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MAY 2008

“VOICE

VOL. 29

NO. 5

OF

THE

$4.00

CONSTRUCTION

INDUSTRY ®

IIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNN THTHTHTHTHTHTHTHTHIIIIIIIIISSSSSSSSS IIIIIIIIISSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSUUUUUUUUUE:E:E:E:E:E:E:E:E:

I IIISSSSSSSSSS SS SSSSSSUUUUU U UUUE:E:E:E:E: E: E:E:E: ROOFING ROOFING U U of of M M

ROOFING ROOFING

U U of of M M Intramural Intramural Sports Sports

Building Building Gets Gets a a New New Roof Roof

Evaluating Evaluating an an Innovative Innovative

Roof Roof Deck Deck Repair Repair

16 16 Years Years Later Later

Grand Carpentry

MGM Grand Debuts Elegant Woodwork and Finishes

Plus: THE TIP AND THE ICEBERG Below Grade Surprises at 41-B District Court

Group Insurance

Quality, Affordability

Group Insurance Quality, Affordability and Solid protection Large medical expenses can be financially devastating.

and Solid protection

Large medical expenses can be financially devastating. That’s why your Association sponsors the CAM Benefit Program for you and your employees.

By combining our responsive local claims service with our new medical insurance carrier, Madison National Life, you now have an opportunity to select a full array of employee benefits:

Medical PPO RX Drug Card Dental PPO Life

New Rates for 2008!

Call us today for pricing and further details

for 2008! Call us today for pricing and further details Rob Walters • CAM Administrative Services

Rob Walters CAM Administrative Services Phone: 248.233.2114 Fax: 248.827.2112 Email: rwalters@camads.com

Ad#1

The CAM Benefit Program is underwritten by

REACH YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE

REACH YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE CAM Magazine is a monthly publication covering construction news throughout the state

CAM Magazine is a monthly publication covering construction news throughout the state of Michigan, highlighting interesting construction projects, personnel news and industry happenings. In-depth feature articles focus on a variety of industry trade segments and on key management and economic issues, keeping pace with the Michigan construction scene. Since 1985, CAM Magazine has been known as the Voice of the Construction Industry. Now, in addition to being printed and mailed to over 4,500 industry professionals each month, thousands more are able to access the entire magazine online, complete with link-thrus to participating advertisers' company websites. This has dramatically increased the circulation and exposure of our award-winning magazine and our advertisers – we are now worldwide!

Call or e-mail to find out how CAM Magazine can help put your company in front of an unlimited number of construction professionals each month.

unlimited number of construction professionals each month. “The Voice of the Construction Industry” For Advertising
unlimited number of construction professionals each month. “The Voice of the Construction Industry” For Advertising

“The Voice of the Construction Industry”

For Advertising Information Call 248.969-2171 Or email at jones@cam-online.com

CAM Magazine is a publication of the Construction Association of Michigan. 43636 Woodward Ave. Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204 www.cam-online.com

“VOICE

OF

THE

CONSTRUCTION

INDUSTRY” ®

FEATURES

16

18

22

Doubles Classic a Success

CAM’s 57th Annual Men’s Bowling Tournament

a Success CAM’s 57th Annual Men’s Bowling Tournament On The Jobsite Building a Stairway to Heaven

On The Jobsite

Building a Stairway to Heaven

Economic Outlook

Retail Market Construction Trends

26

CARPENTRY

MGM Grand ASAP!

Elegant Millwork on Demand

26 CARPENTRY MGM Grand ASAP! Elegant Millwork on Demand 4 C A M M A G

4

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

ROOFING

A M M A G A Z I N E M A Y 2 0 0

38

Walking Tall

U fo M Intramural Sports Building Gets New Roof

44

Molasses Test

Evaluating an Innovative Roof Deck Repair – 16 Years Later

CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT

Roof Deck Repair – 16 Years Later CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT 50 The Tip and The Iceberg Unseen

50 The Tip and The Iceberg

Unseen Benefits at 41-B District Court

DEPARTMENTS

8

Industry News

10

Safety Tool Kit

56

Product Showcase

60

People in Construction

64

CAM Welcomes New Members

66

Buyers Guide Update

68

Construction Calendar

70

Advertisers Index

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

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6

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

6 C A M M A G A Z I N E M A Y 2

PUBLISHER

Kevin N. Koehler

EDITOR

Amanda M. Tackett

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

E. Dewey Little

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

Mary E. Kremposky David R. Miller

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR GRAPHIC DESIGN DIRECTOR OF MARKETING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Matthew J. Austermann Marci L. Christian Gregg A. Montowski Cathy A. Jones

DIRECTORS

OFFICERS

Chairman

Jeffrey W. Cohee,

Frank Rewold & Son, Inc.

Vice Chairman

Rick J. Cianek,

Fraco Products

Vice Chairman

Ted C. McGinley,

Gutherie Lumber Co.

Treasurer

Robert J. Michielutti Jr.,

Michielutti Bros., Inc.

President

Kevin N. Koehler

DIRECTORS

Stephen J. Auger,

Stephen Auger + Associates Architects

Brian J. Brunt,

Brunt Associates

James C. Capo,

DeMattia Group

Brian D. Kiley,

Edgewood Electric, Inc.

R. Andrew Martin,

F.H. Martin Constructors

John O'Neil, Sr.,

W.J. O'Neil Company

Glenn E. Parvin,

C.A.S.S.

Jacqueline LaDuke Walters,

LaDuke Roofing & Sheet Metal

2006 GRAPHIC DESIGN USA MARCOM International Creative Awards Gallery of Fine Printing AMERICAN INHOUSE 2005
2006
GRAPHIC DESIGN USA
MARCOM International
Creative Awards
Gallery of Fine Printing
AMERICAN INHOUSE
2005 Gold Award
DESIGN AWARD
2002 Bronze Award

Michigan Society of Association Executives

2002, 2004, 2005 & 2007 Diamond Award

2003, 2006 Honorable Mention

The Communicator International Print Media Competition

Overall Association Magazine

Magazine Writing

CAM Magazine (ISSN08837880) is published monthly by the Construction Association of Michigan, 43636 Woodward Ave., P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204 (248) 972-1000. $24.00 of annual membership dues is allocated to a subscription to CAM Magazine. Additional subscriptions $40.00 annually. Periodical postage paid at Bloomfield Hills, MI and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: CAM MAGAZINE, 43636 WOODWARD AVE., BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI 48302-3204.

For editorial comment or more information: magazine@cam-online.com. For reprints or to sell CAM Magazine: 248-972-1000.

Copyright © 2008 Construction Association of Michigan. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited. CAM Magazine is a registered trademark of the Construction Association of Michigan.

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

INDUSTRY

NEWS

PHOTO BY MARCI CHRISTIAN

INDUSTRY NEWS PHOTO BY MARCI CHRISTIAN SA+A Architects Fat Tuesday Open House a Success Stephen Auger

SA+A Architects Fat Tuesday Open House a Success

Stephen Auger + Associates Architects, Inc., Lake Orion, host- ed their 8th annual Fat Tuesday open house on Feb. 5, 2008. The meet and greet event is held each year to celebrate the firm’s recent successes, to provide networking opportunities for clients and consultants, and to exhibit past and current work for anyone interested in learning more about SA+A. The attendees of the event were treated to delicious local cui-

sine and live entertainment. “It was great to see some building committee members from our first project almost fifteen years ago,” said Stephen Auger, principal of the firm. “This event has grown each year to the point where our clients have the date pen- ciled in before we send out the invitations. Talk about freeload- ers!” SA+A has developed a reputation for providing distinctive and responsible design solutions through a client-driven process. The firm was recently selected by Crain’s Detroit and The American Society of Employers as one of Detroit’s top 50 “Cool Places to Work.” SA+A is a full-service architectural design and planning practice that has been located in the heart of Lake Orion’s down- town historic district for the past 10 years. For more information please visit www.saa-architects.com.

The Glory of Copper Returns to the Book-Cadillac

Copper ziggurats are the crowning glory of the Book- Cadillac Hotel. Detroit Cornice & Slate Co., Inc., Ferndale, installed the last ziggurat on the pinnacle of the newly restored building in February 2008.

pinnacle of the newly restored building in February 2008. 8 C A M M A G
pinnacle of the newly restored building in February 2008. 8 C A M M A G

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

SME Assists with the Gerald R. Ford International Airport Ramp Up! Terminal and Parking Improvement

SME Assists with the Gerald R. Ford International Airport Ramp Up! Terminal and Parking Improvement Project

Gerald R. Ford International Airport (GFIA) officials and mem- bers of the Kent County Aeronautics Board (KCAB) recently broke ground to kick off construction of the $118 million Ramp Up! terminal and parking improvement project. The Grand Rapids office of Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc. (SME) has been awarded a contract to provide construction materials services for the project. The Christman Company, headquartered in Lansing, will construct the project. The project includes construction of a four-story, 4,900 space parking ramp and related terminal improvements that will fea- ture pedestrian sky bridges connecting the parking ramp to the terminal, a covered roadway canopy for passenger drop-offs, and new utilities and roadway infrastructure. The project is slated to be complete in the fall of 2009. During construction, SME will be working with Gresham Smith and Partners, the Architect of Record that operates from 16 offices located throughout the Southeast and Midwest, and the KCAB representative on site during the construction phase. SME will be providing construction materials services related to foun- dations, reinforcing steel, concrete, density, proof rolls, and struc- tural steel for the project. Previously, SME conducted a geotechnical engineering evalua- tion and provided recommendations for soil and groundwater conditions, site seismic class, site preparation and earthwork, foundations, pavement design, and construction considerations. The GFIA serves more than two million passengers annually. It is the second busiest airport in Michigan and ranks among the top 15 percent of busiest airports nationwide. The Kent County Aeronautics Board, a six-member body appointed by the Kent County Board of Commissioners, is responsible for policy and oversight of the airport. For more information visit www.grr.org.

Simonton Employees Run in 2008 Boston Marathon to Benefit Homes for Our Troops

Two employees of Simonton Windows® trained intensely to participate in the 26+ mile Boston Marathon held on Patriot’s Day, April 21, 2008. Simonton’s Joan Gates, marketing coordina- tor, and Robert Jacobs, vice president human resources, prepared to run the race in order to raise funds for Homes for Our Troops. The goal for “Team Simonton” was to raise $1,000 per mile -- a total of more than $26,000 -- to provide much-needed housing to severely injured service men and women through the efforts of the non-profit organization, Homes for Our Troops. Simonton Windows is a founding corporate supporter of Homes for Our Troops. The company donates windows and funding to project homes each year nationwide. Employees at

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

9

SAFETY TOOL KIT

S AFETY T OOL K IT Joseph M. Forgue Leading Indicators T his month I want

Joseph M. Forgue

Leading Indicators

T his month I

want to con-

evaluate the data. If the reports were done properly, he should be able to identi- fy trends. Things like type of injury (lac- eration, muscle strain, sprain, fracture) and/or method of injury (missing guard, broken tool, damaged extension cord, bro- ken ladder rung) can provide significant amounts information and lead to some pretty good assessments as to the root cause. If, for instance, you see a lot (a “lot” could be 3 of 12 injuries or 25%; the raw number does not have to be high) of hand lacerations while unbundling rebar, you might surmise that gloves or a better band cutting tool might be in order. This is just the beginning of applying leading indicators to your safety program… more to follow. If you have any questions about this or any other safety issue, you can always find me at the end of 248-972-1141 or at forgue@cam-online.com.

me at the end of 248-972-1141 or at forgue@cam-online.com. tinue my dis- cussion on Leading Indicators.

tinue my dis-

cussion on Leading Indicators. As I mentioned last month, this is a rela- tively new concept

(as applied to safe- ty) that takes historical data, evaluates it and then projects it into the future. I recently met with the safety director of one of CAM’s mid-sized member firms who had been tasked with getting their safety program into shape. The company had experienced a higher than expected number of recordable injuries, including two out-of-state fatalities, and the owner wanted it to stop. One of the first things I suggested he do is go back over the acci- dent and near-miss reports from the past several years - up to ten if possible - and

Manager of Education & Safety Services

Simonton facilities throughout the country were engaged in fundraising efforts to support Gates and Jacobs in the Boston Marathon. For more information on Homes for Our Troops and the valuable work done by this organization, visit www.homesforourtroops.org. Simonton Windows produces ENERGY STAR® qualified replacement and new construction windows and doors, includ- ing a line of impact-resistant products. The company was ranked #1 in quality in the 2007 Brand Use Study sponsored by Builder magazine and has won two con- secutive Best In Class Awards for being ranked “Overall Top Rated Vinyl Window Brand” in unaided industry studies. For more information, call (800) SIMONTON or visit www.simonton.com.

New ISO Standard will Make Crossing the Street Safer for Disabled Persons

Equipping pedestrian street crossings with acoustic and tactile signals to help disabled persons was a step forward. The problem is that they vary from one coun-

a step forward. The problem is that they vary from one coun- 1 0 C A

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

try to another. Now, a new ISO standard provides the basis for harmonizing such signals on a worldwide basis. The aim of ISO 23600:2007, Assistive Products for Persons with Vision Impairments and Persons with Vision and Hearing Impairments - Acoustic and Tactile Signals for Pedestrian Traffic Lights, is to ensure equivalent information worldwide at intersections equipped with pedestrian crossing signals. The standard sets out the requirements, technical specifications and performance criteria for acoustic and tactile signals for pedestrian traffic lights and will help to ensure major benefits such as:

• Harmonized criteria for manufacturers and designers

• Safe, reliable and functional products

• Enhanced compatibility between products

• Common testing methods leading to comparable, reliable test results

Acoustic and tactile signals should be used in combination to provide informa- tion, such as precise directional informa- tion and the geometry of the intersection. The signals can indicate for disabled per- sons features such as the:

• Presence and location of a push button

• Location of a pedestrian crosswalk

• Walk initiation period

• Direction of the pedestrian crosswalk

• Prohibited walk initiation period

At an intersection that is not equipped with acoustic and tactile signals, persons with vision impairments are forced to use the sounds of vehicular traffic when possi- ble in order to estimate the time to start crossing a street and to determine their direction of travel. In the case of persons with vision and hearing impairments, the majority of these people have to rely on assistance. The installation of acoustic and tactile signals for pedestrian traffic lights based on ISO 23600:2007 significantly improves the ability of these persons to travel safely and independently. For more information please visit www.iso.org, ISO 23600:2007; or TC 173 – Assistive Products for Persons with Disability.

