bay 21
Saturday, Aug. 17
Arizona 12, Dallas 7
Cincinnati 27, Tennessee 19
N.Y. Jets 37, Jacksonville 13
Green Bay 19, St. Louis 7
Houston 24, Miami 17
Seattle 40, Denver 10
Sundays Game
Indianapolis 20, N.Y. Giants 12
Todays Game
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m.
Thursdays Games
New England at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.
Carolina at Baltimore, 7 p.m.
Fridays Games
Seattle at Green Bay, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Oakland, 9 p.m.
Saturdays Games
Buffalo at Washington, 3:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 6 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 6 p.m.
Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Jacksonville, 6:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Miami, 6:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Denver, 7 p.m.
Cincinnati at Dallas, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Tennessee, 7 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 25
New Orleans at Houston, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at San Francisco, 7 p.m.
Arena League Playoffs
ArenaBowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Friday, Aug. 16
Arizona 48, Philadelphia 39
CFL
EAST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Toronto 5 2 0 10 230 174
Hamilton 3 4 0 6 166 205
Montreal 2 5 0 4 156 201
Winnipeg 1 6 0 2 153 210
WEST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Saskatchewan 6 1 0 12 234 150
B.C. 5 2 0 10 169 164
Calgary 5 2 0 10 226 186
Edmonton 1 6 0 2 161 205
Friday, Aug. 16
Hamilton 37, Winnipeg 18
Saturday, Aug. 17
Saskatchewan 24, Montreal 21
BC Lions 26, Calgary 22
Sundays Game
Toronto 36 Edmonton 33
Thursdays Game
BC Lions at Montreal, 6:30 p.m.
Fridays Game
Calgary at Toronto, 6:30 p.m.
Saturdays Games
Winnipeg at Hamilton, Noon
Saskatchewan at Edmonton, 3 p.m.
Soccer
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting K.C. 11 8 6 39 36 25
New York 11 8 6 39 36 31
Philadelphia 10 7 8 38 36 32
Montreal 11 7 5 38 36 35
Houston 10 7 6 36 29 23
New England 9 9 6 33 29 23
Chicago 9 10 4 31 29 34
Columbus 8 11 5 29 29 30
Toronto FC 4 12 8 20 21 33
D.C. 3 17 4 13 14 40
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 12 8 5 41 41 30
Colorado 10 7 9 39 33 27
Portland 9 3 11 38 34 22
Los Angeles 11 9 4 37 39 32
Vancouver 10 8 6 36 36 32
Seattle 10 8 4 34 30 26
FC Dallas 8 7 9 33 31 35
San Jose 9 10 6 33 26 35
Chivas USA 4 13 6 18 20 40
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturday, Aug. 17
Montreal 2, D.C. United 1
Columbus 2, Toronto FC 0
New England 2, Chicago 0
New York 0, Philadelphia 0, tie
Houston 3, Seattle FC 1
Colorado 2, Vancouver 0
Los Angeles 4, Real Salt Lake 2
Portland 2, FC Dallas 1
Sundays Game
San Jose 1, Sporting Kansas City 0
Wednesdays Games
FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 9:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Portland, 10 p.m.
Fridays Game
Sporting Kansas City at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Saturdays Games
Houston at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Toronto FC at D.C. United, 6 p.m.
Los Angeles at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
San Jose at FC Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Real Salt Lake, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 25
New York at Chivas USA, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at New England, 6:30 p.m.
Portland at Seattle FC, 9 p.m.
National Womens
Soccer League
W L T Pts GF GA
x-Western New York 10 4 8 38 36 20
x-FC Kansas City 11 6 5 38 34 22
x-Portland 11 6 5 38 32 25
x-Sky Blue FC 10 6 6 36 31 26
Boston 8 8 6 30 35 34
Chicago 8 8 6 30 32 36
Seattle 5 14 3 18 22 36
Washington 3 14 5 14 16 39
xclinched playoff berth
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturday, Aug. 17
Western New York 2, Boston 1
Portland 2, Seattle FC 1
Sunday, Aug. 18
Chicago 2, FC Kansas City 1
Washington 1, Sky Blue FC 1, tie
Playoffs
Semifinals
Saturdays Games
Sky Blue FC at Western New York, TBA
Portland at FC Kansas City, TBA
Championship
Saturday, Aug. 31
Semifinal winners, TBA
Tennis
Western & Southern Open
A U.S. Open Series event
Thursday
At The Lindner Family Tennis Center
Mason, Ohio
Purse: Men, $3.73 million (Masters 1000);
Women, $2.37 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men Championship
Rafael Nadal (4), Spain, def. John Isner, United
States, 7-6 (8), 7-6 (3).
Women Championship
Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Serena
Williams (1), United States, 2-6, 6-2, 7-6 (6).
Doubles
Men Championship
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (2), Spain,
6-4, 4-6, 10-4.
Women Championship
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (3),
China, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany,
and Kveta Peschke (6), Czech Republic, 2-6,
6-3, 12-10.
ATP World Tour
Winston-Salem Open
A U.S. Open Series event
Sunday
At The Wake Forest Tennis Center
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Purse: $658,500 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles First Round
Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Romain Bogaerts,
Belgium, 6-1, 6-1.
Alex Bogomolov Jr., Russia, def. Victor
Hanescu, Romania, 6-3, 6-4.
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Adrian
Mannarino, France, 6-3, 6-3.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Grega
Zemlja, Slovenia, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1.
Mardy Fish, United States, def. Evgeny Donskoy,
Russia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1.
Doubles First Round
Andre Begemann and Martin Emmrich,
Germany, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, and Igor
Sijsling, Netherlands, 7-5, 7-5.
WTA New Haven Open at
Yale
A U.S. Open Series event
Sunday
At The Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale
New Haven, Conn.
Purse: $690,000 (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles First Round
Sabine Lisicki (7), Germany, def. Kristina
Mladenovic, France, 7-5, 6-1.
Doubles First Round
Lucie Hradecka and Klara Zakopalova, Czech
Republic, def. Chan Hao-ching, Taiwan, and
Janette Husarova, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-2.
Shuko Aoyama, Japan, and Andreja Klepac,
Slovenia, def. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania,
and Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-3, 6-4.
Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, and Katarina
Srebotnik (2), Slovenia, def. Natalie Grandin,
South Africa, and Darija Jurak, Croatia, 6-3,
2-6, 10-5.
Transactions
Sundays Moves
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLESOptioned RHP Josh
Stinson to Norfolk (IL).
DETROIT TIGERSOptioned RHP Jose
Alvarez to Toledo (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALSOptioned LHP Dan-
ny Duffy to Omaha (PCL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICSPlaced RHP
Bartolo Colon on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
Wednesday. Recalled LHP Tommy Milone from
Sacramento (PCL).
National League
ATLANTA BRAVESReleased 3B Blake
DeWitt.
MIAMI MARLINSTraded RHP Doug Mathis
to Pittsburgh for a player to be named or cash.
NEW YORK METSPlaced RHP Jenrry Mejia
on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Greg Burke
from Las Vegas (PCL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATESOptioned OF
Andrew Lambo to Indianapolis (IL). Select-
ed the contract of LHP Kris Johnson from
Indianapolis. Transferred C Michael McKenry
to the 60-day DL.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS_Placed WR Kevin Elliott on
injured reserve. Released OL Tony Hills, WR
Terrell Sinkfield and DBs Don Unamba and
Mark LeGree.
CHICAGO BEARS_Signed QB Trent Edwards
to a one-year contract. Released WR Jerrell
Jackson.
CINCINNATI BENGALS_Released LB Aaron
Maybin. Waived WR Tyrone Goard and CB Troy
Stoudermire.
CLEVELAND BROWNS_Re-signed RB
Jermaine Cook. Released CB Kenronte Walker.
DETROIT LIONS_Signed T Kevin Haslem.
Released OT Austin Holtz.
First settlement reached in Sandusky case
By MARK SCOLFORO
The Associated Press
HARRISBURG, Pa.
Penn State University never
may be able to fully shake off
the Jerry Sandusky child mo-
lestation scandal, but news
one victim has settled and oth-
er claimants may soon follow
marks a legal milestone after
almost a year of negotiations.
Attorney Tom Kline said
Saturday that a 25-year-old
suburban Philadelphia man
known as Victim 5 in court
flings had completed the
agreement with the universi-
ty, the frst to come to terms
with the university that once
employed Sandusky as an as-
sistant football coach.
Another attorney, Mike
Boni, one of four lawyers
collectively representing 10
claimants including the
young man whose complaint
triggered the Sandusky crim-
inal investigation said Sun-
day those claims were also
close to being resolved.
Id be troubled if it didnt hap-
pen this week, Boni said. Were
not signed off, but were close.
Another lawyer, Jeff Ander-
son, said his two cases are not
that near to being resolved.
Its still a work in prog-
ress, Anderson told The As-
sociated Press on Sunday. If
somebodys talking about they
have deals done, its not us.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
reported Saturday that 26 of 31
claims are close to being settled,
which would validate the strate-
gy used by Penn State to com-
pensate Sanduskys victims,
said Richard Serbin, an Altoona
lawyer who has represented sex
abuse victims for 25 years.
PGA Wyndham Championship
At Sedgefield Country Club, Greensboro, N.C.
