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LLIIMMOO BBLLAAZZEE

DRIVER: FIRE TOOK THREE MINUTES TO CLAIM FIVE LIVES

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FIRE TOOK THREE MINUTES TO CLAIM FIVE LIVES LOCAL PAGE 3 BEARS FRESHMAN SETS FOUR RECORDS

BEARS FRESHMAN SETS FOUR RECORDS

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Tuesday May 7, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 225

www.smdailyjournal.com

PG&E facing record fine

California regulators say utility should pay $2.25B for San Bruno blast

regulators say utility should pay $2.25B for San Bruno blast By Garance Burke THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By Garance Burke

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — California regulators recommended Monday that Pacific Gas & Electric Co. pay a record $2.25 billion fine for decades of negligence that led to a deadly gas pipeline explosion

that leveled a San Bruno neighbor- hood. The penalty would be the largest ever imposed on a utility company by a state regulator, officials said. The California Public Utilities Commission’s investigators said the fine was an appropriate remedy for dozens of safety violations

extending back several decades, and said the company’s sharehold- ers should shoulder the cost, not the utility’s customers. “This is going to send a very strong deterrent message to PG&E that this kind of conduct and cul- ture will not be tolerated,” said Brig. Gen. Jack Hagan, director of

the commission’s Safety and Enforcement Division. “They have just plain failed to follow safety standards in so many areas.” The 2010 pipeline rupture in San Bruno sparked a gas-fueled fireball that killed eight people,

See PG&E, Page 16

fireball that killed eight people, See PG&E , Page 16 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Several projects are
fireball that killed eight people, See PG&E , Page 16 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Several projects are
fireball that killed eight people, See PG&E , Page 16 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Several projects are
fireball that killed eight people, See PG&E , Page 16 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Several projects are

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Several projects are underway or about to be in San Mateo including the widening of sidewalks on Delaware Street,a fencing project to protect the San Mateo Creek and improvements to the Japanese Tea Garden in Central Park and nearby paths.

City tackles projects to improve quality of life

Wider sidewalks,new playgrounds,street improvements in the works

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo has a number of projects either underway or in the works that city officials say should improve the quality of life for its residents. It involves several departments working together with the community to improve safety, road conditions and recreational amenities among other enhancements planned this year and in the near future.

A new playground is planned for Beresford Park after a design is chosen this summer, wider sidewalks and bicy- cle lanes are being constructed now on Delaware Street near Concar Drive and new fencing is planned at select spots around San Mateo Creek to keep out those you currently use it as their own garbage can or to do drugs. In downtown, several bicycle racks have already been installed and, at nearby Central Park, workers are busy now improving the paths around the

Japanese Tea Garden, which will host a 50th anniversary celebration with San Mateo’s sister city Toyonaka, Japan in August. The City Council has also pledged millions of dollars over the next few years to repave some of the city’s worst roads, said Matt Bronson, the city’s interim streets and facilities manager. The city spends about $4 million a year for street improvements but the

See PROJECTS, Page 16

Pete’s Harbor appeal does not hold water

Council sends development back to Planning Commission

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

In a move that opponents consider vindication of their efforts, the Redwood City Council last night decided a sig- nificantly amended development proposal needs reconsider- ation by the Planning Commission and opted not to con- sider an appeal of the original plan. The council was scheduled Monday night to hear the appeal that had been postponed earlier this year until after a state agency reviewed the developer’s plan which included turning the existing commercial marina into a private facil- ity for residents of the planned 411 residential units. Developer Paul Powers has since agreed to keep the marina open to the public which councilmembers said is reason

See HARBOR, Page 20

Ice rink fans cool to impending closure

Bridgepointe ownership considering other recreational amenities as a replacement

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Ice Center of San Mateo supporters have been urging the City Council and staff for months to help them keep the rink in place at the Bridgepointe Shopping Center in com- pliance with its master plan. Last night, a group of them showed up to tell the council in person that the city has failed them and that they should not side toward increased tax revenue over the need for chil- dren to play hockey or figure skate. The item was not on last

See ICE RINK, Page 20

skate. The item was not on last See ICE RINK , Page 20 Stubborn Fat? Dr.
skate. The item was not on last See ICE RINK , Page 20 Stubborn Fat? Dr.
skate. The item was not on last See ICE RINK , Page 20 Stubborn Fat? Dr.

Stubborn Fat?

Stubborn Fat? Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D. Dr. Carie Chui, M.D. ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER 280

Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D. Dr. Carie Chui, M.D. ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER

280 Baldwin Ave. Downtown San Mateo

(650)344-1121

2 Tuesday May 7, 2013

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day “We all live in suspense,from day to day,from hour to hour;
Thought for the Day
“We all live in suspense,from
day to day,from hour to hour; in other
words,we are the hero of our own story.”
— Mary McCarthy,American author (1912-1989)
This Day in History
1763 Pontiac, chief of the Ottawa Indians,
attempted to lead a sneak attack on
British-held Fort Detroit, but was
foiled because the British had been
tipped off in advance.
In 1789, the first inaugural ball was held in New York in
honor of President George Washington and his wife,
Martha.
In 1824, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op.
125, had its premiere in Vienna.
In 1825, composer Antonio Salieri died in Vienna, Austria.
In 1833, composer Johannes Brahms was born in
Hamburg, Germany.
In 1840, composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky was born in
Votkinsk, Russia.
In 1915, nearly 1,200 people died when a German torpedo
sank the British liner RMS Lusitania off the Irish coast.
In 1942, U.S. Army Gen. Jonathan Wainwright went on a
Manila radio station to announce the Allied surrender of the
Philippines to Japanese forces during World War II.
In 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender at
Allied headquarters in Rheims (rams), France, ending its role
in World War II.
In 1954, the 55-day Battle of Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam
ended with Vietnamese insurgents overrunning French
forces.
In 1963, the United States launched the Telstar 2 commu-
nications satellite.
In 1975, President Gerald R. Ford formally declared an end
to the “Vietnam era.” In Ho Chi Minh City — formerly
Saigon — the Viet Cong celebrated its takeover.
In 1992, the latest addition to America’s space shuttle
fleet, Endeavour, went on its first flight. A 203-year-old pro-
posed constitutional amendment barring Congress from
giving itself a midterm pay raise received enough votes for
ratification as Michigan became the 38th state to approve
it.
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Supporters of the Square Peg Foundation watch the‘Run For The Roses’at a fundraiser at the Menlo Circus Club in Atherton
on May 4.This Kentucky Derby-themed event,which included a luncheon,‘divot stomp’and silent auction,supports the care
and training of the Foundation’s rescued horses,the adaptive riding lesson program,and the expansion of its Autism Family
Adventure Camps.Cheering on their favorite horses are,from left,Nicole and Victoria Salmasi,Kathleen Addison,Mara Young,
Betty Schreiber and Diedrie Lindsey.
In other news
Nice-inch copter lands
in arms of Ohio court statue
MARION, Ohio — An unwanted
modern addition has flown into the
arms of a Lady Justice statue that sits
atop a county courthouse in north-
central Ohio.
A 9-inch, remote-control helicop-
ter flew into Lady Justice on the
Marion County Courthouse on April
27 and has been there since — rest-
ing on the hilt of her sword more
than 100 feet high.
Video producer Terry Cline tells the
Marion Star that he was using the
$1,500 camera-equipped helicopter
to shoot a promotional video for the
city when it was caught by an unex-
pected breeze.
Since then, Cline has been trying
figure out how to get the helicopter
back.
County officials say they won’t
pay to remove it or risk anyone’s life
for it.
For now, Lady Justice gets to keep
her new toy.
the 205 students at Bellingham
Christian School, a small, private,
nondenominational Christian school
in Bellingham, Wash., about 90
miles north of Seattle.
Birthdays
“SCHOOL CANCELLED DUE TO
GREAT WEATHER! WAHOOO!” the
school’s website announced
Thursday night. “Yeah! It’s a Sun Day
today and everyone gets the day off
from school.”
Principal Bob Sampson said he
wanted to give students some time to
re-energize and enjoy the weather,
adding that he wanted to re-create the
excitement snow days get among the
kids. He began teasing the possibili-
ty of giving the day off earlier in the
week.
“In a world that’s got
a
lot hard
Rock musician Bill
Kreutzmann is 67.
Actor Michael E.
Knight is 54.
Actor Breckin
Meyer is 39.
things going, it’s fun to create a
moment of joy,” Sampson said.
The forecast for Western
Washington called for a weekend of
sunshine, with highs hitting the low
80s in some parts of the region on
Sunday.
Former Sen. Pete Domenici, R-N.M., is 81. Singer Jimmy
Ruffin is 74. Actress Robin Strasser is 68. Singer-songwriter
Bill Danoff is 67. Rhythm-and-blues singer Thelma Houston
is 67. Rock musician Prairie Prince is 63. Movie writer-direc-
tor Amy Heckerling is 61. Rock musician Phil Campbell
(Motorhead) is 52. Country musician Rick Schell is 50. Rock
singer-musician Chris O’Connor (Primitive Radio Gods) is
48. Actress Traci Lords is 45. Singer Eagle-Eye Cherry is 42.
Rock musician Matt Helders (Arctic Monkeys) is 27. Actor
Taylor Abrahamse is 22.
Small school closes
because of nice weather
Gerbils strut their
stuff at New England pageant
SEATTLE — In a sun-deprived part
of Washington state, the promise of
nice spring weather prompted a small
private school to give students a day
off to enjoy the sunshine.
Friday is a “sun day” of sorts for
BEDFORD, Mass.— The American
Gerbil Society’s annual pageant
brought dozens of rodents scurrying
to New England this weekend for a
chance to win “top gerbil.”
The Bedford competition called for
agility demonstrations in which the
gerbils must overcome obstacles and
race to the end of a course. Breeders
of the small animals vie for coveted
ribbons based on body type and
agility.
“A male gerbil should be a good,
strong, hefty-looking gerbil,” said
Libby Hanna, president of the
American Gerbil Society. “If you are
going to think of it in human terms,
you might think of a football player
— somebody who’s big, thick neck,
nice, strong-looking male gerbil.”
An ideal female gerbil will have a
more streamlined appearance that
even humans covet, she said.
“So she would be strong and athlet-
ic-looking — not really scrawny, but
slim,” said Hanna, who serves as a
judge in the show. “I usually use a
figure skater as my mental image or
gymnasts — so obviously a gymnast
is not necessarily a big, big woman,
but she’s gonna be strong, muscular
and athletic.”
The Friday-Saturday show drew ger-
bil enthusiasts and breeders from
around the country and culminates in
the presentation of champion and
breeder certificates.
Fourteen-year-old Sarah Kaden
from Bordentown, N.J., thinks ger-
bils have great personalities.
“Even though they are so little,
they are very different from each
other and they smell a lot less than
my brother’s hamsters,” she said
Friday.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
Lotto
Local Weather Forecast
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
MMaayy 44 PPoowweerrbbaallll
FFaannttaassyy FFiivvee
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 70s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
7 12
26 36
40
17
1
6
7
14
26
Powerball
ADOVI
DDaaiillyy FFoouurr
MMaayy 33 MMeeggaa MMiilllliioonnss
3
6
7
1
Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy. A
slight chance of showers in the evening.
Lows in the upper 40s to mid 50s. West
2 20
34
42
54 39
winds 10 to 20 mph
Becoming
south-
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
DDaaiillyy tthhrreeee mmiiddddaayy
Mega number
west 5 to 10 mph after midnight.
MMaayy 44 SSuuppeerr LLoottttoo PPlluuss
SHACO
1
8
7
11 13
15
17 26
26
DDaaiillyy tthhrreeee eevveenniinngg
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the 70s. West winds
5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy. Lows around 50. West
Mega number
winds 15 to 20 mph
Becoming
southwest around 10 mph
4
2
8
TEBNIT
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in
second place;and California Classic,No.5,in third
place.The racetime was clocked at 1:45.73.
after midnight.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the 70s.
Thursday night and Friday: Partly cloudy. Lows around 50.
Highs in the 70s.
GEEREM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
To Advertise:
Publisher: Jerry Lee
” jerry@smdailyjournal.com
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jon@smdailyjournal.com
Events:
Print your
answer here:
smdailyjournal.com
scribd.com/smdailyjournal
Delivery:
Jumbles:
Yesterday’s
Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
ICING IGLOO BEWARE SWITCH
He practiced the trumpet for weeks before his
band tryout, but on the big day he — BLEW IT
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Career:
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info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
-
Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Tuesday May 7, 2013

