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Cyberpump! - Iron Striet: ''A Sample Weekly Workout Schedule'' by P.J.

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Posted on Wednesday, August 13 @ 20:01:05 EDT by TheEditor I have received a few emails asking for a sample of a practical and productive weekly strength and conditioning program. Below is an example of "how we do it" here at our training facilities in Cincinnati. Please note that this is not THE program for everyone, but merely an example that I have been asked to provide by a number of Cyberpump readers. Monday: Upper Body Strength Training Overhead Barbell Press: 1-2x3-10 (repetition maximum HIT style) OR 3-5x1-8 + a moderate-high rep back off set (either a fixed weight or progressively heaver when using multiple setsI play with this a lot) *we use a variety of set and repetition protocols, and training loads, based off of repetition maximums Full Range of Motion Chin-ups: same as overhead press above Dips or Dip Machine: 1x8-12 Single Are Cable Crossover: 1x8-12 Shrugs (any varietywe like the hammer or nautilus leverage shrug machines): 1x8-12 DB or Manual Resistance Lateral Raise: 1x8-12 DB High Pull: 1x8-12 External Rotation (any variation): 1x8-15 Tricep Pressdown: 1x8-12 DB Hammer Curls OR DB Zottman Curls OR Barbell Reverse Curl: 1x8-12 Tuesday: GXP Conditioning 5-10 minute graded/progressive warm-up to 85% of HR Max 5 minute work bout at 85% of HR Max 5-10 minute graded cool down (reverse of the warm-up) *The warm-up and cool down serve to increase the overall energy expenditure of the workout **The level of the workout should be progressively increased, BUT ONLY if your heart rate begins to fall below 85% of maximum over a

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Cyberpump! - Iron Striet: ''A Sample Weekly Workout Schedule'' by P.J. Striet

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few weeks (ex: if level 16 on a LifeFitness crosstrainer @ 60 RPM's initially causes your heart rate to climb-and stay-at 85%, but, over a few weeks, that level only increases HR to 80%, increase either the pace of the workout (while holding intensity constant) OR increase the resistance level (while holding pace constant) ***This workout can be done with any traditional cardiovascular equipment modalityyou WILL need to wear a heart rate monitor Wednesday: Lower Body Strength Training Full Range Barbell Squats: 1x10-30 (repetition maximum HIT style) OR 3-5x5-15 (either a fixed weight or a progressively heavier scheme) Hammer Strength Kneeling Leg Curl: 1x8-15 (any leg curl variation will do, but we have access to, and enjoy, this particular piece) Glute-Ham Raise: Max reps (we like the Power-Lift unit) Leg Extension: 1x8-15 Hammer Strength Adduction: 1x8-15 Hammer Strength Single Leg Press OR Hammer Strength V-Squat: 1x10-15 Reverse Hyper Extension (off of Glute-Ham unit): 1x10-20 Calf Raise (on leg press): 1x10-15 Single Leg Bodyweight Calf Raise: 1x10-15 (hold DB if necessary) Walking Lunges: 40-100 total steps (hold DB's if rep volume is on lower end) Thursday: Interval Conditioning 5:00 graded warm-up to 80-85% of Max HR 3 sets of 5 :30 Intervals (work interval should cause heart rate to rise to 85% of max) :30 rest between intervals at a low level OR complete restI prefer a low level in order to increase overall energy expenditure of the workout) 1:00 between sets at a low level OR complete rest 3-5:00 Cool down *About a 20:00 program **Use a very slow progression scheme with the interval workouts (ex: if you did all 15 sprints at level 16 on the LifeFitness crosstrainer during week 1, do 1 interval at level 17 the 2nd workout, and then 14 intervals at level 16; the next week, 2 intervals at level 17 and 13 at level 16, etc.) Friday: Upper Body Strength Training Bench Press: see overhead press on day 1 for sets/reps Seated Rows: same as bench, press, and chins Plate OR DB Front Raise: 1x8-12 Kelso Shrugs: 1x8-12 Seated Shoulder Press (we use a machine): 1x8-12 Pronated Grip Lat Pulldown (not a wide grip): 1x8-12 Cuban Rotation:3-10 lb. DB's 1x10-15 Barbell Curl: 1x8-12 Neutral Grip Push-ups: max reps Barbell Curl: 1x8-12 Neutral Grip Push-up: max reps Saturday OR Sunday (take the other day off): Energy Expenditure Workout Just pick a "recreational" type of activity (walking with your wife, riding a bike, playing basketball, Fartlek "Walk/Jog" training etc.) 30-60 minutes Keep this "lower level"not very metabolically demanding (no more than 75% of heart rate max) 300+ calories expended is your goal with this On the strength training days, every rep of every set should be done

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Cyberpump! - Iron Striet: ''A Sample Weekly Workout Schedule'' by P.J. Striet

perfectlyEVEN WHEN THE REPS BECOME VERY DEMANDING (THIS IS AN ESSENTIAL POINT FOR SUCCESSFUL STRENGTH TRAINING). If you are progressing due to taking longer pauses between reps, speeding up reps, changing your body alignment, using rest pause methods, etc., YOU ARE NOT REALLY PROGRESSINGEVERYTHING SHOULD BE IDENTICAL (THIS IS HARD TRAINING AND IT IS A SKILL THAT MOST, IT NOT THE VAST MAJORITY, OF TRAINEES NEED TO LEARN). The only thing that changes during a proper set is the speed of the concentric portion of the lift: this portion of the lift will slow down as you fatigue. However, the negative portion, the transition between negative and positive, the length of the pause in the contracted position, your body alignment, etc. should remain exactly the same. DOING A SET IN THE MANNER DESCRIBED TAKES EXTREME DISCIPLINE AND TOLERANCE FOR DISCOMFORTI CANNOT EMPHASIZE THIS POINT ENOUGH. If you expect to get optimal results from your training, you need to learn how to "channel in" and do everything correctly at all times. When you see a 1 set protocol called for, you need to be using repetition maximum weights within that rep range. Realize that, on some exercises, you will not be using "fresh" repetition maximum weights. For example, on day 1, if you train heavy and strictly on the overhead press, common sense dictates that you will not be able to use a "true/fresh" 8-12 rep max on dips due to the fact that similar muscle structures are involved in both exercises. Do not let this discourage youjust go as heavy as you can given the circumstances (focus more on rep performance and fatiguing the muscle groups than on trying to hit some #). As for the multiple set protocols I use, I'm not going to go into detail as to how I use these. It is rather complex (maybe overly :), and I believe I went into some explanation about this topic in another article on this site. All I will say is that I think trainees need to use different protocols and training loads for the same exercises in order to get the most out of it (again, this is just my opinion). Finally, on the upper body days, the first push and pull you see (and they don't necessarily have to be the ones I have listed, but that is what we like) should remain constant for a long period of time (months). Exercises working the same muscle structures can be substituted on a weekly basis for the exercises that follow the first push and pull. However, keep a log of what you do so that you'll have a frame of reference should you choose to return to an exercise a few weeks later. Why only lower body training once weekly??? Over the years, I've found there is really no added benefit to training your hips, thighs, legs and low back more than once weekly. This is especially true if you are also conditioning, which you should be in my opinion. If you combine this strength and conditioning program (or something similar) with clean eating (whole and organic grains, lean protein, fruits and veggies, healthy fats), and eating an amount of overall energy (calories) that is suitable for you to stay in a healthy range of body fat, you are going to be "all that you can be", in my opinion. For more articles by P.J., check out Iron Striet under Features

