Sei sulla pagina 1di 9

Translation1 of Satipa.t.thaana sutta from the Chinese by N J Smith.

10/2001
Reading 19 : T # 26.98 = T 1:582b-584b // M 10 = M i 55-63 (D 22 = D ii 290-315) [Introduction]
Thus have I heard; at one time the AO dwelt at Kuru 2 [in] Kamaasadhamma3 a Kuru city. At that time the World Honoured One told the monks: there is one way only for sentient beings to overcome sadness and fear, to destroy stress and anguish, to cut off lamentation and realise the right process. It is called the four foundations of mindfulness. Whatever Ones-Thus-Come there were that have not clung to complete right enlightenment, all have cut the five hindrances which pollute the heart and weaken wisdom, established the mind and rightly abode in the four foundations of mindfulness, practised the seven limbs of awakening and realised enlightenment, the unsurpassed right and perfect enlightenment. Whatever Ones-Thus-Come there will be that do not cling to complete right enlightenment, all will cut the five hindrances which pollute the heart and weaken wisdom, establish the mind and rightly abide in the four foundations of mindfulness, practise the seven limbs of awakening and realise enlightenment, the unsurpassed right and perfect enlightenment. I, the current One-Thus-Come, that do not cling to complete right enlightenment, I also have cut the five hindrances which pollute the heart and weaken wisdom, established the mind and rightly abide in the four foundations of mindfulness, practised the seven limbs of awakening and realised enlightenment, the unsurpassed right and perfect enlightenment. What is it that are called the four? Examining the body [just] as the body foundation of mindfulness. In the same way, examining feelings, the mind and processes [just] as processes foundation of mindfulness.

[The Body]
[First Jhaana - vitakka]
What is it that is called the examining the body [just] as the body foundation of mindfulness? A mendicant when going then he knows I am going. When standing then he knows I am standing. When sitting then he knows I am sitting. When lying down then he knows I am lying down. When falling asleep then he knows I am falling asleep. When waking then he knows I am waking. When falling asleep [or] waking he knows I am falling asleep [or] waking4.
1

Rather than an absolute literal translation, the principle of considering what the original Indian word was (since it is said these Chinese discourses were translated from the Indian) and translating with its meaning in mind is being followed here. The original Chinese text did not have punctuation so the use of it in translation is a matter of opinion. Later versions of the texts, including the one used here, have added punctuation. 2 The text has a three character (syllable) transcription with a footnote saying Kuruusu. This would indicate that the Chinese translator did not realise Kuruusu is the locative form of Kuru. 3 The text has a four character (syllable) transcription with a footnote saying Kammaasadhamma. 4 This last one is not in the Paali and it seems superfluous and two paragraphs below we have the same items but the last two are speaking and remaining silent. One wonders if there has been some confusion here.

Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body a mendicant rightly knows going out and coming in. Examining well and discriminating. bending and stretching [the limbs], lowering and raising [the head] and the manners and deportment [of the] schools. He holds his extra robe 5 well, extending to all the robes and the bowl. Going, standing, sitting, lying down, going asleep, waking, speaking and remaining silent all he rightly knows. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.

[vicaara]
And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant, when an evil unwholesome thought arises, uses the wholesome process of thought to control, to cut, destroy and stop it. Like a carpenter or a carpenters apprentice manages to use an inked string to make [a line] on the wood and then uses a sharp axe to chop it straight. Like this a mendicant, when an evil unwholesome thought arises, uses the wholesome process of thought to control, to cut, destroy and stop it6. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant, with teeth clenched and tongue pressed up to the palate, he uses mind to control mind, to cut, destroy and stop [evil unwholesome thought]. Just like two strong men seizing one weak man. He there and there seizes and returns freely and strikes and forges it7. Like this the mendicant, with teeth clenched and tongue pressed up to the palate, he uses mind to control mind, to cut, destroy and stop it. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, [when] a mendicant breathes in then he knows I breathe in; [when] he breathes out and then he knows I breathe out 8; [when] he breathes in long then he knows I
5 6

The text has a transcription for Sangaati. The text seems uses nian4 here in with the meaning of thought (vitakka) as in M 20 = M i 119 with a similar simile, but above and below it seems to be used as memory (sati/sm.rti). 7 The text still seems to be talking about thought and uses a simile even more like the one at M 20 = M i 121. The Paali has only one strong man. 8 In this first set only the text has nian4 mindfully with each mention of ru4 xi2 in breath and chu1 xi2 out breath, which I omit.

breathe in long; [when] he breathes out long then he knows I breathe out long; [when] he breathes in short then he knows I breathe in short; [when] he breathes out short then he knows I breathe out short; experiencing 9 the whole body he breathes in, experiencing the whole body he breathes out; experiencing 10 the calming11 of the bodily activities he breathes in; experiencing 12 the calming of the bodily13 activities he breathes out. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.