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

11

INDUSTRY

NEWS

Tile Contractors Association Holds Annual Convention

The Tile Contractors Association of America (TCAA) held its 99th annual con- vention on Nov. 3 – 6, 2007 at the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas. The convention host- ed the return of the popular Learning Exchange, a program of multiple AIA CEU credit sessions conducted by TCAA

Supplier Members. Patti Fason, of Professional Attention to Tile Installations, was the keynote speaker for the Learning Exchange. Sessions were conducted by Aqua Mix, Amorim-AcoustCork Products, Custom Building Products, Laticrete International, Noble Company and TEC Specialty Construction Brands. In addition to the TCAA membership,

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

1 2 C A M M A G A Z I N E M A Y

over 20 architects from several prestigious local firms attended the Learning Exchange program. TCAA is committed to showcasing the benefits of tile crafts- manship and professional installations offered by its members to the architectural community through its Trowel of Excellence Certification Program. Since its inception in 2006, eight companies have been certified in the Trowel of Excellence program. Artisan Tile, Brighton, is the most recent TCAA tile company to earn the Trowel of Excellence honor. Artisan Tile joins seven other TCAA member companies in achiev- ing Trowel of Excellence certification. Certification is based on being financially sound, adhering to a code of ethics, having demonstrated safety and learning pro- grams, and possessing a body of work showing professionalism and expertise in installation projects. In addition to Artisan Tile, the other certified companies include Shores Tile Co., Inc., Roseville; Artisan Tile & Marble Company of New Jersey, Somerset, New Jersey; Eugene G. Sackett Co., Inc., Rochester and Elma, New York; Lippert Tile Co., Inc., Menomonee, Wisconsin; Port Morris Tile & Marble, New York City, New York; Selectile of California, Inc., El Monte, California; and Williams Tile & Marble, Maryland Heights, Missouri. This year’s convention was not just about work! Convention guests had great fun, especially enjoying a tour of Hoover Dam, sponsored by Laticrete International. Sunday night, guests attended an opening banquet sponsored by the International Masonry Institute and the International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen. Daltile Corp., Dallas, Texas, closed the con- vention with a dinner at Madame Tussauds where all enjoyed outstanding

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

cuisine and various members posed for the ultimate photo opportunity: a snap- shot with a wax figure.

YES! Magazine Asks What We Can Do About Buildings

The U.S. emits the equivalent of 7.26 gigatonnes of CO2 annually. Our buildings contribute 2.49 gigatonnes of that total.

By Guy Dauncey

Buildings use a lot of energy, so it’s no sur- prise they’re responsible for 30-40 percent of CO2 emissions. The chal- lenge involves two tasks – creating new buildings that are car- bon neutral, and retro- fitting all existing buildings to eliminate their carbon footprint. The first task is easier. In Germany, Passivhaus homes consume 95 percent less energy for heating and cooling by using super insulation, solar gain, and efficient heat recovery. There are 6,000 homes in Europe built to Passivhaus spec- ifications. Building codes should require that all new houses are built to this stan- dard. There is no shortage of innovation. In Guangzhou, China, the 69-story high Pearl River Tower will generate more energy than it consumes, using wind tur- bines inside two floors of the building, solar photovoltaics (PV), and solar heated water. In Malmo, Sweden, the Turning Torso tower, in addition to being powered by local wind and solar energy, recycles organic wastes into biogas that can be used for cooking and to power the city’s buses. In the Chinese city of Rizhao, 99 percent of buildings in the city center use solar hot water. In Spain, all new build- ings and renovations are required to get 30-70 percent of their hot water from solar panels. The Architecture 2030 initiative is pressing to have all new buildings and major renovations in the United States be 100 percent carbon neutral by 2030 – a goal that has been unanimously approved by the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Britain is moving faster – it is requiring that new buildings all be carbon neutral by 2016. The U.S.-based LEED (Leadership in Energy and

by 2016. The U.S.-based LEED (Leadership in Energy and Visit us at www.cam-online.com Environmental Design)

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

Environmental Design) standard for green buildings needs to move in the same direction, said author Guy Dauncey. The challenge is much tougher for existing buildings. Most building owners could achieve a 20 to 50 percent reduction in energy use by investing in new win- dows, super-insulation, heat-recovery systems, and efficient appliances and

boilers. Solar PV and solar hot water can be added, and carbon-neutral heat can be obtained from heat exchange with the air, earth, water, and sewage. There are fur- naces that burn biofuels, and Sweden’s district heating systems circulate hot water fro 50 miles without significant heat loss. Super-insulation, combined with shade trees and white-painted roofs,

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MAY 2008

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can also reduce air conditioning load.

Service to help homeowners upgrade.

Island,

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Subscriptions:

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Since 1993, the small Austrian town of

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need tax credits, self-financing mecha- nisms, and rules like the Residential

Gussing (population 4,000) has reduced its CO2 emissions by an incredible 93 per-

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Conservation Ordinance, which requires owners in San Francisco and Berkley to upgrade a building before it’s sold. Germany is paying for a complete retrofit of all older apartment buildings. London has launched a Green Homes Concierge

cent, by switching, among other things, to biofuel district heat for its buildings. It’s just a matter of vision and determination. Reprinted from “Stop Global Warming Cold,” the Spring 2008 YES! Magazine, 284 Madrona Way NE, Ste.116, Bainbridge

About the Author Guy Dauncey is a speaker, organizer, con- sultant, and author with Patrick Mazza of Stormy Weather: 101 Solutions to Global Climate Change, New Society Publishers.

sultant, and author with Patrick Mazza of Stormy Weather: 101 Solutions to Global Climate Change, New

Clarification:

In the February 2008 issue of CAM Magazine, the On the Jobsite article entitled “Building a Higher Level of Care” did not mention that the George W. Auch Company, Pontiac, and W3 Construction Company, Detroit, are working together on the construc- tion of the Henry Ford Hospital West Pavilion Vertical Expansion Project. The Auch/W3 team submitted together and was awarded the contract for Construction Management Services for this challenging project. The Auch/W3 team together developed and planned the temporary measures required to pre- pare the existing building for the construction of the addition, as well as verifying critical tie-in point locations. W3 subcontracted the temporary roofing and associated work which successfully protected the facility below and provided valuable insight to issues pertaining to project safety. W3 held the subcontracts for the enclosure work that included concrete columns and slabs, structural steel, masonry, roofing and window systems as well as for a portion of the building interiors.

and slabs, structural steel, masonry, roofing and window systems as well as for a portion of
Speak Up! The Editors of CAM Magazine invite comments from our readers. Send your remarks
Speak Up!
The Editors of CAM Magazine
invite comments from
our readers.
Send your remarks to:
CAM Magazine
43636 Woodward Ave.
P.O. Box 3204
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204
Or email us at:
editor@cam-online.com
Hills, MI 48302-3204 Or email us at: editor@cam-online.com 1 4 C A M M A G
Hills, MI 48302-3204 Or email us at: editor@cam-online.com 1 4 C A M M A G

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

Look up stay safe, avoid power lines! Thousands of Michigan-based Detroit Edison and DTE Energy

Look up

stay safe, avoid power lines!

Thousands of Michigan-based Detroit Edison and DTE Energy workers are dedicated to providing you with the level of service and dependability you’ve come to expect for over a century. And that includes doing everything we can to keep you safe. Whether you’re working or playing, if you’re outside, you need to be aware of power lines — and avoid them. Especially if you’re carrying a ladder or working on a roof. And should you ever see a downed wire, keep your distance and call us immediately at 800.477.4747.

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16

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

PHOTOS BY MARCI CHRISTIAN, CAM MAGAZINE
PHOTOS BY MARCI CHRISTIAN, CAM MAGAZINE

CAM 57th Annual Men’s Doubles Classic

C ongratulations go out to Jamie Klatt and Brian Lang of Turner Construction Company in Detroit for winning the

57th Annual CAM Men’s Doubles Classic with a score of 1388. Both Jamie and Brian were among 358 bowlers at the annual event held on February 23rd at Thunderbowl Lanes in Allen Park. Bowlers began checking in for lane assign- ments at 10:30 a.m. Each participant’s high- est USBC Average, as listed in the 2006-2007 Yearbook, guided competition in this tourna- ment. Each team received a handicap of 100% of the difference from 400. The prize check ratio this year was 1-4, with low in the

money at 1212. Each team was also given one deck of playing cards, compliments of the CAM Doubles Committee. This year’s highlights included the Tournament High Game of 276 by Jim Fedorka with Detroit Elevator, finishing with a 715 series. The Tournament High Series of 771 was by Paul Szummy with Field Construction on games of 266-238-267. Following just behind the leaders were Art Szmuto of Field Construction with a 275 game. Robert Kapanowski of Detroit Elevator had games of 268-230-256 for a 754 series and Julius Maisano of The Macomb Group fin- ished with a 725 on games of 258-210-257.

Top 10 Final Results: CAM 57th Annual Mens’s Doubles Bowling Classic PLACE SCORE PRIZE WINNERS
Top 10 Final Results:
CAM 57th Annual Mens’s Doubles Bowling Classic
PLACE
SCORE
PRIZE WINNERS
1
1388
Jamie Klatt
2
1372
Bruce Ellenwood
3
1367
Dennis Sine
4
1365
James Pappas Sr
5
1336
Jerry Krawiec Jr
6
1335
Brandon Eschner
PARTNERS
Brian Lang
Richard Anderson
George Baer III
Ray Cronkhite
John Kalisz IV
Phil Batten
7
1321
Robert Kapanowski Ed Kapanowski Sr
8
1320
James Tucker
Keith Schatko
9
1316
Bryan Thomas
Richard Thomas
10
1294
Sean Walker
Michael Harte
Tie
1294
Bill McGivern
Brandon Perilli

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

Tournament bowling began promptly at noon and was followed by a buffet dinner in the

Tournament bowling began promptly at noon and was followed by a buffet dinner in the Thunderbowl dining hall. At 5:00 p.m. Tournament Director Ron Mitzel, of the Mitzel Agency, began the awards ceremony and the door prize drawings. Mitzel expressed his deep thanks to all of the companies that donated a total of 80 door prizes for the

a Success!

event. The donated prizes are always a high- light of this tournament. The conclusion of the day’s events began at 6:30 p.m. when all registered bowlers were invited to join in the festive afterglow of card playing. In addition to Tournament Director Ron Mitzel, the Doubles Classic Committee includes: Chairman, Joe Murphy; Vice Chairman Rick Cianek; Treasurer, Kevin Koehler; Secretary, Ron Riegel; Greg Andrzejewski; Larry Bowman; Vince Finazzo; John Giannotta; John Jacobs; George Krappitz; Ted McGinley; Andy Privette; and Roger Troke.

Mark your calendars for next year’s tourna- ment! The 58th Annual CAM Men’s Doubles Classic will again be held at Thunderbowl Lanes on February 28th, 2009.

again be held at Thunderbowl Lanes on February 28th, 2009. Visit us at www.cam-online.com North American
again be held at Thunderbowl Lanes on February 28th, 2009. Visit us at www.cam-online.com North American

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

17

ON

TH E

JOBSITE

ON TH E JOBSITE B Y M ARY E. K REMPOSKY , A SSOCIATE E DITOR
ON TH E JOBSITE B Y M ARY E. K REMPOSKY , A SSOCIATE E DITOR

BY MARY E. KREMPOSKY, ASSOCIATE EDITOR

PHOTOS COUR TESY OF C.A.S.S. SHEETMETAL

R ounding a curve of Romeo Plank Road in Clinton Township brings into view one of the most inspired

and unconventional rooflines in Michigan. The roof of St. Paul of Tarsus Catholic Church undulates like a water- slide, cascading in serpentine ribbons of copper from both sides of a central ridge. This series of concave and convex curves yield an overall shape similar to a bell. The portion of roof over the former apse (the interior space housing the altar)

forms an almost three-dimensional bell of copper with the same sinuous line as the rest of this remarkable roof. There was only one flaw in this heaven-

ly canopy of copper: the roof leaked mis- erably since its installation in the 1980s. The parish endured the leaks with the long-suffering patience of Job until suffi- cient funds were available for renovation of both the roof and the church interior. For this desperately needed renovation, the parish placed its faith in Constantine

George

Pappas, AIA

Architecture/Planning, Troy, as architect and Campbell/Manix, Inc., Southfield, as general contractor. The project team brought Detroit-based Custom Architectural Sheet Metal Specialists

18

CAM MAGAZINE

M AY 2008

(C.A.S.S.), an experienced sheet metal contractor well schooled in the copper craft, into the fold as both roofing and demolition contractor. C.A.S.S.’s contract also encompassed roof protection, tempo- rary roofing, wood decking, and single- ply roofing. “We were awarded the contract after a daunting pre-award review of the com- pleteness and qualifications that C.A.S.S. brought to the table on this difficult proj- ect,” said Glenn E. Parvin, C.A.S.S. presi- dent. Having prepared a proposal three years ago, C.A.S.S. aced the final “job interview” with the help of a specially constructed mockup of the roof’s finicky center panel. C.A.S.S. built the mockup panel in its shop, placed it in the back of a pickup truck, and delivered it to the future jobsite as part of a presentation explaining the old world craftsmanship needed to truly save the ailing roof. The mockup clearly showed the difference between the existing copper roof and the proposed approach.

THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS The existing copper roof was a classic case of the wrong system installed in the wrong place, coupled with poor flashing

details across the board and on two 70- foot-tall towers rising from the church interior and projecting through the roof. “It was a snap-on standing seam panel system that is made for decoration only,” said Parvin. “It is only supposed to be used on mansard, storefront type of appli- cations. As the most inexpensive type of panel system in the prefinished market, it is not to be used with copper.” In this sys- tem, a seam cap – separate from the over- all panel – is merely snapped over the ver- tical “legs” of two abutting panels. Water flowing down the serpentine roof would then migrate into the seam caps. This inappropriate system installed on the complicated curvature of the roof cre- ated the perfect storm. Rainwater and snow melt would pool in the center swale of this undulating roof, flooding both the seam caps flowing down the roof and what is called head laps or traverse seams flowing across the expanse. The traverse seams link the three panels needed to form each 45-foot-long ribbon of copper flowing from the roof ridge to the eave. Established roofing industry guidelines dictate the proper location of head laps or traverse seams. “In this case, the head laps needed to be placed in a 6:12 slope (6

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

The two towers await demolition by C.A.S.S. Sheetmetal with the assistance of Connelly Crane.
The two towers await demolition
by C.A.S.S. Sheetmetal with the
assistance of Connelly Crane.

inches of rise to 12 inches of run),” said Parvin. “The head laps in the original roof were installed in essentially a flat area where water collects.” The unfortunate end result was a roof with seams leaking both down and across this beautiful but poorly crafted expanse of copper panels. C.A.S.S. replaced this leaky sieve of a roof with the most watertight copper roofing system available: a well-crafted, dou- ble-locked standing seam roof with soldered traverse seams. The mockup of the problematic central panel displayed the handiwork of this skilled company. Using sheet metal tools in the shop, the experienced crew of C.A.S.S. hand tooled the pan- els, stretching and shrinking the malleable copper to follow the sinuous contour of the wood deck. “We tooled the panel to make it curve and to make sure the head laps were in the 6:12 location of the roof,” said Parvin. “The next step is profiling the seams. We basically hand tooled all the panel seams.”

FOILING THE COPPER THIEVES C.A.S.S. not only obtained the contract for roof renovation but the demolition contract for the entire interior, as well. The com- plex nature of the project compelled C.A.S.S. to request an expansion of its scope of work beyond the copper roofing trade. C.A.S.S. asked to assume responsibility for demolishing the two

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

for demolishing the two Visit us at www.cam-online.com The first of three lifts is executed to

The first of three lifts is executed to remove the existing towers.

of three lifts is executed to remove the existing towers. The first of hundreds of copper

The first of hundreds of copper panels is installed with crafts- men utilizing rope ladders to traverse the roof.

crafts- men utilizing rope ladders to traverse the roof. Tarps serve as temporary weather protection as

Tarps serve as temporary weather protection as the new copper roof takes shape to keep Mother Nature at bay for a lifetime to come.

CAM MAGAZINE

M AY 2008

19

ON

THE

JOBSITE

towers down to the roof, removal of the skylight forming the ridge of the roof, and providing temporary cover for the sky- light and exposed gaps in the deck. “We believed coordination and responsibility issues could be complicated in terms of temporary weather protection in terms of infilling the gaps of the wood decking after tower removal,” said Parvin. The removal and replacement of exist-

ing electrical and fire suppression systems added another layer of complexity to the job. “Who would handle the deck repairs necessary at the approximately 100 electri- cal boxes being removed and infilled with exposed finished wood decking?” said Parvin. For efficiency and better control, Campbell/Manix then turned over the entire tower and interior demolition to

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20

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

C.A.S.S. “This was a first for C.A.S.S.,” said Parvin. “We demolished two existing canopies and the two 70-foot towers from above the roof to the concrete interior floors. We saw cut the concrete floors, removed the carpet, and demolished the altar. We also removed the existing electri- cal systems and infilled the decking at the locations of the removed lights.” With the aid of Connelly Crane Rental Corp., Detroit/Redford and Holt/Lansing, C.A.S.S. began tower dem- olition in late October 2007. Parvin and John Martin, C.A.S.S. foreman, met with Denny Connelly of Connelly Crane to plan and execute the demolition. “Demolition of the towers took two days and the wood decking infill another two days,” said Parvin. In tearing off the old copper roof, C.A.S.S. worked with Campbell/Manix in selecting a recycling company, H & H Metals, Inkster, to recycle approximately 20,000 lbs. of the old copper. “Approximately $35,000 to $50,000 in recycled copper was returned to the parish, “ said Parvin. “As a theft-preven- tion strategy, H & H Metals used a locked dumpster with a thousand pound lid that could only be lifted with big equipment. Plus, the copper was removed on a week- ly basis. All in all, H & H Metals had the best game plan to keep the copper secured. C.A.S.S. also partnered with George I. Landry, Inc., a Milford-based carpentry contractor selected by Campbell/Manix, Inc., to build a carpentry roof structure over the existing deck. “The structure is a new 2 x 8 wood framing and plywood lat- tice system designed to encapsulate new electrical and sprinkler systems, as well as house a foamed-in-place insulation sys- tem,” said Parvin. “Placed over the lattice system, the new wood deck consists of two layers of 3/8” plywood staggered glued and screwed to form the new curved roof system.”

THE COPPER CRAFT Meanwhile back in the Detroit shop, C.A.S.S. built a wood structure following the complete profile of the undulating, laminated timber roof. “We made three wood panels in the shop matching the full length of the 42-foot-long roof profile,” said Parvin. “We actually built a custom jig emulating the profile of the complicat- ed center panel. It was all about lining up the traverse seam in what would be con- sidered the safe zone of 6:12 or greater. We have a curved wood structure just like

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

a pinewood derby track sitting in our shop, measuring 14-foot long and 2-foot wide and created to allow us to make the copper panels fit.” Skilled C.A.S.S. craftsmen, headed by shop foreman Rick Mark, hand tooled the panels and seams and finally shipped the carefully crafted work of their hands to the job site and up to the rooftop where on a bone-chilling morning in February sheet metal workers from Local 80 were busy anchoring the panels with stainless steel slider clips. “It’s a long process,” said Parvin. “The last step is to seam the panel. We formed and hammered a dou- ble lock standing seam – a five-ply seam – to create a watertight metal roof system with the same details of Old World crafts- manship as those used on traditional cop- per domes and large copper roofs.” Altogether, C.A.S.S. installed approxi- mately 20,000 lbs. of copper over the 12,500-square-foot roof. Bright streams of newly minted and hand tooled copper now brighten the church roof, its fresh copper skin gleam- ing across the expanse of a snowy field and visually warming the cold air with its

metallic glow. Parvin anticipates the entire roof will be complete in spring 2008. The most difficult portion – the former apse - will soon be underway. “The three- dimensional bell is segmented all the way

around and will require custom tapered panels,” said Parvin. Redeemed from an ailing roof, the St. Paul of Tarsus parish plans an expansion on its current site in the near future.

plans an expansion on its current site in the near future. C.A.S.S. Sheetmetal craftsmen navigate the
C.A.S.S. Sheetmetal craftsmen navigate the undulating water slide profile of the roof to install a
C.A.S.S. Sheetmetal craftsmen navigate
the undulating water slide profile of the
roof to install a copper panel.
water slide profile of the roof to install a copper panel. Visit us at www.cam-online.com CAM

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

21

ECONOMIC

OUTLOOK

RETAIL

MARKET

CONSTRUCTION TRENDS

CONSTRUCTION TRENDS

RETAIL MARKET CONSTRUCTION TRENDS CONSTRUCTION TRENDS By Don Wilson T he construction of new building space

By Don Wilson

T he construction of new building

space for the retail market and the

renovation of existing stores has

lately been one of the mainstays of non- residential general contractors and their sub-contractors during the downsizing of the Detroit area’s economy. This is espe- cially since the peak of the last business cycle and non-residential construction activity in 2000. Projects in the retail mar- ket, 22.8% of all non-residential building space in 2004-06, were only 31% lower than in 1998-2000 compared with a 37% drop in all other types of non-residential work over the same time span. Most information regarding what is occurring in retail sector featured in daily papers or local business publications is either devoted to the start of new retail projects, to update the progress of an earli- er awarded project, to report on the sign- ing of leases by major tenants, to cover the opening of major outlets, or to report the closing of a particular retail location because of declining sales. As there appears to have been little effort to report on region-wide trends in the Detroit area’s retail market, it seemed appropriate to put together an overview of the retail market for CAM Magazine’s readership. Shown in the chart entitled DETROIT AREA CHANGE IN RETAIL SALES / SPACE BUILT, is a comparison of the

22

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

quantity of space completed (tabulated in

Construction declined in 1991 through

square feet by SEMCOG) during a particu-

1993

with the plunge in retail revenues in

lar year, with the change occurring in retail

1987

and 1988. Building then increased in

sales volume (adjusted for inflation) two years earlier. Sales are advanced two years to approximate the delay in time involved to plan and implement the construction activity as required by the growth or decline in business volume.

1994-96 with the upturn in retail spending in 1992-94, contracted during 1997 with the drop-off of spending in 1995 and then expanded in 1998 through 2002 with strengthening sales in 1996 through 1999. With the decline in retail spending, after

DETROIT AREA CHANGE IN RETAIL SALES / SPACE BUILT

Space Built (Square Feet-Millions) Change in Retail Sales Volume Two Years Earlier (01$-Billions) 7 6
Space Built (Square Feet-Millions)
Change in Retail Sales Volume Two Years Earlier (01$-Billions)
7
6
5
6
4
3
5
2
4
1
0
3
-1
2
-2
-3
1
Space Built
Sales Change Two Years Earlier
-4
0
-5
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

1999 and occurrence of the 2001 recession, the need for additional space and making improvements moderated in 2003-04 as did overall business investment in the Detroit area. Construction has expanded since 2005 because of the stimulus provid- ed by very favorable interest rates and the availability of funds through the first half of 2007, as well as requirements to reno- vate much existing space. While the revenues of merchandise and

select service retailers are certainly a sig- nificant determinant of expanding or reno- vating existing space, another is the will- ingness to lease space, as a significant pro- portion of retailers need to rent the floor space where they operate. No information is publicly available regarding the aggre- gate quantity of Detroit area retail site space available for lease, but a review of the history of the annual amount of square feet built confirms it is increasing. Data on the quantity of space leased and the num- ber of payroll jobs, however, suggests that occupancy of overall retail space was in decline in 2003 through 2006, as set forth in the chart entitled DETROIT AREA RETAIL REAL ESTATE SPACE DEMAND / EMPLOYMENT. The Retail Real Estate Demand Index, calculated by the Birmingham-based consulting firm Allen & Associates, tracks the quantity of occu- pied retail space in the metropolitan Detroit area comprising Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, St. Clair, Lapeer and Livingston counties. The Index shows that occupancy contracted in 2003 through 2006 before making modest upturn in 2007. According to tabulations by Allen Associates, 9% of retail space was vacant at the end of 2007; that means there was 91% occupancy. The occupancy rate would be even lower, except for the steps taken by many retail- ers in their efforts to operate more effec- tively. Retail sales per employee in the Detroit area (adjusted for inflation) were an estimated 1.5% higher in 2007 than in

2000.

According to a presentation made to various groups around the state in late 2007 concerning the state of Michigan’s long term fiscal outlook, the former research director of the Citizens Research Council of Michigan suggested that sales tax collections could decline by $200 mil- lion during 2008. That infers that retail spending in the Detroit area, as calculated from sales tax collections by the Michigan Department of Treasury, could decline to around $53.5 billion in 2008 from $55.0 bil- lion in 2007. Retail sales revenues will like-

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

DETROIT AREA RETAIL EMPLOYMENT / REAL ESTATE DEMAND

Employment (000) Real Estate Demand Index (2000=100) 380 105 375 104 Employment Retail Space Demand
Employment (000)
Real Estate Demand Index (2000=100)
380
105
375
104
Employment
Retail Space Demand
370
103
365
102
360
101
355
100
350
99
345
98
340
335
97
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07

ly shrink because of the weakening in household purchasing power caused by the decline in home equity values and employment as portrayed in the chart enti- tled DETROIT AREA HOME PRICE / PRI- VATE SECTOR EMPLOYMENT. Another factor contributing to the decline in retail spending is the lack of growth in weekly earnings, which is com- pared with hours worked in the chart enti- tled DETROIT AREA PRIVATE SECTOR

WEEKLY EARNINGS & HOURS WORKED. Detroit area home median sell- ing price, a proxy for the shrinkage in the value of homeowners’ equity, receded to $140,300 in 2007, 14.4% lower than at their peak in 2005. 1.96 million workers were on private and public sector payrolls in 2007, 2% fewer than the 2.02 million on payrolls in 2006 and 3.9% below the 2.04 million on the job in 2005. Private sector weekly earn- ings (adjusted for inflation) continue to

DETROIT AREA NON-FARM EMPLOYMENT / MEDIAN HOME SELLING PRICE

Employment ( 000) Home Selling Price ($000) 2250 180 2200 160 2150 140 2100 120
Employment ( 000)
Home Selling Price ($000)
2250
180
2200
160
2150
140
2100
120
2050
100
2000
80
1950
60
1900
Employment
Home Prices
40
1850
20
1800
0
98
99
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
CAM MAGAZINE
MAY 2008
23

ECONOMIC

OUTLOOK

weaken as the number of high paying manufacturing jobs disappear, retail prices creep upward, and wage rates are cut as employers (especially in the automotive industry) have implemented programs to improve their competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace. It is not easy to project the quantity of retail space that will be started into con- struction and completed during 2008 and 2009 in an area where household spending power is under pressure from declining employment, languishing earnings, deteri- orating home equity values, and the tur- moil in the credit markets. However, it is believed it will become an increasingly tougher sell to prospective investors before the project is presented to the archi- tects, engineers, and municipal planners who have to approve the construction project.

planners who have to approve the construction project. Don Wilson is a consulting economist based in

Don Wilson is a consulting economist based in Hartland, Michigan. He has specialized in working for trade associations, banks, cham- bers of commerce and municipalities since

1982.

DETROIT AREA PRIVATE SECTOR WEEKLY EARNINGS / HOURS WORKED

Earnings (Dollars)

900

890

880

870

860

850

840

830

820

810

800

Hours Worked

Earnings Hours 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07
Earnings
Hours
98
99
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
04 05 06 07 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 2

24

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

Are you taking advantage of these Design & Construction Exposition in Novi attracts almost 10,000

Are you taking advantage of these

Are you taking advantage of these Design & Construction Exposition in Novi attracts almost 10,000 people
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Design & Construction Exposition in Novi attracts almost 10,000 people annually. Opportunity to showcase construction products & services to key markets.

Call Ron Riegel at (248) 972-1000

services to key markets. Call Ron Riegel at (248) 972-1000 More than 16,000 copies of this

More than 16,000 copies of this comprehensive construction industry directory are distrubuted. Marketing opportunity through special classified section. Offered online and in print.

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Monthly industry magazine covers construction news throughout the state, as well as timely articles and product information.