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Cyberpump! - Putting it All Together (Part 2) by P.J. Striet

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Posted on Monday, March 22 @ 06:14:48 EST by TheEditor Day 2: Lower Body Strength Training Squats warmup 50% work weightx6-10; warmup 75% work weight by 1-3 Week 1: 1x15 all out Week 2: add 1% from prior week; 4x7-8 Week 3: add 8% from prior week; 1x12 all out; 1x12 with a 30-50% reduction in wt. Week 4: add 1% from prior week; 4x6; back off setx10 Week 5: add 6% from prior week; 1x10 all out; 1x10 with a 30-50% reduction in wt. Week 6: add 1% from prior week; 4x5; back off setx10 Glute-Ham Raise: Max Reps Walking Lunge: 20 Steps Bodyweight Supine Hip Extension (1 leg at a time): 1520 each leg Walking Lunge: 20 Steps Leg Curl (any variation): 1x8-12 Walking Lunge: 20 Steps Bodyweight Calf Raises: 30-50 slow full range reps (hold for 10 sec. at the top after every 10 reps...go right into the next group of 10 without rest)

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Cyberpump! - Putting it All Together (Part 4) by P.J. Striet

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Posted on Monday, March 29 @ 07:00:13 EST by TheEditor

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Day4-Upper Body Strength&Conditioning Standing Overhead Press OR Push Press Variation (DB, Barbell, Steel Log, etc.) Chin-ups/Pulldowns (any grip variation that one likes) *for set, rep and progression formats, see Part I of this series (bench press and row on day 1) DB OR Machine Incline Press 1x6-12 all out High Grip Rows (cable or Hammer Strength)1x6-12 all out: this is a pulling movement with an angle half way between a row and a pulldown. DB OR Machine Bench/Chest Press 1x6-12 all out 10 Degree Chext Machine OR Cable Crossover (perferabley 1 arm at a time) 1x6-12 all out Pullover 1x6-12 all out Kelso Shrug 1x6-12 all out External Rotation (any variation)1x10-15 all out Conditioning *see the 30/90 interval program description on day 1 **choose a different cardio modality from day 1
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Cyberpump! - Putting it All Together by P.J. Striet

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Posted on Monday, March 15 @ 06:31:57 EST by TheEditor

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While a percentage of the readers here at Cyberpump train for a specific strength sport, sport, or event, I think it is safe to say that a large percentage of our readers train for general purposes. They want to attain and maintain a high level of both muscular and cardiovascular fitness, increase lean muscle tissue without the assistance of steroids, and be "healthy" (preventing chronic health problems). Furthermore, they wish to meet all of these goals practically and efficiently, as most are "regular folks" with 40+ hour/ week jobs, home & family responsibilities.

The following program "puts it all together", and provides yet another example of a sensible program which will allow "regular folks" to meet their goals. It is a 5 day/week program, and will require a time commitment of 45-60 minutes per session. For this article submission, let's have a thorough look at day 1: Day 1-Upper Body Strength Training & Conditioning Bench Press Variation (OR Dip) *Week 1-warmup 50% work weightx5-8; warmup 75% work weightx12; 1x10 all out; back off set with a 30% reduction in weight from top set *Week 2-(add 1% from prior week) 4x5; reduce weight by 30% and do a moderate-high rep backoff set *Week 3-(add 6% from prior week) same warmups as week 1; 1x8 all out; back off with a 30% reduction *Week 4-(add 1% from prior week) 4x4; reduce by 30% for a back off set *Week 5-(add 6% from prior week) same warmups as week 1; 1x6 all out; back off set with 30% reduction *Week 6-(add 1% from prior week) 4x3; 30% reduction and a back off set

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Cyberpump! - Putting it All Together by P.J. Striet

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Row Variation (exact same format as bench press variation above) Lateral Raise 1x6-12 all out Front Raise 1x6-12 all out Rear Deltoid 1x6-12 all out Shrug Variation 1x10-15 all out Tricep Isolation Exercise 1x6-12 all out Barbell Curl 1x6-12 all out ON MULTIPLE SET WEEKS FOR BENCH/ROW, 2:00 REST BETWEEN SETS (ADHERE STRICTLY) ON EVERYTHING ELSE, 60-90 SEC. REST (ADHERE STRICTLY) Conditioning: :30 on/:90 off Interval Program (any piece of cardio equipment) 20-30 minutes -the :30 interval period should cause your heart rate to reach 85-90% of maximum -the :90 recovery period should be light-moderate *the work/recovery cycle will last 2:00 (do 10-15 cycles total) **increase the work interval SLIGHTLY (for example, on a treadmill, increase by 1-2 tenths a mile per hour OR 1% grade) on 1-2 cycles each workout ***when you reach the point where you are burning 400-500 calories during the workout, you are doing something right and are pretty fit (for general purposes) Next time, we'll take a hard look at Day 2: Lower Body Strength Training

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Specialization Routines (Part I)

Specialization Routines (Part I)


