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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 160
WINTER WEATHER
LOCAL PAGE 7
WOODSIDE
WINS IN CCS
SPORTS PAGE 11
STEWING GOAT
IN RECORD TIME
FOOD PAGE 17
STORM BRINGS RAIN, HAIL TO BAY AREA
Insurance
fraud nets
year in jail
Business owner must also pay
more than $2M in restitution
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The owner of a San Mateo pest and jan-
itorial services company who prosecutors
say under-reported more than $10 million
of payroll to avoid paying more than $2
million in workers compensation insur-
ance was sentenced yesterday to a year in
jail and ordered to repay the money.
Teresa Reif, 34, faced up to 17 years in
prison after pleading no contest in April to eight various counts
of fraud without any sentencing promises. On Tuesday, Judge
Craig Parson instead handed down the year jail followed by
five years supervised probation. She must also repay
$1,651,148 to the State Compensation Insurance Fund and
$451,310 to Berkshire Hathaway.
Four plead no contest
in fight with neighbor
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Redwood City woman, two daughters
and a friend took plea deals yesterday
rather than stand trial for reportedly
assaulting a 21-year-old neighbor who
they accused of saying something about
their mother.
Anabel Aguilar, 25 pleaded no contest
to felony assault in return for 60 days jail
while her mother, Maria Delcarmen
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Plaza in Foster City, a new mini-
neighborhood at Pilgrim and Triton
drives, is set to have its grand opening
later this month and some city ofcials
like the project so much they say it will
set a new standard for future develop-
ments in the city.
With not much dirt left to develop in
Foster City and the loss of its
Redevelopment Agency, the project rep-
resents one of the last the city will sup-
port nancially to build affordable hous-
ing in the city.
They have spared no expense. It is
absolutely gorgeous, Mayor Pam
Frisella told the Daily Journal yesterday.
Frisella is impressed by the project.
She said it could inuence what her
expectations are for Foster Citys last
major vacant piece of land, the 15-acre
site adjacent to City Hall that is set for a
mixed-use development.
They have set the bar high with the
construction and amenities. Im really
impressed, Frisella said about the
Sares-Regis project.
The Plaza, the rst phase of a larger
project, features more than 300 multi-
High praise for The Plaza
Mixed-used development to open soon in Foster City
Rendering of The Plaza in Foster City.
ERIK OEVERNDIEK/DAILY JOURNAL
The San Mateo-Foster City School District Board of Trustees is scheduled to vote to apply for a magnet grant that calls for moving
Parkside Elementary School into a program focusing on science, technology, engineering and math.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Parents are irked about plans to phase
out the Montessori program at Parkside
Elementary School and convert the San
Mateo campus into a program focusing
on science, technology, engineering and
math, which they say are being put for-
ward without their input.
On Thursday, the San Mateo-Foster
City School District Board of Trustees is
scheduled to vote to apply for a magnet
grant that calls for moving Parkside to a
single focus by implementing a STEM
program science, technology, engi-
Parents, district at odds over schools focus
Proposal would phase out Parksides Montessori program, introduce new curriculum
See SCHOOL, Page 20
See PLAZA, Page 20
See FRAUD, Page 18
Teresa Reif
Anabel Aguilar
See FIGHT, Page 18
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Newspaper heiress
Patricia Hearst is 59.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
2003
A re sparked by pyrotechnics broke
out during a concert by the group Great
White at The Station nightclub in West
Warwick, R.I., killing 100 people and
injuring about 200 others.
There is no hope of joy
except in human relations.
Antoine de Saint-Exupery, French author (1900-1944)
Actor Sidney
Poitier is 86.
Singer Rihanna is
25.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A swimmer dives into the icy water of the Houhai Lake in central Beijing, China.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 50s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest winds
around 20 mph.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 50s. North winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s. North winds 5 to 15
mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s.
Friday night and Saturday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance
of showers. Lows in the lower 40s. Highs in the lower 50s.
Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 02 Lucky
Star in rst place; No. 01 Gold Rush in second
place; and No.05 California Classic in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:42.87.
(Answers tomorrow)
CLASH COURT BROKER DIGEST
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When she got sick after they set sail, he
needed to get BACK TO THE DOC
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
EVUEN
ROYLG
UCONIS
VITACE
2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
7 3 1
1 15 19 30 56 28
Mega number
Feb. 19 Mega Millions
13 16 21 23 29
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 3 7 0
Daily Four
0 1 8
Daily three evening
In 1792, President George Washington signed an act creating
the U.S. Post Ofce.
In 1809, the Supreme Court ruled that no state legislature
could annul the judgments or determine the jurisdictions of
federal courts.
In 1839, Congress prohibited dueling in the District of
Columbia.