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product information. Call Amanda Tackett at (248) 972-1000 Everything you need to know about CAM at

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Accurate up to date project bidding information on Detroit area and state projects. Access bidding information & blueprints, plans, specs, 24 –hours a day, 7 days a week, via your computer.

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CARPENTRY

MGM GRAND

ASAP!

Trend Millwork: Elegance Delivered On Demand

By

Mary

photos

E.

Kremposky,

courtesy

of

Associate

Editor

trend

mill w ork

P lay is big business in the hospitality industry. Entering the doors of one of the region’s newest play- grounds, visitors to MGM Grand Detroit know casino management isn’t playing games; MGM Mirage clearly takes entertainment seriously. The casino has set one of the best dinner tables in town at Michael Mina’s Saltwater restaurant and the Wolfgang Puck Grille. With celebrity chefs, expanded gaming

space, and nightlife aglow at such venues as the V lounge - recently named to Nightclub & Bar Magazine’s list of Top 100 Nightclubs of 2008 - MGM has rolled out the red carpet for the entire Midwest.

Preparing for this lavish and non-stop party for thousands required the talents and organizational skill of hundreds of companies under the direction of MGM Grand Mirage, Las Vegas; Tre Builders, Las Vegas; and the design team of Hamilton-Anderson/SmithGroup Joint Venture, Detroit. A 44-year-old company with offices in Windsor and Lincoln Park, Trend Millwork, Inc. fabricated custom millwork using a diverse menu of woods, both solid and veneer, virtually all installed with the aid of its minority part- ner, Foster Finish Carpentry, Inc., MBE, Detroit. From Hornbeam booth dividers in Wolfgang Puck to Santos Rosewood and Red Gum column covers and wall panels in the casino’s promenade, the wonderful craftsmanship of Trend Millwork and its own team of subcontrac-

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

tors is displayed throughout the interior of MGM Grand. Trend Millwork’s forces spent a hectic 8 to 10 months preparing for one of Detroit’s biggest parties. Polishing stain- less steel wine racks to a mirror finish, arranging delivery of reconstituted veneers from across the globe, and field assembly of a 1,200 lb. door were all part of playing the perfect host. Altogether, Trend’s diverse and well-crafted work graces Saltwater and Wolfgang Puck restaurants, both designed by New York City-based firm, tonychi and associates; the hotel lobby and its exclusive living room for guests; the third-floor confer- ence level; and the casino’s gaming floor, promenade and elevator lobbies. Trend tackled a broad scope of work and transformed a varied palette of

woods into high-end, custom applica- tions. In line with a trend over the last five years of expanding the scope of work for millwork contractors, Trend Millwork handled high polished stainless steel, a variety of wood veneers, leather bar com- ponents, glass, and other non-traditional work items in its assigned areas. The millwork itself entailed a dazzling array of both natural and reconstituted wood veneers, ranging from natural walnut to Coleidolegno reconstituted veneer imported from Italy. Reconstituted veneer is a man-made veneer composed of real wood fiber with colorants added to simulate the color and grain pattern of actual wood veneers. Luca Bonanni, Trend vice president of operations, believes MGM Grand contains the most diverse roster of woods the company has

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Wolfgang Puck’s culinary artistry is on full display behind a window wall of glass and natural walnut.

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

27

CARPENTRY

CARPENTRY of Coleidolegno elegance of this quality interior. The interior Saltwater is swimming the in privacy

of

Coleidolegno

elegance of this quality interior.

The

interior

Saltwater

is

swimming

the

in

privacy

millwork

frames

fine

booths,

cuisine.

adding

Massive

the

to

ever fabricated and installed on a single project. More than high-end, some of the custom millwork required field assembly because of its massive size and scale. Living up to MGM Grand’s name, the main entry door to Saltwater is 10 feet wide and soars to a height of 17 feet. Managing a lengthy list of long lead items added another layer of complexity to the creation of this regional entertainment destination. Hand-carved wood rosettes, imported from France and installed on the doors of Saltwater’s private dining room, is only one of many long lead items. “About 60 percent of the material specified for MGM carried a lead time between 12 and 16 weeks,” said Bonanni. “We had no time to waste. We ordered long lead, specified items early in the game even before shop drawing approval. Purchase orders had to be issued ASAP, and periodic calls had to be placed to all of our vendors to make sure they were on schedule.” In short, Trend managed a broad scope of work, massive cus- tom millwork, and long lead items, all in an incredibly short

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span of only 8 months. “We had a good, solid commitment from all of our people,” said Bonanni. “We had a crew of 30 cabinet makers in the shop and a crew of 20 in the field, both working 10 to 12 hour days for almost 8 months.” Beyond MGM, Trend made its mark on new hospitality ven- tures all across Michigan in 2007. Working three casino projects simultaneously, Trend held contracts at the Four Winds Casino Resort near New Buffalo in western Michigan built for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians by The Christman Company, Lansing, and at Odawa Casino Resort in Petoskey built for the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians by Clark Construction Co., also headquartered in Lansing. As the ultimate understatement, Bonanni adds, “We had a pretty good year.”

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE With Trend’s operational acumen, meeting the aggressive schedule of all three casinos was a game of skill not chance. The successful completion of all three projects in a single year was living proof of Trend’s new corporate slogan, “We Manufacture the Impossible,” developed by David Muzzatti, president of the thriving firm. At MGM Grand, Trend prepared, submitted and obtained approval for over 300 shop drawings in a short span of time. “Shop drawings began as soon as we got the contract,” said Bonanni. “Preparing shop drawings, finish samples, and product date submittals was basically a two-and-a-half-month process.” After shop drawing approval, Trend’s master strategy for MGM Grand can be summarized as divide and conquer. Trend split its forces into two teams. One team scanned the project for items not requiring any field measurements or coordination with other trades, such as the pit podiums and security stands in the gaming floor and the freestanding furniture in both Saltwater and Wolfgang Puck. “This team focused on getting these basic, freestanding items into immediate production upon shop drawing approval, while the other team focused their energies on the rest of the contract,” said Bonanni. The second team gathered field measurements ASAP by developing a close working relationship with the framing con- tractors. Walls, columns and other items were built, measured for millwork and manufactured in such swift succession as to seem almost simultaneous. “Getting field measurements ASAP was a key element to getting this project done on time,” said Bonanni. “It was very important to develop a relationship with the framing contractor in order to establish layouts in the early stages of the project.” Trend worked closely with Ann Arbor Ceiling & Partition Co., Inc., Ypsilanti. Production of custom column covers in the casino gaming floor is an example of this swift sequence of build-measure-fabricate- install with barely a breath in between. “The minute the columns were ready to be measured we were right there next to them mea- suring and then producing the column covers,” said Bonnani. “We just didn’t have much time between field measurement and fabrication if we were to meet the aggressive schedule.” Trend and Foster Carpentry then spent two months installing the high- pressure laminate column covers that now grace the gaming area. Called Detroit Plum, the cladding was produced exclusively for MGM Grand Detroit and was also used on the pit stand cabinets,

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Impress Your Customer & You’re Halfway There

Wolfgang Puck Restaurant - MGM Grand Casino Detroit
Wolfgang Puck Restaurant - MGM Grand Casino Detroit

“Downriver’s Leading Union Manufacturer Since 1988” 1300 John A. Papalas Drive Lincoln Park MI 48146 www.trendmillwork.com

CARPENTRY

security podiums and the main cashiers cage whose metal grills and finishes were also fabricated and installed by the prolific Trend team. Accurate field measurements were par- ticularly critical in the entry arch to the hotel’s opulent private living room for guests and in the living room, itself. Like entering Valhalla, towering 20-foot-tall columns cloaked in Macasar Ebony reconstituted veneer frame a bonfire

Bonanni. “For this reason, we had to have accurate field measurements and we had to be very careful in the shop.” The same story repeated itself in the casino promenade, a long angular corri- dor whose high ceiling again dictated the use of end-matched veneers to maintain a beautifully flowing line of wood grain. “Any mistakes or any delay in field mea- surements would have had a big impact on meeting the schedule,” said Bonanni.

had a big impact on meeting the schedule,” said Bonanni. Approximately 3,500 square feet of Macasar

Approximately 3,500 square feet of Macasar Ebony, a reconstituted veneer from Italy, dresses the towering columns and wall panels of the hotel’s lavish living room.

burning in a contemporary fireplace shaped like a slot and spanning almost the entire wall of this palatial space. Because the Ebony only comes in 10-foot lengths and the columns and entries are 20 feet tall, the panels of this heavily striped wood had to be end matched and sequenced matched to maintain the desired pattern and visual flow of the wood grain. Any errors in cutting the panels in the shop or measuring the pan- els in the field would be costly, and that’s one thing no one would want to measure. “With sequence and end matching, if we cut one panel wrong, we would have to reorder the whole elevation,” said

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Altogether, MGM Grand has 5,000 square feet of natural Santos Rosewood veneer from Brazil and 1,500 square feet of Red Gum veneer placed in the column covers and raised panels of the prome- nade and in the mirror frames of the casi- no’s 12 parking structure elevator lobbies. “Each panel was tagged for each area,” continued Bonanni. “Our field carpenters played a huge part in making sure mis- takes did not happen.”

“IGNITE YOUR SENSES” Now that the sawdust has cleared and the casino has opened, people from across the Midwest are flocking through the

doors and flooding the gaming floor and celebrity chef restaurants at MGM Grand Detroit. At Saltwater, lovers of food and beauty will satisfy both appetites within the elegant confines of this highly rated eatery. The entry door is only an appetiz- er for the custom work within. Made of Coleidolegno reconstituted veneer, the wood is a light, almost blonde color with a natural clear finish. While the door is veneer, the trim and plinth block is solid Coleidolegno. “Solid Coleidolegno is very rare,” said Bonanni. “We had to actively search for the solid wood.” Massive in size, this entry door is a 10- foot-wide, 17-foot-tall monolith weighing approximately 1,200 lbs. A light touch of the “door handle” – a 16-foot-long verti- cal bar of custom metal – will open this hefty, 4-inch-thick portal. No, it’s not magic; it’s custom Rixon pivot hinges designed to carry the weight and size of the door. Not commonly used and of an uncommon size, this heavy-duty steel hinge is embedded in the concrete floor and measures approximately 12 inches long by 6 inches wide, said Bonanni. A companion pivot hinge is installed near the ceiling. The sheer heft and size of the door mandated field assembly. “The biggest challenge with this large entry door was being able to engineer it in a way that it could be completely cut, machined, pre- finished in our shop, and then sent out in components that could be easily assem- bled in the field,” said Bonanni. Trend also worked with the designer to proper- ly place the door’s beautiful joinery or seams. The seams had to align with seams in the adjacent Coleidolegno arch- way – an arc so massive it resembles two side walls and a ceiling as it frames the entire glass front of the restaurant and seems to project into the interior mosaic ceiling. Massive Coleidolegno millwork also fills the interior, forming two 18-feet-tall and 24-feet-wide canopies over the priva- cy booths. “The upright pieces are solid Coleidolegno and the canopy is veneer,” said Bonanni. “The biggest challenge was the sheer size of the millwork. We prefin- ished and machined the panels in our shop. We built it as large as we could in the shop, but much of it had to be done by our site forces in the field.”

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CARPENTRY

Another imposing Coleidolegno arch- way forms the entry to Saltwater’s pri- vate dining room where the massive meets the delicate. An 18-foot-high and 17-foot-wide Coleidolegno archway frames four panels of solid MDF doors, all style and rail with a blue lacquered paint finish that harmonizes with the restaurant’s subtly expressed aquatic theme. The 3-inch-thick doors also open at the touch of a finger thanks to Rixon hinges. The delicate counterpart to the massive millwork is found in 16 hand- carved rosettes imported from France and mounted to the entry doors. “We ordered the rosettes in the very beginning of the project,” said Bonanni. “We probably ordered them in January and we received them five months later in June.” Other well-crafted details add flavor to the dining experience. If angels drank wine, they would store the bottles in Saltwater’s gleaming wine racks. All three of the actual racks are formed of innumerable stainless steel rods polished to a bright mirror finish. The main wine rack is enshrined behind large glass doors fabricated by Harmon, Inc., Livonia, under contract to Trend. Trend installed the 10-feet-high by 16-feet-wide wine rack but contracted metal fabrication to J.L. Dumas, LLC, a Detroit-based compa- ny that spent months polishing the hun- dreds of stainless steel pieces needed to hold over 300 bottles of wine in place. “Each piece had to be fabricated, machined, and polished,” said Bonanni. “Then the whole assembly was welded together and had to be repolished. In total, both hand and machine polishing of all these stainless steel pieces took about three to four months. The main wine rack and two smaller racks, enclosed in glass and Wenge, a Tabu reconstituted wood from Italy, took a great deal of coordina- tion with the designer and the glass, stainless steel and refrigeration trades.” Thanks to Trend Millwork’s ability to manage a broad scope, patrons can also celebrate in style at Saltwater’s circular bar and back bar, both formed of blue leather panels, high-polished stainless steel, and Wenge, both reconstituted veneer and solid. “Again, the bar demanded a coordinated effort,” said Bonanni. “We got there ahead of the game, laying out the circular bar as early

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

as possible to better coordinate the work with food equipment, plumbing, and other involved trades. The actual bar top is stone handled by Michigan Tile & Marble Co., Detroit, but all the coordina- tion came through our auto-cad drawings as far as size and proper layout.” Per the architect’s design, Trend’s pro- lific fabrication shop also carved the bar’s solid Wenge posts, turning the Wenge on a lathe using a custom profile to create these decorative spindles of swiveled wood. The main hostess station is anoth- er feast for the eye. This elegant piece of millwork is formed of two almost inter- locking ellipses of dark Wenge and light Coleidolengo that both curve and taper downward along their elliptical route.