by P.J. Striet

In my last submission, "Thoughts on Program Design: Part II", I discussed how to implement variety into a basic training program. In this submission, I'll carry this theme a step further and actually give you guys and gals some ideas on specific routines that you can integrate into your training program. Let's discuss specialization type programs. Specialization programs should serve a purpose. They should be performed in order to improve upon a weak and/or underdeveloped area of the body. For an athlete, specialization routines may be performed to correct a muscular imbalance, to strengthen the musculature of a specific joint, etc. The best way to perform specialization type programs is to keep them sensible, brief, yet very demanding. Three to four weeks of demanding specialization for a certain area of the body will be more than adequate. During specialization, the area being stressed is given priority. However, an effort should also be made to at least maintain strength in the other muscular structures using brief but hard work. Many times, people find that they also gain strength in the areas not being stressed during specialization because the training volume is reduced and/or the work becomes more focused. The following are specific routines for each area of the body that can be used during specialization, along with comments concerning the intricate details of each. After 3-4 weeks, take a few days off and then return to your traditional program (or "base" routine) and see how the specialization effected your strength levels, especially in those lifts which involve the musculature previously stressed during specialization. Also, note the "Weideresque" routine titles!:) 1)"Big Pipes" (arm specialization) -Alternating DB curl with back supported 1x10 -Biceps supinator 1x10 (each arm) -Barbell curl 1x10 -Biceps supinator 1x10 -Close grip bench press (rest pause in the rack) 1x10 -3 way manual resistance tricep (5 reps each way) Comments: try this one twice weekly for 4 weeks. It may not look like much, but if done with minimal rest between movements, using the heaviest weight possible, it becomes very difficult to complete. Perform 2 forced reps on the first 4 movements. The supinator is great and has really aided my training. You can round out this routine by performing an overhead pressing movement each day, a pullover or row each day, and a compound hip & thigh movement. Each of these done for a set or two prior to the arm work. 2)"Barn Door Lats" (back specialization) -Pullover machine (each rep paused at belt) 1x10 -DB row 1x15 -Negative only pullover 1x6 -Pulldown 1x10 or chins AMAP 3:00 rest (or neck work) -Hand-overhand pulling (for distance or time) Comments: Once again, very demanding if done correctly. The hand-over-hand pulling to end the routine can be done by attaching a thick rope to a combat heavy bag and loading a friend or some
file:///E|/Specialization%20Routines%20(Part%20I).htm (1 of 2)4/3/2006 2:13:16 PM

Specialization Routines (Part I)

plates on top of it. Pull from a standing or seated position (I recommend seated). Try this one 1-2 times/ week. 3)"Quadzilla" (hip & thigh specialization) -Squat: take your 20 rep squat weight and perform 3x10 with 1 minute between sets. -Stiff legged deadlift "ala Dr. Ken" 1x15 -Wall Sit 3:00 (only allowed to fall 3x) Prone leg curl 1x12 -Leg Press 1x15 Comments: After the first two movements (the infamous Dr. Ken combo), you should ponder suicide. If possible, perform the SLD's off a platform or bumper plate. Making it through the last three movements separates the men from the boys. If you get really ambitious, finish out by running hills for 8-10 sprints. 1-2 times weekly for 3 weeks is plenty, and then take about 5 days off. I guarantee you come back stronger in the hip & thigh region. Not for the weak of heart. 4)"Cannon Ball Delts" (Shoulder specialization) -2 arm DB pressing 1x12 -lateral raise 1x12 -front raise 1x12 -1 arm press 1x6 (each arm) -Manual resistance upright row with a towel or rope 1x10 Humerous abduction (top part of lateral raise) 2:00 Comments: 2x/week for 4 weeks. The last exercise isn't as easy as you think if you've done the prior movements correctly. The raises can be done manually, perform these until your arms are shaking uncontrollably on the concentric portion, and until you can no longer resist your partner on the eccentric. Perform a rowing type movement on one day, pulldown or chin the other, squat one day, trap bar dead the other prior to the specialization. Nasty. More routines in part two of this series...

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Specialization Routines (Part II)

Specialization Routines (Part II)


by P.J. Striet

(Continued from Part I) 5)"Freaky Pecs" (?) (Chest specialization) -Barbell Bench (in the rack rest pause) 1x12 -10 degree chest machine or manual flys 1x12 -Incline DB press 1x12 (or Hammer strength incline) -10 degree chest or manual fly 1x12 -20 second push-ups (10up&10down) 1x2-4 -Bag squeezes for time Comment: the soreness encountered 2 days after this routine is almost unbearable. The bag squeezes at the end of this routine are done by placing one hand on each side of a heavy bag and pressing inward. Your chest will be contracting statically. Try pressing your hands through the bag...try touching your palms. You'll be smoked at this point, but keep giving your best effort and don't stop pushing. The bench to begin things should be done to negative failure with the help of a spotter (in the rack!). 2x/ week for 3 weeks will be plenty. Drop overhead work for this period and use abbreviated yet demanding work for all the other muscular structures. 6)Low Back Specialization (sorry, couldn't think of a catchy name) -Squat 1x20 -SLD 1x15 -Nautilus super low back machine or glute/ham 1x20 (2 sec. pause in contracted position) -Hammer or Nautilus hip&back 1x15 -Side Bend 1x15 *If alive, end out by carrying a sandbag around or loading the bag, or stones, whatever onto a waist high platform for a couple dozen reps. Comments: Don't blame me for the nausea you feel after this one. I can tell you from experience, this is bad...real bad. No more than once/week, and eliminate any other work for the low back the rest of the week. If upper body work is done, do it seated (won't have a choice). Be careful if you decide to carry the bag or do a loading type activity. Take a full week off after a month of doing this. After the week off, you'll feel strong as all hell in this region. 7)"Vise Grip" (hand and forearm specialization) -Shot curls 1xAMAP (eliminate all momentum) -Lever Bar 1xAMAP (keep elbow straight...flex at the wrist and bring bar parallel to floor) -Partial supination with lever bar 1xAMAP (elbow tight into body, upper and lower arm at 90 degrees, palm down...hold bar at end...bar should be pulled across from horizontal to vertical...lower slowly)1xAMAP -Reverse lever bar (same as lever bar, just flex wrist in opposite position...requires switching the bar position) 1xAMAP -Hang from thick bar for time OR 5 continuous minutes of ringing out a wet towel OR farmers walking for distance/time/reps. Comments: this can really be done at the end of every workout if time allows. The 1st four movements should be done with the right arm first, and then the left arm (or vice versa). This little cycle will add significant strength to your wrists and will give your forearms a look of raw power. You can go through the cycle twice if you desire. I do the first four every night prior to bed.

file:///E|/Specialization%20Routines%20(Part%20II).htm (1 of 3)4/3/2006 2:13:16 PM

Specialization Routines (Part II)