In 1862, William Wallace Lincoln, the 11-year-old son of
President Abraham Lincoln and rst lady Mary Todd Lincoln,
died at the White House, apparently of typhoid fever.
In 1907, President Theodore Roosevelt signed an immigration
act which excluded idiots, imbeciles, feebleminded persons,
epileptics, insane persons from being admitted to the United
States.
In 1933, Congress proposed the 21st Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution to repeal Prohibition.
In 1938, Anthony Eden resigned as British foreign secretary
following Prime Minister Neville Chamberlains decision to
negotiate with Italian dictator Benito Mussolini.
In 1944, during World War II, U.S. bombers began raiding
German aircraft manufacturing centers in a series of attacks
that became known as Big Week.
In 1962, astronaut John Glenn became the rst American to
orbit the Earth as he ew aboard Project Mercurys Friendship
7 spacecraft.
In 1965, the Ranger 8 spacecraft crashed on the moon, as
planned, after sending back thousands of pictures of the lunar
surface.
In 1971, the National Emergency Warning Center in Colorado
erroneously ordered U.S. radio and TV stations off the air;
some stations heeded the alert, which was not lifted for about
40 minutes.
Gloria Vanderbilt is 89. Author-screenwriter Richard Matheson
is 87. Racing Hall of Famer Bobby Unser is 79. Actress Marj
Dusay is 77. Jazz-soul singer Nancy Wilson is 76. Racing Hall of
Famer Roger Penske is 76. Singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-
Marie is 72. Hockey Hall-of-Famer Phil Esposito is 71. Senate
Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is 71. Movie director
Mike Leigh is 70. Actress Brenda Blethyn is 67. Actress Sandy
Duncan is 67. Rock musician J. Geils is 67. Actor Peter Strauss
is 66. Rock singer-musician-producer Walter Becker (Steely
Dan) is 63. Former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown is 62.
Country singer Kathie Baillie is 62.
Before the introduction of tea from
China, the English drank tea made from
catnip.
***
Judy Garland (1922-1969) was the low-
est paid star in the 1939 movie Wizard
of Oz.
***
South Dakota is a leader in honey pro-
duction. In recognition of its impor-
tance to the states farm economy, the
honeybee was adopted as the state
insect in 1978.
***
The United States devotes about 29 per-
cent of its total land area to forests.
Alaska has 22 million acres of forest,
the most of all 50 states. California has
the second most forestland with 20.6
million acres. Idaho is third, with 20.4
million acres of forest.
***
Do you know what is special about this
sentence? We promptly judged antique
ivory buckles for the next prize. See
answer at end.
***
Automatic electric bread making
machines were introduced in 1992.
***
Each week, Americans spend $90 mil-
lion playing Bingo.
***
Elvis Presley married Priscilla Beaulieu
on May 1, 1967 at the Aladdin Hotel in
Las Vegas. Elvis was 32, Priscilla was
21.
***
More Kraft macaroni and cheese is sold
in Canada than in any other country.
***
The artwork of Pablo Picasso between
1901 to 1904 is called his Blue
Period. Picassos friend Casagemas
committed suicide. The artist was also
away from home for the first time, and
living in poor conditions. His paintings,
done almost entirely in blue, expressed
his depression.
***
The turkey trot, popular in the early
1900s, was almost banned. Dancers
bob their heads like strutting turkeys.
Some people felt the dance was demor-
alizing.
***
You would weigh more than a trillion
pounds on a neutron star.
***
The Baby Ruth candy bar was named
for President Grover Clevelands
daughter Ruth (1891-1904), who was
born while Cleveland lived in the White
House. In 1923, as a promotional stunt,
Baby Ruth candy bars were dropped
from airplanes over many U.S. cities.
Each candy bar had a tiny parachute
attached to it.
***
The 10 story Wainwright Building in
St. Louis, Mo., was the first skyscraper
in the United States. The building was
completed in 1891.
***
The word assassination was invented
by William Shakespeare.
***
The green pigment in plants is called
chlorophyll.
***
There are over half a million species of
beetles.
***
Wooden baseball bats weigh between 2
and 3 pounds. Wooden bats are com-
monly made from ash wood, however,
maple, pine and hickory are also used.
***
Doris Day (born 1924) recorded the hit
song Hooray for Hollywood in 1959.
***
Answer: It is a holalphabetic sentence,
which is a sentence that contains every
letter of the alphabet. Another one is:
The quick brown fox jumps over the
lazy dog.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
13 14 19 35 45 20
Mega number
Feb. 16 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Suspicious circumstances. Two men were
reportedly dragging another man on Redwood
Avenue before 10:24 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15.
Suspicious circumstances. Seven men wear-
ing black hoodies red shots on El Camino
Real before 11:52 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13.