UP NORTH IN DOWNTOWN DETROIT At the Wolfgang Puck Grille, diners now can enjoy the delicacies of Puck’s incomparable crab cakes or a smoked salmon pizza with crème fraiche, fresh dill and black caviar. While the chef is busy in the kitchen – much of it in full view behind a window wall of glass and natural walnut – guests can enjoy the fine interior with its full complement of natur- al walnut, European hornbeam, and laquered MDF. Trend fabricated and installed this window wall and again managed a broad scope of work, ranging from glass and metals to wood veneer and Hornbeam paneling. The contemporary interior of the Wolfgang Puck Grille seems to capture the flavor of Michigan, a hint of the rural Midwest marinated in a heavy infusion of the North Woods and seasoned with the tang and sophistication of urban living. The eatery contains approximately 6,000 lineal feet of poplar trim installed as bat- ten in the walls and ceiling, apparently bringing a subtle taste of rural Midwest farm buildings to the interior. “The bat- ten, placed 12 inches on center across the entire ceiling, was challenging to install, but Foster Carpentry did a good job,” said Bonanni. Chandeliers made of real deer antlers (not provided by Trend) and ten log racks all stacked with wood seem to infuse the grille with a North Woods ambiance. Trend provided the actual log racks of high-polished stainless steel nestled in an enclosure of natural walnut measuring

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12-feet-high by 7-feet wide. The glint of mirror-finished stainless steel racks adds an urban sophistication to this Up North type of motif. Adding to the grille’s rustically chic sensibility, the divider walls between booths are composed of an unusual appli- cation of European Hornbeam. “This was

our first vertical application of Hornbeam, which is typically used as a floor application,” said Bonanni. “Also, this Hornbeam is a manufactured wood block using timber salvaged from the bot- tom of lakes. Distributed by Kaswell Flooring Systems, Framingham, Massachusetts, blocks of wood are pro-

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CARPENTRY

duced from salvaged virgin timber originally cut down in the 1800s and left at the bottom of waterways.” For the Wolfgang Puck Grille, 2,000 square feet of European Hornbeam end grained block was imported from France and transformed into 20 different booth walls. Each divider is com- posed of 4-by-4-inch blocks of Hornbeam applied on both sides of the divider and trimmed in poplar. Each block was hand applied and glued down with mastic, ultimately forming a sin- gle panel with a subtle variety of pronounced end grains. Trend carefully managed each step of the process to meet the project’s rigorous quality and scheduling standards. “With a

rigorous quality and scheduling standards. “With a Trend’s broad scope of work included fabricating and

Trend’s broad scope of work included fabricating and installing the bar’s leather bar top and stainless steel foot rails, the back bar’s millwork, glass and metals, and the log racks of high-polished stainless steel and natur- al Walnut.

lead time of 10 to 12 weeks, it was imperative that we place the order for the material as soon as possible,” said Bonanni. While Trend waited for the arrival of the Hornbeam, the firm’s fabrication shop was busy properly engineering and manufacturing the substrate framing. Trend worked closely with the distributor in finding the right substrate that would control movement caused by the shrinkage and expansion of the finicky Hornbeam. The end result is a substrate of hardy fiber

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cement board placed on both sides of a 13-foot-tall steel frame. “We also worked closely with the designer who elected to incor- porate a 1/4-inch reveal around the perimeter of the panel to allow for some movement,” said Bonanni. Upon arrival, the Hornbeam had to acclimate to the environ- ment for four to five days to minimize the amount of shrinkage or expansion after installation. “The manufacturer’s recommen- dation was to just empty all the boxes in a large pile,” said Bonanni. “This not only gave the material a chance to acclimate but also mixed the various color shades and grain patterns together to ultimately create a more interesting wall divider.” Once the Hornbeam mosaic was assembled into panels, Trend faced the hurdle of sanding these heavy wood canvases. “The 500- to 600-lb. panels were too heavy to run through a belt sander,” said Bonanni. Inspired by the traditional use of Hornbeam as flooring, Trend hired a flooring contractor to sand and finish the panels, essentially treating the vertical booth dividers like a floor. “The panels were placed on the floor for the sanding and finishing process,” said Bonanni. “The sanding and finishing was a three-week process because, unlike finish- ing a floor, these panels had to be sanded and finished with three coats of water-based finish on both sides. Each coat required a day to dry, so it was very time consuming.”

MAKING A CASE FOR QUALITY The Wolfgang Puck Grille’s 16-foot-tall display cases, formed of natural walnut with an oiled rubbed finish, both in veneer and solid pieces, are a showcase for Trend’s astute attention to detail and craft. Trend had to achieve tight tolerances of only a quarter-of-an inch at both floor and ceiling to produce a swivel product with the proper mobility. Accuracy was paramount, since the required tolerances for each display cases varied from location to location throughout the restaurant. As part of its scope, Trend engineered and then contacted a local machine shop to manufacture the actual custom swivel units composed of steel plates and ball bearings. The actual installation called upon the creative problem-solving skills of the field team. “The unit was designed in two pieces, a bottom and a top portion,” said Bonanni. “The carpenters installed the top portion first. While holding it and pushing it tight to the ceiling, others slid the bottom portion, which sat on a ball bear- ing plate, under the top section. When in place, they released the top portion that was held in place by a custom pin that is fas- tened to the ceiling. It was very critical that these units be installed square and plumb in order to properly function. The end result could not have been more perfect.” Trend finished its work at the bar, fabricating and installing diverse materials ranging from the leather bar top and stainless steel foot rails to the glass and metals of the back bar, as well as the millwork. “It is constructed of lacquered-finish MDF panels with solid white oak batten and a pickled finish running through the face of the bar,” said Bonanni. “We again coordinat- ed our work with the food equipment, plumbing and the elec- trical before fabrication to make sure all the pieces fit.” Beyond these two celebrity restaurants, Trend’s work fills the hotel lobby’s main registration area and its sumptuous living room reserved exclusively for hotel guests. Thanks to the Trend

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

team, over 6,000 square feet of quarter cut Wenge, a reconstituted veneer from Italy, blankets wall panels and column covers, enveloping part of the reception area in a glory of wood. The face of the registra- tion desk is composed of three tiers of small semi-circles shaped like baskets. One of the longest lead items provided by Trend, each “basket” is formed of hun- dreds of wood beads imported from Costa Rica, all hand applied and finished with a high-gloss black lacquer. Approximately 3,500 square feet of Macasar Ebony, another reconstituted veneer from Italy, dresses the towering columns and wall panels of this lavish liv- ing room. The panels of this ribbon- striped veneer are coated with a natural finish. Macasar Ebony panels also sheath the archways leading past a bubbling fountain and into the hotel’s elevator lobby. Trend Millwork’s busy crew also fabri- cated and installed work in the casino proper, including the player’s desk of radius Rosewood. Trend also fabricated and installed 4,000 square feet of Zebrawood, a reconstituted veneer from Italy throughout the third-level confer- ence area, as well as mirror finish stain- less steel chair rails and bases throughout the banquet areas and conference rooms. With deft efficiency and commitment to quality, Trend Millwork managed a mind- boggling scope of work that aided MGM in shaping one of the most vibrant enter- tainment destinations in the Midwest. According to Tre Builders, Trend Millwork provided all casino, convention and hotel lobby millwork, as well as the Saltwater and Wolfgang Puck Grille restaurants. The vast scope and scale of millwork and carpentry at MGM Grand also enlisted the services of other compa- nies identified by Tre Builders, including:

Denn-Co. Construction, Detroit, all back of house millwork and casework, as well as installation at the buffet, video poker and both Starbucks; Mueller Custom Cabinetry, Inc., Pacoima, CA, spa and pool area, buffet, and the Ignite Lounge; Quality Cabinet and Fixture Company, San Diego, CA, Bourbon Steak Restaurant and the Int Ice, V (nightclub) and Agua Bar/lounges; and Glenn Rieder, Milwaukee, WI, the Breeze Restaurant, Video Poker Bar, U-Me-Drink (center bar)

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CARPENTRY

CARPENTRY lowed, its humble roots beginning in a 3,000- square-foot facility on Detroit’s Lyndon Avenue before

lowed, its humble roots beginning in a 3,000- square-foot facility on Detroit’s Lyndon Avenue before moving to its current Lincoln Park location closer to its sister company across the Detroit River. By 1997, the ambi- tious company opened the third jewel in the crown of Trend companies: Trend Carpentry, a union carpenter contractor that installs only the work of Trend Millwork USA, said David Muzzatti, president of the company. Sadly, Trend lost its founder, William John Muzzatti, in July 2007. “In true Muzzatti fashion, the Trend Team simply picked up the ball,” said David Muzzatti, who is now pres- ident of this vigorous company built on the strong foundations constructed over the last 44 years. Trend’s recent list of projects includes some of the largest projects under construction in Michigan.

some of the largest projects under construction in Michigan. Trend managed to work on three casinos

Trend managed to work on three casinos simultaneously. Above is a glimpse of the stunning inte- rior of the Odawa Casino Resort in Petoskey.

and the high limit area. Other firms involved in the wood and plastics category, as well as rough and fin- ish carpentry include: Precision Industrial Services, Detroit, wood & plas- tics, millwork (hotel) and wood & plastics (slot base install); Ann Arbor Ceiling & Partition Co., Ann Arbor, finishes, dry- wall (casino, BOH, venues); Pontiac Drywall Systems, Pontiac, finishes, rough carpentry and drywall (Retail 1 and 2); and Turner-Brooks, Inc., Madison Heights, finishes, drywall, exterior fram- ing (hotel).

ABOUT TREND MILLWORK, INC. In business since 1964, Trend Millwork is a Windsor and Lincoln Park-based union man- ufacturer of custom architectural woodwork to commercial, industrial and institutional clients across North America. William John Muzzatti started Bill Muzzatti Woodcraft in the basement of his Windsor, Ontario home 57 years ago. He outgrew his basement shop in less than three years, began a small manufac- turing facility in Windsor, and opened up three other satellite millwork facilities across Ontario, as well as an office Montreal. The establishment of Interstate Millwork in Detroit soon followed. Trend Millwork & Cabinets of Windsor was born in 1964. Trend Millwork USA soon fol-

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W H AT S O N ’ T R E N D S ’ M
W
H AT S O N
T
R E N D S
’ M
I L LW O R K
M E N U AT
M G M
SALTWATER APPETIZERS
• High
polished stainless steel trim
TREND MILLWORK’S
MAIN COURSE MENU -CONTINUED
at the ceiling and
throughout the
• 2,000
feet
of
European
restaurant
Hornbeam
square reconstituted
veneer
• Booth
divider walls fabricated
out
(Wolfgang Puck Grille)
of solid Wenge
with a stretched
• 6,000 square feet of Wenge recon-
fabric panel system
stituted veneer (hotel
living room)
lobby
and
• 16-feet-tall
swivel
display
cases
made out of solid
Wenge
3,500 square
feet
of
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• High
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Ebony reconstituted veneer
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leather, and stainless steel support
reconstituted veneer
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• Wenge
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for
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• Massive Coleidolegno
reconstitut-
doors, hostess stand and other fur-
ed veneer
millwork
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niture items
restaurant)
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• Bar and
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“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

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(248) 647-0231

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Carpenter Contractors’ Association of Detroit 14801 West 8 Mile Road • Detroit, MI 48235 313-341-2629 • Fax: 313-341-1007 www.ccadetroit.org

ROOFINGROOFING

ROOFROOF II NN GG

ROOFING ROOFING ROOF ROOF I I N N G G By David R. Miller, Associate Editor
ROOFING ROOFING ROOF ROOF I I N N G G By David R. Miller, Associate Editor
ROOFING ROOFING ROOF ROOF I I N N G G By David R. Miller, Associate Editor
ROOFING ROOFING ROOF ROOF I I N N G G By David R. Miller, Associate Editor
ROOFING ROOFING ROOF ROOF I I N N G G By David R. Miller, Associate Editor

By David R. Miller, Associate Editor

Photos Courtesy of CEI

A skilled observer can glean all sorts of information by simply watching a person. People who are reluctant to make eye contact, for example, may not be telling the truth. Confidence and well-deserved pride also manifest themselves in how a per-

son acts. People who walk tall and hold their heads high convey a sense of natural self- assurance that can actually impact their interactions with others. A long history of qual- ity work has taught roofers at CEI, Howell, to walk tall, but they never realized how use- ful the skill would be at the Intramural Sports Building (IMSB) at the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus.

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“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

A total of 45,000 square feet of roofing needed to be replaced at the building, but no access was available from inside the facility or on the south side, so con- tractors needed to walk over the top of the ridge to gain access to the north side. The exhausting trip was a daily ordeal, even for roofers who were used to walk- ing tall.

INSTALLING THE ROOF The IMSB, built in 1928, was the first col- legiate intramural sports building in America. The original concrete shingle roof, totaling 32,800 square feet, was cov- ered by metal roof panels that were attached directly onto a furring strip, commonly called a hatrack, which was installed on top of the concrete. The pitched roof includes a 12,200-square- foot gutter area that was covered with a four-ply, modified asphalt, built-up roof-

ing system. A parapet wall, up to eight feet high, runs the perimeter of the gut- ter. CEI stripped the roof and gutter area down to the underlying roof deck or con- crete shingles and installed a new metal roof along with a Firestone RubberGuard Platinum EPDM system over the gutters. Since snow slides down the metal roof and collects in the gutter area, the .090- mil thick product was selected for its increased durability. “This was our first .090-mil job,” said Eric Cook, operations manager for CEI. “The standard is .060-mil but I was very impressed with this product. I think it was easier to install than the .060-mil. It was heavier, but it was almost impossible to wrinkle because it was so thick. This was not an easy job by any means, but this product made a difficult job a little easier.”

A total of 45,000 square feet of roofing needed to be replaced at the Intramural Sports Building at the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus. Built in 1928, the facility is the first collegiate intramural sports building in America.

is the first collegiate intramural sports building in America. Visit us at www.cam-online.com CAM MAGAZINE MAY

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

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MAY 2008

39

ROOFINGROOFING

A temporary staircase outside on the north side of the building provided the only access
A temporary staircase outside on the north side of the building provided the
only access to the roof during the project. U of M’s track ran along the south
side of the building.
U of M’s track ran along the south side of the building. COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL 2007
U of M’s track ran along the south side of the building. COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL 2007

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MAY 2008

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

The smooth anodized panels were also

a Firestone product, creating single

source accountability for the roofing materials. The new metal panels were set on a dual hatrack system that was installed onto purlins set 16” o.c. on the roof. Holes were drilled through the con- crete tiles to allow for attachment to the underlying steel and specialized purlins were created to provide a secure fit on the uneven surface of the concrete. “The concrete tile wasn’t smooth, it was ribbed,” said Cook. “We had special Z- purlins made to fit the exact profile.” Even with the customized purlins, a cer- tain amount of field modification was

inevitable. The project team worked to minimize the impact of this by doing a detailed survey of the roof. Additional

time spent up front almost certainly paid

for itself later in the project.