3

Limo driver: Fire took three minutes to claim five lives

By Martha Mendoza and Garance Burke

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

First came the tapping. Over the blasting music, limo driver Orville Brown heard someone in the backseat knock on the parti- tion behind him, saying something about smoke. No smoking allowed, he told the crowd of partying women. Then the taps turned to urgent knocks, and someone screamed “Smoke, smoke” and “Pull over!” In just a few fleeting moments, five of the women celebrating a girls’ night out were killed by flames that overtook the luxury car with terrifying speed. As smoke thickened in the passenger com- partment, Brown pulled the white stretch limo to a stop on a bridge over San Francisco Bay and started pulling women out through the partition that separated him from his pas- sengers. Three good Samaritans, including a fire- fighter, stopped to help. The first woman who got out ran to the back and yanked open

a door, but Brown said it was already too late. “I knew it wasn’t a good scene. I figured with all that fire that they were gone, man,” Brown said. “There were just so many flames. Within maybe 90 seconds, the car was fully engulfed.” From the first tap on the window until the rear of car became an inferno couldn’t have taken more than three minutes, Brown said. Authorities searched for answers Monday, hoping to learn what sparked the blaze and why five of the victims could not escape the fast-spreading flames. The women who were killed in the Saturday night blaze were found pressed up against the 3-foot by 1 1/2-foot partition, apparently because smoke and fire kept them from the rear exits of the extended passenger compart- ment. The position of the bodies suggested they were trying to get away from the fire, said San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault. The women were celebrating the wedding of a newlywed friend, Neriza Fojas, who

was among the dead. Fojas and another of the fatalities, Michelle Estrera, were nurses at Community Regional Medical Center in Fresno. The remaining three victims have not been iden- tified. The medical center’s CEO, Jack Chubb, said in a statement Monday that Fojas and Estrera were outstanding nurses, loved by their patients, colleagues and staff. “Both were good friends, stellar nurses and excellent mentors who served as preceptors to new nurses,” he said. “We’ll dearly miss these two special people who have touched our lives.” A relative of Fojas said the young nurse was preparing to get her master’s degree and was planning a large second wedding in the Philippines. Christina Kitts said Monday that Fojas lived in Hawaii while she reviewed for her nursing exam, then took a job in Oakland for two years before moving to Fresno, where she had been a nurse at Community Regional Medical Center for a year.

College district looking for applicants to fill board vacancy

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The San Mateo County Community College District is accepting applications to fill a vacancy created by the departure of longtime trustee Helen Hausman. Hausman stepped down April 30 due to health problems. Hausman joined the board in 1989 and her current term expires in November. The district is considering appointing someone to fill the spot. By law, the board has until June 29 to make a provisional appointment. If the board does-

n’t act by June 29, the county superintend- ent of schools will order an election. The application form can be viewed and completed online at www.smccd.edu or it can be obtained from the receptionist at the District Office at 3401 CSM Drive, San Mateo. Applications must be received by 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 28. The application and accompanying materials can be emailed to brooksv@smccd.edu or delivered to the District Office by the deadline. The application indicates that candidate

by the deadline. The application indicates that candidate We Buy Gold, Jewelry, Diamonds, Silver & Coins
by the deadline. The application indicates that candidate We Buy Gold, Jewelry, Diamonds, Silver & Coins
by the deadline. The application indicates that candidate We Buy Gold, Jewelry, Diamonds, Silver & Coins

We Buy Gold, Jewelry, Diamonds, Silver & Coins

candidate We Buy Gold, Jewelry, Diamonds, Silver & Coins Serving The Peninsula for over 25years interviews
candidate We Buy Gold, Jewelry, Diamonds, Silver & Coins Serving The Peninsula for over 25years interviews

Serving The Peninsula for over 25years

Silver & Coins Serving The Peninsula for over 25years interviews will take place on June 5
Silver & Coins Serving The Peninsula for over 25years interviews will take place on June 5
Silver & Coins Serving The Peninsula for over 25years interviews will take place on June 5

interviews will take place on June 5 and

June 12, after which a decision will be made. For more information contact Barbara Christensen, director of community/gov-

at

ernment relations Christensen@smccd.edu.

Police reports

Strike

An intoxicated driver hit several parked cars while leaving a bowling alley on the 2000 block of El Camino Real in San Mateo before 11:06 p.m. Friday, May 3.

SAN MATEO

Disturbance. A loud party had been going on for more than 24 hours on the 1400 block of Dore Avenue before 2:43 p.m. Sunday, May 5. Burglary . The window of a vehicle was

smashed and a computer was stolen on the

2200 block of Bridgepointe Parkway before

1:46 p.m. Sunday, May 5. Disturbance. A man was hit by a person while he was checking his mail box on the 100 block of 36th Avenue before 2:57 a.m. Sunday, May 5. Suspicious circumstances. A man attempted to use a counterfeit bill on the 400 block of South Norfolk Street before 7:51 p.m. Saturday, May 4. Drugs. Three people were seen smoking marijuana on Flores Street and Mary Lu Lane before 7:36 p.m. Saturday, May 4. Theft. A cellphone was stolen from a vehi- cle on the 2800 block of El Camino Real before 11:48 a.m. Friday, May 3.

MILLBRAE

Vandalism. Property was vandalized on the

1100 block of Ridgewood Drive before 2:15

p.m. Monday, April 29. Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on the first block of Corte Balboa before 7:33 a.m. Saturday, April 27.

April 29. Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on the first block of Corte Balboa before

4

Tuesday May 7, 2013

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATIONAL STROKE ALERT DAY May 7, 2013

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATIONAL STROKE ALERT DAY May 7, 2013 San Mateo County Takes Stroke Seriously!

San Mateo County Takes Stroke Seriously!

For information about stroke risk factors, stroke prevention and treatment please contact Paci c Stroke Association at 650-565-8485

please contact Paci c Stroke Association at 650-565-8485 13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 -

13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE

Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto

For information and to reserve seats, visit WWW.PSASTROKE.ORG

13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,
13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,
13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,
13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,
13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,
13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,
13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,
13th ANNUAL STROKE CONFERENCE Friday, May 17 - Palo Alto For information and to reserve seats,

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Tuesday May 7, 2013

5

Hospital returns man accused in hammer attack

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The second-striker committed to a state hospital after he allegedly hit his stepbrother in the head with a hammer over alleged images of his girlfriend is now competent to stand trial, accord- ing to doctors at the facility. Lawrence Lee Buffington, 47, has been at Napa State Hospital since December after two court-appointed doctors found him unable to aid in his own defense against charges of felony assault, assault with force, making criminal threats and violating his parole. Criminal proceedings will now be reinstated unless the defense con-

proceedings will now be reinstated unless the defense con- Lawrence Buffington tests the competen- cy finding

Lawrence

Buffington

tests the competen- cy finding and requests a trial. Redwood City police arrested Buffington in June 2012 after being told by his hospital- ized stepbrother that the man had struck him in the head with

the tool during an argument. The victim also told authori- ties Buffington accused him of having an affair with his girlfriend after find- ing a photograph.

However, Buffington’s girlfriend pre- viously told the Daily Journal Buffington’s stepbrother was the one who asked him to move in to his Redwood City residence. She said Buffington also told her immediately after the confrontation that he had found videos and photographs of his stepbrother harming her. The woman said there was no truth to anything in the alleged images and she had not seen anything herself. The victim, who suffered a fractured skull, was treated at Sequoia Hospital, whose staff alerted police. Buffington remains in custody with- out bail.

County declares CalFresh Awareness Month

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The county Board of Supervisors this morning will declare May as CalFresh Awareness Month to high- light the food stamp program and increase access and participation. The Human Services Agency has planned a host of events throughout May to promote the program including

communities meetings, a radio show and resource fairs. “This is one of the most expensive places to live in the state and it is very difficult for many working families to be economically self-sufficient, HSA Director Beverly Beasley Johnson said in a prepared statement. “The CalFresh program is available for all eligible

participants and we want to get the word out to help our residents put healthy food on their tables.” CalFresh participation in San Mateo County has risen from 16,085 partici- pants in December 2009 to 28,103 participants in December 2012. For more information on eligibility and how to apply, call (800) 223-8383 or visit www.mybenefitsclwin.org .

Molestation brings decade prison

A South San Francisco man was immediately sentenced to 10 years in prison on three counts of child molestation rather than stand trial on allegations he fondled his young nieces and a cousin. Salvador Palacio, 46, must also reg- ister as a sex offender for life.

46, must also reg- ister as a sex offender for life. Salvador Palacio Trying to keep

Salvador

Palacio

also reg- ister as a sex offender for life. Salvador Palacio Trying to keep up with

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The girls’ mother contacted the South San Francisco Police Department after the children, ages 4 and 7, told her that Palacio had stuck his hand down their pants on multiple occasions between August 2009 and

Local brief

August 2010. The mother also reported hearing about Palacio having done something similar to another family member years earlier and investigators located a cousin, now 20, who said she was molested by him at age 5. Palacio faced life in prison if con- victed by a jury because of the multiple victim allegation.

victed by a jury because of the multiple victim allegation. REUTERS FILE PHOTO A firefighter pulls
victed by a jury because of the multiple victim allegation. REUTERS FILE PHOTO A firefighter pulls
victed by a jury because of the multiple victim allegation. REUTERS FILE PHOTO A firefighter pulls

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

A firefighter pulls a hose line as a backfire is ignited into the Santa Monica Mountains on Saturday night.

California crews mop up wildfire as rain falls

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAMARILLO — Rain showers moved across Southern California on Monday, dousing remnants of a wildfire that blackened thousands of acres in coastal mountains and bringing much-needed moisture to a region left parched by a dry winter. The 44-square-mile burn area in the western Santa Monica Mountains was 80 percent surrounded, and firefighters worked in muddy and slippery conditions to complete con- tainment. Ventura County Fire spokesman Tony McHale said the wet weather significantly reduced fire activity. There were no remaining open flames, but firefighters remained on the lookout for flare-ups, he said.

activity. There were no remaining open flames, but firefighters remained on the lookout for flare-ups, he
activity. There were no remaining open flames, but firefighters remained on the lookout for flare-ups, he

6 Tuesday May 7, 2013

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

R ussell Bede School, a private nonprofit school in San Mateo serving

children with learning differ- has

the

its

principal,

Sauntheri

“Sandie”

differ- has the its principal, Sauntheri “Sandie” Sauntheri Spoering ences, announced hiring new of Spoering.

Sauntheri

Spoering

ences,

announced

hiring

new

of

Spoering.

Spoering

to

Russell Bede

comes

School from

MLK

Middle School in the Sausalito Marin City School District, where she was assistant principal. She has extensive experience both in classroom teaching and adminis- tration, and with special educa- tion. Spoering currently is finish- ing her doctorate in education at the University of Nevada, Reno, and her dissertation is in the realm of special education law. Former and Interim Principal Dr. John Piper will work with Spoering through the end of the current school year to assure a seamless transition before the new school year begins. For more information visit the school’s website at www.RussellBedeSchool.com or call 579-4400. ***

Jr.

Middle College High School at the College of San Mateo, an alternative education program for juniors and seniors in the San Mateo Union High

School District, is accepting

applications for fall 2013. Students and parents interested in the program can contact the Middle College office. Applications are available online or in the SMUSHD counseling offices and college and career cen- ters. Middle College, located on the CSM campus, includes 60 stu- dents who take a combination of high school and college classes. These classes are intended to help the student meet high school graduation requirements and col- lege general education require- ments. The students, who prefer not to attend a traditional high school campus, demonstrate the poten- tial maturity to cope with the free- dom of the college environment. Students are recommended for admission by parents, teachers, guidance counselors and adminis- trators. Other application proce- dures include student testing, an information meeting with parents and interviews with students and parents. For more information contact Principal Greg Quigley at

574-6101,

middlecollege@smuhsd.org or visit

www.collegeofsanmateo.edu/mid-

dlecollege. ***

The Burlingame School District is seeking nomination for the H. Jay Burns Award, which is given annually to recog- nize volunteer service in the pur- suit of educational excellence in

service in the pur- suit of educational excellence in the Burlingame Schools . The award is

the Burlingame Schools. The award is presented to a non- employee volunteer, past or pres- ent, based on: service to the dis- trict at larger for a substantial period of time; positive impact on the education of the Burlingame school children; and demonstration of leadership skills on behalf of Burlingame students. Nominations are accept- ed through May 13. Nominations should be sent to Kristen Diktakis, Burlingame School District, 1825 Trousdale Drive, Burlingame, CA

94010

at

kdiktakis@bsd.k12.ca.us.