8)"Top Button Inhibition" (neck specialization) -4 way or manual resistance neck work 1x15 each direction -Kelso Shrug 1x12 -Manual neck rotation (communicate with spotter) 1x15 -DB Shrug 1x12 Comments: this, also, could be done at each workout for overall neck and trap development. If manual neck work is performed, take caution. I'd suggest reading Dan Riley's book on Manual Resistance Training prior to performing any manual work. 9)"Cows" (I'm really struggling with cheezy names...leg/CALF (get it?) specialization) -1 leg calf raises off a block Dave Maurice style (3 up,hold, 3 down) 1xAMAP -Anterior Tibialis/ankle flexion (use the hammer piece if available OR perform manually with a partner) 1x15 -Dave Maurice calf raise (both legs at same time) 1xAMAP -Anterior Tibialis 1x15 -Heel walks for distance Comments: This is excellent for athletes. The leg is an important area for the athlete, but it is often neglected. If you want to stop spraining ankles, avoid shin splits, etc. you need to strengthen and stretch this area. This little beauty will do both. On the raises, really get a good contraction and go through a full ROM. For heel walks, simply point your toes (flex ankle joint) and walk on your heels for distance or time. 10)"Cbass Abs" (abdominal specialization) -Weighted crunch 1x15 (keep lower back driven into ground with the legs straight) -Rotary torso machine 1x15 -Crunch 1xAMAP (you won't be able to use weight this time...at least not for a decent amount of reps). -Rotary torso 1x15 -Side Bend 1x15 Comments: hey, what's a specialization piece without the abs? Little to no rest between movements. If you want a strong ab region, this is your ticket. Some general points and comments for clarification and review: A) Go all out on each movement in every routine listed. That means to failure and beyond if you are willing. The brevity of these routines requires you to leave nothing in the tank. B) Be progressive. You are only doing these for 3-4 weeks, but there is no sense in not challenging yourself. Take this to heart. Always try to better what you did on the previous session. C) Take minimal rest between movements (unless otherwise noted). This will keep the intensity quite high. Sure, you won't be able to use nearly as much resistance, but we are building strength...not demonstrating it. When you are nearing the end of some of these routines, you will not be able to use very much resistance at all due to the great fatigue. Don't let this discourage you...this means you are training hard. The idea is to fatigue the area horribly to create a large overload, and therefore force the area to become stronger and grow. Despite the fatigue, attempt to use the heaviest resistance under the circumstances and adhere to letter "B" above. D) Feel free to play around with these to suit your situation. All these routines are very adaptable. These are just routines that I've used in the past either on myself or others.

file:///E|/Specialization%20Routines%20(Part%20II).htm (2 of 3)4/3/2006 2:13:16 PM

Specialization Routines (Part II)

E) Go all out. Yes, I'm repeating this point. If you feel as though you could perform the routine again after completing it, as Arthur Jones said, "then you didn't do it correctly". If you do the routines correctly, you may never want to do them again. F) Train with someone else or with an enthusiastic group for motivation and to further the intensity. All these routines will be hard to perform alone due to the great mental challenge each one presents. G) Remember to only stay on these routines for a short period of time before returning to your more conventional program. Remember, use a more conventional, well-rounded program as your measuring stick for progress. That's all. Hey, don't say I'm not thorough. I have a 4 hour time block between classes today so I was bored. I hope someone, at some time or another, can benefit from one of the routines in this series. Train hard, PJ

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Changing Set & Repetition Protocols: A Productive Approach


by P.J. Striet I feel that consistently changing the set and repetition protocols used in training leads to better long term progress than simply staying with the same old protocol, week in and week out. The body is quite adaptable, especially when one reaches an intermediate-advanced stage in their training, and varying the training loads, and the number of sets and reps can be very beneficial. The problem many individuals encounter when switching set/rep protocols is being able to quantify strength and not waste valuable training time using weights that are either too heavy or too light for the number of sets and reps called for. The goal of this article is to present a means that will allow one to quantify their strength when changing protocols and keep them progressing. Ive developed a chart in Microsoft Excel, and many different protocols to go with it, that allows me to change the number of sets, reps, and the training load whenever I want: session to session, weekly, monthlywhenever. Furthermore, the great thing about this system is that it allows me to quantify my strength levels and gains at all times, on all exercises, and gives me an easy way to progressonce you get used to using it. The Excel chart can easily be developed by anyone, and the steps below will outline how to set-up your own chart: 1) In the far left hand column of a blank spreadsheet, and in the first cell available, type 1 RM (one repetition maximum). In the next cell, below the 1RM label, type 100 (100 lbs.), and begin to list 1 RMs in 5 lb. Increments all the way up to 500 (or more, depending on how strong you are in certain movements). Now, to the right of the 1RM label, type 2RM. Continue to the right, across the top of the spreadsheet, and go up to a 15 RM in one number increments. Now, apply percentages of the listed 1RM (100-500 lbs.) for RMs 2-15 across (Im not going to go into how to apply a formula in excel...use the help feature in the program if you dont knowbut just multiple the 1 RM by the given percentage). I use a percentage of 1 RM chart found in an older football strength training manual that I have. These percentages of 1 RM are not meant to be exact, but theyll be pretty darn closetheyll give a baseline to go off of. The percentages are as follows: 2RM: 96% of 1RM 3RM: 92% 4RM: 89% 5RM: 86% 6RM: 83% 7RM: 81% 8RM: 79% 9RM: 77%

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Percentage Protocols...anyone using them??


I've had good success in my own training and training others using percentage protocols. I was turned on to them while I interned at Notre Dame and I've used them since. I use 3-5 set protocols, using progressively heavier weights each set. Here are some of the common protocols I use: 4x5 @ 65,70,75,80% 10/8/6 @ 65,70,75% 4x3 @ 70,75,80,85% 15/10/7 @ 55,60,65% All you have to do is estimate a 1 RM in any multiple joint exercise and create a spreadsheet in microsoft excel. Each time you @#%$ the goal # of reps for each set with an estimated 1 RM, simply estimate your 1 RM 5 lbs. higher and move to the next workout on your spreadsheet. For instance, if you were doing the 100 lb. 1 RM workout for 4x5 and performed 5 reps with 65 lbs., 5 reps with 70 lbs., 5 reps with 75 lbs. and 5 reps with 80 lbs., you'd simply move to the 105 workout next time and begin chipping away at that with adjusted percentages. Hey, it's progressive. I progress better using percentage protocols, especially for "free weight" movements, because I have built in warm-up sets and I feel this helps to "prime" the nueromuscular system better. My pressing movements took off (along with my squats) when I switched from traditional 1 set all out with only 1-2 low rep warm-ups to percentage protocols. The actual protocol may need to be adjusted on an exercise to exercise basis to account for different fiber types in various muscle groups. For instance, through experimentation, I found that I could progress well on higher rep percentage protocols on squats and deads (15/10/7 or 10/8/6) but not at all on my pressing and pulling movements. Once I switched to lower rep percentage protocols (4x5 or 4x3) on these exercises, my progression exploded. I listed many different protocols above so interested lifters could try out a # of different schemes to see what they responded to best on certain exercises. I was leary of these multiple set percetage schemes at first because I thought they would be inefficient. However, if you "superset" a pushing and pulling movement, the workout stays very, very efficient, which is good news for the traditional fast paced worker. By supersetting, there is no down time and you can keep a good pace up. For instance, using a 4x5 protocol, you can superset a bench press and barbell row (a set of bench followed by a set of row, back to bench etc.) and the entire protocol will only take about 12 minutes. One other thing, you do not have to perform an entire workout in this percentage fashion. I've had good success performing a percentage protocol for one major pressing and pulling movement in a superset fashion and then performing a compound hip and thigh movement using a percentage protocol. After this, all the major structures have been worked and I'll use 1-2 sets to failure for 3-4 more movements and the workout is over. Total duration of 35-45 minutes...this certainly isn't high volume and excessive, especially is only performing 2 full body sessions weekly. Here is how an entire program might look, 2x/week: Day 1 Standing barbell press out of the rack supersetted with seated row *4x5 @ 65,70,75,80%