Purse: $5.3 million
Yardage: 7,127; Par: 70 / FedEx Cup points in parentheses
Final
Reed won on second playoff hole
Patrick Reed (500), $954,000............................................................... 65-64-71-66266
Jordan Spieth (300), $572,400 .............................................................65-66-70-65266
Brian Harman (163), $307,400 ..............................................................67-66-69-66268
John Huh (163), $307,400 ..................................................................... 68-62-70-68268
Matt Every (100), $193,450 ....................................................................67-67-68-67269
Zach Johnson (100), $193,450 .............................................................67-68-66-68269
Matt Jones (100), $193,450 ...................................................................65-71-71-62269
Bob Estes (80), $153,700 ......................................................................67-66-68-69270
Andres Gonzales (80), $153,700 .......................................................... 69-67-70-64270
Rory Sabbatini (80), $153,700 .............................................................. 67-66-72-65270
Robert Garrigus (63), $116,600 ............................................................65-69-68-69271
Jim Herman (63), $116,600 ................................................................... 67-66-72-66271
Webb Simpson (63), $116,600 ...............................................................71-67-70-63271
Brendan Steele (63), $116,600 ..............................................................71-67-66-67271
Hideki Matsuyama, $95,400 ................................................................. 70-65-71-66272
Martin Flores (54), $82,150 .................................................................... 67-72-71-63273
Bryce Molder (54), $82,150 ................................................................... 66-69-71-67273
Henrik Norlander (54), $82,150 ............................................................ 67-68-72-66273
David Toms (54), $82,150 ..................................................................... 72-66-73-62273
Ricky Barnes (49), $57,417 ................................................................... 69-69-69-67274
Ernie Els (49), $57,417 .......................................................................... 71-68-70-65274
Bill Haas (49), $57,417 ........................................................................... 69-66-71-68274
Martin Kaymer (49), $57,417 ................................................................. 70-68-73-63274
Charlie Beljan (49), $57,417 .................................................................. 69-67-69-69274
Jin Park (49), $57,417 ............................................................................ 67-69-70-68274
Tim Clark (44), $40,810 ......................................................................... 69-70-72-64275
Ryo Ishikawa (44), $40,810 ................................................................... 70-69-69-67275
Brendon Todd (44), $40,810 .................................................................68-68-75-64275
Steven Bowditch (39), $32,264 ..............................................................71-66-72-67276
Will Claxton (39), $32,264 .................................................................... 68-67-72-69276
Sergio Garcia (39), $32,264 ..................................................................65-70-70-71276
Paul Haley II (39), $32,264 ................................................................... 69-68-72-67276
Jeff Overton (39), $32,264 .....................................................................68-71-72-65276
Alistair Presnell (39), $32,264 ................................................................67-71-67-71276
John Senden (39), $32,264 .................................................................. 66-70-72-68276
Camilo Villegas (39), $32,264............................................................... 69-68-72-67276
K.J. Choi (31), $22,260 .........................................................................69-68-72-68277
Trevor Immelman (31), $22,260 ............................................................. 65-71-70-71277
Colt Knost (31), $22,260 ....................................................................... 69-67-72-69277
Geoff Ogilvy (31), $22,260 .....................................................................67-70-71-69277
Robert Streb (31), $22,260 ................................................................... 68-70-70-69277
Chris Stroud (31), $22,260 .................................................................... 64-72-73-68277
Andrew Svoboda (31), $22,260 ............................................................ 65-69-74-69277
Boo Weekley (31), $22,260 ................................................................... 69-67-73-68277
J.J. Henry (23), $14,855 ........................................................................ 68-70-71-69278
Jerry Kelly (23), $14,855 ........................................................................68-71-68-71278
Stuart Appleby (23), $14,855 ................................................................ 66-70-76-66278
Doug LaBelle II (23), $14,855 ................................................................ 67-72-71-68278
Justin Leonard (23), $14,855 ................................................................ 69-70-71-68278
Nick OHern (23), $14,855...................................................................... 68-71-67-72278
Shawn Stefani (23), $14,855 .................................................................. 67-70-70-71278
Sang-Moon Bae (16), $12,177 .............................................................. 68-70-72-69279
Greg Chalmers (16), $12,177 ................................................................ 69-69-71-70279
Brendon de Jonge (16), $12,177 ............................................................70-68-70-71279
Chris DiMarco (16), $12,177 ...................................................................70-68-70-71279
Ross Fisher (16), $12,177 ...................................................................... 64-69-74-72279
Tommy Gainey (16), $12,177 .................................................................68-69-73-69279
Scott Gardiner (16), $12,177 .................................................................. 67-72-67-73279
Jeff Maggert (16), $12,177..................................................................... 69-68-70-72279
Tom Gillis (9), $11,448 ........................................................................... 69-68-73-70280
George McNeill (9), $11,448 .................................................................69-68-75-68280
Greg Owen (9), $11,448 ........................................................................68-69-75-68280
Cameron Percy (9), $11,448 ................................................................. 68-68-74-70280
Charlie Wi (9), $11,448 .......................................................................... 68-65-75-72280
Morgan Hoffmann (4), $10,918 ............................................................. 65-69-75-72281
Chris Kirk (4), $10,918 ............................................................................ 66-71-72-72281
Steve LeBrun (4), $10,918 ...................................................................... 68-70-72-71281
David Mathis (4), $10,918 ...................................................................... 71-68-73-69281
William McGirt (4), $10,918 ................................................................... 70-68-73-70281
Robert Karlsson (1), $10,600 ................................................................ 70-66-75-71282
Arjun Atwal (1), $10,494 ........................................................................ 69-70-78-66283
Nicholas Thompson (1), $10,388 .......................................................... 70-69-75-70284
Kevin Chappell (1), $10,282 .................................................................. 69-69-75-72285
Solheim Cup
At Colorado Golf Club, Parker, Colo.
Yardage: 7,066; Par: 72
EUROPE 18, UNITED STATES 10
Sunday
Singles
Europe 7, United States 4
Anna Nordqvist, Europe, halved with Stacy Lewis, United States.
Charley Hull, Europe, def. Paula Creamer, United States, 5 and 4.
Brittany Lang, United States, def. Azahara Munoz, Europe, 2 and 1.
Carlota Ciganda, Europe, def. Morgan Pressel, United States, 4 and 2.
Caroline Hedwall, Europe, def. Michelle Wie, United States, 1 up.
Catriona Matthew, Europe, halved with Gerina Piller, United States.
Suzann Pettersen, Europe, halved with Lizette Salas, United States.
Giulia Sergas, Europe, halved with Jessica Korda, United States.
Lexi Thompson, United States, def. Caroline Masson, Europe, 4 and 3.
Jodi Ewart-Shadoff, Europe, def. Brittany Lincicome, United States, 3 and 2.
Beatriz Recari, Europe, def. Angela Stanford, United States, 2 and 1.
Karine Icher, Europe, halved with Cristie Kerr, United States.
Saturday
Foursomes
United States 2, Europe 1
Anna Nordqvist and Caroline Hedwall, Europe, def. Morgan Pressel and Jessica Korda,
United States, 2 and 1.
Stacy Lewis and Paula Creamer, United States, def. Azahara Munoz and Karine Icher,
Europe, 1 up.
Catriona Matthew and Caroline Masson, Europe, halved with Brittany Lincicome and
Lizette Salas, United States.
Michelle Wie and Brittany Lang, United States, def. Suzann Pettersen and Beatriz Recari,
Europe, 2 and 1.
Fourballs
Europe 4, United States 0
Jodi Ewart-Shadoff and Charley Hull, Europe, def. Paula Creamer and Lexi Thompson,
United States, 2 up.
Azahara Munoz and Carlota Ciganda, Europe, def. Gerina Piller and Angela Stanford,
United States, 1 up.
Caroline Hedwall and Caroline Masson, Europe, def. Michelle Wie and Jessica Korda,
United States, 2 and 1.
Beatriz Recari and Karine Icher, Europe, def. Cristie Kerr and Morgan Pressel, United
States, 1 up.
Friday
Foursomes
Europe 3, United States 1
Anna Nordqvist and Caroline Hedwall, Europe, def. Stacy Lewis and Lizette Salas, United
States, 4 and 2.
Suzann Pettersen and Beatriz Recari, Europe, def. Brittany Lang and Angela Stanford,
United States, 2 and 1.
Morgan Pressel and Jessica Korda, United States, def. Catriona Matthew and Jodi Ew-
art-Shadoff, Europe, 3 and 2.
Azahara Munoz and Karine Icher, Europe, def. Cristie Kerr and Paula Creamer, United
States, 2 and 1.
Fourball
Europe 2, United States 2
Suzann Pettersen and Carlota Ciganda, Europe, def. Stacy Lewis and Lexi Thompson,
United States, 1 up.
Caroline Hedwall and Caroline Masson, Europe, def. Angela Stanford and Gerina Piller,
United States, 2 and 1.
Brittany Lincicome and Brittany Lang, United States, def. Anna Nordqvist and Giulia
Sergas, Europe, 4 and 3.
Cristie Kerr and Michelle Wie, United States, def. Catriona Matthew and Charley Hull,
Europe, 2 and 1.
Champions Dicks Sporting Goods Open
At En-Joie Golf Club, Endicott, N.Y.
Purse: $1.8 million / Yardage: 6,974; Par: 72
Final
Bart Bryant (270), $270,000........................................................................66-62-72200
Russ Cochran (144), $144,000 ................................................................... 67-67-67201
Corey Pavin (144), $144,000...................................................................... 68-64-69201
Gene Sauers (96), $96,300 ........................................................................69-66-67202
Duffy Waldorf (96), $96,300 ...................................................................... 68-65-69202
Chien Soon Lu (72), $72,000 ..................................................................... 72-66-65203
John Cook (58), $57,600 ............................................................................ 70-69-65204
Kenny Perry (58), $57,600 ..........................................................................65-71-68204
Rod Spittle (58), $57,600 ........................................................................... 69-66-69204
Fred Funk (40), $39,960 .............................................................................. 71-67-67205
Scott Hoch (40), $39,960 ........................................................................... 73-63-69205
Bernhard Langer (40), $39,960 ................................................................. 73-66-66205
Peter Senior (40), $39,960 ......................................................................... 68-69-68205
Esteban Toledo (40), $39,960.....................................................................67-68-70205
Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $32,400 .......................................................................69-71-66206
Joel Edwards (0), $27,036 ........................................................................... 66-71-70207
Rick Fehr (0), $27,036 ................................................................................. 67-67-73207
Jeff Freeman (0), $27,036 ........................................................................... 67-70-70207
David Frost (0), $27,036 .............................................................................. 70-66-71207
Larry Nelson (0), $27,036............................................................................68-70-69207
Joe Daley (0), $19,470 .................................................................................68-69-71208
Mike Goodes (0), $19,470 .......................................................................... 70-69-69208
Jeff Hart (0), $19,470 ...................................................................................68-70-70208
Peter Jacobsen (0), $19,470 .......................................................................72-70-66208
Gil Morgan (0), $19,470 ...............................................................................70-70-68208
Jeff Sluman (0), $19,470 ............................................................................ 70-69-69208
Mark Brooks (0), $15,660 ........................................................................... 74-66-69209
Brad Bryant (0), $15,660 ............................................................................. 66-72-71209
Dan Forsman (0), $15,660 .......................................................................... 70-71-68209
Steve Elkington (0), $12,996 ....................................................................... 72-68-70210
John Huston (0), $12,996 ............................................................................ 70-71-69210
Steve Jones (0), $12,996 ............................................................................ 68-72-70210
Joey Sindelar (0), $12,996 .......................................................................... 70-70-70210
Craig Stadler (0), $12,996 .......................................................................... 73-69-68210
Chip Beck (0), $10,368 .................................................................................70-70-71211
Jeff Brehaut (0), $10,368 .............................................................................71-69-71211
Mark McNulty (0), $10,368 .......................................................................... 73-66-72211
Loren Roberts (0), $10,368 ......................................................................... 70-69-72211
Mark Wiebe (0), $10,368 ............................................................................. 72-66-73211
Michael Allen (0), $8,820 ............................................................................ 71-66-75212
Roger Chapman (0), $8,820 ....................................................................... 74-68-70212
Brad Faxon (0), $8,820 ...............................................................................73-70-69212
Jim Carter (0), $7,020 ...................................................................................75-71-67213
Gary Hallberg (0), $7,020 ............................................................................ 71-68-74213
Gene Jones (0), $7,020 ............................................................................... 70-74-69213
Steve Pate (0), $7,020 ................................................................................. 72-72-69213
Don Pooley (0), $7,020 .................................................................................72-67-74213
Sonny Skinner (0), $7,020 ........................................................................... 71-73-69213
Hal Sutton (0), $7,020 .................................................................................. 73-72-68213
Brian Henninger (0), $5,220 ........................................................................71-73-70214
John Inman (0), $5,220 ............................................................................... 72-69-73214
Jim Rutledge (0), $5,220 .............................................................................77-68-69214
U.S. Amateur
Yardage: 7,310; Par: 70
Championship (36 holes)
Matt Fitzpatrick, England (137) def. Oliver Goss, Australia (137), 4 and 3.
Sundays Golf Scores
Long completed. Last week,
Long and friend John Ar-
nett, of McCool, competed
in the Tri4Life in Brandon.