[Second Jhaana - piiti, sukha (no vitakka, vicaara)]


And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant has zest and happiness born of seclusion saturating his body, freshening and invigorating all over fully [so that there is] not a place in his body that is not infused with zest and happiness born of seclusion. Just like a person working in a bathhouse14 fully kneads soap powder [with] water 15 rolling [it round with his hands] and the water saturates, freshens and invigorates all over fully [so that there is] not a place it does not extend to. Just like that mendicants, zest and happiness born of seclusion saturates his body, freshens and invigorates all over fully [so that there is] not a place in his body that is not infused with zest and happiness born of seclusion16. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant has zest and happiness born of concentration saturating his body, freshening and invigorating all over fully [so that there is] not a place in his body that is not infused with zest and happiness born of concentration. Just like a mountain spring pure and clean, not muddy, full and overflowing. There is no chance for water to enter from [any of] the four directions and water rises up out from the base of that spring. It overflows to the outside saturating the mountain freshening and invigorating all over fully [so that there is] not a place it does not extend to. Just like that mendicants, zest and happiness born of concentration saturating his body, freshening and invigorating all over fully [so that there is] not a place in his body that is not infused with zest and happiness born of concentration 17. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.
9

The text has xue2 (study) with jue2 (experience) as an alternate reading which I take. The text has xue2, but I read jue2. 11 The text has zhi4 stopping here and in the next item. 12 The text has xue2, but I read jue2. 13 The text has kou3 xing2 verbal activities, but I read bodily activities to match the previous sentence. 14 The text says gong1 yu4 ren2 work bathe person. 15 The text has zao3 dou4 shui3 wash bean water, alternate reading could be soap paste. 16 The simile is found at A iii 25 = A 5.28. 17 The simile is found at A iii 25 = A 5.28.
10

[Third Jhaana - no piiti]


And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant has happiness born of non-zest saturating his body, freshening and invigorating all over fully [so that there is] not a place in his body that is not infused with happiness born of non-zest. Just like a blue lotus flower, red, or white lotus, water produced, water grown, touching the bottom of the water, their roots, stems, flowers and leaves all are saturated, freshened and invigorated all over fully [so that there is] not a place it does not extend. Just like that mendicants, happiness born of non-zest saturates his body, freshening and invigorating all over fully [so that there is] not a place in his body that is not infused with happiness born of non-zest18. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.

[Fourth Jhaana]
And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant has in his body a pure clean mind. There remains a fully liberated mind. In his body there is a pure clean mind that has no place untouched (by it). Just as if there were a man throwing a seven or eight cubit cloth from head to toe around his body, there would be no place not covered. Just like that mendicants, in his body there is a pure clean mind that has no place untouched (by it)19. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.

[Sati]
And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant thinks glorious bright thoughts, well received, well grasped, well remembered thoughts; like before and after are the same; like after and before are the same; like day and night are the same; like night and day are the same; like below and above are the same; like above and below are the same. Like this he is not confused at heart, he does not have entanglement. He practises a glorious bright mind, a mind that is finally not covered by darkness 20. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.
18

The simile is found at A iii 25 = A 5.28 in the Paali and it refers to the Third Jhaana. Similar ones appear at M 39.17 = M i 277, M 77.27 = M ii 17 and M 119.20 = M ii 93-4, the last of which is in the Kaayagaaasati Sutta and so would parallel the topic here, Kaayanupassanaa, the first foundation of mindfulness. 19 The simile is found at A iii 25 = A 5.28. 20 This simile is not found with the other five in the Paali, but a similar one is found elsewhere: A 7.146.

And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant well receives the image and well remembers what is thought. Just as if a man sitting examines one lying or a man lying examines one sitting. Just like this he well receives the image and well remembers what is thought21. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.

[Sampajannyya]
And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant examines this body according to how it is22, good or bad, from head to foot, seeing it filled with all kinds of impurities gross and subtle, covered by skin 23. In this body there is: hair of the head, hair of the body, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, muscle, bone, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, large intestine, small intestine, spleen, stomach, portions of faeces, brain and brain stem, tears, sweat, mucus, phlegm, pus, blood, fat, synovial fluid, saliva, bile and urine. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant examines all the elements of the body. In this, my body, there is the earth, water, fire, wind, space and consciousness element 24. Just as if a butcher or his apprentice had killed a cow, skinned it and spread it out on the ground, dividing it into six sections. Just like that a mendicant examines the body in all its elements. In this body of mine there is the earth, water, fire, wind, space and consciousness element. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. [anicca] And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant examines a dead corpse either one or two days up to six or seven days pecked by crows and kites, eaten by jackals and wolves, burnt by fire, buried in the earth, all decayed, rotten and decrepit. Having seen it he comparing it to himself: now even this body of mine is like this and finally cannot escape it. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body.
21 22

The simile is found at A iii 25 = A 5.28. The text has ci3 shen1 sui4 zhu4 sui4 qi1. 23 In the text gross and subtle, covered by skin is placed between teeth and skin that follow, but that does not make sense and does not follow the Indian. 24 The Paali does not have the last two.

