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PHOEBE A.

HEARST

MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

N E W S ◆ ◆ ◆

VOLUME 4, NUMBER 1 FALL 2003

ECUADORIAN POTTERY AND TEXTILE TRADITIONS OPENING IN SEPTEMBER

T
he Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology announces the new exhibition,
9 4 7 2 0 – 3 7 1 2

Ecuadorian Pottery and Textile Traditions, on view to the public September 12


through December 14, 2003. The exhibition pays tribute to Ecuador's rich histo-
ry and cultural accomplishments by tracing the chronology and devel-
opment of the materials, methods, and designs used by Ecuadorian
artists from pre-Hispanic times to the present. The Berkeley presenta-
tion includes Ecuadorian textiles from the Mossman-Vitale Collection
C A

along with examples of pre-Hispanic pottery from the San Diego


◆ B E R K E L E Y ,

Museum of Man and contemporary Ecuadorian pottery from pri-


vate collections. Ecuadorian Pottery and Textile Traditions is based
on the exhibition Ecuadorian Pottery Traditions organized by the
San Diego Museum of Man.

Ecuadorian cultures were among the first in the Americas to discover the mixture of
clay, water, and fire that led to the invention of ceramics. The earliest examples of pottery,
H A L L

LARGE FIGURATIVE fired some 6,000 years ago, have revised the archaeological record, peeling back layers of time to reveal
VASE MADE BY Ecuador's heritage. Archaeological evidence supports theories that an ancient ceramic tradition and perma-
ESTHELA DAGUA, nent farming villages were established in Ecuador at least a thousand years before similar pottery-making
2001, QUICHUA
and agrarian communities were established in Peru and Mesoamerica. The development of a pottery tradi-
K R O E B E R

(CANELOS) PUYO,
ECUADOR tion goes hand-in-hand with cultural development. Before pottery-making techniques evolve, civilizations
PRIVATE COLLECTION must first establish settled communities with a sufficient food supply to sustain their way of life. A strong
PHOTOGRAPH BY textile tradition also accompanied the development of pottery in Ecuador. Evidence of intricate ceramic
THERESE BABINEAU
spindle whorls and ornate costumes on ceramic figures are an indication of the high level of textile devel-
opment in Ecuador from pre-Hispanic times forward.
1 0 3

continued on page 6
FROM THE DIRECTOR
Dear Friends, ing fieldwork in Oceania.
Patrick Kirch, class of 1954 professor of anthropology,