Squats 10/8/6 @ 65,70,75% Dips 2x12-15 to failure supersetted with Shrugs 2x12-15 to failure Walking lunge holding dumbbells 60-80 total steps Thick bar curl 1-2x8-12 to failure Neck work Day 2 Bottom position bench supersetted with pulldowns (same protocol for press and row above) Trap Bar Deadlift 10/8/6 (same %'s as squats above) Seated Press (any modality)1x8-12 all out to failure Hand over hand pull with thick rope attached to pulling sled 4-5 reps Leg Press 1x15-20 all out Manual resistance front, lateral and rear delt raises Neck work Anyone else using percentage training? I'd like to hear your comments on specific protocols. PJ

Sunday, August 12, 2001 Hi everyone, As I mentioned in my last post, I am going to cover my lower body routine in todays post. Ive been utilizing the TBDL exclusively for the last 5 months and have made significant progress in both strength and hip/leg development. Lately, however, I have reached a plateau both mentally and physically so its time for a change. I have been fortunate enough to acquire a hip belt (which can be purchased from Ironmind @ www.ironmind.com) to work my lower extremities and I am very excited about the new challenge. Before I get into my workout, Id like to focus on the hip belt squat if I may. First, I built a 7 platform out of 2x4s and 2x12s. I went to Home Depot and had them cut a 2x12 into 2 - 3ft. pieces. I then got 3 - 2x4s, each 3ft. long, and nailed them lengthwise to the 2x12, (one on each end and one in the middle using the full height of the 2x4), flipped it over and hammered on the other 2x12. This gave me about 7 in total height for the platform. Now that I have the height I need to get deep in my squats, I hook up my hip belt to my Oly bar inside my squat rack. I will state here and now the hip belt is not the most convenient piece of equipment to use but it is extremely effective. With the assistance of my lovely wife, Lori (she helps to hook up my back loop), I then stand on the platform and extend my arms out to lightly hold onto a bar in front of me and then proceed to perform squats. I did a few trial runs a week or two ago and was very surprised at the level of difficulty this apparatus provided. Even more surprising was its effectiveness. My quads and glutes were particularly sore the next day. In fact, I trained on Tuesday morning and by midday could already feel the results of my effort.

Just recently on the Hardgainer RT there has been some posting with regards to the hip belt as being a substitute or replacement for the squat, which prompts these thoughts. Personally, I love to squat, it used to be one of my favorite exercises, but because of lower back problems I am unable to perform them any longer. Squatting isnt for everyone. Quite a few people feel that if they CAN squat than they HAVE to squat and that is not true. Even if you dont have a reason not to, thats fine, it just may not be for you. You should however make certain that you are working your hips/leg musculature via a deadlift variation; pressing or squatting type motion. There are, believe it or not a few safe and effective leg presses out there that can be utilized, you just have to be lucky enough to belong to a gym that has one. The Trap Bar of course ranks very high as being what I think one of the ideal ways to train the lower body. Im sure others could (and will) argue that the TBDL isnt as effectual as the squat but Im going on record as saying it is an equal in its ability to overload the hips and legs as well as the entire neuromuscular system. Again, I am not discounting the rewards squatting offers, I just dont want you to think its the only means of lower body development. Rounding out the other viable options are the Hip Belt and ball squats, which are also prudent and efficient means of lower body training.

OK, on to my workout: Tuesday, August 7th, 2001 @ 7:15 am Hip Belt Squat: 1 warm-up then, 115x16 1.5-minute rest, 95x17 Dont let the numbers fool you, this is NOT easy!!!!! I expect to make progress fast on these since it is a new exercise but compared to 255x20 in the TBDL the experience was humbling, to say the least. I was puffing like a locomotive after I got done and couldnt wait to get unstrapped and outta that belt. Next up were trap bar shrugs. Here I did 225x8, then 205x8. I was handling more in these a few weeks ago but felt my shoulders were slouching a bit towards the end of the set so I opted to reduce the weight and work my way back up to better executed reps. There is no sense in making weight progress if your form is going to be compromised. If your form isnt close to being impeccable then you can risk injury. Then, the progress you seem to be making isnt really progress, is it? Keep that in mind when training. Weight increases arent real increases if your form isnt as perfect as it can be or your reps become quicker than normal in order to just get the weight up. Next up were single leg calf raises. Performing them using a 6 block, I got 10 very controlled reps with an extra 25 pounds held in my hand. I then rested 1 minute and got 11 more reps with 15 pounds. Crunches were next and I got 87 x15 and 67 x14. I then proceeded on to side bends with my trap bar and got 77 x10. Im going to drop down to 65 next time and get more reps since I think 10 reps in this movement is risky for the lower back. The next movement was manual neck in which I performed 12 reps laterally (L/R) and 12 reps for extension. I did reverse back extensions for a set of 15 and finished up with some CoCs doing 5 consecutive closes with the #1 and 10 closes with the T. The workout took me 50 minutes and I felt great. The split sessions and extra rest have definitely done me some good. My bodyweight has increased by 5 pounds (in less than 2 weeks) since Ive taken on this new protocol. The increase did not occur due to extra calories since I havent

altered my diet really, I think my nervous system was just so taxed I couldnt gain any weight and the rest over the last few weeks has been responsible for my upsurge. Im not suggesting that everyone start doing a split routine or follow my training verbatim, just give your routine some careful consideration if you have been halted in your progress for a time.

As always, thanks for taking time out to read my column and have a great training week. Fred Sunday, August 5, 2001 Developing a training routine is one thing, being committed to that routine is another. For those of who know me well (go ahead Herk, chime in if you like) can attest to my difficulty in staying with one workout routine. Dont get me wrong, I dont jump around on a weekly basis nor do I abandon my high intensity training philosophy. I just seldom maintain a long-term commitment to one program. Hell, I think it was easier for me to commit to getting married than it is to being committed to any one particular routine. I tend to get bored when routines are the same and when that happens, progress seems to come to a screeching halt. As I mentioned in my last post, I have established a plan if you will that enables me to stay with a program AND implement some diversity so I can hopefully achieve both physical and mental stimulation. The strategy, which David Maurice played an intricate part in developing, is to prioritize select movements at different times during the year. By rotating exercises, it will allow me to center on one or two particular core lifts instead of trying to generate improvement on all of them. Ive used this approach (just focusing on 1 or 2 movements) in the past while maintaining my strength levels on other lifts and have found it to be quite productive. My problem was not rotating them and staying with my agenda. With that explained, here is a look at the ranking of priority for each exercise: Highest Priority * * * * * High Priority * * * * Important * * *