Long completed that race in
3:10:37. The event features
a one-third mile swim, a 16-
mile bike ride, and a 5-K run.
It was real tough, Long
said. I actually was like, Why
am I doing this? I fnished and
it was an awesome feeling.
Long credits Arnett and
his brother, Tanner Long,
for their help in helping him
break down barriers. Ar-
nett was with Long for the
600-yard swim, guiding him
through the water and mak-
ing sure he stayed afoat in
his wetsuit and swim brace.
From there, Arnett had to
help Long change clothes
and get him situated on the
hand cycle. Most of the time
they spent in the transition
area focused on taping rods
to Longs hands that he in-
serted into the slots of the
apparatus he used to turn the
cycles wheels. Unfortunate-
ly, the tool on Longs right
hand broke at mile No. 15, so
the team had to stop and get
assistance.
Luckily one of the guys
who was helping here I
think it was a freman had
some tools and we fxed it up
real quick and put it back on
and kept going, Arnett said.
By the 3.3-mile run, Ar-
nett said he had to dig deep
to keep up with Long. He
said they plan to do as many
events together as they can.
On July 27, John Long
and Arnett competed in the
Heart O Dixie Triathlon in
3:51:46. The event features
a half-mile swim, a 27-and-
a-half-mile bike ride, and a
seven-mile run. The team of
Long and Arnett completed
the frst phase in 29:52, the
second in 1:33:01, and the
third in 1:47:35.
Long did the swimming
and running events, while Ar-
nett did the cycling and the
running events.
Arnett said it is inspira-
tional and humbling to
help Long break down barri-
ers and realize what he can
accomplish.
Life knocked him down
and he got back up and kept
going, said Arnett, who is
from McCool. He keeps
going and it motivates us. I
wish everybody could have a
chance to watch him so they
can feel the way we feel.
According to Apparelyzed,
a website that provides spi-
nal cord injury peer support,
quadriplegia is caused by
damage to the cervical spi-
nal cord segments at levels
C1-C8. Damage to the spinal
cord is usually secondary to
an injury to the spinal verte-
brae in the cervical section of
the spinal column. The injury
to the structure of the spinal
cord is known as a lesion
and may result in the loss of
partial or total function in all
four limbs, meaning the arms
and the legs. Quadriplegia is
defned in different ways de-
pending on the level of inju-
ry to the spinal cord. C1C4
usually affects arm sensation
and movement more so than
a C5C7 injury. However, all
quadriplegics have or have
had some kind of fnger dys-
function.
Arnett has known John
and Tanner for six or seven
years. He said serving in a
support role for Long has be-
come a hobby he loves to do.
It is even more satisfying to
remember how the accident
impacted Long and how he
has recovered mentally and
physically.
He is shining brighter
now, Arnett said. It was a
process. At frst, there was
nothing really going on. It
was just getting use to every-
thing. Little by little, piece
by piece, we started getting
equipment and getting out
there. Like he said, he is ad-
dicted to it. He and I are ad-
dicted to it.
Arnett said he didnt com-
pete in triathlons or mara-
thons before teaming with
Long. He said they bicycled
together for a half marathon
in their frst race. Since then,
the bug has infected Arnett
and Long and keeps them
motivated in training so they
are ready for the next stop.
On Saturday, Long and
Arnett had to adjust to some
technical diffculties when
the apparatus that was taped
to Longs right hand and
inserted into the steering
wheel to turn the bicycle he
used for the 17-mile bicycle
ride broke. Arnett said the
mishap at mile 15 wasnt go-
ing to stop them.
Long is looking forward
to getting faster and to us-
ing better equipment. He
thanks Boardtown Bikes, of
Starkville, for helping him
with his equipment. Without
them and the support he re-
ceives from his brother and
Arnett, he knows he wouldnt
be able to realize a goal he
thought of when he was in
the intensive care unit in the
hospital.
It is 90 percent mental
and 10 percent physical,
Long said. You hear that
at frst and are like, What?
It really is true. You battle
through it and you learn how
do everything different. The
beauty of it is you enjoy things
a lot more. It make take me
an hour to get dressed, but I
am excited I am dressed and
here. You amaze yourself ev-
ery day with little goals.
Mentally, it was fear for
a long time. It looked pretty
chaotic at frst. Finally I re-
laxed my body and relaxed
my mind and fgured I would
kind of foat a little bit. I was
trying to perfect a stroke. I
kind of do a backstroke now,
and I got that fnally done.
The racer I had done a good
bit. Putting the racer in with
the swim and the run was
the tough part. It is a lot of
strengthening my back.
Long said he and his team
probably spent two days pre-
paring for the Possum Town
Triathlon. He said his brother
and Arnett push him and he
said he pushes them prob-
ably too much sometimes
so he can throw fear to the
win and compete.
I am hooked, Long said.
It has got me. You just get
where you get more compet-
itive. You want to fnish the
frst few times. Then you
want to see if you can actually
beat somebody.
But Long admitted it took
a couple of months for him to
lose the fear he had after get-
ting injured. He said he heard
all of the talk that he would
never be independent again
and wondered what he would
be able to do with his life.
When I frst got injured,
I was scared to turn the TV
on, Long said. It took me
forever to learn how to get in
my chair from the bed. Then
you just fgure it out.
As for triathlons, there
was the fear of the pool. I had
probably 10 people out there
watching me and I would
freak out. Within a weekend,
I just felt relaxed and now I
can go out there myself and
swim. It took months. It was
a mental battle.
Now I am completely
independent, and getting
out here racing shows oth-
er people that are injured or
anybody that they can get out
here and push and they can
be real athletes. That is the
key to being healthy.
Long has to take precau-
tions because he doesnt
sweat, so it is easy for him
to overheat. Fortunately,
the overcast conditions Sat-
urday cooled temperatures
and helped Longs body tem-
perature stay regulated. He
said he forgets he is disabled
while he is on the course and
enjoys being an athlete again.
He hopes his ability to com-
pete in triathlons shows oth-
ers they can do anything they
put their mind to.
Now that I know I can do
it, I am the most confdent
person in the world, said
Long, who is married and
has two children. I feel like
there isnt anything I cant do.
Nothing. As long as you have
the right prep and equipment,
it is pretty much limitless as
far as what you can do. It
takes a little longer, but you
can do it. I never thought I
would be able to do a triath-
lon. When I was in ICU, I
decided I wanted to do one.
It took me a couple of years,
but I just keep trying to push
it and break barriers.
I feel like I am a guy who
is trying to push himself. If it
inspires people, I am excited
about it and glad. I just want
to push my body and mind
and keep healthy. I want to
inspire people to keep mov-
ing. If you keep moving, it is
the key to health and feeling
good. I am in a wheelchair
and I feel like I am 8 feet tall
and I can walk again when I
get through. It can do that for
you because it is such a men-
tal battle. You think, I cant
do this and youre out on the
course and somehow your
mind tricks you and youre
back on the course next week
and doing it again.
back at his alma mater as
a recruiting specialist on
coach Dan Mullens staff.
This place is very
special, Robinson said.
It is near and dear to my
heart. I was always wait-
ing for the right opportu-
nity to give back in some
way. This seemed like the
right time and the right
opportunity.
When Mullen was
hired fve years ago, his
initial plans included
fnding a way to increase
the coaching staff. He
felt like more people and
more funds were needed
for those positions. As the
Bulldogs have won more
on the football feld, the
ability to grow that staff
has followed.
Robinson will work
with Director of Player
Personnel Rockey Felker
to put together a recruit-
ing class that will best ft
MSUs needs. Originally
recruited by Felker, Rob-
inson played one season
under him before Sherrill
came on as head coach.
Robinson primary duty
will be to evaluate high
school juniors and seniors.
You want experience,
and with Sleepy, you have
that experience, Mullen
said. You have someone
that has lived in this state
their entire life. They
know the back roads.
At the same time, they
played the game on a high
level and they know what
we need to help get to that
next level.
Robinson spent the
past 16 seasons as a high
school coach, and has
lived in Starkville the past
12 years. His coaching ca-
reer most recently includ-
ed a stop at Durant High
School. Prior to that, he
spent four seasons as foot-
ball coach at East Oktib-
beha County High.
I am looking forward
to seeing it from the oth-
er side, Robinson said.-
Coaching has been a bless-
ing, and I am grateful for
the opportunities. In the
past, I was working with a
certain number of young
men, helping them un-
derstand team goals and
chemistry. A lot of players
looked up to me because
they were all trying to get
where I had been.
Now the situation
changes a little bit. I am
trying to evaluate young
players on their talent, but
I am also looking at their
heart and their desire.
At MSU, you are taking
those three-star recruits
and coaching them up.
I have to fnd those play-
ers who have that special
quality inside you know
our coaches can relate to.
Felker is in his 12th
season at his current po-
sition. Also a former quar-
terback at MSU, Felker
spent fve seasons as head
coach and later returned
to the program under
Sherrill. Felker and Rob-
inson give MSU an added
boost of familiarity with
the area.
For fve years, my fam-
ily and I have been invest-
ed in this program and
this university, Mullen
said. With Rockey and
Sleepy, you are talking
people who have been in-
vested in this place their
whole lives. You cant un-
derestimate how import-
ant that is. It gives you an
extra boost in everything
you are trying to do.
Robinson said he
learned a lot coaching at
small schools, like East
Oktibbeha. Always cast
in the underdog role, he
sees some comparison
as MSU continues to
battle to get to the top of
the Southeastern Con-
ference, which has had a
member team win
At East Oktibbeha,
I found young men who
wanted encouragement
and guidance, Robinson
said. As a coach, you can
never underestimate the
ability you have to infu-
ence and mold a young
mind. You have to keep
working hard and you
have to keep believing.
The same thing is
happening here. You have
the right people in place
to make special things
happen for this universi-
ty.
Meanwhile for Robin-
son, coaching is now in
his blood. He is ready for
next chapter and any sub-
sequent ones that follow.
Obviously, I would
like to be on the feld ac-
tively coaching one day,
Robinson said.It is some-
thing I look forward to.
You always have to have
goals and something you
are trying to achieve.
That is what makes it fun
to go to work.
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com MONday, aUGUST 19, 2013 3B
Robinson
Continued from Page 1B
The Associated Press
Preseason Top 25
The poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, 2012
records, total points based on 25 points for a first-
place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote,
and final ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Alabama (58) 13-1 1,498 1
2. Ohio State (1) 12-0 1,365 3
3. Oregon 12-1 1,335 2
4. Stanford 12-2 1,294 7
5. Georgia (1) 12-2 1,249 t5
6. South Carolina 11-2 1,154 8
7. Texas A&M 11-2 1,104 t5
8. Clemson 11-2 1,083 11
9. Louisville 11-2 1,042 13
10. Florida 11-2 894 9
11. Florida State 12-2 845 10
12. LSU 10-3 802 14
13. Oklahoma State 8-5 755 NR
14. Notre Dame 12-1 748 4
15. Texas 9-4 677 19
16. Oklahoma 10-3 579 15
17. Michigan 8-5 531 24
18. Nebraska 10-4 382 25
19. Boise State 11-2 328 18
20. TCU 7-6 323 NR
21. UCLA 9-5 286 NR
22. Northwestern 10-3 199 NR
23. Wisconsin 8-6 185 NR
24. USC 7-6 134 NR
25. Oregon State 9-4 129 20
Also Receiving Votes: Michigan State 95, Baylor 92,
Virginia Tech 86, Miami 85, Arizona State 53, Kansas
State 43, Fresno State 36, Vanderbilt 19, Washington
17, Northern Illinois 16, Mississippi 11, Utah State 8,
Georgia Tech 6, Arizona 3, Cincinnati 3, North Caroli-
na 3, Penn State 2, BYU 1.