A
s the new director of the Phoebe A. took over as museum director in July 1999. His earnest persuasive-
Hearst Museum of Anthropology ness led to new funding for a permanent exhibit in the Native
(PAHMA), I promise you that the Californian Cultures Gallery and to the highly acclaimed centennial
year ahead will be one to remember as we exhibit, A Century of Collecting. Pat worked diligently to expand the
reveal the Hidden Treasures of the Hearst. public reach of the Museum, initiating the partnership with the
We are embarking on an ambitious three- Haases, for example, to spearhead the redesign of the Museum's
year program of changing exhibitions and public programs to Web site for broader access to the collections and to program infor-
increase our role of service to the campus and the broader communi- mation.
ty under a newly launched initiative: Diversity – Cultural Arts – Another of Pat's important accomplishments was oversee-
Antiquities. ing the completion of the NAGPRA inventories and the consultation
In September 2003 we will open the exhibition, Ecuadorian work with Indian Tribes. Pat and his staff were able to develop effec-
Pottery and Textile Traditions, which explores the birthplace of tive working relationships with the tribes and to make several loan
ceramics and the evolution of styles and techniques through exam- agreements so both the tribes and the Museum can have access to
ples of ancient and modern pottery. We are grateful to the San Diego these important anthropological collections into the future.
Museum of Man, curator Grace Johnson, and to guest curators During his directorship, Pat organized a long-range plan-
Richard Burkett and Joe Molinaro, for enabling us to bring the ning process at the Museum and created a visionary plan for the next
exhibit to Berkeley, which we are augmenting with several examples ten years. The first step in the plan was to hire a full-time museum
of Ecuadorian textiles from the Mossman-Vitale Collection. director, and it is with great enthusiasm that I have accepted the
In February 2004, the Hearst Museum will open Hecho en position. As I move forward with my plans for the Hearst Museum
México: Mexican Folk Art. The exhibition, featuring objects from of Anthropology, I am honored to have the camaraderie of my
every state in the country, will be accompanied by a series of scholar- esteemed colleague who continues as a fulltime faculty member here
ly lectures, docent and school tours, and public events. The Museum at UC Berkeley and as PAHMA’s curator of oceanic archaeology.
will also be developing programs with local artists in conjunction When Phoebe Hearst identified the need for an anthropo-
with the exhibit. logical collection in the Western United States over 100 years ago,
The Hearst Museum continues to maintain its strong com- her original vision for that museum was as a great educator dedicat-
mitment to the collections and their use in support of faculty teach- ed to the dissemination of knowledge among the many. After more
ing as well as for intra- and extramural research. In the spring, UC than a century of service and association with one of the greatest
Berkeley Classics Professor Dr. Stephen G. Miller captivated our public universities in the world, we continue to be guided by this
imaginations with his discovery that a bust of Plato and an unre- vision as we strive to promote understanding of the history and
markable herm in the Museum’s collections belonged together as one diversity of human cultures through our collections, research, exhibi-
sculpture to portray one of the best likenesses of the Greek tions, and programs.
philosopher. We look forward to seeing you at the Museum!
Dr. Tim White, professor of integrative biology at UC
Berkeley and PAHMA’s curator of biological anthropology, con- Sincerely,
firmed with his team of researchers that fossilized skulls of two
adults and one child discovered in eastern Ethiopia are 160,000 years
old and are the oldest known fossils of Homo sapiens. Skeletal sam- Douglas Sharon, Ph.D.
ples from the collection were integral to this research. Director
Recent efforts to extend the reach of the collections can
PHOEBE A. HEARST
also be seen through the Museum’s new Web site –http://hearstmuse-
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
um.berkeley.edu – which includes online exhibitions, program infor-
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
mation, and is the gateway for further study about our vast
Douglas Sharon, Director
holdings.
Margaret R. Pico, Newsletter Editor
A Fond Farewell
Nicole Mullen, Graphic Design
It goes without saying that I have inherited this position from an
The newsletter is published twice yearly.
extraordinary director who managed to make great strides in moving
Copyright © UC Regents
the Museum forward in a brief three years, doing so on a part-time
http://hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu
basis, while teaching in the Anthropology Department and conduct-

1
COMPARING EXHIBITIONS AND WEB SITES
By Ira Jacknis

M
ost museums now have Web sites of some sort, paintings. While the viewer can rarely touch an exhibited
which they use for many purposes: listing practi- object, one can often walk around an object and move
cal information such as hours, staff, access poli- closer or farther away. Good exhibits also make use of
cies, and current programs, or offering curated presenta- paths and vistas, allowing one to see what is coming up
tions of their collections. As museum media, exhibits have and look back at what one has seen, relating an object to
a fairly stable technology and form, while Web sites keep an adjacent object within an architecturally-formed space.
evolving. As the technology changes, much of what once Early Web sites were poorly designed in this regard, but
could not be done, or not done easily, is now common- designers are finding ways to replicate such previews and
place. reviews. A feeling for the third dimension in cyberspace
can be suggested by using multiple views, so that one can
There are many similarities between the two media. Like zoom in and out, or more recently, around, through digi-
films and books, both combine images (standing in for tized video. Still, these take more computer memory and
objects) and words. Unlike those, however, exhibits and bandwidth and so are not common. Another problem,
Web sites have a non-linear structure. While exhibits may inherent in publications as well, is the difficulty of indicat-
have a suggested path, in most cases the viewer determines ing size and scale, especially if one is dealing with a
which units will be accessed first and in what order, just as strange, foreign object. Not all pictures include rulers.
one can do on-line.
Finally, and most mysteriously, there is the question of
However, there can be many differences between exhibits "aura," knowing that one is in the presence of an actual
and Web sites. Perhaps the prime advantage of a Web site object created by someone in a distant space or time. We
is its greater accessibility for people who cannot come to tend to perceive things with greater intensity when we use
an exhibit. Furthermore, because it is not bound by spatial multiple senses and our whole body, than through mere
constraints, a Web site can hold much more content. It is visual perception. These profound issues of being and exis-
also easier to make cross-references in cyberspace. As with tence may be the most basic reasons we still have museums
footnotes in books, one can readily find linked bits of of real objects instead of living in a complete world of vir-
information—sometimes of only supplementary interest— tual objects. As many of these limitations are not inherent
in a non-linear way. Exhibits are much more limited in in cyberspace, it will be interesting to see how museums of
their ability to do this. On the other hand, while virtual the future choose to present their collections.
exhibits may include more content, sometimes, as in our
Centennial site, they have less. Label text is almost always Ira Jacknis is Research Anthropologist at the Phoebe A.
available, but good photographs of the exhibited objects Hearst Museum of Anthropology and recently curated The
often are not. World in a Frame: Photographs from the Great Age of
Exploration, 1865-1915, on view at the Museum through
The most decisive difference between the two, of course, is February 2004. An online version of the exhibit can be
that of dimensionality. As a two-dimensional medium, the viewed at: http://hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu.
Web is better suited for flat objects such as photographs or