So right now these are the core exercises and their level of priority for my upper body workout: SOHP * * * * * Parallel Grip Pull downs * * * * Narrow Grip Bench with 2 bar * * * 1 Arm row * * * Please keep in mind that I dont view the lower priority exercises superfluous. I will attack those exercises with the same tenacity I usually do but I will be primarily concentrating on making progress on the highest priority lift. In fact, the last 2 exercises are recommended not to be taken to failure so over training does not occur. I will keeping the reps a bit higher from now on (12-15 range) and pushing the set very close to muscle failure. When I start to plateau (and I will eventually) on the SOHP it will be moved to the bottom of the list and the workout will look like this: Parallel Grip Pull downs * * * * * Narrow Grip Bench with 2 bar * * * *

1 Arm row * * * SOHP * * * This rotation can continue indefinitely, allowing one to really zero in on a particular exercise and/or body part. I would imagine training in this manner also helps add a certain level of joint protection and helps reduce potential injury. This will give me the variety I like and also provide a long-term dedication to my agenda. (God, I hope so).

Okay, this was my workout for Saturday, August 4th, 2001. Prior to my 7 am training session I had 2 cups of coffee (around 5:30 - 6 am) and a small protein shake for some energy. My workout started with, you guessed it, standing overhead presses. I did 3 warm-up sets and 2 work sets to failure. I rested no longer than 75 seconds between sets. This is how it broke down: 45 x 10 warm-up 95 x 6 warm-up 115 x 2 warm-up 145 x 7 work set (up from 135x8 last week) 115 x 8 work set Next up were parallel grip pulldowns on the Hoist machine (Hoist makes a pretty decent line of home equipment). Here I did 2 warm-up sets, which were performed in between my SOHP warmups to save time. By doing this I was able to go right to my work set after the SOHPs without wasting any time or minimizing my level of intensity. I performed 2 work sets to failure. This is how it went: 65 x 10 85 x 8 135 x 8 (up from 125 from last week) 115 x 9 I then went right into narrow grip benches with the 2 bar and did 157 x 11 (up 2 lbs.) and then on to 1-arm rows which was 77 x 9. I made an error in loading the since I was supposed to use 67 and get around 12-15 reps so Ill adjust next week. On to 2 thick bar curls. I really never cared for curls before but since I got the 2 bar I love em. This bar really makes you work hardyour forearms, hands, biceps; I even feel it in my shoulders and upper back so for me its a keeper for now. I got a set with 66 for 10 smooth reps. BTW, I cut a 1 plate in half and glued magnets to each one so I can micro load. These work great since they can be stuck anywhere really quick. It wouldnt be a Saturday morning if I didnt perform my walk so I took my farmers bars with handles and with 107 lbs in each hand I strode up and down the driveway for 210 feet. I rested about 1 minutes and did another stroll for 130ft. I then finished up with wrist rollers. I did 3 reps for flexion and 3 for extension with 45 pounds on my homemade wrist roller. BTW, last weekend I went to Home Depot and bought some tape that has the same texture as a light grid sand paper. You probably have seen the same kind on the leg press machine and such so it gives you some traction (similar to the knurling on a bar). I added the tape to the bar since the PVC would get too slippery and not allow me to get the reps/weights I was capable of. This tape allowed me to go up about 7 pounds and when I was done it literally took almost 10 minutes for me to be able to straighten my fingers out. My forearms and hands were extremely pumped!!!!

I know Ive only covered my one training day and my next post should cover what Im performing for lower body. I will be including Hip Belt Squats in my program and putting TBDLs on the back burner for a while. Again my buddy Herk came through for me and sent me his Squat Hip Belt to use. Last time he sent me his farmers bars and hell never see those babies again so the likelihood of getting this belt back Herk is slim. Im VERY excited about performing this exercise for a few reasons. First, it gives me a chance to do something different for my lower body other than the trap bar. Secondly, I really like squatting (but cant do traditional squats) so this movement is right up my alley both mentally and physically. And most importantly, I have a new challenge to conquer and that REALLY gets my fire burning.

Sunday August 5th, 2001 8 am Today is when I perform one of my two cardiovascular sessions. I use the Schwinn Evolution Comp Air Dyne 99% of the time since it is easy on the joints and involves the entire body which I feel is very important. My session went as follows: 5 minute graded warm-up 10 30/30 intervals 5 minute graded cool down The intervals were done with a 30 second work set at an average level of 5.2 followed by a 30 second less intense interval at an average level of 3.7. This session thoroughly worked my cardiovascular system and I dont feel anaerobically taxed. I followed up the session (as I did yesterday) with a good stretch session of the lower back, hips, quads, hamstrings and calves. I will be talking about stretching particulars in forthcoming posts Until next time, have a GREAT week of training. Fred
Copyright Cyberpump! No liability is assumed for the information provided on Cyberpump. The opinions are those of the writers. The text on all the pages of Cyberpump does not provide medical advice on exercise or diet. Specific medical advice should be obtained from a licensed health-care practitioner. Always check with your doctor before beginning any type of exercise program.

10RM: 75% 11RM: 74% 12RM: 72% 13RM: 70% 14RM: 68% 15RM: 65% Again, these percentages are not meant to be exact, and the number of repetitions one can perform with a given percentage of maximum will vary widely according to fiber type, nuero firing ability, etc. However, in my experience using this chart, the accuracy is pretty good, especially up to a 10 RM. OK, now that youve developed this goofy, overly scientific chart, how do you apply it practically to your training?? Lets start with a basic example. Lets say your best effort in the standing overhead press is 75 lbs. for 10 repetitions, meaning a 10 rep set to complete failure where the 11th rep is attempted but not completed. By using the chart, you can see that your 1 RM is about 100 lbs. You can also decipher, based off of your performance, that your 15 RM is 65 lbs., your 2 RM is 96 lbs., etcwhatever you want to know. Lets say you stay with this one set to failure approach for the next five weeks, and you work your way up to 85 lbs. for 10 reps in this exercise. Now, using your chart, you can see that your estimated 1 RM is now higher, about 115 lbs. Lets say you stay with the one set to failure approach then next two weeks, but you have not progressed, and are stuck at 85x10. Instead of spinning your wheels, why not try something else? Why not try a 4 set approach, keeping the resistance the same on all 4 sets? Ive developed 4 set, constant weight, protocols to be used with this chart. If your current 10 RM is 85 lbs., simply double the rep number, in this case, 20 reps, and split the reps evenly over four sets. Your goal is to complete 4 sets of 5 reps with 85 lbs. your next session. Lets say you do just that, with 2 minutes in between sets. Next session, estimate your 10 RM 2 lbs. higher; 87 lbs. Try to get 4x5 again. If you do it, try 90 lbs. the next time in for the same 4x5. If you get this, use your chart to see what your 1 RM is: 90x10=120 lb. 1RM. Now, lets mix it up again. Lets use a lighter training load, 15 RM or 65% of 1 RM. Stick with the 4 sets, using a constant weight. Once again, double the rep max #, which, in this case, would be 30 reps. Split the reps up again: try an 8/8/7/7 protocol. If your 10 RM is 90 lbs., use your chart to see what an estimated 15 RM would be-the chart tells you it is 78 lbs. Use this weight for the 8/8/7/7. If you get the required reps on each set, use 80 lbs. for the work sets the next session. Lets say you stay with this approach until you are using 85 lbs. for 8/8/7/7. It is safe to say that you could do one all out set of 15 reps with this weight, so, once again, see what your 1 RM is estimated at: about 125 lbs. At this point, the chart tells you that you have added about 25 lbs. to your maximal overhead pressing strength-lets see if this holds true. Lets jack up the training load, and use a lower rep, 4 set protocol, once again using an equal resistance on each set. If your 1 RM is 125, see what the chart says your 6 RM is: about 110 lbs. Now, double that rep max number once again, which would be (obviously) 12. Now, do 4 sets of 3 reps using this weight. If you get the required # of reps on each set, progress yourself 2 lbs. each session. Lets say you work up to 4 sets of 3 reps