And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant sees [the body] as before, lying on the road. Bones a green colour, rotten, decayed and eaten, (unknown character lying?) on the earth. Having seen it he comparing it to himself: now even this body of mine is like this and finally cannot escape it. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant sees [the body] as before, lying on the road, skin, flesh and blood, only tendons binding them together. Having seen it he comparing it to himself: now even this body of mine is like this and finally cannot escape it. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant sees [the body] as before, lying on the road, bones broken up and scattered in all directions: a foot bone, shin bone, upper leg bone, pelvis bone, spine bone, shoulder bone, neck bone, a skull bone, each in different places. Having seen it he comparing it to himself: now even this body of mine is like this and finally cannot escape it. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. And again mendicants, examining the body [just] as the body, a mendicant sees [the body] as before, lying on the road. Bones white like shells and green like the colour of the dove, red as if blood (unknown character), decayed, broken down and smashed (unknown character). Having seen it he compares it to himself. Now this body of mine is also just like this. All have this nature and finally cannot be freed from it. Like this the mendicant examines the internal body [just] as the body. He examines the external body [just] as the body. He establishes mindfulness in the body [so that] there is knowing, there is seeing, there is understanding and there is intelligence. This is called a mendicant examining the body [just] as the body. If a male or female mendicant examines like this, little by little, then this is called examining the body [just] as the body foundation of mindfulness.

[The Feelings]
[dukkha]
What is called examining the feeling [just] as feeling foundation of mindfulness? When a mendicant feels a pleasant feeling, then he knows I feel a happy feeling. When feeling a painful feeling, then he knows I feel a painful feeling.

When feeling neither a pleasant or painful feeling, then he knows I feel neither a pleasant nor a painful feeling. When feeling a: pleasant bodily, painful bodily [or] neither painful nor pleasant bodily [feeling], a pleasant mental, painful mental [or] neither painful nor pleasant mental [feeling], pleasant to eat, painful to eat, neither painful nor pleasant to eat [feeling], pleasant not to eat, painful not to eat, neither painful nor pleasant not to eat [feeling], pleasant desire, painful desire, neither painful nor pleasant desire [feeling], pleasant non-desire, painful non-desire feeling, neither painful nor pleasant non-desire feeling. Then he knows I feel a nonpainful, non-pleasant, non-desire feeling. In this way the mendicant examines the internal feeling [just] as feeling and he examines the external feeling [just] as feeling. He establishes mindfulness in the feeling. [So] there is knowledge, vision, understanding and intelligence. That is called a mendicant examining the feeling [just] as the feeling. If a male or female mendicant examines like this, little by little, then this is called examining the feeling [just] as the feeling foundation of mindfulness.

[The Mind]
What is called examining the mind [just] as mind foundation of mindfulness? When a mendicant has a desirous mind, then he knows I have a desirous mind, as it really is. [When a mendicant has] a non-desirous mind, [then] he knows I have a non-desirous mind, as it really is. [When a mendicant] has: anger, nonanger, delusion, non-delusion, a mean dirty [mind], a non-mean, non-dirty [mind], a collected, a scattered [mind], a low, a high [mind], a small, a big [mind] a sharp, a dull [mind], a concentrated, non-concentrated [mind] Having an unliberated mind, he knows I have an unliberated mind, as it really is. Having a liberated mind, he knows I have a liberated mind, as it really it. In this way the mendicant examines the internal mind [just] as mind and he examines the external mind [just] as mind. He establishes mindfulness in the mind. [So] there is knowledge, vision, understanding and intelligence. That is called a mendicant examining the mind [just] as the mind. If a male or female mendicant examines like this, little by little, then this is called examining the mind [just] as the mind foundation of mindfulness.

[The Processes]
[anattaa]
What is called examining the processes [just] as processes foundation of mindfulness? [When] eye causes form and an internal fetter arises, [when] the mendicant really has an internal fetter, he knows internally there is a fetter as it really is. [When] internally there is no fetter, he knows internally there is no fetter as it really is. If there has not arisen an internal fetter or one has arisen, he knows it as it really is. If the already arisen internal fetter does not cease and again arises, he knows it as it really is. So also with ear, nose, tongue, body and mind, the causing processes that produce internal fetters. When a mendicant really has a fetter internally, he knows Internally there is a fetter as it really is. [If] internally there really is no fetter, he knows Internally there is no fetter as it really is. If the unarisen internal fetter then arises, then he knows as it really is. If the already arisen internal fetter does not cease and again arises, he know it as it really is.