THE HEARST MUSEUM GIFT STORE carries a wide variety of items that reflect the museum collections and the
diversity of world cultures. The store has extensive selections of jewelry, textiles, wooden and soapstone
carvings, musical instruments, puppets, and other beautiful gifts. Most are handcrafted by native artisans
from different parts of the world. The store has a wide selection of books about cultural history and
anthropology, as well as museum publications. The Hearst Museum Gift Store offers reasonable prices and
a wonderfully unique shopping experience. Open Wednesday - Sunday, during regular Museum hours.
(left: traditional Indonesian wooden puppet)

SAVE THE DATE FOR THE ANNUAL "SANTA FE CRAFTS" NATIVE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST JEWELRY AND FOLK ART SALE,
COMING NOVEMBER 20, 2003.

3
PAHMA STAFF NOTES

W
ith this issue of the newsletter we welcome Dr. We also welcome Margaret R. Pico, PAHMA’s new direc-
Douglas Sharon as the new director of the tor of development, who joined the staff in April 2003.
Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Coming to the Hearst Museum is a homecoming for
Director Sharon comes to PAHMA from the San Diego Maggie, who was an undergraduate in art practice at UC
Museum of Man where he was executive director from Berkeley in the 1980s.
1981 until 2002. As the Hearst Museum’s first full-time Previously she has served
director since its founding in 1901, Dr. Sharon is charged as director of development
with leading the Museum into a new era of program plan- at The Jewish Museum San
ning, outreach, and fund development. While at the Francisco and San
Museum of Man, Sharon took the organization through a Francisco Performances,
major period of growth, implementing innovative exhibits and as associate director of
and programs, increasing museum attendance and private development at the San
financial support, and overseeing the expansion of the Francisco Museum of
museum. Dr. Sharon served as member of the San Diego Modern Art.
Coalition for Arts & Culture, the Mexican Cultural
Institute of San Diego, and the Balboa Park Cultural Transitions NEW STAFF MEMBERS MATTHEW
Partnership. He is a member of the Association of Science We extend our heartfelt KIMMINS AND MARGARET PICO IN
thanks to Kathleen Hull, THE HEARST MUSEUM GALLERY
Museum Directors. Sharon earned his doctorate from
UCLA, where he worked as a research anthropologist at Pamela Peck, and Barbara
the Latin American Center. Prior to his years at UCLA, he Takiguchi for their extraordinary service and dedication to
was the executive secretary of Andean Explorers headquar- the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Each of
tered in Trujillo, Peru. He has published extensively on these women brought their best to the Museum through
Peruvian shamanism, a topic on which he produced the the era of its Centennial Celebration. Kathleen served as a
award-winning documentary film, Eduardo the Healer. senior museum scientist for the NAGPRA team, while
Sharon has also established a field school for ethnobotany simultaneously completing her doctoral dissertation.
as part of a collaborative effort between the Museum of Pamela was the principal museum preparator, and her
Man, San Diego State University, and the National excellent craftsmanship is evident in the Centennial and
University of Trujillo. Dr. Sharon continues his fieldwork Native Californian exhibits. As a member of the Museum
each summer focusing on Andean shamanism and staff since 1993, Barbara organized a number of public
cosmology. program initiatives, including the Re-Generations program
that brought Native artists into the Museum. Barbara also
We are pleased to announce that Victoria Bradshaw was served as exhibit coordinator for many years and was the
recently promoted to coordinator of the collections project manager for publications. We wish them all the
Division. Victoria joined the staff in July 1994 as museum best of luck in their new endeavors.