The AP Top 25
Football Poll Board
Bob Asmussen, Champaign (Ill.) News-Gazette;
Greg Auman, Tampa Bay Times; Eric Avidon, The
MetroWest Daily News, Framingham, Mass.; Brent
Axe, The Post-Standard, Syracuse, N.Y.; Mike Barber,
Richmond (Va.) Times-Dispatch; Steve Batterson,
Quad City (Iowa) Times; Kirk Bohls, Austin (Texas)
American-Statesman; Patrick Brown, Chattanooga
(Tenn.) Times Free Press;
Ryan Brown, WJOX-FM, Birmingham, Ala.;
Jimmy Burch, Fort Worth (Texas) Star-Telegram; Don-
ovan Campbell, WSVN Miami; Christian Caple, The
Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash.; Robert Cess-
na, Bryan-College Station (Texas) Eagle; John Clay,
Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader; Chadd Cripe, The
Idaho Statesman, Boise; Charles Davis, FOX Sports;
Pete DiPrimio, The Fort Wayne (Ind.)
News-Sentinel; Rustin Dodd, The Kansas City (Mo.)
Star; Seth Emerson, The Macon (Ga.) Telegraph/Co-
lumbus (Ga.) Ledger-Enquirer; Chris Fowler, ESPN;
Joe Giglio, The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C.;
Anthony Gimino, Tucson (Ariz.) Citizen; Tim Griffin,
San Antonio Express-News; Mike Griffith, mlive.com,
Grand Rapids, Mich.;
Glenn Guilbeau, Gannett News Services Loui-
siana; Harold Gutmann, The Herald-Sun of Durham
(N.C.); Rich Hammond, Orange County Register,
Santa Ana, Calif.; Eric Hansen, The South Bend (Ind.)
Tribune; Chris Harris, WSMV-TV, Nashville, Tenn.;
Gary Horowitz, Statesman Journal, Salem, Ore.; Ed
Johnson, Albuquerque (N.M.) Journal; Jon Johnson,
Dothan (Ala.) Eagle;
Hugh Kellenberger, The Clarion Ledger,
Jackson; Josh Kendall, The State, Columbia, S.C.;
Doug Lesmerises, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland;
Rob Long, WJFK-105.7 Baltimore; Dave Matter, St.
Louis Post-Dispatch; Matt McCoy, 610 WTVN Ra-
dio, Columbus, Ohio; Sam McKewon, Omaha (Neb.)
World-Herald; Tom Mulhern, Wisconsin State Journal,
Madison;
Tom Murphy, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Lit-
tle Rock; Chris Murray, Reno (Nev.) Gazette-Journal;
Scott Nulph, Laramie (Wyo.) Bommerang; Scott Ra-
balais, The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La.; Bill Rabinow-
itz, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch; Dave Reardon,
Honolulu Star-Advertiser; Kyle Ringo, Daily Camera,
Boulder, Colo.; Nate Sandell, 1500 ESPN Twin Cities/
KSTP AM, St. Paul, Minn.;
Keith Sargeant, Asbury Park (N.J.) Press; Drew
Sharp, Detroit Free Press; John Shinn, The Norman
(Okla.) Transcript; John Silver, The Journal Inquirer,
Manchester, Conn.; Gary Smits, Florida Times-Union,
Jacksonville; Mike Sorensen, Deseret News, Salt
Lake City; Andy Staples, SI.com; Mitch Vingle, The
Charleston (W.Va.) Gazette;
John Mitchell, The Philadelphia Inquirer; Sam
Werner, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; Jon Wilner, San
Jose (Calif.) Mercury News; Scott Wolf, Los Angeles
Daily News; Adam Zucker, CBS Sports Network
Sprint Cup
Continued from Page 1B
least, Logano said. Weve
just got to keep that mo-
mentum going. It just goes
to show, as long as nothing
goes wrong knock on
wood weve been pretty
good. Weve had some good
speed in our cars.
Everything went pretty
much according to plan at
Michigan. Logano won the
pole Friday and took Sun-
days race by a second over
Harvick, who is fourth in
the standings.
I was very pleased with
the day, Harvick said. Its
just going to come down to
getting on a hot streak over
10 weeks and not making
any mistakes.
There are three races
left before the Chase, and
the jockeying for the fnal
spots is just as muddled as
it was before Sundays race.
Keselowski, the defending
champion, is eighth with
667 points, but Kurt Busch
is now only two points be-
hind him after a third-place
showing Sunday.
Greg Biffe (663) is 10th.
Kasey Kahne (659) and
Truex (653) are in line to be
the wild cards, but Logano
closed a lot of ground.
Points leader Jimmie
Johnson lasted less than 60
laps Sunday before engine
trouble knocked him out.
He has a 41-point lead over
Clint Bowyer.
Biffe fnished ninth af-
ter winning the previous
two Cup races at Michigan.
His victory in June was the
1,000th for Ford Motor
Company across NASCARs
three national series Cup,
Nationwide, and Truck.
Biffe drives for Roush
Fenway Racing. This time,
it was Penskes turn to cel-
ebrate.
I go back about 30 years
here at the track this is
probably one of the biggest
wins, Penske said. I say
its my home state, its my
home track, and Detroits
my city.
It was the third Cup win
of Loganos career, and it
came after he posted the
ninth-fastest pole-winning
speed in NASCAR history
during Fridays qualifying.
Johnson, Kyle Busch,
and Dale Earnhardt Jr.
were among the big names
to have problems, but the
race was a clean one for
Logano in his No. 22 Ford.
He was battling Kurt Busch
for the lead at the very start
and needed only to outlast
Harvick at the end.
The race began with 10
of the frst 17 laps under
caution. There were nine
cautions, and Logano and
Kurt Busch led for 94 of the
200 laps.
The 54-year-old Martin
emerged late, making a bid
for his frst Cup win since
2009, but his fuel didnt
hold up. He fnished 27th.
We saved a bunch of
gas but we needed one
more yellow, Martin said.
One more yellow and we
would have been in good
shape.
Johnson fnished 40th
and is now winless in 24
Cup starts at MIS. His lost
weekend began when a
practice crash Saturday
forced him to use a backup
car and start in the back of
the feld. He quickly made
his way into contention
before the engine problem
ended his day.
Braves
Continued from Page 1B
season for the Nationals, who have lost
three of four after fve straight victories.
I think in that situation you cant really
call that, Harper said, especially when
the home plate umpire says, No about
three times and doesnt want to check.
They check and they bang me. Thats one
less pitch I get to see against him.
Kimbrels a great closer. I think trying
to see as many pitches as you can against
him is huge. The deeper I get in the count
makes me stronger.
Harper, who had two hits, said he didnt
mind being booed before every at-bat
during the series.
I love these fans, Harper said. These
people, theyre absolutely unbelievably
amped up for their team.
Freddie Freeman and Chris Johnson
had RBI singles off Gio Gonzalez (7-6) in
the frst. Gonzalez gave up only two hits
and no runs in the next six innings.
Teheran had baserunners reach second
in fve of his six innings. He retired the Na-
tionals in order only in the fourth.
Teheran gave up fve hits with three
walks as the Nationals stranded nine run-
ners in his six innings.
I know anytime I got in trouble like that
I stay confdent, Teheran said, adding he
wanted to make it deeper in the game.
There was no sign of the tensions be-
tween the teams that began when both
benches emptied after Teheran hit Harper
in a Braves win Aug. 6 at Washington.
Braves pitchers hit Harper with two
pitches in Atlantas victory Friday night.
Washingtons Stephen Strasburg hit Jus-
tin Upton in the frst inning Saturday
night and was ejected after throwing two
straight pitches behind Andrelton Sim-
mons back.
There was no reaction from the umpires
or the Nationals on Sunday when Teheran,
who often pitches inside, hit Rendon to
open the third. Teheran leads the National
League with 13 hit batters.
Its over with, Gonzalez said of the
friction. Its two boys playing in the sand-
lot in the schoolyard. Its over with. I think
both teams have respect for each other, ob-
viously. There are a lot of good players on
that club and weve got good players and I
dont see anything going on the rest of the
(season).
Harper followed with a single but Tehe-
ran pitched out of trouble.
The Braves scored twice in the frst.
B.J. Upton walked and stole second. Rook-
ie second baseman Phil Gosselin, making
his frst start in the majors, reached on a
bunt single for his frst hit. Freeman and
Johnson singled home runs.
The Nationals broke through for a sev-
enth-inning run off Scott Downs and Da-
vid Carpenter, with Jayson Werth hitting
an RBI single.
n noTES: Simmons, Brian McCann,
Jason Heyward and Justin Upton were
out of the starting lineup for rest. Hey-
ward and Simmons entered the game
as defensive replacements. ... The start
of the game was delayed by rain for 39
minutes. ... Werth started following pre-
game concerns about tightness in his
lower back. His seventh-inning single
extended his hitting streak to 10 games.
Long
Continued from Page 1B
Life knocked him down and he got back
up and kept going. He keep going and it
motivates us. I wish everybody could have
a chance to watch him so they can feel
the way we feel.
John Arnett, friend of John Long
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
DOONESBURY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY:
My husband
lost his job
more than a year
ago because his
plant closed.
He was almost
retirement age,
so he took an
early retirement.
The problem is
he isnt adjust-
ing well to the
change.
He has his
hobbies, but he
seems to have
lost interest in
them. He is angry
a lot of the time and lost at
other times. I understand its
a huge adjustment for him,
but Im concerned that it has
been going on too long. I have
tried to get him interested in
things, but he doesnt take
my suggestions well anymore.
He thinks I want him out of my
hair, but its not true. I want
him to be happy.
I know hes depressed
but he denies it. When other
people ask how he likes
retirement, he says he loves
it. I think he feels silly for not
enjoying it. He doesnt want to
spend money for counseling,
even though he knows he can
get the fee adjusted according
to our income.
Im at a loss about what to
do to help him. He reads your
column regularly, and I think
he would take seriously any
advice you could offer. CON-
CERNED WIFE IN MICHIGAN
DEAR CONCERNED WIFE:
Retirement is not for everyone,
and not everybody loves it.
Thats why its
so important
that before a
person retires,
he or she have a
plan in place for
staying mentally
and physically
active.
Your hus-
band may have
valuable skills
he could pass
on by mentoring
others. He could
volunteer in the
community, de-
livering meals to
shut-ins, coach-
ing youngsters sports, help
out at the police department
or a hospital. All he needs to
do is go to his computer and
type in volunteer opportuni-
ties in Michigan to fnd plenty
of opportunities. He can do-
nate as little or as much time
as he wants. But frst, he will
have to admit that he ISNT
loving retirement and needs an
outlet. Please make sure he
sees this column.