Nominations should include the nominee’s name, address, tele- phone number and a brief descrip- tion of the reason for the nomina- tion as well as the name, address and contact information of the person making the nomination. *** San Bruno children from 3.5 to 13 years old have been enjoying summer camp in San Bruno City Park, recreation center and

or

swimming pool for many years. Some of the camp’s current lead- ers were once campers them-

selves. The camp has a new addi- tion to their program this year. The San Bruno Education Foundation in partnership with the city of San Bruno’s

Recreation

San Bruno Park School District, is funding the optional Scholastic Reading Counts K-12 program, an independent reading program that encourages the success of a child’s reading progress. Scholastic Reading Counts motivates students with suggested reading choices that match their interests and reading levels, then reinforces through testing com- prehension, vocabulary and fluen- cy skills. The parent has the option of sharing their child’s Reading Counts data with their child’s elementary school teacher, which can help the teacher better craft a lesson plan. If the parent and student decide to participate in Reading Counts at the San Bruno Summer Camp, known as Camp Kaleidoscope (for children up to 10 years old), or Adventure Camp (for chil- dren between 10 and 13 years old), on testing days camp lead- ers will walk children to nearby El Crystal Elementary School. El Crystal is San Bruno’s newly-designated magnet school with a focus on collabora- tive studies of STEM (Science, technology, engineering and math) for students in kindergarten through fifth grade.

Div ision and the

visit

http://www.sanbruno.ca.gov/par

ks_main.asp.

*** The San Mateo-Foster City School District is proud to announce that from May 13 through May 17, the Audubon Elementary School Student Council will encourage students to show their school spirit by wearing a certain color each day as well as collecting food of that color or packaging for Project Wee Care . On Monday, students will wear purple and bring in “purple” non- perishable foods or foods in purple packaging. Tuesday will be red day, Wednesday will be yellow day, Thursday will be green day and Friday will be blue day. Students will have fun choosing their clothes and looking for matching colored food/packaging. The Samaritan House Project Wee Care is a communi- ty partnership that teaches thou- sands of students from local area public and private schools the importance of giving. Parents and teachers, with the help of Samaritan House staff, teach chil- dren about the needs in our com- munity and assist children in organizing food, clothing and toy drives. All donations are then dis- tributed to Samaritan House clients through various programs.

For

more

information

Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by educa- tion reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.

(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com. Obituary Jeanette Callis Resident of San Carlos
Obituary Jeanette Callis Resident of San Carlos Jeanette passed away on April 29, 2013, cradled

Obituary

Jeanette Callis

Resident of San Carlos

Jeanette passed away on April 29, 2013, cradled in the love of her daughters. Jeanette was a woman of strong convictions, feisty attitude, and a passion for playing the piano. Jeanette was born in Oakland, CA, to Cethil and Laura (Day) Jones. She was raised in Dunsmuir, CA, but spent her adult life in San Carlos. Jeanette was preceded in deathbyherloving husband Dale Callis, son Gary Rossetto, and sister Constance Krouskup. She is survived by her daughters Nanette Elaine, Paulette Carey (George), and Sue Marshall (Bob); daughter-in- law Patty Rossetto. She is further survived by her brother-in-law Don Krouskup, loving niece Elaine, nephew Roger, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Jeanette was an avid volunteer and an active member of numerous organizations including the Community United Church of Christ, Order of Eastern Star, Jr. Matrons, San Carlos Villagers, Golden Gate District, and RWC Women’s Club, Republican Women’s Club, Filoli, Sequoia Hospital Auxiliary, to name only a few. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations in her honor be made to your favorite charity. One of Mom’s was her local ASPCA. Memorial service celebrating her life will be on Saturday, May 11, 2013, 1:00 PM at the Community United church of Christ, 1336 Arroyo Ave., San Carlos. Reception will follow at the San Carlos Masonic Lodge

the Community United church of Christ, 1336 Arroyo Ave., San Carlos. Reception will follow at the
the Community United church of Christ, 1336 Arroyo Ave., San Carlos. Reception will follow at the
the Community United church of Christ, 1336 Arroyo Ave., San Carlos. Reception will follow at the
the Community United church of Christ, 1336 Arroyo Ave., San Carlos. Reception will follow at the
the Community United church of Christ, 1336 Arroyo Ave., San Carlos. Reception will follow at the

THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE/NATION

Tuesday May 7, 2013

7

East about to be overrun with billions of cicadas

By Seth Borenstein

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Any day now, billions of cicadas with bulging red eyes will crawl out of the earth after 17 years underground and overrun the East Coast. The insects will arrive in such numbers that people from North Carolina to Connecticut will be out- numbered roughly 600-to-1. Maybe more. Scientists even have a horror-movie name for the infestation: Brood II. But as omi- nous as that sounds, the insects are harm- less. They won’t hurt you or other animals. At worst, they might damage a few saplings or young shrubs. Mostly they will blanket certain pockets of the region, though lots of people won’t ever see them. “It’s not like these hordes of cicadas suck blood or zombify people,” says May Berenbaum, a University of Illinois ento- mologist. They’re looking for just one thing: sex. And they’ve been waiting quite a long time. Since 1996, this group of 1-inch bugs, in wingless nymph form, has been a few feet underground, sucking on tree roots and bid- ing their time. They will emerge only when the ground temperature reaches precisely 64 degrees. After a few weeks up in the trees, they will die and their offspring will go underground, not to return until 2030. “It’s just an amazing accomplishment,” Berenbaum says. “How can anyone not be impressed?” And they will make a big racket, too. The noise all the male cicadas make when they sing for sex can drown out your own thoughts, and maybe even rival a rock con- cert. In 2004, Gene Kritsky, an entomolo-

rival a rock con- cert. In 2004, Gene Kritsky, an entomolo- REUTERS This year heralds the

REUTERS

This year heralds the springtime emergence of billions of so-called 17-year periodical cicadas, with their distinctive black bodies,buggy red eyes and orange-veined wings,along a roughly 900-mile stretch from northern Georgia to upstate New York.

gist at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati, measured cicadas at 94 decibels, saying it was so loud “you don’t hear planes flying overhead.” There are ordinary cicadas that come out every year around the world, but these are different. They’re called magicicadas — as in magic — and are red-eyed. And these magicicadas are seen only in the eastern half of the United States, nowhere else in the world. There are 15 U.S. broods that emerge every 13 or 17 years, so that nearly every

year, some place is overrun. Last year it was a small area, mostly around the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, West Virginia and Tennessee. Next year, two places get hit:

Iowa into Illinois and Missouri; and Louisiana and Mississippi. And it’s possi- ble to live in these locations and actually never see them. This year’s invasion, Brood II, is one of the bigger ones. Several experts say that they really don’t have a handle on how many cicadas are lurking underground but that 30 billion seems like a good estimate. At the Smithsonian Institution, researcher Gary Hevel thinks it may be more like 1 trillion.

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Around the state

Groups want details on license plate readers

LOS ANGELES — Two privacy rights groups questioning law enforcement’s use of automated license plate readers asked a judge Monday to order the Los Angeles Police Department and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department to provide more details on how they use the technology. The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Southern California and the Electronic Frontier Foundation filed a writ against the city, county and its law enforce- ment departments after waiting more than eight months for a complete response to pub- lic records requests. The groups are seeking one week of data collected by the readers, which are usually mounted on police cars and scan thousands of license plates in an offi- cer’s shift. The readers — which collect the license plate numbers, the time, date, GPS location and a photo — alert law enforcement to stolen and wanted vehicles. “If you’re not wanted for anything, it does- n’t do anything,” said Los Angeles County sheriff’s Sgt. John Gaw, who works in the advanced surveillance and protection unit. “It does collect that information, it does put it in our database, and we’re able to go back and review that information if you’re wanted in some type of criminal investigation.”

State objects to moving inmates because of fungus

SACRAMENTO — California officials say it’s premature to move more than 3,000 inmates out of two state prisons until more is known about an airborne fungus that is being blamed for nearly three-dozen inmate deaths. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention agreed last week to study prob- lems with valley fever at Avenal and Pleasant Valley state prisons. The state said in a court filing Monday night that a federal judge should wait for the centers’ recommendations before enforcing an order last week by the federal official who controls prison medical care.

centers’ recommendations before enforcing an order last week by the federal official who controls prison medical

8 Tuesday May 7, 2013

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the nation

Biden asks clergy to make moral argument on guns

WASHINGTON — Vice President Joe Biden wants pastors, rabbis and nuns to tell their flocks that enacting gun control is the moral thing to do. But another vote may have to wait until Congress wraps up work on an immigration overhaul. Biden met for two-and- a-half hours Monday with more than a dozen leaders

from various faith com- munities — Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh, to name a few. Both Biden and the faith leaders encouraged each other not to give up on what has been an arduous and thus far fruitless effort by Biden and President Barack Obama to pass new gun laws in the wake of December’s schoolhouse shooting in Connecticut. Around a large, circular table in a confer- ence room on the White House grounds, Biden waxed optimistic about prospects for passing a bill, according to four partici- pants who spoke to the Associated Press after the meeting.

FDA wants cancer warnings on tanning beds

WASHINGTON — Indoor tanning beds would come with new warnings about the risk of cancer and be subject to more strin- gent federal oversight under a proposal unveiled Monday by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA has regulated tanning beds and sun lamps for over 30 years, but for the first time ever the agency says those devices should not be used by people under age 18. The agency wants that warning on pam- phlets, catalogues and websites that pro- mote indoor tanning. And regulators are also proposing that manufacturers meet cer- tain safety and design requirements, includ- ing timers and limits on radiation emitted.

includ- ing timers and limits on radiation emitted. Joe Biden Study sets off immigration bill squabble

Joe Biden

Study sets off immigration bill squabble

By Erica Werner

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan Senate immigration bill would cost the govern- ment a net $6.3 trillion over the next 50 years to provide benefits for millions of people now living in the U.S. illegally, the Heritage Foundation said in a report Monday, setting off a fierce dispute with fel- low conservatives who attacked the study as flawed and political. The study from the prominent conserva- tive think tank said immigrants granted new legal status under the bill would eat up more than $9 trillion in health, education, retire- ment and other benefits over their lifetime, while contributing only around $3 trillion in taxes. Republicans and conservative groups who support the bill quickly coun- tered that the study failed to measure broader economic benefits from an immigration overhaul, including a more robust workforce that would boost the gross domestic prod- uct. “The Heritage Foundation document is a political document; it’s not a very serious analysis,” said former Mississippi gover- nor Haley Barbour, a Republican who’s part

“The Heritage Foundation document is a political document; it’s not a very serious analysis

This study is

designed to try to scare conservative Republicans into thinking the cost here is going to be so gigantic that you can’t possibly be for it.”

— Former Mississippi governor Haley Barbour

of a task force with the nonprofit Bipartisan Policy Center that supports the bill. “This study is designed to try to scare conserva- tive Republicans into thinking the cost here is going to be so gigantic that you can’t possibly be for it.” Former Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., the Heritage Foundation’s new president, dis- missed such criticism. “It’s clear a number of people in Washington who might benefit from an amnesty, as well as a number of people in Congress, do not want to consider the costs,” DeMint said. “No sensible thinking person could read this study and conclude that over 50 years that it could possibly have a positive economic impact.” The brouhaha developed as both sides pre- pare for the landmark bill to undergo its first tests later this week in the Senate Judiciary

Committee, which will begin voting on amendments Thursday. It underscored the high political stakes for both supporters and opponents, as each jockeyed to define the legislation. And it laid bare splits with- in the Republican Party, where business- oriented leaders such as Barbour and anti-tax activist Grover Norquist are pushing for immigration reform, while more ideologi- cally focused lawmakers and groups are voicing increasingly loud opposition. The Heritage report was a reprisal of a study the group released at the height of the last congressional debate on immigration, in 2007, which said the bill being consid- ered then would have cost $2.6 trillion. That figure, too, was disputed, but it carried weight with Republicans and helped lead to the legislation’s eventual defeat in the Senate.