scientist in the Native American Graves Protection Act
(NAGPRA) unit. As division coordinator she is responsible Publications of Note
for the daily workflow of all members of the division and The 2003 book, Ishi in Three Centuries, edited by Karl
for strategic planning for collections care. In addition, Kroeber and Clifton B. Kroeber, and published by the
Victoria works as a hands-on collections manager with University of Nebraska Press, features essays by two of the
special responsibilities for our media collections. Museum’s staff researchers and offers the latest research
about Ishi and Yahi culture. Research Anthropologist Ira
Matthew Kimmins recently joined the staff as creative Jacknis contributed the essay, “Yahi Culture in the Wax
director and is responsible for in-house exhibit and publi- Museum: Ishi’s Sound Recordings.” Research
cation design. Matthew majored in drawing and illustra- Archaeologist M. Steven Shackley contributed the article,
tion at the Atlanta College of Art, Georgia, where he was "The Stone Technology of Ishi and the Yana," which
also involved with Alliance Theatre, building sets and appeared previously in American Anthropologist. The
doing scenic artistry. Matthew’s design experience includes book Ishi in Three Centuries is available for purchase in
graphic design, architectural illustration, digital painting the Hearst Museum Gift Store.
for video games, and 3-D computer animation modeling
for clients such as Advanced Courtroom Technologies.

4
PAHMA EVENTS
Unless noted, all programs take place at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Programs are free to
members, UCB faculty, staff, and students, and are free with museum admission to the general public.

September 2003 CERAMIC FOLK ART OF ECUADOR


Thursday, October 9, 12–1 pm.
ECUADORIAN POTTERY AND TEXTILE TRADITIONS A lunchtime gallery talk by Richard Burkett, professor
Exhibition Preview of ceramics at San Diego State University.
Wednesday, September 10, 4–6 pm.
By invitation.
POTTERS, PAINTERS, AND WEAVERS OF ECUADOR
Thursday, October 23, 12–1 pm
ECUADORIAN POTTERY AND TEXTILE TRADITIONS A lunchtime gallery talk by Javier Guerrero, senior curator
Exhibition Opening at the San Diego Museum of Man.
Friday, September 12
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: APPLIED TO THE UHLE
THE ETHNO–ARCHAEOLOGY OF A SACRED HALLUCINOGEN ARCHAEOLOGY COLLECTIONS FROM PERU
ARF Brown Bag Lecture ARF Brown Bag Lecture
Wednesday, September 17, 12–1 pm. Wednesday, October 29, 12–1 pm
A lunchtime gallery talk by PAHMA Director A lunchtime gallery talk by William Whitehead,
Douglas Sharon. doctoral candidate in the UCB Department of
Anthropology.
WHO WAS ANDY KOCHERGIN? THE SAGA OF A HAIDA CARVING
Thursday, September 25, 12–1 pm November 2003
A lunchtime gallery talk by Selig N. Kaplan, UCB profes-
sor emeritus of nuclear engineering. RECENT RESEARCH ON INCA ARCHAEOLOGY IN ECUADOR
Thursday, November 6, 12–1 pm
ECUADORIAN DANCE, MUSIC, AND ART A lunchtime gallery talk by Dennis Ogburn, ARF research
Family Day archaeologist.
Sunday, September 28, 1–4 pm
An afternoon program for young and mature audiences ECUADORIAN FIESTAS
alike. Martha Brankline and guests will be performing Thursday, November 13, 12–1 pm
ethnic dances from the North and South of Ecuador. A lunchtime gallery talk by Grace Johnson, curator of
Craft-making for children includes weaving demonstra- Latin American ethnography at the San Diego Museum of
tions, working with clay materials, and painting. Free Man.
with museum admission.
ECUADORIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS: 1963–1970
October 2003 Thursday, November 20, 2003, 12–1 pm
A lunchtime gallery talk by textile collectors Kathleen and
POT HUNTERS, GEOGRAPHERS, AND ARCHAEOLOGISTS–100 Paul Vitale.
YEARS OF SOUTHWEST ARCHAEOLOGY
MUSEUM CLOSED
ARF Brown Bag Lecture
November 27–28 for Thanksgiving Holiday
Wednesday, October 1, 12–1 pm
A lunchtime gallery talk by M. Steven Shackley,
PAHMA research archaeologist.
December 2003