using 120 lbs. over 5 sessions. In other words, your new 6 RM is 120 lbs. Once again, see what the chart says your 1 RM is: about 136 lbs.

OK, now that youve seriously increased your strength, using mostly multiple sets, lets go back to a one all out set, repetition maximum routine. Lets do one all out set of 8 reps after 2 lighter warm-ups. If your 1 RM is 136 lbs., see what the chart says is an estimated 8 RM: about 112 lbs. If you get 8 reps with this weight, add 1 pound to the bar next workout. Keep going like this until you get to 115x8. Once again (starting to get the picture), see what the 1 RM is at: youre right about 140 lbs. Wanna try something new? Wanna go back to a multiple set routine, but with a twist? Lets try a 3 set, progressively heavier pyramid, dropping the reps each set in a 10/8/6 format. Start with a 15 RM, or 65% of 1RM, for the set of 10: 90 lbs. For the set of 8, jump to 70%, about 98 lbs. For that final set of 6, go up to a 10 RM weight, 75%, at 105 lbs. If you get the 10/8/6 with those weights, estimate your 1 RM 5 lbs. higher for the next session, and use the corresponding percentages (for 145). Stay with this routine until you are doing the 10/8/6 workout that corresponds to a 1RM of 155 lbs. Now, lets get an idea of your maximal strength, and lets see if all of these estimates and percentages hold up. Use your chart, go off the 155 1 RM, and do six singles (6 sets of 1 rep) using a 3 RM resistance (92%). If you can get six singles, 2-3 minutes in between each, you can be fairly assured the 1 RM is accurate. Now that your head is spinning, the big question that you are probably asking is: P. J., Ive hypothetically increased my maximal strength 55 lbs. in the overhead press using this varied, bizarre approachbut couldnt I have done the same thing simply doing one all out set and adding weight each week?? If I started at 75 lbs. for one all set of 10, and worked my way to about 117 lbs. for one all out set of 10, Id be just as strong, but without all this hassle. My answer is that if you are a beginner, then yes, you probably could have stuck with the one set, repetition maximum approach and did the same thing. However, if you are more advanced, I feel you need this type of variety, and you need to present your muscles with different stimuli, different training loads, etc. to continue making long term progress. Ive implemented this approach over the last 8 months, after being strictly a die-hard one set rep max guy, and my strength took off. Ive done the same thing with many of my clients, and they received the same result. I have not abandoned a one set approach, but I have supplemented it with other protocols with great success. Once again, the protocols, percentages, etc. presented are not meant to be 100% accurate, hell, they may be way off for some, but like I said, they are fairly closeclose enough to make sense out of and implement the approach. Also, I use many other protocols than those presented here. When using the 4 set same weight protocols, it is easy to figure out: simply double the rep max # you are using and divide that number evenly (or as evenly as you can), over 4 sets. Besides the 10/8/6 pyramid, progressively heavier protocol I noted, I use 3-4 more of these Ive found to be effective. Many of these I came across while I interned at Notre Dame (the 10/8/6 included). One final comment on sets and reps: things are not always what they appear to be. For instance, if someone is using 4 sets of 5 reps, same weight on each set, they may feel as though they are doing low reps for strength. However, if you look closely, it becomes quite apparent that the training load that they are using is no different than if they were going to do one all out set of 10 or so reps, a rep number many associate with hypertrophy training and not strength training. One cannot possible do 4 sets of 5 repetitions with a true 5 rep maxnot unless they are taking 30 minutes between sets. Similarly, if one does the ever popular 5/4/3/2/1 5 set protocol, they are

not using a 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1 rep max, respectively, on each set. If they did a true 5 RM their first set, there is no way they could complete the rest of the sets with an increased resistance due to the fatigue involved. Also, on the other end of the spectrum, a very popular cookie cutter protocol is 3 sets of 10 repetitions using the same weight on each set. I really question this ones effectiveness in terms of its potential to bring positive morphological changes. If you can, in fact, perform 3 sets of 10 reps with a given weight, then you are using a weight that could probably be lifted close to 20 consecutive times if doing one all out set. For some lower body movements, I could see this being productive, but I dont know what using a resistance this light is going to do for you on movements such as the row, press, dip, etc., especially when using proper form. It is one thing to do a 20 rep max with great form, and quite another to rep out, moving as quickly as possible. I could probably rep out my 10 RM for 20 reps in any upper body exercise if I made a point to move as quickly as possible, bounce the weight, and contort my body. OK, this is really my final comment on sets and reps. Many, mostly die hard one set types, do not see the point in doing multiple sets with the same weight and/or pyramiding the weight up and dropping the reps down. They feel it is pointless to do a set if it does not require your maximum effort to complete the target # of reps. They feel it is pointless to do say, 3 sets of 6 with the same weight because, as I noted above, you really are not using a true 6 rep max resistance. They dont see the point in limiting yourself. They feel the same way about pyramiding the weight: why do 225x6, 250x6, and 275x6 when you could have just jumped to 275 and got 8 or more reps? This logic makes sense, to a point. However, look closer at what is going on. If you do 3 sets of 6 reps with a weight that would allow for 10 all out reps in one set or grouping, you would end up doing 18 reps with a 10 rep maxthis is overload to me. Instead of having your muscles lift this weight 10 times, you are doing it 18 times. Yes, you are doing it over 3 sets, but this is still a good form of overload. The benefit to one set, all out rep max training is that you require your muscles to lift a given resistance the maximum # of times possible in a single groupinghigh intensity. However, the benefit to multiple sets is the exact opposite: you expose your muscles to a higher volume of workyour muscles are contracting more total times against the same resistance, although over several groupings. Furthermore, on some stubborn exercises, multiple sets allow you to practice the movement, and that enhances efficiency and skill. On pyramid type protocols, although the intensity is lower, I feel you are able to prime your nervous system, and this will lead to better performance once you hit the top set. Would any of this stand up to science? I dont know, but it has stood up in the trenches in my experience. The bottom line: (1) The body is very adaptable, and changing the set/rep format leads to better gains, in my opinion anyway (2) There are benefits to both single set and multiple set training protocols, and both can be used productively. If anyone has any questions on this long-winded article, please feel free to email me at ironstriet@cincinnatistrength.com. I hope someone out there took something positive away from this article, or at the very least, it made them think about things differently, if only for a second. Copyright Cyberpump! Bob, I'll give a brief rundown of some of the topics covered by each speaker: 1) Boyd Epley: give a brief overview of his (well, actually, Mike Arthur's) Husker Power Program. It's basically monday/tuesday/thursday/friday upper/lower/rest/upper/lower/2days rest program, with Explosive movements on Monday and Thursday, and "strength" movements on Tuesday & Friday. He also spoke on the "ground based circuit" that his players perform in season, and the one