Massachusetts funeral director considers burial offers

By Denise Lavoie

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — A Massachusetts funeral director said Monday he has received bur- ial offers from out-of-state cemeteries for the body of a Boston Marathon bombing suspect who was killed in a gun battle with police, even as Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s mother told him she wants the body returned to Russia. But Worcester funeral home director Peter Stefan said despite the request, he

home director Peter Stefan said despite the request, he Tamerlan Tsarnaev doesn’t think Russia will take

Tamerlan

Tsarnaev

doesn’t think Russia will take Tsarnaev’s body and he is working on other arrangements. He declined to be more specific. Meanwhile, a friend of the surviving suspect in the bombings was released from federal custody Monday amid a

swell of support from family and friends, but was under strict

house arrest and only allowed to leave his home to meet with lawyers and for true emergencies. Also, the administrator of the One Fund Boston released the protocol for payouts of the fund, with the families of those who lost loved ones and individ- uals who suffered double amputations or permanent brain damage in the bombings receiving the highest payments. The question of where Tamerlan Tsarnaev will be buried dragged on for another day, and the issue seemed far from resolved.

on for another day, and the issue seemed far from resolved. Advertisement Funeral Trends Indicate Upswing

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Funeral Trends Indicate

Upswing in the Economy

By Paul Larson

Trends Indicate Upswing in the Economy By Paul Larson MILLBRAE – Our country’s economic roller-coaster ride

MILLBRAE – Our country’s economic roller-coaster ride has been interesting and historic for sure, but also very troubling for many families who’ve not

been as financially stable as others. Recently though I’ve been observing a phenomenon with those we serve at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may be too early to confirm, but it appears that there is a general state of confidence with many families, along with the decisions and choices they make during funeral arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking that “confidence” is not a term you would use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”, but it appears to me that people I see are tending to be more financially assured than during the deepest years of “The Great Recession”. They say that the two things you can’t avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in mind, during the economic downturn I saw a very noticeable sense of “thrift” and “prudence” with a lot of families who experienced a death during that period. Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at various funeral homes selected CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or cremation arrangements. These families found comfort with our service, and notably with our more economic cost structure. Now, lately the trend with families and their funeral choices reminds me of the days way before the recession hit. It’s not that people are utilizing their funds differently, spending more or spending less, but that they are more assertive and confident when

using their wallet. Seeing this over and over gives me a good indication that something in the economic climate is changing compared to not that long ago. Even though many of our honorable elected officials in Sacramento and Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible with economic issues as always, the air of confidence with the families I’ve been dealing with means to me that these people are feeling less pressured financially. It is well known that when businesses do well they hire more employees, and when those employees are confident they will spend their money on goods and services. In turn, the companies that provide goods and services will need competent employees to create more goods, give more services, and so on…making a positive circle for a healthy economy. In relation to that, after a long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs being sent over-seas there is news of a growing number of companies bringing this work back to the United States. Real Estate values on the Peninsula remained in a good state during the recession, but houses here are now in demand more than ever. “Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive” are words to describe the optimistic vibrations that people are giving off. If the community is becoming more comfortable with spending, that indicates good health for business and the enrichment of our economic atmosphere. I hope I’m right, so let’s all keep our fingers crossed. If you ever wish to discuss cremation, funeral matters or want to make pre- planning arrangements please feel free to call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650) 588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you in a fair and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at:

www.chapelofthehighlands.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Tuesday May 7, 2013

9

Save Pete from what?

By Jim Clifford

I never met Pete Uccelli, but the current controversy brought back images of the many bumper

stickers I saw in the 1980s that read “Save Pete’s Harbor.” A volunteer in the Redwood City Library history room, I decided to find out about Pete and what people wanted to save him from — or for. Pete, who died in 2005 at 84, can be summed up as “a really interesting guy.” For one thing, he owned a har- bor, but never a boat, telling reporters a boat “was a hole in the water you poured money into.” He preferred airplanes and was the pilot of a single-engined Cessna who, despite his many ties to water, spent much of his time in landlocked Nevada, where he owned a few hundred acres of barren desert. Uccelli was often described as “fiercely independent,” which may have been an understatement. A sign painted in the colors of the Italian flag told visitors they were leaving the United States. The sign had a bit of rancor about it, which I thought was strong stuff coming from a World War II Army veteran. A little digging

coming from a World War II Army veteran. A little digging and I found out that

and I found out that Pete loved the United States, but he did, indeed, have a fight with the state of California, namely the State Lands Commission. In the 1970s and ’80s, people rallied around Pete. Not

only were there the omnipresent

bumper stickers, 10,000 Redwood

City residents signed a petition back-

ing Pete’s ownership of the land. The

state claimed it had made an error dur-

ing a survey conducted more than 100 years ago, a contention that seems to be lost in the current controversy. The state argued that the surveying

error resulted in the land, which was

tidelands, being classified improperly as swampland when it was conveyed

into private ownership starting back

in the 1850s.

As well as the petition, Pete’s back- ers took out an expensive newspaper ad that said they were “outraged by

this small businessman’s private

property rights being threatened by the state.” The petition in the present dispute, which was signed by around 700 peo-

Guest

perspective

ple, said the public saved Pete’s Harbor in the ’70s and ’80s “for use as a harbor and marina.” On the contrary, my research shows that Pete Uccelli wanted to see his land developed someday and that his fight is still with the land commis- sion. The Journal of Local History staff is still investigating, but we have no doubt that the story is much bigger than Pete’s Harbor.

Jim Clifford retired in 2000 after spend- ing 40 years as a news reporter, a span split between UPI and AP. He volun- teers at the San Mateo County History Museum, the Redwood Library History Room and the San Francisco International Airport museum. He and his wife Peggy, both San Francisco natives, raised their seven children in Redwood City.

Letters to the editor

Hurrah for Plan Bay Area

Editor, I read with interest your article on Plan Bay Area (“What is Plan Bay Area?” in the May 1 edition of the Daily Journal). It’s great to see leader- ship to address the extraordinary housing shortage in the region. My wife and I plan to start a family and want to find a new home. It’s a real challenge. Not only are the prices exorbitant and getting worse, there is a dearth of housing options which allow us to readily take the train or BART to our jobs in San Francisco and San Jose respectively. Sure, we could find a more reason- ably priced home in a distant location — and endure costly 90-minute com- mutes that compromise our quality of life. We are hopeful that we will be able to find a home in the new Bay Meadows development in San Mateo. This will be a beautiful new neighbor- hood with a wide range of home options, with healthy walkable parks and amenities, right on Caltrain. The city of San Mateo is to be applauded for fostering exactly the kind of development Plan Bay Area encour- ages.

This is about having choices, not

just large, expensive single-family

homes. We do not have enough homes close to work centers for smaller families and seniors, espe-

cially that are affordable to all those

who are not on a high-tech salary.

Plan Bay Area will provide a better

mix

of homes for the region, help

ease

the cost of homes, foster better

communities and reduce pollution. Sounds pretty good to us.

Prove it

Rafael Reyes

San Mateo

Editor, “WRA wants the public to under-

stand that there are millions of peo- ple successfully treated for addiction

who now lead healthy, productive

lives.” (Guest perspective by Debbie Tate, from the May 2 edition of the Daily Journal). It is now time to prove this statement by reviewing

longitudinal studies that confirm suc-

cess or failure rates beyond two years.

Real success yells out for proof and most administrators of these pro- grams really don’t know without fol-

lowing recipients for moe than 20 years. If you can’t prove this, then why try to “buffalo” the public into think- ing otherwise to achieve more fund- ing? I suggest that all programs, includ- ing Women’s Recovery Association, have a performance audit yearly and conduct ongoing longitudinal studies of those who have undertaken this program, as well as other programs in the state. My bet is that after two years of completing the program, there will be an 80 percent recidivism rate. All social net programs should have built-in longitudinal studies and significant top-down yearly audits. It is not enough to have a 20 per- cent success rate without tweaking program elements. We should not accept minimal success that the tax- payer and private sources may be funding.

Jack Kirkpatrick

Redwood City

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Education in collaboration

Y ou can’t tell by looking. You also can’t rely on

stereotypes and assumptions. Take the recent

public service announcement by San Mateo

County Assemblyman Rich Gordon and his Republican counterpart Assemblyman Brian Jones of Santee. The pair joined forces to let the public know they can go online for a number of Department of Motor Vehicle services, which is admittedly important and maybe a little interesting — who actually likes going into a DMV office? — but on paper looks about as low on the news priority list as one can get on an average day. At least, that’s the assumption. But the PSA is just the frosting on a slice of politics a lot more interesting than using the Internet for name changes and learner permits. The two men couldn’t be more different if they tried. Gordon is from Northern California, a Democrat, gay. Jones is from Southern California, Republican, conservative, religious and it may go without saying not a big fan of same-sex marriage. Jones wasn’t available to offer his two cents on the unlikely friendship but Gordon expects his assump- tions about him were probably as narrow as his own. When Gordon hears somebody is an evangelical Christian, his guard goes up and he assumes they won’t be welcoming him with open arms so he can only imagine what Jones initially expected from “the gay guy from Northern California.” And yet, Gordon said, when Jones’ constituents ask him if there is anybody in Sacramento with whom he gets along he has to admit it might be the first openly gay person he’s ever known. This doesn’t mean their philosophies meet somewhere in the middle. They’ve never voted alike and their perspec- tives are pretty polar opposite, Gordon said. In fact, in Gordon’s first year, Jones joined other Republicans walking off the Assembly floor during a gay pride recognition event. That said, the men developed a social relationship and while they might not agree Gordon said he respects Jones’ values because those are who he is. While both served on a budget committee, the pair learned about the DMV’s online presence and figured out pretty quickly it was a useful service that nobody knew about. A PSA was in order but what happened next is prob- ably a good example of why nothing ever seems to get done at the capitol — each party has a small television studio for filming that exact type of PSA but the Republicans wouldn’t OK Gordon in their space and the same went with the Democrats toward Jones. Whoever said the Hatfields and McCoys had anything on partisan squabbling? Long story short, Gordon and Jones opted to film in an actual DMV office but could only do so after hours when there are no actual customers. Staff, friends and a few DMV employees were called to play the role of clients. Gordon’s husband, Dr. Dennis McShane, is even in the background filling out a form. His day as an extra also gave Gordon the chance to introduce his other half to Jones. Does all this mean that Jones is ready to throw his weight behind more traditionally liberal causes or that Gordon is itching to lean away from his Democratic plat- form? Not necessarily. But Gordon says while he can’t speak for Jones, the conservative lawmaker has certainly helped him overcome some of his own stereotypes about people unlike himself. Ayear after Jones joined his fellow GOP-ers in walking off the floor, Gordon said he fully expected a repeat per- formance at the next recognition ceremony. Instead, Jones stayed. “He told me, ‘I know you,’” Gordon remembered. Isn’t that often the first step of changing one’s mind about a long-held perception, knowing somebody and finding out that a label doesn’t begin to scratch the sur- face? Gordon thinks his friendship with Jones proves that dif- ferences are sometimes less important as people get to know each other. He’s right. Respect doesn’t have to mean agreement. And thinking you know what somebody is all about does- n’t mean you know who they are at all. Maybe that’s what people and legislation have in com- mon. Both are usually much more than skin deep.

have in com- mon. Both are usually much more than skin deep. Michelle Durand’s column “Off

Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:

michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.