“We try to spend a lot of time up front,” said Mike Wilson, sheet metal manager for CEI. “We go out and measure, so our materials are ready to roll when they hit the field. It is more productive to fabri-

cate in our shop than it is in the field.” Not only can the work be done more efficiently in a shop environment, but the steady flow of useable materials also ensures a constant flow of work on the jobsite. “It’s a lot cheaper to send two people out to look ahead of time, than it is to have an entire crew of eight to 12 people standing around and waiting,” said Cook. The end result of the project was a roof that should serve the IMSB for several years, but a number of operational issues needed to be addressed before this could

be realized.

OPERATIONAL ISSUES Access to the IMSB was a major chal- lenge throughout the project. “U of M’s track ran on the south end of the building, so there was absolutely no

staging on the backside of the building,” said Cook. “The challenge was bringing everything that was on the south end over to the north end. The only way to do it was to walk over the ridge.” Metal panels arrived over a two-day period and the crew was fortunately able

to set them on the north end with its own

28-ton crane while renting a 90-ton crane

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

with sufficient reach to place materials on the south end. Even though they didn’t need to bring the panels over by hand, the roof pitch was a familiar obstacle for every member of the crew. “Every day you had to take the staircase

up, walk up the 5-12 pitch roof, and then walk onto the 7-12 pitch roof on the other side of the ridge,” said Cook. “The 5-12 was pretty easy to walk on, but the 7-12 was a little more difficult.” An existing hatch provided access to

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MAY 2008

41

ROOFINGROOFINGROOFINGROOFINGROOFINGROOFING

The crew had to climb a staircase, walk up the 5-12 pitch roof, and then walk onto the 7-12 pitch roof on the other side of the ridge to gain access to the south end of the building.

the roof, but crews would have still need- ed to make the daily trek over the ridge because its position. Using the roof hatch would not have made the project much easier but transporting workers and materials through the building would have disrupted the operation of the IMSB, so the University informed contractors that their only access to the roof would be by a temporary stairway outside. Mid- Michigan Metals, Brighton, fabricated and

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MAY 2008

installed ladders and platforms for two new roof hatches that provide access to both sides of the ridge, which will greatly simplify future roof work. Positioning of the roof hatches was only part of the logistical challenge asso- ciated with the IMSB project. The limited staging area that was available on the ground significantly altered pedestrian and vehicular traffic on the site. “Our staging area was on Hoover

Street,” said Cook. “We had to set up road and sidewalk closures. We rented cement barricades in addition to our own eight- foot-high construction fence and they kept the majority of people out, but we still had a few people walk through. We tried to be as polite as we could, but we also had to make sure that no one got hurt.” Pedestrians were only one group that CEI interacted with. The complexity of

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

the project required coordination with multiple trades. CEI acted as a general contractor as John E. Green Co., Highland Park, replaced drains, and Western Waterproofing Co., Livonia, rebuilt one chimney, tuck pointed another and per- formed other miscellaneous brickwork. Having a good work history with these companies helped CEI comfortably step into an unfamiliar role. “We put a lot of effort into building relationships with subcontractors,” said Cook. “They know how we work and we know how they work, so we can all come together on ideas to get jobs in at a lower cost up-front. We can all win projects that way.” Of course, contractors who work in spe- cific trades may know very little about what other contractors do. Having a good professional relationship helps to

establish

a

dialogue where each can discuss how the operations of the other might be impact- ed. “I had no idea how the mason [Western Waterproofing] would affect us,” admit- ted Cook. “Things worked out really well, but there were some scheduling issues. We didn’t realize how much work was involved in taking the existing chimney all the way down. They set up on the existing roof and we didn’t want to take the existing roof out until they were done because we didn’t want to have to do any repair work if anything fell.” The close partnership between con- tractors greatly contributed to the suc- cess of the project. Every contractor involved has earned the right to walk just a little bit taller.

involved has earned the right to walk just a little bit taller. Visit us at www.cam-online.com

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

involved has earned the right to walk just a little bit taller. Visit us at www.cam-online.com
CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008 43
CAM MAGAZINE
MAY 2008
43

ROOFINGROOFING

ROOFING ROOFING T ests come in many forms, but all pro- vide a chance to learn
ROOFING ROOFING T ests come in many forms, but all pro- vide a chance to learn
ROOFING ROOFING T ests come in many forms, but all pro- vide a chance to learn

T ests come in many forms, but all pro- vide a chance to learn from our perfor- mance – it just may take longer in

some cases. Roof consultants at Roofing Technology Associates, Ltd., Livonia, for example, waited 16 years to see if the innov- ative solution used to repair the roof deck at the Public Safety Building in Southfield had dried out the existing lightweight insulating concrete fill so it wouldn’t need to be removed. Since this was one of the firm’s first projects, it could be thought of as an

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MAY 2008

acid test for the skills of its employees, but it was also a molasses test, as time until the results could be evaluated flowed more slowly than sugary syrup on a winter’s day. Instead of making a premature declaration, consultants at Roofing Technology Associates wisely waited until the roof mem- brane applied in 1992 was recently sampled and the deck underneath was analyzed before saying “Mission Accomplished.”

HOW THE ROOF WAS BUILT The Public Safety Building was built in 1979 and the 26,300-square-foot roof looks typical of the construction of the time, but appearances can be deceiving. A jail facility on the top floor of the building mandated a more durable material than the steel that would have been commonly used for the roof deck, so reinforced concrete was used instead. A layer of lightweight Elastizell insu- lating concrete was placed atop the rein- forced concrete to add insulation value, and

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

the material was screeded to provide a slope towards the rainwater drains. The top layer was an asphalt roof system with aggregate to provide a watertight barrier. Once water breached the top layer, damage to the insu- lating concrete came quickly. “They had leakage all over,” said Michael Mathers, RRC, president of Roofing Technology Associates. “It had been leaking for a long period of time. So much water had leaked through the roof system that the owner’s maintenance personnel began cut- ting holes in the roof and putting portable pumps inside the holes to pump the water from within the lightweight insulating con- crete to the roof drains.”

The water issues got worse over time, and Roofing Technology Associates provided an assessment in 1992. “We took two-inch cores out of the insu- lating concrete, and the holes actually filled up with water as soon as we took the cores out,” said Michael Bode, RRC, vice president of Roofing Technology Associates. Clearly, the roof of the Public Safety Building needed some work. Roofing Technology Associates approached the pro- ject with a goal of minimizing the necessary labor to reduce costs. Salvaging the light- weight concrete was a key goal. “Taking all of the insulating concrete out would have been a very expensive process,”

said Mathers. “You would have lost all the insulating value of the material and you would have had disposal costs, plus you would have needed to add new material to create a slope.” The concrete deck underneath the insu- lating concrete was not a concern because it was dense enough to resist water damage. Since water had saturated the lightweight concrete, its composition was critical. Perlite, a volcanic glass that is heated to cause expansion, is added to some light- weight concrete mixes to add insulating value. All insulating concrete tends to crum- ble under freeze/thaw conditions in a wet environment, but the addition of perlite

Consultants at Roofing Technology Associates waited for 16 years to see if the innovative solution used to repair this roof had dried out the existing lightweight insulating concrete fill so it wouldn’t need to be removed.

insulating concrete fill so it wouldn’t need to be removed. Visit us at www.cam-online.com CAM MAGAZINE

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

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MAY 2008

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ROOFINGROOFING

Wind-powered vents (below) and stationary vents were installed to propel air across the insulating concrete.
Wind-powered vents (below) and stationary vents were
installed to propel air across the insulating concrete.
An insulating product intended for basement walls
(above) allowed free air movement below the new rubber
roofing material.
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46

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MAY 2008

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

exacerbates this problem. Fortunately the project team was able to determine that Elastizell, which contains no perlite, was used. About 20 core samples were taken to evaluate the condition of the lightweight concrete. “The top one-half inch to inch-and-a-half of the lightweight at some locations was completely crumbled, but we had a pretty good surface to work with underneath that,” said Bode. The project team worked on devising a plan to transform the majority of the light- weight concrete into a solid surface upon which a new roof could be applied. It was estimated that not having to remove the lightweight insulating concrete and provid- ing new tapered insulation could save $100,000 to $150,000.

HOW THE LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING CONCRETE WAS SAVED After removing the asphalt roof system, the project team focused on the underlying lightweight concrete. “Could we recover it without affecting the new roof?” asked Mathers. “If we put a new built-up roof on, any amount of moisture underneath would have worked against the new roof system. We decided to use a single ply ballasted EPDM rubber roof system instead. As long as we could keep the mois- ture from attacking the seams from below, the EPDM would probably work. In-seam sealant was used to accomplish this.” The lightweight concrete fill was crum- bling badly near the top of its thickness, but this debris was simply swept and Lightcrete Companies, Inc., Whitmore Lake, applied a new layer of lightweight concrete to the more solid material underneath. The light- weight concrete was sloped to carry water towards the drains. Fisher Roofing Co., Dearborn Heights, won the contract to install the new roof, although a portion of the work was subcontracted to the former Lower Peninsula Roofing & Sheet Metal Company. Even though the EPDM rubber roof system was more water-resistant than other material options, the lightweight con- crete still needed to be dried as much as possible. A number of innovative tech- niques were used to accomplish this. Allowing free air movement below the new rubber roofing material seemed like a good way to vent excess moisture. The pro- ject team found an insulating product intended for basement walls that could serve this purpose. The product was a rigid board insulation composed of extruded

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ROOFINGROOFING

Work was scheduled for warm summer days to aid the drying effort.
Work was scheduled for warm summer
days to aid the drying effort.
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48 CAM MAGAZINE
MAY 2008

polystyrene, a closed cell membrane that is resistant to moisture. The product already had horizontal and vertical grooves cut into

it to channel water away from walls, and the

manufacturer was even able to provide a special order without the filter paper that would have interfered with the water flow on the roof, making it ideal for this applica- tion. In addition to providing room for air to move, the project team also devised a way to propel it across the insulating concrete sur- face below the roof membrane. Wind-pow- ered rotors were added to a multiple rooftop vents, and these vents were augmented with

a number of stationary vents. “The concept was to pull air through the channels and vent out moisture,” said Mathers. “I’ve been in the roofing business for 35 years, and I have never seen wind vents used like that.” Mother Nature aided the drying effort in more ways that one. Work was scheduled for warm summer days to maximize the power of the sun’s rays. “As we tore off each section of the built- up roof, we pulled it back and we didn’t re- roof that section on the same day,” said Mathers. That was a little risky, especially with an occupied jail underneath, so we used large rubber membrane sheets to pro- vide temporary protection overnight. We pulled the rubber off in the morning to let the sun hit it [the insulating concrete] again. You could actually see a color change as the moisture evaporated and we got a signifi- cant amount of moisture out through that process.” Even though the work had to be covered every night, the removal process was a text- book example of jobsite efficiency. One obstacle that slowed operations down was the existing helicopter pad on the roof. Even though it may never have been used, it still needed to be removed to gain access to the roofing materials underneath. “It took about two days to break up the helicopter pad with jackhammers,” said Bode. “The workers used a chute to bring the debris down to a lower roof and they threw it into a dumpster from there.” Like any roof system, the EPDM applied in 1992 had a finite life. The system carried a 10-year manufacturer’s warranty, but it had a life expectancy of 12-15 years. Roof leaks have become evident in recent months, although not as severe as before, and Roofing Technology Associates recently per- formed a new study on the condition of the roof. Deterioration of the roof system was

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

Two-inch cores were taken out of the insulating concrete to evaluate its condition. The lightweight

Two-inch cores were taken out of the insulating concrete to evaluate its condition.

out of the insulating concrete to evaluate its condition. The lightweight concrete was crumbling badly near

The lightweight concrete was crumbling badly near the top of its thick- ness, but this debris was simply swept away and a new layer was applied to the more solid material underneath.

expected due to aging, but the condition of the insulating concrete underneath was on everyone’s mind. “Our first test cut was dry all the way through,” said Bode. “Other test cuts verified this dry condition.” The replacement of the EPDM roof will occur this summer, with no significant insulating concrete repairs expected. In order to save on new roof system costs this year, the existing extruded polystyrene insulation will be reused as will the existing river gravel ballast.

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MAY 2008

49

CONSTRUCTION

HIGHLIGHT

50 CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008
50 CAM MAGAZINE
MAY 2008
CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT 50 CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008 P eople often refer to “the tip of the

P eople often refer to “the tip of the iceberg” when they realize that something far more substantial or problematic lurks underneath the surface of a visible chal- lenge. Few projects illustrate this phrase more clearly than a recently completed

courthouse in Clinton Township. The efficiency of the 47,000-square-foot facility that combines operations for the two branches of the 41-B District Court, which previously functioned in two separate facilities, is obvious to anyone who visits. The innovative ideas that truly make this facility work, including a geothermal system and a massive basement that separates prisoners from the general population while providing space for extensive mechanical systems, lie below grade where they are shielded from view. Construction manager The Dailey Co., Lake Orion, and project architect French Associates, Inc., Rochester, combined their talents to create the tip and the iceberg that facilitates the orderly functioning of the 41-B District Court.

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

THE TIP The new 41-B Courthouse, serving Clinton Township, Harrison Township and Mount Clemens, was built in a light industrial area. Drawbacks associated with the site included its small size and limited frontage on Groesbeck Highway, but these drawbacks were overridden by a desire to build near the Macomb County Jail and heavy land use in the area. Controlling interaction between prison- ers, the public, and staff is an important security consideration with any court

facility, but separate circulation patterns are more difficult to incorporate into smaller facilities. “Prisoners are brought in through a sal- ley port at grade level inside a garage and they take an elevator to the basement level,” explained Suzanne Carlson, AIA, project architect for French Associates. “Once there, they are either put into a holding cell or they are put into one of two elevators that takes them directly to the courtroom. Using the basement that way aided with the circulation of the first

level.” Two additional elevators were needed for the staff and general public, along with an elevator providing access to the basement salley port, making for a total of five func- tional elevators where only two would have been typical in a similarly sized build- ing. Despite having to devote a significant amount of floor space to elevators, the design team was still able to include three separate courtrooms, the largest being 1,800 square feet, plus a magistrate hearing room. Video arraignment capabilities were also

Once people pass through one of the three entry points, they are in a secure environment where face-to-face interaction can safely occur.

environment where face-to-face interaction can safely occur. Visit us at www.cam-online.com CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008 51

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

51

CONSTRUCTION

HIGHLIGHT

CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT Despite a small site and having to devote a significant amount of floor space

Despite a small site and having to devote a significant amount of floor space for a total of five functional elevators, the project team was still able to include three separate courtrooms, the largest being 1,800 square feet, and the magistrate hearing room seen here.