DEAR ABBY: Im 12, and for
the last fve months my family
hasnt been getting along. We
act like we love each other, but
Im not so sure. My mom and
dad have been fghting. I saw
something Mom left on our
computer she had been look-
ing at, and the title was How
to Let Go of Emotions During
the Divorce Process. I dont
know if my parents are getting
a divorce or not, but its slowly
tearing my family apart, and I
dont know what to do. What
can I do to prevent it? CON-
FUSED PRE-TEEN
DEAR CONFUSED: Tell your
mother you saw the article she
left on the computer, and ask
her if she and your dad are
separating. If the answer is
yes, tell her you hope theyre
getting counseling.
It is important you under-
stand that while they both
love YOU, they have reached a
point where their relationship
may no longer be working.
Much as you might like to,
there is nothing you can do
to head this off because their
problem has only to do with
them and not you.
DEAR ABBY: I was just
wondering why when men drink
and get drunk, they always talk
about themselves. HEATH-
ER IN NEW HAMPSHIRE
DEAR HEATHER: They may
do it because the alcohol
allows them to loosen up and
open up. Or, because they
think the subject is fasci-
nating, and you are a willing
listener.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
For everything you need to
know about wedding planning,
order How to Have a Lovely
Wedding. Send your name
and mailing address, plus
check or money order for $7
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Wedding Booklet, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-
0447. (Shipping and handling
are included in the price.)
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 4B Monday, august 19, 2013
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Aug.
19). You feel; therefore you
are. Your confdence will
strongly affect the success
of your efforts. In September,
dont get lazy just because
things go so right. Youll have
to work for the bonus you get
in October, but this will ready
you for the next professional
challenge. Youll be favored in
a decision in December. Can-
cer and Scorpio people adore
you. Your lucky numbers are:
2, 4, 44, 28 and 10.
ARIES (March 21-April
19). Most people would be
stressed by todays fnancial
decisions, but not you. Youll
remain calm and in control, as-
signing no special power to the
dollars and cents in question.
Its just money.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). You dont have to reach
to come up with solutions.
Your imagination is overfowing
with creative fxes. It seems
to be an endless resource for
entertainment, as well.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You have romantic mojo at
your fngertips, and whomever
you touch will feel happier,
lighter and more loved be-
cause of your attention. Youll
spend most of the day simply
spreading good energy.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). There is a message in the
timing of things. What happens
easily and quickly will bring you
good fortune. If its taking too
long, bail. Today, its better to
do nothing than to stand in a
long line for something youre
not sure about.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
Some cry for help at the
slightest provocation. You
like to deal with things on
your own. A rescuer will step
in today, whether or not you
deem the situation dire. Its all
relative.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Families may seem to come
as a package deal today. You
wont get to pick and choose
from the group you want to
spend your time with. Its all or
nothing.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Wrong turns are no big deal
as long as you quickly try to
fnd the way back to the right
road. There is absolutely no
sense in staying on a road that
clearly is not leading you in the
direction you want to go.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). You dont want to hear
declarations of love. Youd
rather know that someone
really appreciates the way you
think and operate. Your true
love is the one who pays the
closest attention to detail.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21). Your ideas are
stellar, and you have the
experience to back them up.
Dont let past success go to
your head, though. Someone
with far less experience could
offer the winning strategy, so
listen up.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). As long as youre making
plans, you may as well include
your most capable, generous
and talented friends. They will
contribute unexpected nuanc-
es and create memories in the
process.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Holding on too tightly to
an idea in your head of what
will make you happy might
prevent you from seizing the
opportunity for even greater
happiness, the likes of which
youve never conceived. Stay
open.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). Even if you are the
only one who is limiting you,
self-limitation can be the
hardest to overcome. So talk
through your situation with a
friend who might shed light on
the part that is so familiar to
you that you cant see it.
Horoscopes
Jamaican sprinter Bolt fnishes worlds with three more gold medals
By PAT GRAHAM
The Associated Press
MOSCOW A barefooted
Usain Bolt bopped and boogied
his way around the track on a cel-
ebratory lap.
This was his party, his mo-
ment and his stage after winning
a third gold medal on the last day
of the world championships.
First, the Jamaican jammed to
the reggae sounds of Bob Mar-
ley. Later, to a spiced-up beat that
almost had him falling down
Bolts only misstep of the cham-
pionships.
And when his celebrating was
over, Bolt fung his spikes into the
crowd. He certainly didnt need
them anymore. His work was fn-
ished.
On tired legs, Bolt grabbed the
gold-colored baton for his anchor
leg of the 4x100-meter relay Sun-
day and hurried toward the fnish
line as if he were being chased.
He wasnt. At these champion-
ships, no one could keep up.
For me, my aim is to contin-
ue hard (toward) the greatness
thing, said Bolt, whose team
fnished in a world-leading time
of 37.36 seconds. Continue dom-
inating.
He defnitely accomplished
that, taking gold in the 100, 200
and the relay. With that perfor-
mance, Bolt became the most
decorated male athlete in world
championship history with eight
golds and two silvers, moving
past Carl Lewis (8 golds, 1 silver,
1 bronze).
To be able to rise to the oc-
casion when an entire stadium
full of people are either rooting
for you or want to see you fail
and youre able to hold it togeth-
er, that takes talent, said Justin
Gatlin, who anchored the U.S.
to a silver medal despite mo-
mentarily stepping outside his
lane. Its about rising to the
occasion. He understands what
that means.
Almost overlooked in the Bolt
frenzy was the performance
of teammate Shelly-Ann Fras-
er-Pryce, who also won three
sprinting events. She fnished
it off by breaking away from the
feld in the 4x100, easily beating
an American squad that strug-
gled to get the baton around
again.
Originally fnishing third after
a bad exchange, the Americans
were later bumped up to second
after France was disqualifed.
THE DISPATCH cdispatch.com MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2013 5B
CALL
328-2424
to place an ad in the
How else are you
going to sell that
stuff in your
garage?
2BR/1BA upstairs apt
for rent $375/ mo +
dep. 662-364-3443
Apartments For
Rent: South 704
TOWNHOUSE. 2BR/1.5
BA. New ceramic tile &
carpet. Central air &
heat. HUD accepted.
662-425-6954
FURNISHED EFF. studio
apt. No smoking. Incl,
utilities, satellite, DSL,
washer/dryer. Quiet
country setting. 5 mi.
east of Columbus. Ref.
& dep. req. No pets.
Great for someone
transferring to town.
$600/mo. 328-2785/
251-1829
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS &
townhouses. Call for
more info. 662-549-
1953
Apartments For
Rent: East 702
NORTHWOOD TOWN-
HOUSES 2BR, 1
1/2BA, CH/A, stove,
refrig, DW, WD
hookups, & private pa-
tios. Call Robinson
Real Estate 328-1123
DOWNTOWN APTS. on
5
th
St. 2BR/1BA. $700
& $800 per mo. 662-
327-2588
1, 2, 3 BEDROOM
apartments & townhous-
es. Call for more info.
662-549-1953
2BR TOWNHOUSES
Starting @ $500. Move-
in specials. Short term
leases avail. Next to
hospital. Pear Orchard
Apts. 662-328-9471
2BR APARTMENT in du-
plex. Appliances fur-
nished. Close to town &
the W. Available im-
mediately. Contact
Bobby Caldwell 328-
1011
1&2BR. Move in spe-
cials. Starting @ $600
or $500 w/military disc.
Short term leases avail.
Located next to Hospi-
tal. Fox Run Apts. 662-
328-9471
***$99 1st Month***
Move in special. 1-
5BRs. Lg. remodeled
units. Close to every-
thing but nothing even
comes close. HUD ac-
cepted. Leo 662-630-
2506
Apartments For
Rent: Northside
701
VENDORS WANTED
Caledonia Day 2013
October 19, 2013
Arts, Crafts,
Food, etc..
Call 662-356-4117 or
662-574-3744
For an application
OWN YOUR OWN busi-
ness whether a busi-
ness or franchise oppor-
tunity...when it comes to
earnings or locations,
there are no guaran-
tees. A public service
message from The Dis-
patch and the Federal
Trade Commission
Business
Opportunity 605
CKC MINATURE
Dachshund puppies. 1st
shots. Wormed. $125
each. 662-364-8768
Pets 515
6 WK. old kittens.
Black, gray, Blk. & wht,
gr & wht. Lovable.
Call 245-1048
Free Pets 510
BALDWIN SILENT Touch
church organ. Needs
slight repair. $500 obo.
Story & Clark of Chicago
baby grand piano. Brn.
mahogany finish. Very
playable. Needs TLC.
$500 obo. 889-7000
Musical
Instruments 469
PLAID SOFA & loveseat,
like new $250. 2 tan
microfiber recliners $75
ea. Coffee tbl. $50 &
matching end tbls. $35
ea. 662-244-0416
LARGE LIFT chair. Will
seat extra large person.
Used only 1 yr. Like
new. Pd $1200, asking
$500. Call Trip 662-
328-8032 or 570-5322
LARGE ELECTRIC wheel
chair. Used 3 times.
Like new w/new batter-
ies.$2000. Call 328-
8032 or 570-5322
ENT. CTR. 16X50x66.
$25. Faux leather
loveseat $75. Bookcase
from TV cab. $25. Wood
full bed frame $25. 2
mattress sets $50/set.
662-244-0416
CONTINENTAL MARKET
& Bistro is open until all
merchandise is gone.
Come & get yours
today!!! 662-352-4460
4 BURNER elec. stove
w/2 ovens, SBS fridge
w/water & ice disp, 20
qt. Hobart comm. mixer
w/attch, rnd. ped. tbl.
w/4 chrs & sd. tbl. 662-
352-4460
General
Merchandise 460
Apartments For
Rent: Starkville
707
UNION CHAPEL Baptist
Church Fellowship Hall.
2 mi across state line,
Co. Rd. 30. 8/24. 7am-
until. Outdoor & hunting
gear, girls/ladies
clothes, some furn,
books, etc. Moving, ev-
erything will go
Garage Sales:
Other 456
ROCKINGHAM HARD-
WOOD DR tbl. w/6 high
back chairs. 8ft. incl. 2
15 extensions. Very,
very good cond. $700.
328-3977
BROYHILL SOFA. 2
cushion floral design.
Like new. $200. 662-
251-3205
3 PC. LEATHER section-
al, 2 pc. suede section-
al 2 pc. full mattress/
box/rails, computer
desk, pictures, acces-
sories, etc. Serious inq.
Only. 662-570-9149
Furniture 448
FARMERS/HUNTERS
Spray liquid fertilizer.
Starting @ $30/acre.
Way more efficient than
granular fertilizer. Works
all season long. 386-
9122
Farm Equipment &
Supplies 442
Apartments For
Rent: Starkville
707
WOOD COFFEE tbl.
35x35 $50. 2 match-
ing end tbls. 21x25.
$35 ea. 662-244-0416
OLDER SEARS gas side-
walk edger. Tuned &
ready. $100 obo. 328-
8238
Bargain
Column 418
OLDER GAS weed eater
trimmer. Tuned & ready.
$45 obo. 328-8238
OLDER CRAFTSMAN
leaf blower/vacuum
Tuned & ready. $50
obo. 328-8238
GREEN FAUX leather
loveseat $75. Bookcase
from TV cab. $25. 662-
244-0416
FULL MATTRESS set.
