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Week 2 Knowledge CheckResults

Concepts Components of an Argument - Claims Mastery 0% Questions

Score:

8/11

Types of Argument

67%

Components of an Argument Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Arguments

100%

100%

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Concept: Components of an Argument - Claims


Concepts Components of an Argument - Claims Mastery 0% Questions

1.When evaluating an argument with unstated premises, which of the following is the most appropriate tactic? A. Find a claim that would make the argument invalid or weak and evaluate the argument as if this claim had been included. Dont add anything. If the arguer had wanted a claim to be included, he or she would have included it. Evaluate the argument as it stands. Find a claim that would make the argument valid or strong and evaluate the argument as if this claim had been included.

B.

C.

Incorrect When you approach an argument without an obvious claim, the best approach is to give the best read. It is important to find the best claim to make the argument work.

2.All of the following are reasons that you should include claims that contradict the conclusion when diagramming an argument EXCEPT: A. B. C. It shows that you have considered other sides of the issue and found them wanting. To confuse your audience To bring up an objection, and then give reasons for rejecting it, is more powerful argumentation than to ignore possible objections to your argument.

D. Including counterclaims in your argument helps make you look more credible.

Incorrect When diagramming an argument, all claims must be included. Without claims, the argument lacks a clear foundation and leads to confusion.

Concept: Types of Argument


Concepts Types of Argument Mastery 67% Questions

3.In most general terms, what do we call an argument if it gives grounds for accepting the conclusion? A. B. C. Weak Good Invalid

D. S t r o n g

Correct! A good deductive argument is called "valid" and a good inductive argument is called "relatively strong."

4.What word is used to classify an argument if it is valid and all of its premises are true? A. B. C. Weak Sound Invalid

D. S t r o n g

Incorrect Soundness is what to strive for in a deductive argument.

6.An argument with true premises that provides absolute proof of the truth of the conclusion would be called what? A. B. C. A weak argument A good argument An invalid argument

D. A s t r o n g a r g u m e n t E. A valid argument

Correct! Validity has to do with the structure, or "shape," of the argument. Truth has to do with what the argument is about. Even if every premise in the content of the argument were true, they wouldn't support the conclusion if they weren't in the right structure. For example, "All cats are mammals. All cats meow. Therefore, all mammals meow." is not a valid construction, so even though the premises are true, they do not support the conclusion. An argument has to be both valid and have all true premises to provide absolute proof of the conclusion. It must be "sound."

Concept: Components of an Argument


Concepts Components of an Argument Mastery 100% Questions

5.Which of the following words is a good example of a premise indicator? A. B. C. Since Therefore For

D. Because

Correct! "Since" points to the claim or claims given as reasons for accepting the conclusion.

7.Which of the following words is a good example of a conclusion indicator? A. B. C. Since Therefore For

D. Because

Correct! "Therefore" points to the claim the argument was constructed to prove.

Concept: Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Arguments


Concepts Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Arguments Mastery 100% Questions

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8.In most general terms, what word do we use for a deductive argument whose premises, while true, do not necessarily prove its conclusion? A. B. C. Weak Good Invalid

D. S t r o n g

Correct! There are only two places to check an argument: the form and the content. If the content has all true premises, then the form, or shape, of the argument must not be a valid one. If the form is valid, then at least one of the premises must be false for it to be possible to yield a false conclusion.

9.Which of the following types of arguments are evaluated using the terms valid and invalid? A. B. C. Inductive Deductive Rhetorical

Correct! Validity pertains to the structure, or "shape," of the argument.

10.Which of the following types of arguments are not intended to be valid, and are evaluated using the terms relatively strong and relatively weak? A. B. C. Deductive Inductive Rhetorical

Correct! Some inductive arguments are stronger than others. The stronger it is, the more probable the conclusion is.

11.Which of the following types of arguments are evaluated using the terms sound and unsound? A. B. C. Inductive Deductive Rhetorical

Correct! Soundness pertains to the content of the valid argument, what it is about.