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

added to streamline operations while reducing the number of prisoners who must enter the building, thereby minimiz- ing the amount of space needed to house them securely. The design team kept cumbersome secu- rity infrastructure from taking up too much space by limiting access to three entry points, one for the public, one for the staff and one for prisoners. Once peo- ple pass through these entrances, they have entered a secure environment where face-to-face interaction can safely occur. Underneath this welcoming environment lie a number of complex systems that power its operation.

THE ICEBERG Geothermal systems always involve extensive excavation. They can be designed vertically, with wells that are dug hundreds of feet into the ground, or horizontally with shallowly buried pipes running over a large surface area. Site size made a horizontal system a more cost effective option for the 41-B District Court, so all of the space underneath the parking lot was used for this purpose. “If you dig down under the asphalt at any spot on that site, you’ll hit a geother- mal pipe,” said Paul Danko, project man- ager for the Dailey Co. “In order to install the system, we had to dig the entire park- ing lot down 10 feet and then build it back up after the geothermal loops were installed.” In addition to the geothermal system, a 15-foot deep, 20,000-square-foot base- ment was excavated to house holding cells and mechanical equipment. A total of 84 heat pumps were squeezed into the basement, and each was individually ducted to a mechanical shaft. A high degree of coordination was needed to allocate space between various contrac- tors. Access to the building and parking for tradesworkers were also problematic because the extensive excavation took up much of the site. Large amounts of soil also needed to be stored on the site to bury the geothermal pipes at the proper elevation, but existing springs and Clinton River Valley soil conditions ham- pered this effort. “We encountered a lot of groundwa- ter,” said Danko. “Some of the soils were too wet to go back into the hole, so we had piles of original soil and we still had to truck in sand. There must have been 3,000 cubic yards of material in the way as we sorted everything out.” In spite of the sloppy conditions, the

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

project team was held to a tight 14-month construction schedule that included working through two winters. Crews even placed sod in December to keep on schedule. Other tactics used to keep the project on track included covering up the ground at night to prevent freezing, uti- lizing temporary heating and anticipating long lead time items to prevent material shortages. Much like the below grade ele- ments of the project, the impact of these timesaving measures cannot be seen in the finished project. Instead, they are one of the many unseen elements that sup- ported the successful completion of the project.

that sup- ported the successful completion of the project. THE FOLLOWING SUBCONTRACTORS AND PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
THE FOLLOWING SUBCONTRACTORS AND PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS CONTRIBUTED THEIR SKILLS TO PROJECT: THE Asphalt Paving
THE
FOLLOWING SUBCONTRACTORS
AND PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
CONTRIBUTED THEIR SKILLS TO
PROJECT:
THE
Asphalt
Paving – Asix
Asphalt
Paving, Inc., Milford
Bulletin
Boards and
D
isplay
Cases –
Advanced
Specialties,
Inc.,
Birmingham
Carpentry
and Millwork
George
I.
Landry, Inc., Milford
Carpet and Rubber Flooring –
Conventional Carpet,
Heights
Inc., Sterling
Ceramic
and Terrazzo
– Artisan
Tile,
Inc. Brighton
Courtroom Seating – Sauder
Manufacturing Co.,
Inc., Archbold,
OH
Doors
and
Hardware – LaForce,
Inc.,
Green
Bay, WI
Drywall,
Cold Formed
Framing, GRG,
Metal Studs, Insulation and
Acoustics
– Huron
Acoustic
Tile
Company, Inc.,
Mt. Clemens
Earthwork, Utilities and
Grading –
AG Excavating,
Berkley
Electrical – Metro
Electric
Engineering
Technologies, Romeo
Elevators – Schindler Elevator
Corporation, Livonia
Fabric
Wrapped
Interiors, Inc.,
Panels – Integrated
Warren
Fencing
Future Fence
Company,
Warren
Fire Protection – TriStar
Fire
Protection, Inc.,
Plymouth
Flatwork and Site
Concrete – J.C.
Holly Contracting, Inc.,
Romulus
Footings and Foundations – Rocwall
Company,
Wixom

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Romulus Footings and Foundations – Rocwall Company, Wixom Visit us at www.cam-online.com CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008
Romulus Footings and Foundations – Rocwall Company, Wixom Visit us at www.cam-online.com CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

53

Attractive finishes are on display in this hearing room, but the innovative features that make

Attractive finishes are on display in this hearing room, but the innovative features that make this facility work are shielded from public view.

Geothermal Heating – Loop Group, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN Glazing – Icon Glass Systems, Inc.,
Geothermal
Heating
– Loop Group,
Inc., Fort
Wayne, IN
Glazing
Icon Glass
Systems, Inc.,
Livonia
HVAC – Systemp
Rochester Hills
Landscaping and
Corporation,
Irrigation –
Great
Oaks
Landscaping Assoc.,
Inc., Novi
Masonry
– Giannola
Masonry
Company, Clinton Township
Mobile Storage Unit –
The
Casper
Corporation, Farmington Hills
Overhead Doors
KVM Door
Systems,
Clinton Twp.
Painting – Accurate Painting
Company, Warren
Plumbing – J.T.’s Enterprises,
Inc.,
Chesterfield
Twp.
Precast Bollards
Royal Stone
LLC,
Williamstown
Roofing
RoofCon, Inc.,
Brighton
Security
and Access Systems –
Ctec,
Centerline
Security Products
– Jails Correctional
Products, Minster, OH
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54

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DAILEY CO.

Signage – J.L. Geisler Corp., Warren Spray-on Fireproofing – Painting, Inc., Lansing Valley Stainless Steel
Signage
– J.L. Geisler Corp.,
Warren
Spray-on Fireproofing –
Painting, Inc., Lansing
Valley
Stainless Steel Railings – Sav’s
Welding
Services, River Rouge
Structural Steel
– Kirby Steel,
Inc.,
Burton
Surveying and Layout – Boss
Engineering Company, Farmington
Hills
Temporary Signage
– SignWorx,
Waterford
Toilet Partitions
and Accessories, Fire
Extinguishers, Screens and Shades –
International
Building
Products, Co., Livonia
Waterproofing –
Western
Waterproofing Co., Livonia
Subcontractors
and
professional
consultants
listed
in
the
Construction
Highlight
are
identified
by the general
contractor, architect
or
owner.
The 41-B District Court includes a horizontal geothermal system with shallowly buried pipes. Its large
The 41-B District Court includes a horizontal geothermal system
with shallowly buried pipes. Its large surface area was covered
by the parking lot to conserve space.
surface area was covered by the parking lot to conserve space. Visit us at www.cam-online.com CAM

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CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

55

PRODUCTS

PRODUCTS iLevel® Shear Brace Stands Strong Against Nature's Wrath and Meets the Wall Framing Challenges of

iLevel® Shear Brace Stands Strong Against Nature's Wrath and Meets the Wall Framing Challenges of Today's Homes

iLevel by Weyerhaeuser provides a fast and simple way to frame walls to meet the most demanding structural challenges. The iLevel® Shear Brace is a pre-built, engineered panel with pre- dictable and consistent performance, providing critical lateral brac- ing to help homes resist the forces imposed on them by high winds and earthquakes. In addition, the iLevel Shear Brace can be used in multi-story applications and provides a way to build stable, narrow walls quickly and with high quality in homes with many window and door openings. The iLevel Shear Brace is optimized to resist high lateral loads with the ability to fit in narrower wall sections. The panel is engi- neered for performance and is manufactured in a controlled setting, providing builders and homeowners with confidence that it will help the home stand strong. Beyond concerns with in-plane lateral loads created by earth- quakes and high winds, the iLevel Shear Brace is able to resist ver- tical gravity loads and out-of-plane lateral loads, which gives it greater design flexibility. In addition, homeowners now demand more and larger windows in their homes, which may be part of a great room tall wall. Many times, these choices lead to tall, narrow wall segments in the structure, which are a challenge to properly brace using traditional or prescriptive framing methods. The iLevel Shear Brace provides the solution by allowing for building strong and narrow wall sections using a one-piece panel that is simple to install. The iLevel Shear Brace is available in 12" and 18" widths and in various stock and custom heights that can be trimmed in the field, if needed. It offers ease of installation through mounting brackets that allow builders to adjust the panel front-to-back for ready align- ment with bolts installed in a home's foundation. The panel can be used on both the first story and second stories of homes. iLevel also makes life easier for other trades, as well, since the iLevel Shear

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Brace has pre-drilled holes to facilitate installation of wiring and plumbing. Additional holes can be drilled at the job site, helping contractors save time and eliminate guesswork. Builders and homeowners can be confident that they have made an environmentally responsible choice when selecting the iLevel Shear Brace. The TimberStrand® Laminated Strand Lumber (LSL) used to produce the iLevel Shear Brace is made from logs that are too small for conventional solid-sawn lumber and the manufacturing process uses virtually every portion of every log to produce strong, straight and consistent framing members. To learn more about the complete iLevel line of residential framing products, software tools, technical support, and exten- sive distribution network throughout North America, visit www.ilevel.com or call 1-888-iLevel8 (888-453-8358) to locate a dealer near you.

Honeywell Expands X Series Line of Portable Gas Detection for Construction Workers

Honeywell has announced that three new products have been added to its X Series line of durable, easy-to-use portable gas detection instrumentation. The X series now has the capability of protecting an entire industrial crew from toxic and combustible gas hazards. The X series now includes: the X5 model five-gas detector simultaneously monitors up to five gases, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the XD model single-gas detec- tor monitors a wide range of toxic gases at parts per million lev- els and percent oxygen concentration. The MicroDock II test/cal- ibration docking system is compatible with X5 and XD portable detectors. Expandable up to 10 docking modules, the MicroDock II offers automatic "one touch" calibration/bump testing/data transfer and simplified record keeping, plus battery charging of up to 6 detectors (X5 model only, wall adaptor required). The MicroDock is expandable to meet the needs of larger crews. The X5 and XD detectors use a wide range of Honeywell's elec- trochemical sensors, available in many user-selectable configura- tions to detect the most common gases that crews are likely to encounter in construction environments. In addition, the X5 offers an optional IR sensor for monitoring percent of car- bon dioxide and a PID sensor for detecting volatile organic com- pounds. Both units offer small, lightweight, robust designs that protect against water and dust ingress and extreme impact. Other common features include multi-language support, datalogging, large, easy-to-read backlit display, attention grabbing alarms and

datalogging, large, easy-to-read backlit display, attention grabbing alarms and “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

compatibility with Fleet Manager II data management software. The Honeywell Analytics X series also includes the Minimax XP(single-gas) and Minimax X4 (4-gas) portable gas detectors. All X series units include a standard two- year factory warranty and are available through distributors of Honeywell Analytics gas detection instrumentation. Honeywell Analytics offers a wide range of gas detection devices to suit all types of applications and industries. For more information about our products and services, please visit our website:

www.honeywellanalytics.com or e-mail:

detectgas@honeywell.com, or call toll-free

1-800-538-0363.

Firestone Ride-Rite™ Air Helper Springs Available for New Toyota® Tundra®

Firestone Industrial Products Company, LLC has announced the availability of its Ride-Rite air helper springs for the new Toyota Tundra, both 2WD and 4WD. The Ride-Rite kit provides heavy duty support for Tundra owners to safely and comfortably tow heavy loads by using air pressure to adjust Firestone's air helper springs, compensating for varying load capacities and road conditions. Additional benefits of Ride-Rite systems include maintaining braking effectiveness, reducing tire wear, leveling off-center loads - individual inflation valves allow for separate side-to-side adjustment - and increasing vehicle stability.

side-to-side adjustment - and increasing vehicle stability. A pair of Ride-Rite air springs provides up to

A pair of Ride-Rite air springs provides up to 5,000 pounds of load leveling capac- ity. (Note: Air springs do not increase the load-carrying capacity of the vehicle. Do not exceed the vehicle's recommended Gross Vehicle Weight Rating [GVWR]). Firestone's Tundra Ride-Rite kit includes everything needed for an easy installation that typically takes less than one hour and

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comes with a two-year limited warranty. The system's reinforced double convolut- ed air springs install between the frame and the axle, and the kit utilizes the vehi- cle's factory holes for "no drill" installation. Firestone also offers the Air-Rite™ air accessory system to complement the Tundra Ride-Rite kit, which enables driv- ers to make air pressure adjustments with a push of a button installed on the dash- board. Trained technicians are available toll- free 800-888-0650 to answer any product application, installation or warranty ques- tions Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EST. For more informa- tion, visit www.ride-rite.com.

Speedy, Accurate PowerDigger Automated Excavation System Introduced by Leica Geosystems

PowerDigger features a large, see-at- glance color display screen giving the operator precise information on the depth

and position of the excavator bucket. Operators can dig with ease and confi- dence even in demanding “blind cut” situ- ations. Multiple job settings let the opera- tor switch between different digging pro- files at the touch of a button, and custom profiles can even be created on the machine to continue from existing ground profiles. For further information please contact:

Leica Geosystems Inc., Atlanta, GA 30092; website: www.leica-geosystems.us; or by phone: 770-326-9557.