$50. Weight bench $50.
Great cond. 662-386-
5427
CHINA CABINET. Oak.
Needs glass shelves.
$100. Call 662-434-
7905
2 TAN microfiber reclin-
ers $75 ea. 662-244-
0416
2 FULL mattress sets &
box springs. $50/set.
662-244-0416
Bargain
Column 418
WE SELL used appli-
ances & haul off your
old ones. CALL 662-
549-5860 or 662-364-
7779

WASHERS, DRYERS,
fridges, hot water
heaters, a/c's & stoves
for sale. 662-251-0176

Appliances 409
MECHANIC NEEDED to
work on company vehi-
cles. 662-386-5692.
Trades 365
RN SUPERVISOR need-
ed for day shift M-F,
7am-3pm at skilled
nursing facility. Apply in
person & bring all cre-
dentials to 2002 5
th
St.
N. Columbus, MS
PART TIME hygienist.
Tuesday only. Paid on
commission. Send re-
sume to Box 492 c/o
The Commercial Dis-
patch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS 39703
CARE CENTER of
Aberdeen seeks the
following: LPN (FT)
3pm -1pm & MDS RN
(FT). Req: 1 yr. MDS 3.0
exp. Competitive pay &
benefits. Apply in per-
son 505 Jackson St,
Aberdeen,MS 39730.
662-369-6431
or fax resume to:
662-369-6473. EOE
Medical &
Dental 330
WESTERVELT RENEW-
ABLE Energy, a division
of The Westervelt Com-
pany, is currently seek-
ing qualified applicants
at its wood pellet manu-
facturing plant near Al-
iceville, Alabama for the
following positions:
Industrial Electrician/
Control Specialist - Re-
quires troubleshooting
mechanical, electrical &
hydraulic systems.
Maintaining industrial
control systems such as
Allen Bradley, HMI &
PLC. Preventive mainte-
nance, installations &
start-up of new state of
the art equipment. Me-
chanical, welding & fab-
ricating. Rotating shifts
Basic Qualifications:
High School/GED, Asso-
ciates/ Technical de-
gree strongly preferred,
minimum of 3 plus
years manufacturing ex-
perience, successfully
pass both written &
hands on assessment,
prior construction, new
equipment start-up ex-
perience a plus, prior
machine shop experi-
ence a plus.

Control Room Operator
*Assists in the safe &
efficient operation of the
plant with supporting
equipment & systems,
reviews the operation of
the plant to monitor pro-
duction & quality, &
communicates with the
laboratory to ensure the
highest quality product.
Basic Qualifications: As-
sociate's degree in Con-
trols, Electrical, PLC, In-
dustrial Maintenance or
Computer Systems,
minimum of 3 plus
years experience in
manufacturing to in-
clude HMI & systems
automation, previous
training in environmen-
tal compliance, instru-
ment controls, electri-
cal, computer or heat
energy systems, profi-
cient in Microsoft Office
applications. Competi-
tive salary & excellent
benefits package. If in-
terested, send resume
& salary history in confi-
dence to jobs@
westervelt.com
PEST SERVICE tech.
Established local com-
pany seeks a mature,
self-starter for a route
service technician. Send
resume to: Box 493
C/O The Commercial
Dispatch P.O.Box 511
Columbus, MS
General Help
Wanted 320
MECHANICAL CON-
TRACTOR in Aliceville,
Al has openings for X-
Ray Carbon & Stainless
Pipe Welders & X-Ray
Carbon & Stainless
Plate Welders. No
phone calls. Please mail
resume to PO Box 441,
Aliceville, Al 35442.
Attn: Recruiting or email
to deborah@lavender
inc.com
LOOKING FOR experi-
enced duct installers.
Please come by Progres-
sive Heating & Cooling,
Inc. to fill out an appli-
cation. 662-369-3694
LOCAL SPA seeks an
experienced licensed
nail technician with
hopefully an established
clientel. Send resumes
to the Box 490 c/o The
Commercial Dispatch,
PO Box 511, Columbus,
MS or call 662-243-
7795
LOCAL RESTAURANT
hiring experienced bar-
tenders, line cooks &
servers. Must be experi-
enced. Please call 662-
798-0045 between 2pm
& 5pm for appointment
LOCAL ESTABLISHED
HVAC company has
openings for: Residen-
tial lead installer, certi-
fied FT service tech & a
PT weekend tech for
weekends. Inquiries
kept confidential. Send
resume to Box 494 c/o
The Commercial Dis-
patch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS 39703
FREE TRAINING in job &
life skills plus computer
training for women. Tue.
through Thur. starting in
Sept. @ Christian Wom-
en's Job Corp. 662-328-
6802
ATTENTION. UP TO
$800 Bi-Weekly. Per
agreement, due to mas-
sive expansion rapid ad-
vancement with leader-
ship positions available.
Start immediately no ex-
perience necessary neat
in appearance. 662-
268-8085
ANIMAL ATTENDANT.
FT daytime position
avail. immediately @ the
Starkville Animal Shel-
ter. Strenuous work in-
volved. Fringe benefits.
ABSOLUTELY NO CALLS
Send letter of interest
with dog/cat skills & re-
sume to: OCHS Person-
nel, PO Box 297,
Starkville, MS 39760
General Help
Wanted 320
PT OFFICE assistant for
non-profit organization.
Pleasant, polite & gram-
matical phone voice is
needed. Experience with
Word & Excel required.
Flexibility & good judg-
ment desired. Send re-
sume to Box 491 c/o
the Commercial Dis-
patch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS 39703
GRANT COORDINATOR
for non-profit organiza-
tion. 20 hrs. Req: exp.
w/administering grant
budgets, attention to
detail, great organiza-
tional skills & college
degree. Send resume &
cover letter to Box 491
c/o the Commercial Dis-
patch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS 39703
Clerical &
Office 305
NEED NEW or used
items for Humanitarian
Aid for Ghana, Africa.
For more information or
to make a donation call
662-386-5692
Special
Notices 240
LET US HELP find your
lost pet. Email, fax, mail
or bring your information
by the office and we will
run your lost & found ad
in the Pet Finder for 3
days FREE!
Lost & Found 230
VOLUNTEER TUTORS
Needed all subjects
Must be 18 or older
Contact 574-5455, E
Johnson, 574-4642, or
H Barry, 497-0584
Instruction &
School 225
~Fully Insured ~Big
trees ~Small trees
~Trees over house
~Storm cleanup ~
~Brush clearing~ FREE
QUOTES. Call today.
662-801-7511
J.R. BOURLAND
Tree & Stump
Removal. Trimming
w/bucket truck
Licensed & Bonded
Firewood 4 sale LWB
$75. 662-574-1621
Tree Service 186
J&A TREE REMOVAL
Work from a bucket
truck. Insured/bonded.
Call Jimmy for a
free estimate
662-386-6286
A&T Tree Service
Bucket truck & stump
removal. Free est.
Serving Columbus since
1987. Senior citizen
disc. Call Alvin @
242-0324 / 241-4447.
We'll go out on a limb
for you!
Tree Service 186
QUALITY PAINTING.
Int/ext, sheetrock repair
& finishing, pressure
washing. No job too
large or small. Free est.
435-0882
PAINTING INC. Int/ext
painting, sheet rock re-
pair & pressure wash-
ing. Special prices on
wall paper removal. Free
est. Call Derek 364-
0048. Honest-Reliable-
Insured
SULLIVAN'S PAINT
SERVICE
Certified in lead removal
Offering special prices
on interior & exterior
painting, pressure
washing & sheet rock
repairs. Free Estimates
Call 435-6528
Painting &
Papering 162
MURRAY'S LAWN
service of Caledonia.
Let me help you clear
your property. Bush hog-
ging, tilling & leveling.
Very reasonable prices.
Also do commercial cut-
ting. Call 662-242-8809
J&R LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & weed eating
reasonable rates & ex-
cellent service. Trim
hedges & prune. Call
662-574-0786 for free
estimate
FOR DEPENDABLE lawn
care services call Danny
@ 549-4565. Mowing,
edging, weed eating,
bush/tree trimming,
roofs, gutters & flower
beds. Free est.
FOR ALL your lawn care
needs call Jacob Bryan
662-231-5899. Free es-
timates, no contracts,
trustworthy service
JESSE & BEVERLY'S
LAWN SERVICE
Mowing, landscaping,
tree cutting, sodding &
clean-up. 356-6525
Lawn Care
Landscaping 147
WE DO air conditioning,
painting & full renova-
tions at low rates.
Call CMM. 327-1723
UNITED FAITH Fellow-
ship Hall w/kitchen,
basketball court incl.
Great for family re-
unions, repass, bithday
celebration & etc.
$300. Funeral & repass
$500 (incl. church). Call
662-251-5320 or 662-
889-8711 for appt.
MICHELE'S A-ONE
cleaning service. No job
too large or too small.
Clean Antebellum
homes, businesses &
residential. Free est.
Ref. avail. 205-695-
0219 or 205-399-6182
RETAINER WALL, drive-
way, foundation, con-
crete/riff raft drainage
work, remodeling, base-
ment foundation, re-
pairs, small dump truck
hauling (5-6 yd) load &
demolition/lot cleaning.
Burr Masonry 242-0259
HOME OR BUSINESS
cleaning, honest & de-
pendable. References
avail. Limited availabili-
ty. 662-386-3132
General
Services 136
Legal Notices 001
TOM HATCHER, LLC
Custom Construction,
Restoration, Remodel-
ing, Repair, Insurance
claims. Call 662-364-
1769. Licensed &
Bonded
TODD PARKS
CONSTRUCTION
New Construction, Re-
modeling, Repairs, Con-
crete. Free est. Call or
email 662-889-8662 or
toddparks.construction
@gmail.com
Building &
Remodeling 112
Legal Notices 001
BUILDING & REMODEL-
ING Additions from the
ground up, remodeling
inside & out. You'll like
our est. You'll love our
work! 662-889-8791
HAMLETT'S
CONSTRUCTION
Painting and all types
of home repairs,
inside & out & more
662-386-1234
Building &
Remodeling 112
State of Mississippi
Notice of Sale
WHEREAS, the following tenants
entered into leases with Gate-
way Center Mini Storage for stor-
age space in which to store per-
sonal property and WHEREAS,
default has been made in the
payment of rent and Gateway
Center Mini Storage pursuant to
said Leases is authorized to sell
the personal property to satisfy
the past due and any other
charges owed to it by the follow-
ing tenants. NOW, THEREFORE,
notice is hereby given that Gate-
way Center Mini Storage will of-
fer for sale all personal property
in storage units leased by the
following tenants at Gateway
Mini Center Storage 217 Mc-
Crary Road, Columbus, MS
39702 at 10:00 am September
7, 2013. Office located 201-J
Alabama Street, Columbus, MS
39702. All auction's are with re-
serve and therefore all units can
be withdrawn from the sale at
any time by the auctioneer/man-
ager. The following tenants
have the right to pay the entire
amount due, including expenses
incurred, prior to sale. You can
thereby avoid the sale and re-
trieve your personal property. Ti-
tle to the personal property to
be sold is believed to be good,
but at such sale, Gateway Cen-
ter Mini Storage will convey only
such title as is vested in it pur-
suant to its lease with the fol-
lowing and its allowed under
Mississippi Code Annotated Sec-
tion 85-7-123.