UC BERKELEY HOMECOMING AND PARENTS WEEKEND ECUADORIAN POTTERY AND TEXTILE TRADITIONS
Friday–Sunday, October 3–5 Exhibition Closing
PAHMA will be open regularly scheduled hours Sunday, December 14, 2003
and special docent tours will be offered. All other galleries will remain open during regular
museum hours.

5
ECUADORIAN POTTERY AND TEXTILE TRADITIONS continued from page 1

Pottery traditions in Ecuador are maintained by women, pottery that is pre-Hispanic in appearance.
often with the help of family members. From the shaping According to Museum Director Dr. Douglas Sharon,
and decorating of the clay to the firing of their wares, the "Ecuadorian Pottery and Textile Traditions provides an
artists have been responsible for implementing innovations incredible opportunity to learn about contemporary
in both technology and design. Advances such as the pot- Ecuadorian pottery within an historical context. We are
ter's wheel have given greater speed and control. The delighted to be able to augment the display of ceramics
enclosed kiln has enabled the potter to fire clay at higher from the San Diego Museum of Man exhibition with fine
temperatures, thus yielding a stronger pot. The use of examples of textiles from our friends, the Vitales, in order
glazes has provided both a decorative element and a pro- to provide a broader understanding of these artistic
tective surface to the finished work. While Ecuadorian traditions."
artisans working today rely on these modern techniques,
many communities still produce their pottery using pre- In conjunction with Ecuadorian Pottery and Textile
Hispanic methods such as manual coiling and hand mold- Traditions, the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of
ing, as well as firing over an open flame. Ecuadorian Anthropology will be presenting a series of lunchtime lec-
Pottery and Textile Traditions explores the array of styles tures, including three lectures co-presented with UC
being used through pottery examples from the various Berkeley's Archaeological Research Facility (ARF). A
regions, the tools that are used, and related documentation Family Day (September 28) will combine Ecuadorian
showing the processes. music and dance traditions with craft-making opportuni-
ties for all ages. Please see the
Central to Ecuadorian Pottery and Textile Traditions is the calendar in this newsletter for
research provided by Professor Richard Burkett, a ceramic more details.
artist from San Diego State University, and Professor Joe
Molinaro, a ceramics instructor at Eastern Kentucky CREDITS
University. Both men have traveled extensively to regions The exhibition was curated by
of Ecuador to study the work of indigenous potters who Douglas Sharon, Ph.D., based
make modern reproductions of pre-Hispanic designs and on the exhibition Ecuadorian
contemporary decorative ceramics for the retail market. Pottery Traditions curated for
Professors Burkett and Molinaro have documented potters the San Diego Museum of Man
in Jatumpamba, in the Southern Andes near Azogues and by Grace Johnson, curator of
Cuenca, and in the Amazonian Basin along the Rio Latin American ethnography,
Bobonaza. The pottery from the Amazon is primarily with guest curators Richard
Quichua from the Puyo and Jatun Molino villages. Burkett, professor of ceramics
at San Diego State
The pottery from Puyo and Jatun Molino villages is deco- University, and Joe
rated with geometric patterns of black, brown, and white Molinaro, professor of
slip on red clay. Faces and limbs often adorn the pottery. ceramics at Eastern
For one artist, Esthela Dagua of Puyo, animals are a Kentucky University.
favorite subject for functional vessels, depicted
with such playful details as long spiny Ecuadorian Pottery and
tails and protruding lizard tongues. Textile Traditions at the
Works from the Quito region Phoebe A. Hearst Museum
include the colorful and intricate of Anthropology is made possible by the
scenes created by artists from the generous support of the Museum's
town of Pujulí. In one example, an donors and members.
overcrowded bus, piled high with the
personal belongings of the passengers, ECUADORIAN FIGURE MADE
BY THE VÀSCONEZ SISTERS
waits for its driver who stands poised on the front bumper
QUITO, ECUADOR,
to lean under the bus's hood. Purely decorative, these
SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF MAN COLLECTION,
small sculptural pieces of dollhouse scale are crafted with PHOTOGRAPH BY THERESE BABINEAU
amazing details that tell much about daily life in Ecuador.
The modern examples of traditional pieces allude to the
popularity and current market demand for Ecuadorian