Geosystems Inc., Atlanta, GA 30092; website: www.leica-geosystems.us; or by phone: 770-326-9557. CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008 57
Geosystems Inc., Atlanta, GA 30092; website: www.leica-geosystems.us; or by phone: 770-326-9557. CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008 57

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

57

5 8 C A M M A G A Z I N E M A
5 8 C A M M A G A Z I N E M A

58

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

PRODUCTS

Let's Go Aero Offers the Moover Transporter

Let's Go Aero (LGA) has developed The Moover™ Transporter to serve the needs of the mobility, mower and other powered equipment markets. The new Moover Transporter consists of a high capacity, fixed, straight-out-of-the- hitch rack platform - and a durable Ramp with Anti- Skid tape and D-Ring Tie Downs. The Moover provides a large haul- ing area of 48 inches by 32 inches with a 7-inch-high rail, grip tape for easy loading of wheeled items, and D- Ring Tie Downs for securing mobility scooters, snow blowers and other large heavy mowers, large portable generators, and more. In addition, The Moover Transporter's outside location allows for more room inside the vehicle. Plus, it doubles as a car- rier for hauling even more cargo. Additional options are available, includ- ing a GearBag™ expandable cargo bag and Bicycle Mounting hardware to trans- form The Moover into an enclosed carrier and bicycle rack, all-in-one. LGA's Moover Transporter - which is rated to carry equipment up to 300 lbs. - mounts to cars, vans, trucks and SUVs with standard 2-inch size receiver hitches. The product also has integrated LGA design features like the Silent Hitch Pin™. The Moover Transporter system has an MSRP of $399.95. For more information, visit Let's Go Aero at www.LetsGoAero.com, contact company headquarters at 877-GO-4- AERO (464-2376), or write to 3380 N. El Paso St., Colorado Springs, CO 80907.

or write to 3380 N. El Paso St., Colorado Springs, CO 80907. Metcar® Babbitt Bearing Materials

Metcar® Babbitt Bearing Materials for Elevated Temperatures Up to 350° F

Metallized Carbon Corporation now offers Metcar grades M-161 and M-162 mechanical materials for running at elevat- ed temperatures. These unique carbon/graphite Babbit impregnated materials are designed to operate in diffi- cult environments where conventional lubricating methods cannot be used. This proprietary Babbit impregnation provides

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

excellent wear resist- ance and enhanced lubrication for bearings and thrust washers for submerged and dry environments.

Operating

at

tempera-
tempera-

tures up to 350º F these materials are unri- valed for lubricating in submerged low viscosity fluids such as water and fuels. For dry environments they provide excel- lent oil free lubrication at high tempera- tures. These Metcar grades are typically utilized for moderate loads at medium and high speeds. Designed to provide maxi- mum lubrication, bearings manufactured from these materials are low in friction and will not score the mating shaft. Bearings manufactured from Metcar materials are self-lubricating, non-galling, dimensionally stable and have high com- pressive strength. Boasting excellent lubri- cating qualities and long life, these materi- als are completely homogenous and pro- vide continuous lubrication for their serv- ice life, making them an excellent candi- date for bearings, bearing assemblies and

excellent candi- date for bearings, bearing assemblies and Visit us at www.cam-online.com mechanical components for

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mechanical components for operating at elevated temperatures. For additional information about the company and its services, please visit us online at www.metcar.com or call (914)

941-3738.

Metabo's New 3/8" Drill Ideal for Light to Medium Drilling and Driving Applications
Metabo's New
3/8" Drill Ideal for
Light to Medium
Drilling and Driving
Applications

Metabo Corporation, a leading international manufacturer of pro- fessional grade portable electric power tools and abrasives for industrial, con- struction and welding applications, has just released its new 3/8" drill, which is perfect for light to medium drilling and driving. Offering a no-load speed of 2,850 RPM, the BE4010 is ideal for drilling holes and driving screws into wood or sheet

metal, particularly in the carpentry, metal fabrication and plant maintenance indus- tries. The tool has a drilling capacity of 7/8" in soft wood with the use of self-feed bits and a drilling capacity of 3/8" in mild steel. In addition to offering a 3/8" keyless chuck for easy bit changing, the BE4010 incorpo- rates a variable speed electronic switch that allows for easy starting of a bit into any material. The 400-watt drill's light weight of 2.64 Lbs as well as its ergonomic design enables extended use without fatigue, which is useful when drilling in an awkward posi- tion or from on top of a ladder. The 3.5 amp motor offers a maximum tightening torque of 53 inch Ibs. In addi- tion, the BE4010 offers an optional joist hanger to keep the tool within easy reach and to make working from a ladder or a scaffold safer. For more information, please contact Terry Tuerk, Metabo Corporation, 1231 Wilson Drive, West Chester, PA 19380; 800- 638-2264; fax: 800-638-2261; e-mail:

ttuerk@metabousa.com; or visit www.metabousa.com.

e-mail: ttuerk@metabousa.com; or visit www.metabousa.com. 313•531•2700 Complete Crane Rental Services Since
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MAY 2008

59

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PEOPLE

IN

CONSTRUCTION

SSOE, one of the nation’s largest architecture and engineer- ing firms, has announced the fol- lowing news items: 39 new sen- ior associates and 20 new associ- ates were added to the firm in 2007 - currently SSOE has 1,000 employees, nearly 300 of which

are associates and senior associates; the firm has appointed Matthew Kennedy, RA, ACHA, senior associate, to the role of healthcare account executive; and Donald L. Warner, PE, vice president and director of quality and training, was recently named Engineer of the Year by the Technical Society of Toledo and the Toledo Chapter of the Ohio Society of Professional Engineers.

Chapter of the Ohio Society of Professional E ngineers. K ennedy Warner DeMaria Building Company ,

Kennedy

Warner

DeMaria Building Company, Detroit, is pleased to announce the following new hires and promotions: Jeff Burch has been

hired in the position of estimator; Dave Sargent has been hired in the position of cost engineer; and Ryan Kidd has been promoted from cost engineer

to project engineer in the firm’s Commercial and Industrial

Groups.

engineer in the firm’s Commercial and Industrial Groups. Burch Sargent K idd The Albert Kahn Family

Burch

Sargent

Kidd

The Albert Kahn Family of Companies, Detroit, a leading provider of architecture, engineering, planning, design and management services, has announced that Building Owners and Managers Association of Metropolitan Detroit (BOMA) named Michael Lauhoff, RPA, FMA, 2007’s Facility Manager of the Year. This award recognizes Lauhoff as an outstanding leader in commercial real estate management and validates his ability and com-

mitment to exceeding standards of service and professionalism.

to exceeding standards of service and professionalism. Lauhoff Spalding DeDecker Associates, Inc. (SDA), a

Lauhoff

Spalding DeDecker Associates, Inc. (SDA), a regional civil engineering and surveying firm based in Detroit, announces that Kimberly McDaniel, PE, PTOE was chosen as one of the National Society of Professional Engineers’ top ten candidates for “New Faces of Engineering” program.

ten candidates for “New Faces of Engineering” program. McDaniel Troy-based Controlled Power Company , a global

McDaniel

Troy-based Controlled Power Company, a global manufac- turer of complete commercial, industrial, and medical electrical power solutions, has announced the promotions of Kevin Marheine to east regional sales manager (from east regional sales coordinator), and Devon Brown to east regional sales coordinator (from receptionist).

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

SmithGroup, Detroit, the nation’s 6th largest architectural, engineering, planning and interior design firm, has hired Darryl James, business development manager, to lead project pursuits and client development for its Learning and Office Workplace Studios; SmithGroup has also hired Michael J. Weingartz, PE, to lead its electrical engi- neering staff, as its electri- cal engineering discipline director.

staff, as its electri- cal engineering discipline director. J ames Weingartz Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc.

James

as its electri- cal engineering discipline director. J ames Weingartz Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc. (SME),

Weingartz

Soil

and

Materials

Engineers,

Inc.

(SME), Plymouth, has announced the transfer of Jeff Krusinga, PE, GE, sen- ior consultant, from the firm’s Plymouth office to their Kalamazoo office.

from the firm’s Plymouth office to their Kalamazoo office. Krusinga Brighton-based Professional Concepts Insurance

Krusinga

Brighton-based Professional Concepts Insurance Agency (PCIA) has added Glenn Alkire as a vice president to their team serving architects and engineers. Alkire is a veteran of the insurance indus- try and has served the design profession- al community in Indiana for the past ten years. Also, PCIA is pleased to announce that Brian Kordich, a sophomore at the University of Michigan, is the winner of the first annual PCIA engineering excel- lence scholarship. Kordich received his scholarship at the annual American Council of Consulting Engineers of Michigan Engineering Excellence Awards Program in February.

Ann Arbor-based NSF International, an independent, non-profit organization that certifies products and writing standards for food, water and consumer goods, recently announced that Jennifer Tong has been appointed director of NSF's Restaurant Food Safety Division.

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The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the elevation of Detroit architect Charles F. Merz, FAIA, to the organization’s College of Fellows. Merz, the proprietor of the Detroit-based architectural and urban design firm Merz & Associates, was among 116 architects nationally elevated to AIA’s prestigious College of Fellows. This distinction is bestowed on architects with at least 10 years of membership in the AIA and who

have made significant contributions to

architecture in a number of areas. New Fellows are entitled to use the designa- tion “FAIA” following their names and will be invested in the College of Fellows at the 2008 AIA

National Convention and Design Expo in Boston in May.

the College of Fellows at the 2008 AIA National Convention and Design Expo in Boston in

Merz

the College of Fellows at the 2008 AIA National Convention and Design Expo in Boston in

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

61

PEOPLE

IN

CONSTRUCTION

PEOPLE IN CONSTRUCTION Rubin Darga Rochester Hills-based civil engineering and surveying firm Giffels-Webster

Rubin

PEOPLE IN CONSTRUCTION Rubin Darga Rochester Hills-based civil engineering and surveying firm Giffels-Webster

Darga

Rochester Hills-based civil engineering and surveying firm Giffels-Webster Engineers, has announced two appoint- ments: Marlin Rubin to director of busi- ness development and Michael Darga to senior project manager.

Skanska USA Building Inc. announced today the promotion of Steve Orlando to project executive from sen- ior project manager at the company’s Portage loca- tion. Kirk Frownfelter, area general manager for Skanska’s Michigan opera- tions, made the announce-

ment. Skanska has offices in Southfield, Portage, Grand Rapids, and Detroit.

offices in Southfield, Portage, Grand Rapids, and Detroit. Orlando Detroit-based architectural design firm, Hamilton

Orlando

Detroit-based architectural design firm, Hamilton Anderson Associates (HAA), has announced the following four appoint- ments to associate: Amy Chesterton, ASLA, AICP; Sybil Griffin, SPHR, NOMA; Daniel Kinkead, AIA; and Lori Singleton, ASLA.

NOMA ; Daniel Kinkead, AIA ; and Lori Singleton, ASLA . C hesterton Kinkhead Griffin Singleton

C

hesterton

Kinkead, AIA ; and Lori Singleton, ASLA . C hesterton Kinkhead Griffin Singleton Since 1968 “SPECIALTY

Kinkhead

AIA ; and Lori Singleton, ASLA . C hesterton Kinkhead Griffin Singleton Since 1968 “SPECIALTY CLEANING”

Griffin

; and Lori Singleton, ASLA . C hesterton Kinkhead Griffin Singleton Since 1968 “SPECIALTY CLEANING”

Singleton

Since 1968

“SPECIALTY CLEANING”

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62

CAM MAGAZINE

MAY 2008

CORPORATE

NEWS

DeMaria Building Company, Detroit, has been hired by the Western Townships Utilities Authority (WTUA) to complete the Lower Rouge Expansion project in Canton. The project includes the construc- tion of a 5.5 million gallon equalization basin and a new pump station, upgrades to the existing equalization basin and pump station, site improvements, concrete work and mechanical and electrical sup- port system upgrades. Also, DeMaria

Building Company has been hired by Mercy Memorial Hospital to build the new Monroe Ambulatory Care Center project in Monroe. The 75,000-square-foot med- ical office building will include a 25,000 square-foot surgery center, a diagnostic radiology center and a café.

LaForce Inc., a leading distributor of door hardware and a manufacturer of cus- tom hollow metal frames and doors, has relocated its offices from Auburn Hills to a new, larger location at 289 Robbins Drive in Troy. Headquartered in Green Bay, WI, LaForce has additional offices and manu- facturing facilities throughout Illinois, Wisconsin and Ohio.

The Asphalt Pavement Association of Michigan (APAM) awarded the Chrysler High Speed Oval Test Track in Chelsea the “Award of Excellence” in the Special/Challenging Projects Category at the recent APAM-MDOT Asphalt Paving Awards Banquet. APAM honored Ajax Paving Industries, Inc.; Chrysler, LLC; Wilcox Professional Services; and Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc. (SME) for their work on this project. APAM also awarded The Mall at Partridge Creek, in Macomb County, the “Award of Merit” in the Commercial Projects Category. APAM honored the Taubman Company; John Carlo, Inc.; Skanska USA; and SME for their efforts on this project.

C2AE, a full-service engineering, archi- tecture and planning firm with offices in Lansing, Grand Rapids and Gaylord, is opening C2AE Nevada in the Las Vegas area. C2AE Nevada has also established a strategic partnership with Sigma Engineering Solutions, Inc. of Las Vegas.

“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

Ann Arbor-based NSF International recently announced that the Douglas Barwick, Inc. company has obtained NSF Certification for its stainless steel pipe and fittings, becoming one of the first compa- nies to offer a complete size range of NSF/ANSI 61 certified products. By obtaining certification to NSF/ANSI Standard 61: Drinking Water System Components-- Health Effects, Douglas Barwick, Inc. - a leader in the manufactur- ing of stainless steel pipe and pipe fittings - has demonstrated compliance with all of the Standard's requirements.

Peter Basso Associates (PBA), Troy, a mechanical and electrical engineering firm, has been awarded a contract to pro- vide building commissioning services for nine new Meijer Stores in Michigan, Ohio, and Illinois. Four of the new stores will be seeking LEED certification under the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) require- ments.

Richard C. Rich, PE, president of Rich and Associates, one of North America’s leading companies dedicated solely to parking design and planning, recently announced that the firm has moved its headquarters to a new Southfield location at 26877 Northwestern Highway. Rich and Associates has been headquartered in Southfield since 1974.

Warren-based TrynEx International has named Power Equipment Distributors, Inc., headquartered in Richmond, as a new distributor for their SnowEx and TurfEx product divisions. Power Equipment Distributors, Inc. is located at 69250 Burke Dr., Richmond, MI 48062; phone 1-800- 624-2932; website www.powereqp.com.

MI 48062; phone 1-800- 624-2932; website www.powereqp.com. Visit us at www.cam-online.com HHEELLPP GGRREEEENN YYOOUURR

Visit us at www.cam-online.com

HHEELLPP GGRREEEENN YYOOUURR BBUUIILLDDIINNGG THICK OR THIN DETROIT TERRAZZO CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION ARTISAN TILE
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OR THIN
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CAM MAGAZINE MAY 2008 63
CAM MAGAZINE
MAY 2008
63

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