ERIC A. JONES UNIT C81
CEQEULIA BIGBEE UNIT A38
KURSTEN WASHINGTON
UNIT B66
CHRISTINE HILL UNIT B39
SHELATTA OWENS UNIT B70
JERRY LOCKERTT UNIT B43
MAURICE WEBBER UNIT E158
JESSICA GILMORE UNIT B62
RICKY HUDSON UNIT B40
BRITNEY S FENTON UNIT A35
JUSTIN JACKSON UNIT E188
ASHLEY BURNETT UNIT E193
WITNESS MY SIGNATURE this
18th day of August 2013
/s/ OWNER
08/18/13
Publish: 8/19/2013
LEGAL NOTICE
REQUEST FOR SEALED BIDS
FROM QUALIFIED HOUSING
CONTRACTORS
The Lowndes County Board of
Supervisors will at 10:00 AM
on September 10, 2013, re-
ceive sealed bids from qualified
residential building contractors
on behalf of two (2) homeowners
in Lowndes County for the follow-
ing:
Demolition and reconstruction of
two (2) single-unit residential
houses located in Lowndes
County, Mississippi. All units
must be constructed according
to Mississippi Development Au-
thority HOME regulations and all
local building codes. Houses
must be completed within 180
working days.
CONTRACTOR MUST submit
copy of Mississippi contractor s
license with bids.
CONTRACTORS ARE REQUIRED
TO ATTEND A PRE-BID CONFER-
ENCE AND WALK-THROUGH OF
THE PROPOSED HOUSING
UNITS SCHEDULED FOR AU-
GUST 20 AT 10:00 AM IN THE
COMMUNITY CENTER AT THE
ARTESIA TOWN HALL IN ARTE-
SIA. DETAILED SPECIFICA-
TIONS WILL BE PROVIDED AT
THIS MEETING.
Interested respondents may re-
quest additional information by
contacting the project adminis-
trator, Spencer Broocks at Gold-
en Triangle Planning and Devel-
opment District, 662-320-2009.
Contract will be on a fixed price
basis and will be awarded to the
lowest and best bidder.
This project is funded by the
HUD HOME Investments Partner-
ship Grant and is a Section 3
covered activity as defined by
the Housing and Urban Develop-
ment Act of 1968 (12 U.S.C.
1701u) (section 3). Contrac-
tors and subcontractors are en-
couraged to provide, to the
greatest extent feasible, train-
ing, employment, and contract-
ing, opportunities generated by
the expenditure of this assis-
tance to low-and very low-income
persons and business concerns
owned by low-and very low-in-
come persons, or which employ
low-and very low-income per-
sons.
ENVELOPE SHOULD BE
MARKED: BID FOR HOUSING
CONSTRUCTION AND HAVE MIS-
SISSIPPI CONTRACTOR S LI -
CENSE NUMBER ON THE OUT-
SIDE OF ENVELOPE.
The County reserves to right to
reject any and all bids.
Publish: 8/12 & 8/19/2013
Legal Notices 001
NORTHSTAR PROPERTIES
500 LouisviIIe 5treet 5tarkviIIe, M5
Cedar Cove
10-11 on Louisville
Middlecreek
Briarwood
Del-Mar
1 bedroom-$465-$535
2 bedroom-$525-$605
3 bedroom-$720
2 bedroom Townhouse-$500-$550
(662) 323-8610
8am-5pm Monday-Friday
Northstarstarkville.com
xpanded hasic cahIe incIuded


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LEGAL NOTICES
published in
this newspaper
and other
Mississippi
newspapers are
on the
INTERNET
THE DISPATCH www.cdispatch.com 6B MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2013
Sudoku
SATURDAYS ANSWER
Sudoku is a number-
placing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difIcul|y
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.
Skating on thin ice
WHATZIT ANSWER
6XQGD\VDQVZHU
Sundays Cryptoquote:
ACROSS
1 Librarians stamp
6 Thin board
10 Start of a Caesar
quote
11 Singer Jones
13 Funny fellow
14 Visibly stunned
15 Greek vowel
16 Brit. iers
18 Storage spot
19 Poverty
22 Start of a count
23 Indy event
24 Attacks
27 Sub system
28 Rara
29 Debtors letters
30 Amends
35 Tiny worker
36 Afternoon break
37 Compass dir.
38 Composers
creation
40 Walking aids
42 Mister, in Madrid
43 Deal maker
44 Dispatched
45 Uncool group
DOWN
1 Chopped into
cubes
2 Keen
3 Slangy farewells
4 Aussie bird
5 Book copy
6 Big mixup
7 Ship record
8 Swift horse
9 Pudding choice
12 Marilu of Taxi
17 Had lunch
20 Club sandwich
base
21 Lake swimmer
24 Pester
25 Broad streets
26 Romes
Chapel
27 Warhol subject
29 Call day
31 Like xenon
32 Central
33 Without letup
34 Bird abodes
39 Great weight
41 Candle count
6XQGD\VDQVZHU
Five Questions
1 Lady Bird
Johnson
2 Tinnitus
3 The Hagia
Sophia
4 A bung
5 The
mizzenmast
Cl assi fi ed
Advertising
Gets
Response
Theres one thing you can count on when you advertise your unwanted
goods in The Dispatch Classifieds-Response!
Hundreds of people shop classified daily. And theyre ready to buy. We
guarantee many of them will be interested in what you have to sell.
Remember: interest generates response; response activates sales.
Interest. Response. Sales. With classified, its as easy as 1-2-3
Classified Advertising
328-2424
2006 HARLEY Ultra
Classic FLHTCUI. Black.
Exc. cond. Recent ser-
vice, runs great, new
tires, Rinehart exhaust
system, 2 different
windshields, extra
chrome, driver backrest,
25k miles. $12,900
obo. Contact Greg @
765-617-9230
08 YAMAHA V-Start
1100. 28,332 mi. Rd.
pegs, w/shield, saddle
bags, lug. rack, crash
bars, bk. rest, chrm.
prts/lts. 329-8689
Motorcycles &
ATV's 940
2006 TRAVEL trailer.
33 ft. Great condition.
662-242-3119
2006 PROWLER. 29 ft,
bumper pull, dining
room slide out, new
canopy, hitch included.
Queen bed & full bed
with bunk on top.
$13,500. Call 436-
8575
Campers &
RV's 930
NEED A
CAR?
Guaranteed
Credit Approval!
No Turn
Downs!
We offer late model
vehicles w/warranty.
Call us!
We will take an
application over the
phone!
We help rebuild your
credit.
Tousley Motors
662-329-4221
4782 Hwy 45 North
(by Shell Station
& 373 Turn Off )
TOYOTA YARIS 2008
112k hwy. miles on this
car. It is in immaculate
condition & it gets over
30 MPG. This car runs
& looks great. Call Chad
@ 662-213-3648
DUE TO harassment
from a salesperson, I
am selling my 2007 Toy-
ota Avalon. 105K mi.
Great condition. Call
662-251-8296
2013 HONDA Odyssey
Touring . White, naviga-
tion, backup camera,
dvd player, 10,558
miles. $38,000 OBO.
889-0118
2005 CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER, 1 owner,
173,000 miles, $4750.
662-549-8837
2005 BUICK Terraza.
V6, 142k mi. Silver,
new tires, extra clean,
cold air. $6850 obo.
Call 662-386-4706 or
356-6352
2004 CHEVY Tahoe
4x4. 3
rd
row, leather,
sunroof, dvd player, 6
disc cd changer, power
seats, windows & locks,
luggage rack, towing
package. Great condi-
tion. 162K miles.
$8000. Call 205-712-
6975
1997 ASTRO Van. Very
good cond. Cold air.
$1800. Call 356-6413
or 251-5003
Autos For Sale 915
SUPER HOT DEAL: For
sale. 2013 Southern
Pride. 28x72 4BR/
2BA. Incl. separate liv-
ing room & den, awe-
some kitchen w/rock
bar, glamour bath, huge
rooms w/walk-in clos-
ets, thermal windows,
Ashley furn, washer/
dryer & more!!! All for
only $430 (plus escrow)
per month! Call South-
ern Colonel Homes,
Meridian, MS at 1-877-
684-4857! www.south
erncolonelmeridian.com
SUMMER SIZZLER
SALE: For sale. 2013
Clayton Knockout
14x80 3BR/2BA . Incl.
vinyl siding/shingle roof,
lg. bedrooms, front
kitchen w/black appli-
ances, Ashley furn,
washer/dryer & much
more!!! All for only $279
(plus escrow) per
month! Call Southern
Colonel Homes, Meridi-
an, MS at 877-684-
4857 for details!
www.Southerncolonel
meridian.com
MUST SEE to believe.
2007 River Birch 32x76
4BR/2BA manufactured
home. Large master
bedroom/bath. Must be
moved. Asking payoff
only. Contact Deborah
364-8408
LIKE NEW. 2009 Cava-
lier 16x80 3BR/2BA.
Large kitchen, lots of
cabinets, all appliances
included. Home has
vinyl siding & shingle
roof. Very nice, a must
see. Delivered & set up.
$27900. Call 662-296-
5923
LAST 4BR/2BA! Don't
miss out on this home.
DW ready to move in at
The Grove Mobile Home
Community. Easy financ-
ing avail. Only $27,900.
Call 662-329-9110 for
more info today!
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
4 YRS. free lot rent!!!!
That's right!....4 yrs.
free lot rent at The
Grove Mobile Home
Community! Beautiful
new energy-efficient,
16x80 Clayton home.
3BR/2BA. Move in to-
day at 508 Lehmberg
Rd, Columbus, MS. Call
662-329-9110 for more
details
I PAY top dollar for
used homes! Call 662-
296-5923
HAVE IT your way. We
will fix for you or you fix
it yourself & save lots of
money. 16x80 3BR/
2BA for low as $5000.
3 to choose from. Hurry.
Won't last long. 662-
296-5923
3/2. DBL. wide. New
Hope school. Ex. cond.
$560/mo. Plus dep. or
down. Rent or rent to
own. Call 601-940-
1397
28x48 3BR/2BA. Re-
modeled, new lino. &
carpet. Home has every-
thing you need for small-
er double wide. Delivery
& set up on your proper-
ty. $29,900. Call 662-
397-9339
2014 model homes at
prices that will not be
beat by anyone, guaran-
teed. Call Kristi @ 662-
308-7662 & let us work
for you!!!
2013 28X76 4BR/2BA.
Delivered, A/C (10 yr
warranty), underpinned,
& 1 year factory warran-
ty on home for only
$59,900. Call Kristi @
662-308-7662
2006 CLAYTON 16x80.
3BR, central heat & air.
Must be moved.
$18,500. Call for more
info. 662-401-1093
2005 RIVERBIRCH
Mobile home.
16X80. 3BR/2BA.
Includes 5 ton heating &
cooling unit & dishwash-
er. Must be moved. Call
205-712-9325
2005 28X64 large 3
BR/2BA. Great cond. All
appliances, central heat
& air, kitchen with plen-
ty of cabinets. Call to-
day about this home.