he performs year round. Basically, its a circuit of six movements performed on the Hammer ground base machines...nothing revolutionary. Actually, he got a little carried away, re-hashing well known ACSM guidelines for fitness, and letting everyone know what his heart is throughout his circuit workouts. I think many in the audience were expecting his speech to be more on training for performance, and not his own personal fitness regimen. Oh well. Aaron Hillman: one of the great thinkers in the strength coaching profession. I spent some time with Aaron when I was up at Notre Dame. This guy really cares about his profession, and is one of the up and coming guys in the field. He spoke on the realities of his job, his current situation at Bowling Green, and how he utilizes his available equipment. Also, he gave some fine points on ways not to "paralyze the workout" by getting too technical. Everyone really enjoyed his speech. Ken Mannie: he was my favorite. Showed some great video of actual training sessions at MSU. He does some cool sHeet, and he's got some great equipment. He brought along his new 7 foot, 52 lb. bar with the parallel grip handles from Reflex/Atomic Athletic. I want this!! He has his guys front squat, press, and squat/press (one movement, very neat compound exercise) with it. He also showed footage of the MSU B-ball team during their 6 am workouts while on the indoor field. He does a "lunge matrix" with these guys, where he has them do a variety of walking lunge movements at different angles and positions...very cool. He also showed a few new "core training" exercises which were very demanding. I didn't see the talk by Will Hicks from Syracuse Joe Kenn: this guy is probably the top up and coming guy in the field. This guy was born to be a strength coach: physically intimidating, very smart, and loves the weight game. He has a very interesting Hybrid type of approach: he incorporates percentage training, westside barbell stuff, HIT, Olympic Lifts, Traditional lifts (he loves to squat), band training, all into one package. He, as he put it himself, "thinks outside the box". He's got cool ideas. I'm sure his athletes never get bored. I wish he would have talked more about his running program...I was very interested in his hard training article on his summer running program. Also, he doesn't have his athletes perform the "catch" on explosive exercises, which is something I've felt was a good idea for years. Mark Asanovich: Mark is a smart guy. He gave a very well received talk, which was a bit more exercise physiology based than any other speech given. He talked about the process of overloading the type II fibers, his experiences at Tampa Bay, along with many other subjects...very nice presentation. Ted Lambrinides: Ted is my partner here in Cincinnati and he's a nationally renowned "guru" on sports nutrition and supplementation. Ted is a superior presenter of information, and can simplify the most complex subjects, such as what happens when one ingests Androstenedione. Everyone in attendence benefited from his talk. He presented the "real deal" on many of the most popular supplements out there including the new "hot one", Myostatin. He gave coaches common sense ideas on improving the nutritional habits of their players, and stressed hydration greatly. One of the more interesting things he noted was that if one simply replaces soft drinks with milk at fast food restuarants, the nutritional quality of the meal drastically improves. Everyone took something away that they could easily apply.

I didn't stick around for the hands on stuff...I had an appointment. Hope this was somewhat beneficial. PJ
Re: Typical Training...........

Like Bob, my planned workouts don't always work out with my schedule of clients, so I get in what I can, when I can. I rotate 2,3,4,and(yes) 5 day/week routines every 6 weeks. Currently, I'm on a 2 day/week program consisting of the following: Day 1 Weighted Dips 3-4 sets of 3-10 reps (depends on the load I'm using) Squats 10/8/6/4 Chins: as many reps as possible in 10:00. I try to beat the total # of reps in that time period each week...works well for me. Day 2 I call this my "look of power" type routine, focusing on the shoulders and posterior chain of the body (from the traps all the way down to the hammy's) Overhead DB Press (standing) 3x4-8... After last DB press, lower bells to sides and go right into DB stiff legged deadlifts 3x20 reps Hammer Pullover 3x4-8 reps *I do the 3 above movements in a cycle 2:00 rest Hammer IsoRow 3x4-8 Hammer single leg press 3x8-15 DB Shrugs 3x10-15 *this, too, is done in a cycle Neck work For my clients, most train 2 days/week and we use the following format: Day 1 5:00 hard condititioning (bike, crosstrainer, treadmill) Vertical Push/Horizontal Pull (usually an overhead press and a hammer row) 1-2 sets 610 reps 5:00 hard conditioning Compound Hip & Thigh movement 3-4 sets of various reps with the following after each set (one after each set of compound movement): -box step up -hip extension -leg curl -inner thigh

5:00 hard conditioning Horizontal press/Vertical Pull (usually a hammer chest press piece and a pulldown, pullover, or chin) 3-4 sets of 6-10 reps CORE work (trunk flexion, rotation, and stabilization movement) 5:00 hard cardio conditioning Day 2 5:00 conditioning Horizontal press/vertical pull 3-4 sets 5:00 conditioning Compound hip&thigh 3-4 sets -leg extension -outer thigh -ball squat -calf raise *the above 4 done in between sets of compound movement 5:00 conditioning Shoulder joint series -lateral raise (manual) -DB front raise (alternating) -rear deltoid (manual) -DB/trap type bar shrug Horizontal Pull 1-2x8-12 reps 5:00 conditioning CORE work and bi/tricep I pretty much use that format for everyone, with changes made in some cases. They get a hard cardio and a strength workout all in one. The 20:00 of conditioning they do is demanding...by keeping in to 5:00 at a time, we can do this. The energy expenditure during a workout is quite high. This is "typical" for us here at our Cincinnati facility. PJ