In this way the mendicant examines the internal processes [just] as processes and he examines the external processes [just] as processes. He establishes mindfulness in the processes. [So] there is knowledge, vision, understanding and intelligence. That is called a mendicant examining the processes [just] as the processes. If a male or female mendicant examines like this, little by little, then this is called examining the processes [just] as the processes foundation of mindfulness. These are called the six internal sense organs25. Then again mendicants, examining processes just as processes, when a mendicant internally really has desire, he knows desire as it really is. When internally there really is no desire, he knows non-desire as it really is. If the as yet unarisen desire then arises, he knows it as it really is. If the already arisen desire does not cease and again arises, then he knows it as it really is. This is ill-will, sloth and torpor, distraction and doubt26. [If] internally there really is a hindrance, he knows there is a hindrance, as it really is. [If] internally there really is no hindrance, he knows there is no hindrance, as it really is. If the as yet unarisen hindrance then arises, he knows it as it really is. If the already arisen hindrance does not cease and again arises, then he knows it as it really is. In this way the mendicant examines the internal processes [just] as processes and he examines the external processes [just] as processes. He establishes mindfulness in the processes. [So] there is knowledge, vision, understanding and intelligence. That is called a mendicant examining the processes [just] as the processes. These are the five hindrances. Then again mendicants, examining processes just as processes, when a mendicant internally really has the mindfulness limb of awakening, he knows the mindfulness limb of awakening as it really is. When internally he does not have the mindfulness limb of awakening, he knows not having the mindfulness limb of awakening as it really is. If the as yet unarisen mindfulness limb of awakening then arises, he knows it as it really is. If there is the already arisen mindfulness limb of awakening, then dwelling in unforgetfulness and not failing he turns back and studies increase and knows things as they really are. So also for (investigating) processes, effort, happiness, calm and concentration. When a mendicant internally really has the renunciation limb of awakening, he knows the renunciation limb of awakening as it really is. When internally he does not have the renunciation limb of awakening, he knows not having the renunciation limb of awakening as it really is. If the as yet unarisen renunciation limb of awakening then arises, he knows it as it really is. If there is the already arisen renunciation limb of awakening, then dewelling in unforgetfulness, without effort, he turns back and studies increase and knows things as they really are. In this way the mendicant examines the internal processes [just] as processes and he examines the external processes [just] as processes. He establishes mindfulness in the processes. [So] there is knowledge, vision, understanding and intelligence. That is called a mendicant examining the processes [just] as the processes. These are the seven limbs of awakening. If a male or female mendicant like this, examines little by little processes [just] as the processes, [then] this is called examining the processes [just] as the processes foundation of mindfulness.
25 26

The text just has internal six places nei4 liu4 chu4. The five hindrances (called coverings in Chinese) are: sensual desire, ill-will, sloth and torpor, distraction and doubt, but the last two are not so clear in the Chinese.

[The Conclusion]
If a male or female mendicant for seven years established their mind properly and abided in the four foundations of mindfulness, they must receive [one of] two fruits: either in present processes receive final knowledge, or [if still] having some remainder, [then] being a Non-Returner. [If for] seven, six, five, four, three, two years or one year, or if a male or female mendicant for seven months established their mind properly and abided in the four foundations of mindfulness, they must receive [one of] two fruits: either in present processes receive final knowledge, or [if still] having some remainder, [then] being a Non-Returner. [If for] seven, six, five, four, three, two years or one month, or if a male or female mendicant for seven days and nights established their mind properly and abided in the four foundations of mindfulness, they must receive [one of] two fruits: either in present processes receive final knowledge, or [if still] having some remainder, [then] being a Non-Returner. [If for] seven, six, five, four, three, two years or one month, or if a male or female mendicant for seven days and nights established their mind properly and abided in the four foundations of mindfulness, they must receive [one of] two fruits: either in present processes receive final knowledge, or [if still] having some remainder, [then] being a Non-Returner. [If for] seven, six, five, four, three, two days and nights Non-Returner. [If for] one day and night or if there were a male or female mendicant, little by little, moment by moment, established their mind properly and abided in the four foundations of mindfulness, they in the morning act so (unknown character = well?) mind realise and entered peace. Well acting like this in an instant the mind would realise and enter peace. The Buddha spoke like this. All mendicants listened to what the Buddha said and happily practiced.