10 Tuesday May 7, 2013

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

BofA leads banks up; S&P 500 index ekes out gain

JOURNAL BofA leads banks up; S&P 500 index ekes out gain D D o o w

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NNaassddaaqq 3,392.97

+0.42%

OOiill (per barrel)

95.83

SS&&PP 550000 1,617.50 +0.19%

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1,469.60

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE Tyson Foods Inc.,down 83 cents at $24.10 The meat company said that its second-quarter net income fell 42 percent. The company also cut its full-year revenue forecast. Bridgepoint Education Inc.,down 18 cents at $10.83 The for-profit college operator said that its first-quarter net income dropped 29 percent as student enrollments continued to fall. Westlake Chemical Corp.,up $6.49 at $88.94 The chemical company’s net income rose 40 percent thanks to strong income from its olefins and vinyls units as well as lower costs. WellCare Health Plans Inc.,down 88 cents at $56.38 Shares of the Medicaid and Medicare provider fell after reporting last week that its first-quarter net income fell 58 percent. Humana Inc.,up $1.56 at $75.49 A J.P.Morgan analyst upgraded the insurer’s stock rating,saying it should be able to grow its Medicare Advantage enrollment. Nasdaq Google Inc.,up $15.83 at $861.55 Shares of the Internet search company hit an all-time high of $861.85.The stock is up over 20 percent since the start of the year. Tesco Corp.,down 69 cents at $12.02 The oil and natural gas drilling service provider’s first-quarter net income fell 39 percent,hurt by reduced North America rig activity. 3D Systems Corp.,up $3.29 at $43.17 S&P Dow Jones Indices said that the printing company’s stock is being added into its S&P MidCap 400 index.

By Matthew Craft

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Bank of America led a rally in big-bank stocks in mostly quiet trading on Monday. Stock indexes ended little changed following a record-setting run last week. News that Bank of America and MBIA,

a bond-insurance company, had reached

a settlement over a long-running dispute propelled both companies’ stocks up. BofA will pay $1.7 billion to MBIA and extend the troubled company a credit line. MBIA soared 45 percent, or $4.46, to $14.29. Bank of America gained 5 per- cent, or 64 cents, to $12.88, making it the leading company in the Dow Jones industrial average. The Dow slipped 5.07 points to close at 14,968.89. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index crept up 3.08 points to 1,617.50, a gain of 0.2 percent. Six of the 10 industry groups in the S&P 500 rose, with financial companies in the lead. No major economic reports came out Monday, but a handful of companies reported their quarterly results. Tyson Foods, the nation’s largest meat-pro- cessing company, fell 3 percent, the biggest drop in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index, after saying its net income sank as costs for chicken feed rose.

“Yet again,corporations continue to do more with less.”

— Dan Veru,the chief investment officer of Palisade Capital Management

Tyson’s stock lost 83 cents to $24.10. Companies have reported solid quar- terly profits so far this earnings season.

Seven of every 10 big companies in the

S&P 500 have beat the earnings esti- mates of financial analysts, according to S&P Capital IQ. But revenue has looked weak: six of 10 have missed revenue forecasts. “Yet again, corporations continue to do more with less,” said Dan Veru, the chief investment officer of Palisade Capital Management. Veru said the trend is likely to lead to more mergers in the coming months, as cash-rich companies look for ways to raise their revenue. A wave of mergers could shift the stock market’s rally into a higher gear, he said. The stock market cleared new mile- stones Friday after the government reported that employers added more workers to their payrolls in recent months. The unemployment rate fell to 7.5 percent, the lowest level in four years. That news sent the Dow through the 15,000 mark for the first time, while the S&P 500 closed above

1,600, another first. In Monday trading, the Nasdaq com- posite rose 14.34 points to 3,392.97, an increase of 0.4 percent. The price of crude oil edged up 55 cents to $96.16 and gold rose $3.80 to $1,468.10 an ounce. In the market for U.S. government bonds, the yield on the 10-year note inched up to 1.76 percent from 1.74 per- cent late Friday. Berkshire Hathaway rose 1.3 percent, or $1.36, to $110. Warren Buffett’s com- pany turned in earnings late Friday that trumped analysts’ estimates for both profit and revenue. Berkshire reported strong gains from its insurance units, Geico and General Reinsurance, its BNSF Railway company and other investments. In a round of television interviews on Monday, Buffett said that the stock mar- ket still appears reasonably priced even though major indexes are at all-time highs. By contrast, bonds are “a terrible investment right now,” he said. Buffett explained that with interest rates at his- toric lows, a buyer of long-term bonds is bound to take a loss when rates eventual- ly rise.

Senate passes bill letting states tax online sales

By Stephen Ohlemacher

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Senate sided with traditional retailers and financially strapped state and local governments Monday by passing a bill that would widely subject online shopping — for many a largely tax- free frontier — to state sales taxes. The Senate passed the bill by a vote of 69 to 27, getting support from Republicans

and Democrats alike. But opposition from some conservatives who view it as a tax increase will make it a tougher sell in the House. President Barack Obama has con- veyed his support for the measure. Under current law, states can only require retailers to collect sales taxes if the store has a physical presence in the state. That means big retailers with stores all over the country like Wal-Mart, Best Buy and Target collect sales taxes when they sell

goods over the Internet. But online retailers like eBay and Amazon don’t have to collect sales taxes, except in states where they have offices or distribution centers. As a result, many online sales are tax- free, giving Internet retailers an advantage over brick-and-mortar stores. “We ought to have a structure in place in the states that treats all retail the same,” said Matthew Shay, president and CEO of the National Retail Federation. “Small

retailers are collecting (sales tax) on the first dollar of any sale they make, and it’s only fair that other retailers who are selling to those same customers the same product have those same obligations.” The bill would empower states to require businesses to collect taxes for products they sell on the Internet, in catalogs and through radio and TV ads. Under the legisla- tion, the sales taxes would be sent to the state where the shopper lives.

Disney teams with Electronic Arts Inc. on ’Star Wars’ video games

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Disney is not giving up on “Star Wars” video games after all. A month after shutting down game pro- duction at Lucasfilm subsidiary LucasArts,

The Walt Disney Co. said Monday that it had entered multi-year deal with Electronic Arts Inc. to develop new “Star Wars” video games. According to a statement, EAwill develop games for a “core gaming audience” while

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Disney will retain the right to develop titles for mobile devices, social platforms and online. Terms were not disclosed. Disney is aiming to make its money-los- ing interactive unit profitable this year and

shifting some game development costs elsewhere should help. Disney bought Lucasfilm for $4.06 bil- lion in December. The company said last month that it will release a new “Star Wars” movie every year starting in 2015.

in December. The company said last month that it will release a new “Star Wars” movie
in December. The company said last month that it will release a new “Star Wars” movie
NHL PLAYOFFS: SHARKS CAN CLOSE SERIES OUT WITH WIN AT ‘THE TANK’ >>> PAGE 12
NHL PLAYOFFS: SHARKS CAN CLOSE SERIES OUT WITH WIN AT ‘THE TANK’ >>> PAGE 12
Tuesday, May 7, 2013
<< Giants cool off versus Phillies, page 12
• A’s pitcher shelled by Indians, page 15

M-A Bears freshman sets four new records at PALs

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

If it’s true that you only get one chance to make a first impression then it’s safe to say that Menlo-Atherton’s Brooke Stenstrom has the entire Peninsula Athletic League shaking right about now. It’s not that the PAL hadn’t seen the fresh- man swimmer before Saturday’s Bay

Division championship meet — she’s already been tearing things up with a fine dual meet season that saw the Bears go unde- feated at 6-0. It’s just that on Saturday the freshman had her very own coming out party with the entire league watching.

And the party was of the record-breaking variety. Not once. But four, yes four, times.

The 200-yard girls’ medley relay. New PAL meet record.

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

The 50-yard freestyle. New PAL meet and M-A record. The 100-yard freestyle. New PAL meet and M-A record. The 400-yard freestyle relay. New M-A record. “It was a long meet on Saturday,” said M- A coach Jane Worden. “She was busy the

entire day. It was a very exciting meet for everybody but especially for Brooke.” The Stenstrom family is no stranger to swimming at a high level. Brooke’s mother Lori, a former Stanford Cardinal swimmer, is now the head coach of the Bears team that

See AOTW, Page 14

Missed opportunity

Golden State lets a big 4th quarter lead slip away,falls in 2OT

By Raul Dominguez

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN ANTONIO — Manu Ginobili’s 3- pointer from the wing with 1.2 seconds left in double overtime lifted the San Antonio Spurs to a thrilling 129-127 victory over the Golden State Warriors and Stephen Curry’s 44 points in Game 1 of their Western Conference semifinals Monday night. The Spurs trailed by 16 points with 4 min- utes left in regulation before going on an 18-2 run to close the fourth quarter and force overtime. They trailed 127-126 with 3.9 seconds left in the second overtime before Ginobili hit his 3-pointer off a cross-court inbounds pass from Kawhi Leonard. “It’s only the second one I made all day,” Ginobili said. “Good timing though.” Golden State had one final chance but Jarrett Jack’s 3-pointer from the top of the key was off. After trailing by so many points late Ginobili wasn’t sure how his team rallied for the improbable victory. “I have no clue. I really got to watch it to see what happened,” he said. “They started missing shots. Steph was unbelievable in the third quarter.” Tony Parker scored 28 points to lead San Antonio while Danny Green added 22 points, Leonard had 18 and Ginobili 16. Tim Duncan finished with 19 points and 11 rebounds in 35 minutes. Duncan, who is battling a stomach bug, left the game with 3 minutes left in regulation and only played the final seconds of each overtime. Curry had 11 assists and was 18 for 35 from the field and 6 for 14 on 3-pointers for Golden State, which has lost 30 straight in San Antonio dating back to Feb. 14, 1997.

See NBA, Page 15

Antonio dating back to Feb. 14, 1997. See NBA , Page 15 REUTERS Warriors’guard Klay Thompson

REUTERS

Warriors’guard Klay Thompson goes up for a shot in Golden State’s Game 1 loss to the Spurs.

Menlo’s Bosco wins Player of the Year

Oaks manager Stefan McGovern named West Manager of the Year

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

From the state that brought you the world championship of duck calling, Johnny Cash and Bill Clinton, comes an export that paid off locally on the baseball diamond. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics West Group end of the year honors were announced last week- end with Menlo College’s Jimmy Bosco earning top billing as Player of the Year by a vote of the group’s head coaches. Bosco, a junior outfielder, batted .426,

the second best mark in the conference after transferring from the University of

Arkansas and enrolling at Menlo during the spring semester. Bosco’s home runs (15), slugging percent- age (.805), and runs bat- ted in (56) were all tops in the group. He tied for first in runs scored with 51. His 2013 campaign

also included a slew of top rankings on the national stage includ-

a slew of top rankings on the national stage includ- Jimmy Bosco ing first overall in

Jimmy Bosco

ing first overall in total bases (153), total bases per game (2.942), the aforementioned slugging percentage (.805) and fielding per- centage (1.000). “I knew he was a talented player,” said Menlo manager Stefan McGovern. “There was no question there. He never took a series off and never struggled for more than a couple of games. I’ve never seen a player be given almost like, the Bonds treatment — where they were set on not letting one player beat them.”

See MENLO, Page 14

PAL races heating up

C ould Peninsula baseball fans have

asked for better races than this sea-

son? Heading into the final week

of the regular season, not only are the Peninsula Athletic League’s Bay and Ocean divisions still up for grabs, only two of the six Central Coast Section playoff spots appear to be locked up — but even that could change. Here’s what I know:

the PAL gets six auto- matic berths into the CCS tournament — the top four from the Bay

and the top two from the Ocean. Sequoia’s sweep of Mills pulled the Cherokees into a first- place tie with the Vikings and barring a mammoth upset, the two will take the two CCS berths from the Ocean. Assuming both teams win this week — against Westmoor and Jefferson, which are a combined 2-22 in league play — Sequoia will be the divi- sion’s top seed based on the head-to-head tiebreaker with Mills, which will go as the No. 2 team.

tiebreaker with Mills, which will go as the No. 2 team. See LOUNGE , Page 13

See LOUNGE, Page 13

Real tight races defined Ocean championships

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The San Mateo girls’ swim team has put a bow on a very special 2013 season. After going 8-0 during the dual meet sea- son, the Bearcats capped off their Peninsula Athletic League year with a win at the Ocean Division championships over the weekend. In what turned out to be an exciting race to the finish, San Mateo held off El Camino High School by seven points to win the meet (226-219) — and they accomplished the championship with only two gold medal finishes. With the teams knotted very close in the standings come event 45, the 400-yard freestyle relay, it was San Mateo’s third- place finish and El Camino’s ninth that made the difference. San Mateo’s two golds were special though as they involved sophomore sensa- tion Julia Hansen, who, according to San Mateo head coach Rich Farley, showed great spirit and leadership for a well-balanced Bearcats squad. Hansen won the 100-yard butterfly (1:01.14) and the 100-yard breast-

See OCEAN Page 13

12 Tuesday May 7, 2013

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sharks look to close out Canucks with 4-0 sweep

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JOSE — San Jose Sharks

coach

Todd

McLellan sees

no

need

to

remind

his

team

of

the

precariousness

of a 3-0 series

lead

in

the

Stanley

Cup

playoffs.