6
LOCATION
The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is located in Kroeber Hall at the corner of of
Bancroft Way and College Avenue on the UC Berkeley Campus.

HOURS/ADMISSION
The Museum is open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.Wednesday through Saturday and noon to
4:00 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors, $1 for students age 13 and
above; free admission to Museum members, UCB students, faculty, staff, children 12 and under;
free to all on Thursdays. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. VICE CHANCELLOR FOR RESEARCH BETH
TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING BURNSIDE AND PAHMA DIRECTOR DOUG
Campus is served by the following AC Transit bus routes: 7, 40, 51, 52, 64. The Museum is a 15- SHARON DISCUSSING AT THE WIZARD'S
minute walk east from the Berkeley BART station. Metered parking is available on streets near the TABLE–CONTEMPORARY PERUVIAN
Museum. Paid public parking is available at Berkeley Public Parking, 2420 Durant Avenue (west of SHAMANISM, A SPECIAL LECTURE GIVEN BY
Telegraph), and after 5 p.m. and on weekends in the parking structure adjacent to the Museum. THE DIRECTOR FOR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS.

MEMBERSHIP

T
he Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology serves the ■ New ■ Renewal ■ Gift
community through exhibitions, educational programs, and
research opportunities that promote understanding of the Name (of member or gift recipient)
history and diversity of human cultures. Membership is a great way
Name on second card (if applicable)
to get involved and provides a valuable source of unrestricted oper-
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( ) ( )
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M USEUM A SSOCIATES
Enjoy all the benefits of membership plus invitations to Director's
Please make check payable to UC Regents or charge as follows:
special events. Two cards provided for all Associates.
■ Visa ■ Mastercard ■ Discover
■ Donor Gifts of $100 – $499
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■ Director’s Circle Gifts of $5,000 or more Card Expiration Date

Your membership at all Member and Associate levels is fully tax deductible Signature
Thank you!

7
ECUADORIAN POTTERY AND TEXTILE TRADITIONS ALSO ON VIEW
OPENING SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 THROUGH FEBRUARY 2004
The World in a Frame: Photographs from the Great
Age of Exploration, 1865–1915, which features
Native American portraits, wilderness landscapes of
the American West, images of ancient ruins of the
Southwest, monumental architecture in Lebanon,
Syria, and Egypt, and hand-painted photos of
Japan. All works are by founders of documentary
photography including Felice Beato, Maison Bonfils,
Edward S. Curtis, John Hillers, William Henry
Jackson, Frederick Monsen, Timothy O'Sullivan, and
Carleton E. Watkins.

ONGOING
Beginnings: The Phoebe Hearst Era (1901–1920),
the founding collections of the Museum, including
Egypt, Peru, Ancient Mediterranean, and Native
Alaska.

Native Californian Cultures, a visual storage exhibit

BUS SCENE, PUJILÍ, SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF MAN COLLECTION, of California Indian artifacts from throughout the
PHOTOGRAPH BY THERESE BABINEAU state.

PHOEBE A. HEARST
Nonprofit Org
US Postage
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY PAID
University
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