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COMPLEMENTARYINFINITIVE verb The complementary in nitive is when a verb ful lls the sense of
COMPLEMENTARYINFINITIVE
verb
The complementary in nitive is when
a
verb ful lls the sense of another verb.
For example: “I want to sleep” the
Caesar
vult
in
nitive “to sleep” completes the
sentence. Without the in nitive “to
sleep” the sentence “I want” does not
make much sense.
An in nitive in English is the form of
the verb with “to” in front. For example
“to be or not to be” and “to jump” are
object
verb
volo, velle- to want to
Caesar
cibum
vult
in
nitives.
Latin expresses the in nitive with the
-re ending that we see in the dictionary
entry . For example “amo, amare” and
in nitive
verb
“porto, portare”. “Amare” is to love and
“portare” is to carry.
The term complementary comes from
the Latin “complere - to ll up”.
Caesar
edere
vult.
It
should not be confused with the
English word“complimentary” which
means either free of charge or nicety.
Some imporant words that take the
object of in nitive
in nitive
verb
in
nitive are: possum “to be able to”,
soleo “to be accustomed to”, volo “to
want to”, debeo “to ought to” and cupio
“to desire to”.
Davus
cibum
edere vult.

In the rst sentence “Caesar wants” the main verb is vult and it has no object. The sentence does not seem complete since we don’t know what it is that he wants. NOTA BENE: vult is from the irregular verb “volo, velle”

In the second sentence “Caesar wants food” the main verb is vult and its object is cibum. Notice how the noun changes from cibus to cibum when it is the object of a verb.

In the third sentence “Caesar wants to eat” the main verb is vult and its object is the verb edere. Notice how the verb uses the in nitive form to complement the main verb. It is the 2nd form in the dictionary “edo, edere”

In the nal sentence “Caesar wants to eat food” the main verb is vult, edere is the complement in nitive, and cibum is not the object of vult but rather of edere.

COMPLEMENTARYINFINITIVE verb The complementary in nitive is when a verb ful lls the sense of
COMPLEMENTARYINFINITIVE
verb
The complementary in nitive is when
a
verb ful lls the sense of another verb.
For example: “I want to sleep” the
Caesar
vult
in nitive “to sleep” completes the
sentence.
Without the in nitive “to
sleep” the sentence “I want” does not
make much sense.
An in nitive in English is the form of
the verb with “to” in front. For example
“to be or not to be” and “to jump”. Latin
expresses the in nitive with the -re
ending that we see in the dictionary
entry . For example “amo, amare” and
“porto, portare”. “Amare” is to love and
“portare” is to carry.
The term complementary comes from
the Latin word “complere” which means
“to ll up”. It should not be confused
with the English word“complimentary”
which means either free of charge or
nicety.
Some imporant words that take the
object
verb
volo, velle- to want to
Caesar
cibum
vult
in nitive
verb
Caesar
edere
vult.
object of in nitive
in nitive
verb
in nitive are: possum “to be able to”,
soleo “to be accustomed to”, volo “to
want to”, debeo “to ought to” and
cupio “to desire to”.
Davus
cibum
edere vult.

In the rst sentence “Caesar wants” the main verb is vult and it has no object. The sentence does not seem complete since we don’t know what it is that he wants. NOTA BENE: vult is from the irregular verb “volo, velle”

In the second sentence “Caesar wants food” the main verb is vult and its object is cibum. Notice how the noun changes from cibus to cibum when it is the object of a verb.

In the third sentence “Caesar wants to eat” the main verb is vult and its object is the verb edere. Notice how the verb uses the in nitive form to complement the main verb. It is the 2nd form in the dictionary “edo, edere”

In the nal sentence “Caesar wants to eat food” the main verb is vult, edere is the complement in nitive, and cibum is not the object of vult but rather of edere.