The

Sharks

in the Stanley Cup playoffs. The Sharks Todd McLellan nearly squan- dered that advantage the last

Todd McLellan

nearly squan- dered that advantage the last time they held it, needing the full seven games to eliminate Detroit in the second round two years ago. With many of the same core players still around, McLellan is content to let past experience serve as the teaching tool heading into Game 4 of the series on Tuesday night at the Shark Tank. “We just left it alone,” McLellan said. “Our group is mature enough. They should know what’s coming, what to expect and how to respond.” Given the comments coming out of the dressing room on Monday, it’s clear McLellan is correct. Players echoed the mantra that the fourth win in a series is always the hardest and insisted nothing had been won yet despite a decisive 5- 2 win in Game 3 that followed two narrow victories in Vancouver. “I was here when we went through that and we let a team back into a series,” center Logan

Couture said. “Obviously it went seven games. We were fortunate to win it. We let them back in. That’s something we don’t want to do. We want to put them away in Game

4.”

There’s one big difference from that series two years ago when the Sharks eked out three straight one- goal wins to build their cushion over the Red Wings. Their edge over the Canucks so far has been more convincing, especially in the 5-2 thrashing on Sunday. The power play clicked to tie a franchise record with three goals, the defense kept pressure off goal- tender Antti Niemi and the Sharks showed discipline to stay out of the penalty box even when the game got testy. The Canucks feel there is anoth- er factor: embellishment. Defenseman Kevin Bieksa sin- gled out Couture and Sharks cap- tain Joe Thornton for exaggerat- ing contact to draw penalties. Bieksa said Couture flails every time he is touched and blamed Thornton for taking off his glove and shaking his wrist to draw a slashing penalty on Dan Hamhuis that led to a 5-on-3 goal that opened the scoring Sunday. “Those are two Canadian guys that are supposed to be playing the game with integrity,” Bieksa said. “Maybe our team has to do more of that. Maybe we have to sell calls.” The Canucks have earned quite a reputation for embellishment themselves over the years with

Ryan Kesler and Alex Burrows considered two of the main viola- tors. In fact, Kesler crumbled to the ice grabbing his throat after tak- ing a high stick from Patrick Marleau on the helmet strap Sunday. Kesler quickly recovered and stayed in the game for the ensuing power play. The Sharks had eight power plays in Game 3, while Vancouver got only two chances with the man advantage. “That’s always something we talk about especially when they have a potent power play like they have,” Marleau said. “At playoff time you have to try to stay disciplined and not let your emotions get the better of you sometimes after the whistle with pushing and shoving.” The talk of diving may have been a tactic to divert the conversation from Vancouver’s brutal recent playoff past. After beating the Sharks in the Western Conference finals and tak- ing a 3-2 lead in the Stanley Cup finals over Boston two years ago, the Canucks have been downright abysmal in the postseason. Vancouver has lost nine of its past 10 playoff games, having also fallen behind 3-0 in the opening round a year ago to Los Angeles before being eliminated in five games. The Canucks have 15 goals in that span as a normally potent offense led by the Sedin twins has disappeared of late in the postsea- son.

Phillies cool off the S.F. Giants

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Cliff Lee shut down the Giants once again with eight strong innings, Michael Young hit a two-run dou- ble among his three hits, and the Philadelphia Phillies stopped San Francisco’s season-best six-game winning streak with a 6-2 victory Monday night. Domonic Brown hit a solo home run and Delmon Young and Jimmy Rollins each added sacrifice flies as the Phillies began a seven-game trip. Lee (3-2) outpitched fellow southpaw Madison Bumgarner and kept intact his perfect career regu- lar-season record against the Giants. Hunter Pence hit a solo homer, double and single against his for- mer club. His sixth homer of the season, in the second inning, snapped a 21-inning scoreless stretch by Lee against San Francisco. Lee is 5-0 with a 0.88 ERA in six regular-season starts against the Giants, including 4-0 with a 0.84 ERA in five of those outings at AT&T Park. He struck out six and didn’t walk a batter for the first time this sea- son in a 102-pitch performance. Lee also singled in the fourth for his third hit of 2013. The two runs and three of the five

hits Lee allowed were to former Phillies teammate Pence, acquired by the Giants at last summer’s trade deadline. Pence singled leading off the fifth and doubled to start the eighth. He scored when shortstop Rollins threw wildly past first for an error after fielding Francisco Peguero’s infield single. Jonathan Papelbon pitched a 1- 2-3 ninth for his sixth save in as many chances, and his 11th straight scoreless appearance. The Giants couldn’t keep their winning streak going on a night Hall of Famer Willie Mays was treated to the singing of “Happy Birthday” in the middle of the fourth. The “Say Hey Kid” tipped his cap from the suite level as the sellout crowd of 41,171 gave him a warm standing ovation on his 82nd birthday. Bumgarner (3-1) struck out seven but saw his winless stretch reach four starts since he won his initial three outings of the year. Bumgarner escaped a bases- loaded jam in the first when he fielded Brown’s comebacker for the final out. Bumgarner walked Chase Utley, loading the bases again with two outs in the second, then Michael Young lined a two- run double to right. Bumgarner received a mound visit from pitching coach Dave Righetti and threw a wild pitch past Ryan Howard.

to right. Bumgarner received a mound visit from pitching coach Dave Righetti and threw a wild
to right. Bumgarner received a mound visit from pitching coach Dave Righetti and threw a wild
to right. Bumgarner received a mound visit from pitching coach Dave Righetti and threw a wild

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Tuesday May 7, 2013

13

LOUNGE

Continued from page 11

In the Bay Division, every team is still mathematically in the running for one of the top four places in the standings — and the CCS spot that comes with a finish in top four. And the schedule maker gave us some juicy matchups to close out the regu- lar season.

Here’s what I know: Carlmont and Terra Nova will play twice to determine a Bay Division champion. But it’s not as cut and dry as that. Burlingame, a game behind both the Scots and Tigers, could make it a co-championship if the Panthers sweep Capuchino while Carlmont and Terra Nova split.

If Carlmont or Terra Nova sweep this

week, the loser would be looking at an 8-6 record, which should be good enough for third place. But Half Moon Bay, Hillsdale and Menlo-Atherton could all get to 8-6 this week as well if they can win two their final two games of the regular season. Half Moon Bay and Hillsdale hook up this week, while M-A takes on Aragon, which, along with Capuchino, could sneak into that fourth playoff spot with seven losses. But they need to sweep this week and get a lot of help elsewhere.

In other words, buckle up and keep a close on eye this week’s Bay Division results.

***

And what can you say about Serra? A week ago, the Padres appeared destined for a second-place finish in the West Catholic Athletic League.

A week later, the Padres are the top seed

in the WCAL playoffs and almost assuredly

one of the top two seeds in the CCS play- offs which begin next week. It took a perfect storm for the Padres to catch St. Francis, which started last week with a two-game lead over Serra. But the Lancers, who are ranked in the top 10 in the nation by both the MaxPreps.com polls, suffered its only two-game losing streak of the years — dropping games to Bellarmine and Valley Christian. Serra, meanwhile, won its games over Riordan and Sacred Heart Cathedral, giving the Padres and Lancers a share of the WCAL regular-season title. But due to tiebreakers, Serra gets the No. 1 seed in the tournament. The first tiebreaker was head to head with St. Francis. The teams split the season series. The second tiebreaker was how both teams fared against third-place Bellarmine. St. Francis split with the Bells while Serra recorded the two-game sweep. Advantage Serra.

*** The PAL softball berths appear to be much more clear-cut. Carlmont, Half Moon Bay and Hillsdale all appear to have the top three spots locked up, while Woodside will claim the Ocean Division CCS berth for the PAL’s four automatic postseason berths. The one remaining question is if the Bay Division’s fourth-place team will receive an at-large bid. Sequoia, which currently occupies fourth place, controls its own destiny, but it won’t be easy. The Cherokees finish up the regular season this week with home games against Aragon and Half Moon Bay. Both squads beat Sequoia during their first meeting this year. If Sequoia loses both, it opens up the possibility of Burlingame sneaking into that fourth-place finish and enhance their chances at making CCS.

OCEAN

Continued from page 11

stroke with a new PAL Ocean Division record of 1:09.99. On the boys’ team side, the race turned out to be even tighter. Half Moon Bay defeated Hillsdale 246.5 to 244. In a championship day when every point counted, Mike Tyler, Malcolm Feix, Brendan Garrison and Peter Lundgard’s fourth place finish in the 400- yard freestyle relay — the meet’s final event — was huge considering Hillsdale took gold in that with a 3:35.84. Seven seconds separated the Cougars from fifth and that might have cost them the title. El Camino girls took the day’s initial event, the 200-yard medley relay with a 2:00.83 — less than a second ahead of San Mateo in a sign of things to come. That same team took gold in the 200-yard freestyle relay. There, they bested Half Moon Bay by four seconds. On the boys’ side, Hillsdale’s Erik Garcia, Vincente Chisholm, Javier Rosas and Daniel Amaya won the 200 medley relay. In the girls’ 200-yard freestyle, Sara Stretch took gold with a 2:07.92. Stretch is a Half Moon Bay Cougar. JJ Halet of San Mateo High School won the boys’ 200-yard freestyle and qualified for the Central Coast Section meet in the process. He did the same a couple of events later in the 100-yard freestyle swim with a 49.33. Halet owns the PAL Ocean meet record in that event. Morgan Smith of El Camino won the girls’ 200-yard individual medley with a 2:28.07. Hillsdale’s Garcia took gold on the boys’ side of the event with a 2:01.79. That mark is good for a berth in CCS.

In the 50-yard freestyle, Emma Adams of Woodside (25.00) and Eoin Bloomer of Half Moon Bay (23.33) laid claim to “Fastest in the Ocean” with wins.

Adams followed up her win in the 50 with

a victory in the 100 as well. Her time of

56.26 was just good enough to send her to CCS.

Christopher Lee of Westmoor took gold

in the boys’ 100-yard butterfly with a 54.21

and gold once again in the 100-yard breast-

stroke. Four different Ocean swimmers qual- ified for CCS in that event.

In the longest individual swim of the day, the 500-yard freestyle, a Knights freshman stole the show on the girls’ side. Michelle Karpishin won the swim with a 5:20.73 — 37 seconds ahead of her nearest competitor.

Just as impressive was the performance of Hillsdale’s Rosas, who, after a couple of second place finishes earlier in the meet, annihilated the Ocean Division in the 500- freestyle. His 4:55.63 was tops by those 37 seconds as well.

Bloomer led the charge for the Cougars in the 200-yard freestyle relay. His initial leg propelled Avery Calhoun, Jack Dobbrow and Matthew Tolar to victory. The quartet will race once again at CCS.

Karpishin followed her win in the 500 with a victory in the 100-yard backstroke (1:02.03). Garcia won the event on the boys’ side. Both will swim at CCS.

South San Francisco boys took third place on Saturday. Half Moon Bay did the same on the girls’ side.