Won't last long. MUST
GO. 662-401-1093
1997 28x48 double
wide. 3BR/2BA. Very
nice home. Vinyl siding,
shingle roof, large
kitchen with lots of cabi-
nets (real wood), island
in kitchen, all appli-
ances included. Single
female only one who
has ever lived in home.
Delivered & set up for
only $26,900. Call 662-
296-5923
'96 MOD. 16X80. 3/2.
Ex. cond. $475/mo.
Plus dep. or down. Rent
or rent to own. Call 601-
940-1397
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
OLD WEST Point Rd. Ex-
ceptional 20 acre build-
ing site. Paved road
frontage, great neighbor-
hood. Fenced with lake
site. Call Phillip R. Long
@ Long & Long 328-
0770. Broker/Owner
NEW HOPE area. 14
acres, hunting land,
beautiful to build on.
$29,900 firm. Call 662-
549-7454
SUMMER SIZZLER. 2
acre lots. Good/bad
credit. $995 down.
$197/mo. Eaton Land.
662-726-9648
47 ACRES in N.H. w/24
yr. old pines. $3500/
ac. Will divide into 10
ac. plots. 1.8 ac. on
Tiffany Ln. $7500. 915
6
th
St. S. $4000. Owner
fin. avail. 386-6619
1 ACRES on
Ponderosa & 2 acres
on Stokes Rd. Reason-
ally priced. FMI, call
662-328-2207
Lots &
Acreage 860
OWNER TO PAY ALL
CLOSING COSTS FOR
QUALIFIED BUYERS. All
3 of these homes will
have new carpet, ceram-
ic tile, appliances &
painted inside & out
with too many new ex-
tras to mention.(183
Television Rd.) $109k.
This CH&A brick will
qualify for a rural hous-
ing loan. (202 Spring-
dale Dr.) $72k. (656
Ward Rd.) $72k. These
two, 3BR/1.5 BA brick
homes have CH&A.
Call Jeffrey Carter 662-
327-4620
HOUSE & LAND for
sale. 2000 sf. brick
home, 3BR/2BA, bonus
room over garage, 98
acres. Ex. deer/turkey
hunting. Must sell. Near
Ethelsville. $250k obo.
Call 662-658-2664 or
205-886-4884
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM
3 story power plus
home. 5BR/3BA on 5.7
ac. lot. 3700 sf, wrap
around porch, dbl car
garage, hardwood
floors, family room, DR,
great room, lots of stor-
age & energy efficient.
$229k. 18 min. from
Severstal. Call Kimberly
@ Crye-Leike 662-364-
1423
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
LOVELY 3BR/2BA
home w/1399 sf. Home
features metal roof, re-
modeled baths/kitchen,
ss appl, lg. fenced in
back yd. on .90 acre. All
for $126,500. Call Kim-
berly Reed w/Crye-Leike
@ 364-1423 or 328-
1150
4BR/2BA. 1900 sf. 3
ac. 4 lease w/option to
buy w/dwn. pmt. &
credit chk. No pets.
Avail. 9/1. 435-1248
Houses For Sale:
Caledonia 845
NEW CONSTRUCTION
6569 Greenfield Rd.
Tibbee Comm. 3BR/
2BA 2.5 ac, 1950 sf,
LR, cstm. cabs, ss appl,
gran. tops, lg. MA, deck.
Move in ready. $218k.
295-0250
Houses For Sale:
West 835
Very Nice 4BR/2BA
2200 sf. home located
on 1 acre treed lot.
Home features real
wood floors, carpet, SS
appliances, new roof &
paint. Large bedrooms,
gazebo, 24'X32' wired
shop with 2 car at-
tached carport. Call
Kimberly Reed at Crye-
Leike 662-364-1423
FSBO. 3BR/2BA 2000
sf. Approx. 1/2 mi. from
school in quiet cul-de-
sac. Private backyard
with in-ground pool, pool
house & shop. 574-
4128 or 574-0991
3BR/2.5BA, plus bonus
room. 2076 sf, LR, DR,
den, hw floors, new car-
pet, security system,
acre lot, N.H. School
dist. Located on quiet
dead end street. 2 wired
shops. 328-0766
Houses For Sale:
New Hope 825
812 CYPRESS St.
3BR/2BA. CH&A, 2100
sf, enclosed 2 car
garage, large corner
shaded lot, privacy
fence, brick patio &
walkways, watering well,
custom built storage,
new roof/paint/stone
tile, carpet & hardwood
flooring, custom drap-
ery, built-in bookcases,
alarm system & at-
tached greenhouse.
Convenient to schools,
churches & shopping.
Good neighbors.
$99,900. Motivated
seller. 662-251-7691
Houses For Sale:
East 820
LEE PARK. Remodeled
cottage-style home.
2800 sf, wood floors,
LR, DR, lg. fam rm, bkf-
st rm, 4-5BR/3BA,
deck, carport, lg shaded
lot, much more.
$159,900. 574-3218
3BR/2BA. New $10k
40 yr. roof, wd. flrs, ctl.
h/a, new inter. paint,
gas f/place. Access to
5 ac. Lake. Off Ridge
Rd. Below value. Owner
pays closing costs.
$145k. 251-8726
Houses For Sale:
Northside 815
2BR/1BA RIVER home.
Hamilton, MS. $950 per
month rent or
$100,000 for sale.
Call 662-255-7731
Waterfront
Property 760
INEXPENSIVE MINI-
STORAGE. From 5'x10'
to 20'x20'. Two well-lit
locations in Columbus:
Near Walmart on Hwy
45 & near Taco Bell on
Hwy 182. Call 662-328-
2424 for more informa-
tion
Storage &
Garages 750
DOWNTOWN OFFICE.
This three room office
space is located up-
stairs at The Commer-
cial Dispatch building in
historic downtown
Columbus. The quiet
space is approximately
400 sf, has tall ceilings,
carpet & large windows
that look down on Main
Street. $450 rent in-
cludes utilities. Call Pe-
ter at 328-2424 for
more information
Office Spaces 730
RV CAMPER & mobile
home lots. Full hookup
w/sewer. 2 locations
W&N from $75/wk -
$260/mo. 662-251-
1149 or 601-940-1397
MOBILE HOMES to rent
by the wk/mo. 2BR
starting @ $125/wk.
Incl. util. or $325/mo.
Call Don 386-5552
COUNTRY LIVING. AL
state line. 3BR/2BA,
dbl. wide. $500/mo.
Single wide $400/mo.
No pets, dep. req. Call
205-662-3751
3BR/2BA 16x80 home.
1 yr. lease. Avail. Imme-
diately. 3BR/2BA. 28x
48. Newly renovated.
Fenced back yard w/
screened in porch, stor-
age sheds, & carport.
Should be available mid
of August. Dep. & credit
check req. on both. NO
PETS! Call 434-6000
Mobile Homes
For Rent 725
BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY
home for rent. Secluded
4BD/2BA, large brick.
FMI, call 662-418-8260
3BR/1.5BA country
home in Brooksville.
$575 per month. View
by appointment only.
Call 303-549-8359 for
more information
Houses For Rent:
Other 718
4BR/4.5BA with pond.
Great price. Available
immediately. $1200/
month. Call 242-5173
House For Rent:
Starkville 717
4BR/2BA, 2200 SQ FT,
double garage, 4 County
Power Plus home, Elm
Lake golf course,
$1300 mo + dep. 662-
549-4492
Houses For Rent
West: 715
938 KINCADE Rd. 3BR/
3BA, 3 car garage, no
pets, no smoking, no
HUD, fence yard & com-
munity boat slip. $875/
mo + lease & dep. Appt
only 662-386-1287
46 CHARLESTON Circle.
3BR/2BA home +
bonus rm. 1911 sf. Lo-
cated in 1
st
Colony. For
more info. call Patton
Whitten, licensed Real-
tor. 662-574-5196
3BR/2BA. New flooring
& paint. Large lot.
Fenced yard. 1 @ $750
per mo & 1 @ $925
per mo. No HUD. 662-
251-4914
3BR/1BA. CH&A,
stove, fridge, fenced,
c/port. No HUD. No
smoking. Dep. & ref.
req. 574-9749 night-
329-1692
3BR/1BA in Doyle Es-
tates. Fenced in back
yard, no indoor pets.
$725/mo. with $725
deposit. Avail. 9/1.
327-5528 or 549-9298
House For Rent:
New Hope 713
GREAT 3 & 2BR houses
available. Call 662-244-
8944. Ask to speak to
Al to hear about August
Move In special
3BR/2BA Rent or buy.
CH&A, stove, fridge fur-
nished. NO PETS. NO
HUD. NO SMOKING.
$650/mo. $650 dep. +
ref. 662-328-8251
133 MAPLE St. 3BR/
1BA. $600/mo. Plus
dep. Call 386-0651
Houses For Rent:
East 712
LUXAPALILA & Water-
works Rd. 3BR, 1 & 2
BA, $450 mo. + $450
dep. 662-386-7694 &
662-364-1030
COLONIAL TOWNHOUS-
ES. 2 or 3 bedroom w/
2-3 bath Townhouses.
$575/$700. 662-549-
9555. Ask for Glenn or
leave message
2 & 3BR houses for
rent. North side area.
NO HUD accepted. For
more info call 251-5804
Houses For Rent:
Northside 711
RETAIL/COMMECIAL
space in West Point,
MS. Secure & attractive
outlet mall location.
Contact Sonny Jameson
at 662-295-0247.
OFFICE SPACE in east
Columbus. Starting at
$285-$800/mo. In-
cludes utilities & inter-
net. 662-386-7694 or
364-1030
Commercial
Property For Rent
710
Rivergate
Apartments
Quiet Country Living
Studio,
1&2 Bedrooms
Executive Units
Water
Furnished
Monday - Friday
8a-5p
327-6333
300 Holly Hills Rd.
Columbus
Commercial Dispatch
Chateaux
Holly Hills
Apartments
102 Newbell Rd
Columbus
Mon-Fri 8-5
328-8254
Central Heat & Air
Conditioning
Close to CAFB
Onsite Laundry Facility
All Electric/Fully Equipped
Kitchen
Lighted Tennis Court
Swimming Pool
Where Coming
Home is the
Best Part of
the Day
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS &
TOWNHOUSES.
1BR/1BA Apt. $300
2BR/1BA Apt. $350-
$400. 2BR/2BA 3BR /
2BA Townhouses $550-
$800. No HUD allowed.
Lease, deposit, credit
check required. Cole-
man Realty. 329-2323
2BR/1BA. Mayhew. 2
car garage, new appli-
ances, satellite, plus
more. No pets. 15 min.
to West Point, Starkville
& Columbus. $600 plus
$300 dep. Call 494-
5419 or 243-2454
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
VI P
Rent al s
Apartments
& Houses
1 Bedrooms
2 Bedrooms
3 Bedrooms
Unf ur ni shed
1, 2 & 3 Baths
Lease, Deposi t
& Credit Check
viceinvestments.com
327-8555
307 Hospital Drive
Fur ni shed &
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625 31st Ave. N.
(Behind K-Mart Off Hwy. 45 N.)
Office Hours Mon-Fri 8-5
662.329.2544
www.falconlairapts.com
1 & 2 Bedrooms
A Cut Above The Rest
H T
Summer Deals
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12 month lease required
Apartments For
Rent: West 705