Saturday. Half Moon Bay did the same on the girls’ side.   R EVERSE MORTGAGE CALL
Saturday. Half Moon Bay did the same on the girls’ side.   R EVERSE MORTGAGE CALL
Saturday. Half Moon Bay did the same on the girls’ side.   R EVERSE MORTGAGE CALL
Saturday. Half Moon Bay did the same on the girls’ side.   R EVERSE MORTGAGE CALL
 

R EVERSE

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14 Tuesday May 7, 2013

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

MENLO

Continued from page 11

Bosco batted .533 while leading the Oaks to a runner-up finish in the NAIA West Group Tournament — losing to tourney host Concordia University. His eight tournament hits included a double while knocking in four runs. He also hit the tournament’s only home run. Bosco will also receive a Gold Glove award for his defense in the Oaks’ outfield as he was not charged with a single error in 102 chances on the season. “His defense is one of those areas where he proved everyone wrong,” McGovern said, adding that Bosco didn’t play any outfield during his time at Arkansas. Bosco wasn’t the only Oak hon- ored. McGovern, in his second season as the Menlo front man, was named the group’s Manager of the Year. McGovern led Menlo to a 19-9 conference record and a 30-win

regular season and was selected by the seven other managers in the conference. “It’s humbling,” McGovern said. “It’s definitely an honor. You

set goals for yourself at the begin- ning of the year for the season overall, in

terms of wins and whatnot and. If you accomplish those, every- thing else pret- ty much takes care of itself. But it’s definite- ly an honor when the other coaches honor

you with that.” In just his second season at the helm of the Oaks, McGovern has amassed 64 wins, claimed a group tournament championship and a second-place finish. “I’d be lying if I didn’t say I wouldn’t trade it all for a regional bid. Unfortunately, we fell one win short of that.”

bid. Unfortunately, we fell one win short of that.” Stefan McGovern The 2013 All-NAIA West Group

Stefan

McGovern

The 2013 All-NAIA West Group Team was also announced with five Oaks earning a spot. With five members on the team, Menlo tied the University of British Columbia as the most decorated team in the group. Bosco, Daniel Comstock, Derek Martinez, James Jensen and Corey Metoyer all secured a place on the list. Comstock turned heads behind the plate for the Oaks in his fresh- man campaign. Only a freshman, Comstock hit .317 with four home runs, 11 doubles and 29 RBIs. Metoyer was the Oaks’ primary designated hitter in 2013. He con- cluded his career with Menlo by batting .301 with three home runs, 13 doubles, 46 RBIs and a .428 slugging percentage. The Menlo pitching staff was the best in the conference with a 2.88 earned run average and 352 strikeouts. Martinez paved the way for the Menlo starting rotation with the best ERA of all starters (2.03) and

a conference-best 83 strikeouts. Martinez tossed two complete

game shutouts and held opponents to a .237 batting average while collecting five wins in his senior season. He finished his Menlo career as the program’s career leader in innings pitched, wins and strikeouts.

Jensen compiled six wins including three complete-game shutouts, and a 2.34 ERA. His sea- son was highlighted by his com- plete-game one-hitter on March 30 against Oregon Tech when he did not face a batter over the mini- mum and struck out nine. “You really can’t say enough about our pitching,” McGovern said. “The starting staff as well as our bullpen was outstanding all year.” The Oaks also picked up a pair of Gold Gloves. Along with Bosco, Kyer Vega, Menlo first baseman, took home some defensive hardware. Vega committed just two errors in 380 chances and recorded 341 putouts and 37 assists.

Menlo fielded .970 as a team in

2013.

Sports brief

Utah prosecutor weighs charges in soccer ref death

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah prosecutor said Monday he plans to decide soon what charges to file against a teenager accused of punching a soccer referee who later died after slipping into a weeklong coma. Authorities say the 17-year-old struck Ricardo Portillo in the head last month during a recreational league match after the referee called a penalty against him. Hours later, the 46-year-old went into a coma. He never regained consciousness and died Saturday. An autopsy was performed the next day, authorities said, but the results have not been made public. Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said he and other officials are reviewing evidence and state statutes to determine the appropriate charges, which he expects to announce by midweek.

AOTW

Continued from page 11

won the PAL girls’ regular season and meet titles. And actually, the two former M- A records were held by Mary Edwards — Lori Stenstrom’s for- mer college roommate. Brooke was also the flower girl at Edwards’ wedding when she was 4 years old. Yes, it’s a small world. But no doubt, Lori Stenstrom is already making a big splash in it. For her efforts, Lori Stenstrom is the Daily Journal Athlete of the Week.

“We had full confidence in her ability and how she’s been swim- ming at each meet during the sea- son,” Worden said of the coaching staff’s attitude heading into the PAL’s biggest meet. “She’s swam really well and she’s had a great winter so far. So we were fully con- fident in her ability.” Stenstrom rewarded the confi- dence right out of the chute by swimming the anchor leg of M-A’s 200-yard medley relay win. Twelve races later, Stenstrom was back in the pool and posted a 23.54 in the 50-free — almost two seconds ahead of Kristen Denney of Carlmont for her second record of the day. “She was just very happy,”

Worden said. “And we were all super happy and proud of her. We

celebrated. But then she got down

to the next race and knew she was-

n’t done. And she’s still not done. She’s got CCS this weekend and it’s going to be a big challenge. There’s some super fast kids there. So, I think it’s great. We cele- brate. But then we focus on what’s coming up.”

Stenstrom proved she has that kind of focus by getting right back into the pool and chasing down the 2004 record of Katherine Wong in the 100-yard freestyle. She was almost three seconds bet- ter than everyone else in that race which set her third record of the day.

“I swam,” Worden said of Stenstrom’s 100, “and the time that she swam, I’m familiar with

how fast she went. And, it was pretty dang impressive. She’s get- ting there. She’s getting up there in the world of the really elite swimmers.” Stenstrom capped off the magi- cal day by swimming the anchor on the 400-yard freestyle that clinched the team title for the Bears. Stenstrom, along with Maddie Pont, Nicole Zanolli and Kindle Van Linge, set a new Menlo-Atherton record in the process. “You know, I don’t think it does,” Worden said when asked if Stenstrom exceeded expectations

with her championship meet. “I think we had the full belief that Brooke was capable of it from the beginning of the season essen- tially. No, I think it was an awe- some performance but we thought she had it in her all season long.

“She’s been great. She’s a very calm, very well-liked girl on the team. It’s been easy. Everyone respects her and she respects everyone else so you wouldn’t be able to pick her out of the crowd as the superstar because she doesn’t act like it. She just fits with every- one else and we all care about each other. Brooke is no different.”

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Tuesday May 7, 2013

15

NBA

Continued from page 11

Klay Thompson and Harrison Barnes each added 19 points, Jarrett Jack had 15 and Andrew Bogut had 10 points and 15 rebounds. Golden State trailed by five with 1 minute left in the second over- time before the Warriors scored six straight points to take a one-point lead on Kent Bazemore’s reverse layup that gave the Warriors a 127-126 advantage with 3.9 sec- onds left. The Warriors missed eight of their final nine shots in regula- tion, including a desperation heave by Curry at the buzzer against several defenders. The Spurs slowed Curry early in the fourth quarter by putting the 6- foot-7 Leonard on in the fourth quarter. Curry scored only six points in the fourth quarter, help- ing fuel San Antonio’s rally behind Parker and Leonard. Curry had 22 points in the third quarter, including 14 straight late in the period. Curry’s run gave Golden State a 90-72 lead with 37.5 seconds left in the third. He found his groove after a slug- gish first half.

After averaging only 3.3 turnovers in Golden State’s first- round upset of Denver, Curry had four in the first quarter alone while struggling to find his shot. Curry missed his first two attempts while committing two turnovers and picking up a person- al foul before hitting a 19-foot jumper with 6:31 left in the first. He finished 2 for 6 in the first quar- ter, scoring four points in 12 min- utes while primarily being defend- ed by Green. Curry’s first 3 came did not come until there was 7 minutes left in the first half.

of

offense without Curry, though. Golden State raced to a 28-25 lead in the opening period by outscoring San Antonio 12-2 in the paint. The Spurs started 1 for 9, with Green’s 3-pointer their only bas- ket in the opening 4 minutes. Parker’s jumper with 7:17 left in the first broke the drought and pulled the Spurs within 11-5.

The

Warriors

had

plenty

Parker hammered as A’s battered 7-3 by Indians

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — Jarrod Parker’s neck was already sore before the game. Then the Indians twisted it a lit- tle. Parker gave up four solo homers, two to Asdrubal Cabrera and a 460-foot shot by Mark Reynolds that nearly cleared the left-field bleachers, to help Cleveland pound the Oakland Athletics 7-3 on Monday night for its seventh win in eight games. Parker (1-5) was in trouble right away, giving up back-to-back homers in the first inning to Jason Kipnis and Cabrera. Then, in the fifth, he allowed Cabrera’s second homer and the monster shot to Reynolds, who wanted payback

after he was drilled by the right- hander in the first. Following the game, Parker said his neck has been issue. “It’s something that’s been bothering me for a little bit,” he said. “Obviously, those are pitch- es up in the zone. They’re semi- uncharacteristic. I don’t think, if I’m feeling 100 percent, they would be in that location.” Parker has now given up eight homers in 34 1-3 innings. Last season, he allowed just 11 in 181 1-3 innings. “It’s not like him,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said. “He’s a guy you don’t expect to get hit. Sometimes he’s a little bit wild, but I would say the amount of home runs he’s given up is not him. He’s had a couple of good starts. He’s had

some bad starts. He hasn’t got to where he’s consistent yet. A lot of that can be confidence, too.” Cleveland’s four homers off Parker backed Ubaldo Jimenez (2- 2), who had his second straight solid outing. Jimenez struck out a season-high eight in 5 2-3 innings. Jason Giambi hit a clutch, two- run single and Ryan Raburn dou- bled home a run in the seventh for the Indians, who had their six- game winning streak stopped Sunday. Yoenis Cespedes homered and hit a sacrifice fly for the A’s, who had won eight in a row over the Indians but fell behind early and dropped to 6-11 after a 12-4 start.

neck

improves, but realizes he may

Parker’s

hoping

his

need to take some time off. “We’ll see how it feels and go from there,” he said. “If need be, it’s early, and it’s something we don’t want to continue and snow- ball and build into something worse. It’s not something I want to keep dealing with.” Jimenez pitched seven shutout innings in his previous start last week at Kansas City. It was the type of performance the Indians have been waiting to see from the right-hander, who has been a major disappointment since com- ing over in a 2011 trade from Colorado. Jimenez slowed down the A’s , who came in leading the majors in runs, doubles and extra-base hits. Jimenez allowed two runs and four hits.

WHATS ON TAP

TTUUEESSDDAAYY SSOOFFTTBBAALLLL ICA at Crystal Springs, Mercy-Burlingame at King’s Academy, Alma Heights at Menlo School, Notre Dame-Belmont at Valley Christian, 3:30 p.m.; Burlingame at Terra Nova, Hillsdale at Capuchino, Carlmont at Half Moon Bay, Aragon at Sequoia, South City at Menlo-Atherton, 4 p.m.

BBAASSEEBBAALLLL Menlo School at Pinewood, Sacred Heart Cathedral at Serra,Westmoor at Mills,Woodside at El Camino, South City at San Mateo, Sequoia at Jefferson, 4 p.m.

BBAADDMMIINNTTOONN Crystal Springs at Hillsdale, Burlingame at Terra Nova,Woodside at San Mateo, Capuchino at Jefferson, Menlo-Atherton at Mills,Westmoor at Aragon, Carlmont at South City, El Camino at Sequoia, 4 p.m.

BBOOYYSSGGOOLLFF CCS regional at Rancho Canada, all day

WWEEDDNNEESSDDAAYY BBAASSEEBBAALLLL Sacred Heart Prep at Harker, King’s Academy vs. Crystal Springs at Sea Cloud Park, Hillsdale at Half Moon Bay, Aragon at Menlo-Atherton,Terra Nova at Carlmont, Burlingame at Capuchino, 4 p.m.;WCAL tournament semifinals at Santa Clara University, 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.

SSOOFFTTBBAALLLL Woodside at Jefferson, El Camino at San Mateo, 4 p.m.

BBOOYYSSGGOOLLFF CCS regional at Rancho Canada, all day

TTHHUURRSSDDAAYY

SSOOFFTTBBAALLLL

Capuchino at Carlmont,Terra Nova at Hillsdale,

Aragon at Burlingame, Half Moon Sequoia, 4 p.m.

Bay at

BBAASSEEBBAALLLL Mills at Westmoor,Woodside at El Camino, South City at San Mateo, Sequoia at Jefferson, 4 p.m.; WCAL tournament championship at Santa Clara

NATIONAL LEAGUE

EEaasstt DDiivviissiioonn

W

19

17

15

12

10

L

Pct

GB

12

.613

15

.531

2 1/2

18

.455

5

16

.429

5 1/2

23

.303

10

L

Pct

GB

11

.645

14

.548

3

15

.545

3

16

.467

5 1/2

20

.375

8 1/2

L

Pct

GB

13

.594

13

.581

1/2

15

.516

2 1/2

18

.438

5

17

.433

5

Atlanta

Washington

Philadelphia

New York

Miami

CCeennttrraall DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

St.Louis

20

Pittsburgh

17

Cincinnati

18

Milwaukee

14

Chicago

12

WWeesstt DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

San Francisco

19

Colorado

18

Arizona

16

San Diego

14

Los Angeles 13

——— MMoonnddaayyss GGaammeess Atlanta 7, Cincinnati 4 Chicago Cubs 9,Texas 2 San Diego 5, Miami 0 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, Late Philadelphia 6, San Francisco 2 TTuueessddaayyss GGaammeess Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-1), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Medlen 1-4) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-3), 4:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 5-0) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 2-2), 5:05 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 5:10 p.m. N.Y.Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 5:40 p.m. Arizona (McCarthy 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-4), 7:10 p.m. Miami (Sanabia 2-4) at San Diego (Stults 2-2), 7:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

EEaasstt DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Boston

21

11

.656

New York

18

12

.600

2

Baltimore

19

13

.594

2

Tampa Bay

14

17

.452

6 1/2

Toronto

12

21

.364

9 1/2

CCeennttrraall DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Detroit

19

11

.633

Kansas City

17

11

.607

1

Cleveland

15

14

.517

3 1/2

Minnesota

13

15

.464

5

Chicago

13

17

.433

6

WWeesstt DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Texas

20

12

.625

Oakland

18

15

.545

2 1/2

Seattle

15

18

.455

5 1/2

Los Angeles

11

20

.355

8 1/2

Houston

8

24

.250

12

MMoonnddaayyss GGaammeess Chicago White Sox 2,Kansas City 1,11 innings Cleveland 7,Oakland 3 Boston 6,Minnesota 5,11 innings Toronto 8,Tampa Bay 7 Chicago Cubs 9,Texas 2 TTuueessddaayyss GGaammeess Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmer- mann 5-1),4:05 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 3-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 2-3),4:05 p.m. Oakland (Milone 3-3) at Cleveland (McAllister 2-3), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2- 2),4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0),4:10 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 2-2) at Boston (Dempster 2- 2),4:10 p.m. Toronto (Happ 2-2) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 1- 4),4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 3-0) at Houston (Lyles 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 5:10 p.m. N.Y.Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3),5:40 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

BBAASSEEBBAALLLL

AAmmeerriiccaann LLeeaagguuee

BBAALLTTIIMMOORREE OORRIIOOLLEESS Assigned RHP Zach Clark to Bowie (EL). BBOOSSTTOONN RREEDD SSOOXX Placed RHP Andrew Bailey on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 29. Placed LHP Craig Breslow from the 15-day DL. CCHHIICCAAGGOO WWHHIITTEE SSOOXX—Sent OF Dayan Viciedo

on a rehab assignment to Charlotte (IL). CCLLEEVVEELLAANNDD IINNDDIIAANNSS Sent OF Michael Bourn to Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment. Placed RHP Vinnie Pestano on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 1. Recalled LHP Nick Hagadone from Columbus (IL). DDEETTRROOIITT TTIIGGEERRSS—Sent LHP Phil Coke on a rehab assignment to Toledo (IL).

HHOOUUSSTTOONN AASSTTRROOSS Designated OFs Rick Ankiel and Fernando Martinez for assignment. Reinstated OF J.D. Martinez from the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of OF Trevor Crowe from Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled INF/OF Jimmy Paredes from Oklahoma City. Optioned INF Brandon Laird to Oklahoma City. LLOOSS AANNGGEELLEESS AANNGGEELLSS—Optioned RHP Ryan Brasier to Salt Lake City (PCL). Reinstated RHP Mark Lowe from the 15-Day D.L. NNEEWW YYOORRKK YYAANNKKEEEESS Assigned RHP Cody Eppley outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). NNaattiioonnaall LLeeaagguuee AATTLLAANNTTAA BBRRAAVVEESS Reinstated C Brian McCann from the 15-day DL. Optioned SS Tyler Pastornicky to Gwinnett (IL). CCHHIICCAAGGOO CCUUBBSS Designated RHP Kameron Loe for assignment. Optioned OF Dave Sappelt to Iowa (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Ryan Sweeney from Iowa. Recalled RHP Rafael Dolis from Iowa. LLOOSS AANNGGEELLEESS DDOODDGGEERRSS—Placed INF Mark Ellis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 27. Reinstated LHP Chris Capuano from the 15-day

DL.

PPHHIILLAADDEELLPPHHIIAA PPHHIILLLLIIEESS Agreed to terms with LHP Greg Smith on a minor league con- tract. Placed RHP Roy Halladay on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Joe Savery from Lehigh Valley (IL).

SSTT LLOOUUIISS CCAARRDDIINNAALLSS Optioned OF Jermaine Curtis to Memphis (PCL). SSAANN DDIIEEGGOO PPAADDRREESS Placed LHP Clayton Richard on the 15-day DL. Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the 15-day DL.

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16 Tuesday May 7, 2013

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

PROJECTS

Continued from page 1

council approved an additional $2.5 mil- lion expenditure this year to be put toward repairing failed streets and another $2 mil- lion a year for the next five years for street improvements, Bronson said. The funds will go toward fixing streets in need of “immediate corrective repair,” Bronson said. While some work is taking place at Central Park now for immediate improve- ments, the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission and staff will take a look at amending the park’s master plan when the new fiscal year begins July 1, said Sheila Canzian, the department’s director. The master plan is like a blueprint for the park, she said, which could be modified to the extent that some of the its features will be moved.

Amending the master plan, however, does not mean the changes will come quick, she said. “It depends on when the money becomes available,” she said. The work on Delaware Street is being done well ahead of the construction of sev- eral high-density projects near the Hayward Park Caltrain station. The project involves narrowing Delaware Street from four lanes to three from Charles Lane to Garvey Way and from four lanes to two lanes from Garvey Way to 16th Avenue to accommodate a Class II bicycle lane extending from Charles Lane to Sunnybrae Boulevard, Bronson said. It is a $1.2 million project paid for by the developer of Station Park Green, the mas- sive mixed-use development slated to replace the Kmart, with a $600,000 match- ing grant from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. The project is intended to make the area more pedestrian and bicycle friendly and should be complete by July.

The downtown fence project is meant to minimize access to San Mateo Creek at four spots including the Transit Center, Railroad Avenue, Claremont Street and Delaware Street, Bronson said. The project is intended to protect the creek from trespassers, litter and debris and improve public safety in the adjacent areas, Bronson said. The Daily Journal went down into the creek yesterday afternoon and found two gentleman doing drugs under the bridge where the creek is accessed at the Transit Center. The Daily Journal also found massive piles of garbage and plenty of graffiti under the bridge adjacent to the creek. It is an estimated $120,000 project and is funded through a public/private partnership using both city funds and easement funds as part of the adjacent Mi Rancho development project at the Blue and White Cleaners on B Street. This project also involves the police department.

The city is also working with private property owners next to city property to see if they too would like to install fencing, Bronson said. The contract is expected to be awarded in June with construction beginning this sum- mer and completed in the fall, he said. The city is also ready to award a contract for graffiti abatement that officials hope will address the problem quicker than city workers currently can, since they have other more pressing work to do. San Mateo also just held a downtown cleanup last month with 200 volunteers where they removed litter, did some land- scaping and even a little “yarn bombing” with new decorations on parking meters and bike racks and even a lollipop on a garage sign. New murals have also sprouted up in downtown that officials hope will deter graf- fiti.

silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com (650) 344-5200 ext. 106

PG&E

Continued from page 1

injured dozens more and consumed 38 homes in the quiet bedroom community. The National Transportation Safety Board unanimously agreed in 2011 that the acci- dent was caused by what board chairman Deborah Hersman called a “litany of fail- ures” by PG&E, as well as weak oversight by regulators. Separate from the NTSB investigation, investigators at the utilities commission blamed PG&E for the explosion, which occurred when an underground pipeline rup-

tured at the site of a decades-old faulty weld, sparking a massive fire. Commission investigators and consumer advocates filed a range of proposals for fines Monday. The City of San Bruno, which is still struggling to rebuild the neighborhood dev- astated in the blast, said earlier Monday that the utility’s shareholders should pay no less than $1.25 billion in fines, plus at least $1 billion toward pipeline inspection and upgrade costs. PG&E will file its proposal later this month, and a judge from the utilities com- mission is expected to make a final decision about how much to fine the company later this year.

PG&E has accepted liability for the disas- ter in numerous public statements but has denied most of state investigators’ allega- tions that the utility violated safety rules. “The penalties proposed by the commis- sion staff and others far exceed anything that I have seen,” PG&E Corp. CEO Tony Earley said in a statement. He added that the penalty “could dramatically set back our efforts to do the right thing by making it harder and more costly to finance the remaining improvements that are needed in our gas system.” Consumer advocates said the fine the com- mission proposed was appropriate, given the company’s myriad violations before the explosion and an outside consultant’s find-

ing that PG&E could raise $2.25 billion in equity to cover fines without damaging its financial condition. The proposal calls for the $2.25 billion to be directly invested in safety testing, replacing and upgrading hundreds of miles of PG&E’s gas transmission lines, rather than being sent to the state’s general fund. That means the company would be able to claim the penalty as a tax deduction, Hagan confirmed. “It’s absolutely the amount PG&E should pay for their all their past violations,” said Marcel Hawiger, an attorney with the non- profit Utility Reform Network. “This is a very big penalty, but it’s not quite as big as it seems when you account for the tax bene- fits PG&E would accrue.”

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

HEALTH

Tuesday May 7, 2013

17

Court: California cities can ban medical pot shops

By Lisa Leff

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — The California Supreme Court ruled Monday that cities and counties can ban medical marijuana dispen- saries, a decision likely to further diminish the network of store- front pot shops and fuel efforts to have the state regulate the indus- try. In a unanimous opinion, the court held that California’s med- ical marijuana laws — the nation’s first and most liberal — neither prevent local govern- ments from using their land-use powers to zone dispensaries out of existence nor grant authorized users convenient access to the drug. “While some counties and cities might consider themselves well- suited to accommodating medical marijuana dispensaries, condi- tions in other communities might lead to the reasonable decision that such facilities within their

borders, even if carefully sited, well managed, and closely moni- tored, would present unacceptable local risks and burdens,” Justice Marvin Baxter wrote for the seven-member court. The ruling came in a legal chal- lenge to a ban enacted by the city of Riverside in 2010, but another 200 jurisdictions have similar prohibitions on retail pot sales, the advocacy group Americans for Safe Access estimates. Many were enacted in the past five years as the number of dispensaries swelled and amid concerns that the drug had become too easy to get. A number of counties and cities were awaiting the Supreme Court ruling before moving for- ward with bans of their own. Of the 18 states that allow the medical use of marijuana, California is the only one where residents can obtain a doctor’s recommendation to consume it for any ailment the physician sees fit as opposed to for only conditions such as AIDS and glaucoma. The

state also is alone in not having a system for regulating growers and sellers. “The irony in California is that we regulate everything that con- sumers purchase and consume, and somehow this has been allowed to be a complete free-for-all,” said Jeffrey Dunn, the lawyer who rep- resented Riverside in the success- ful defense of its ban. “Cities and counties looked at this and said, ‘Wait a minute. We can’t expose the public to these kind of risks,’ and the court recognized that when it comes to public safety, we have independent authority.” Marijuana advocates had argued that allowing local governments to bar dispensaries thwarts the intent of the medical marijuana law that voter’s passed nearly 17 years ago. On Monday, they blamed the absence of state over- sight and the failure of local authorities to adopt operating guidelines that fall short of ban- ning dispensaries for the court’s decision.

short of ban- ning dispensaries for the court’s decision. REUTERS Marijuana remains illegal under federal law,

REUTERS

Marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and the U.S. attorneys have threatened to seize the property of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted or closed voluntarily.

of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted
of landlords who lease space to the shops. Hundreds of dispensary operators have since been evicted

18 Tuesday May 7, 2013

HEALTH

THE DAILY JOURNAL

1 8 Tuesday • May 7, 2013 HEALTH THE DAILY JOURNAL 650-365-1668 From providing more ways
1 8 Tuesday • May 7, 2013 HEALTH THE DAILY JOURNAL 650-365-1668 From providing more ways