Suspicious person. A suspicious man was
knocking on doors on Farm Hill Boulevard
before 10:03 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13.
Burglary. Someone reported their purse was
taken from their vehicle on Whipple Avenue
before 3:22 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13.
Suspicious person. A woman wearing a white
jacket was trying to sell marijuana on Alden
Street before 5:21 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12.
Stolen vehicle. A blue Chevrolet 1500 was
stolen on Warren Street before 8:25 a.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 12.
Burglary. Someone reported their home being
ransacked on Stanley Street before 1:22 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 11.
SAN BRUNO
Suspicious person. A man knocked on some-
ones door at 5:30 p.m. asking if she needed
repairs on her house on 500 block of Redwood
Avenue. After he left, another man knocked on
her door asking the same thing before 7:19
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13.
Grand theft. A man left his laptop on the roof
his vehicle and when he went back it was gone
on 900 block of Sneath Avenue before 9:24
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12.
Suspicious circumstances. A man reported
that his wife stepped on two hypodermic nee-
dles that were sticking out of a drain in the
womens rest room on 400 block of Third
Avenue before 4:23 p.m. Monday, Feb. 11.
Police reports
Dude, wheres my car?
Police found a car for a owner who forgot
where she parked on the 1400 block of
Burlingame Avenue in Burlingame before
12:42 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Elected officials with the Sequoia
Healthcare District are bracing for uncertainty
as they grapple with the implications of the
federal Affordable Care Act and whether new
strategies should be developed as it supports
the health-care needs of residents in southern
San Mateo County.
The board recently reorganized with Dr.
Jerry Shefren being appointed president to
take over for Kim Grifn and Art Faro being
named vice president. Katie Kane was also
renamed the districts secretary-treasurer at its
Feb. 6 board meeting.
At the same meeting, the districts Chief
Financial Ofcer Lee Michelson reported that
the district last year spent $10.3 million on
programs while collecting $8.3 million in tax
revenues. A contractual payment from Dignity
Health, operator of Sequoia Hospital, and
reserves provided the balance of spending, he
reported in his State of the District speech.
Dignity Health is the new name for the for-
mer Catholic Healthcare West which bought
Sequoia Hospital from the district in 1996.
Shefren praised the districts recent direc-
tion in terms of tighter
controls on how grants are
given and pledged careful
oversight of taxpayer
money.
As for the future, in the
next two to three years the
board has to understand
the implications of the
Affordable Care Act and
how it affects the care-
delivery systems in the district which may
require changes in our strategy. We have to
make sure that our activities are in sync with
the major changes that will be occurring in
health care, Shefren wrote in a statement.
Faro wants to make sure as many residents
as possible have access to critical health-care
services.
There are many loopholes in our health
care delivery system. As best we can, the dis-
trict should ensure that no citizen in our dis-
trict goes without preventive and curative
care, Faro wrote in a statement.
Jack Hickey, who has consistently called for
the districts dissolution, rounds out the board.
The district provides major funding to
numerous nonprot community health organ-
izations that directly assist more than 50,000
women, children and seniors in the district,
which includes the cities of Atherton,
Belmont, Menlo Park, Portola Valley,
Redwood City, San Carlos, Woodside and
portions of San Mateo and Foster City from
Skyline Boulevard to the Bay.
In other health care news: Sequoia Hospital
announced yesterday that it is one of the
nations 50 best hospitals for 2013 as meas-
ured by Healthgrades, an online resource that
helps consumers search, evaluate, compare
and connect with physicians and hospitals.
Healthgrades evaluated nearly 4,500 hospitals
nationwide reviewing and analyzing clini-
cal performance across 27 common proce-
dures and diagnoses to determine the
nations best performing hospitals based on
objective measures of clinical quality. To be
recognized with this distinction, according to
Healthgrades, hospitals must have had risk-
adjusted mortality and complication rates that
were among the lowest 5 percent in the nation
for a minimum of seven years. This is the rst
year that Sequoia Hospital has achieved this
designation.
District braces for major changes to health care
Sequoia Healthcare District appoints new leaders; touts program spending
Gerald Shefren
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Redwood City has hired a former senior
advisor and project leader for the county as
assistant city manager, a newly created role to
oversee operations of the ofce along with
human resources and public information, the
city announced yesterday.
Audrey Ramberg will begin March 18 and
was plucked from a candidate pool of more
than 100 candidates, according to City
Manager Bob Bell.
I know shell excel as a crucial member of
our executive team, Bell said in a prepared
statement. Audrey offers Redwood City a
wide range of experience and success in
every aspect of municipal management, and a
great combination of skills, talent and knowl-
edge.
Ramberg most recently worked for the
county and has a total of 22 years in public
service including positions as assistant city
manager in Menlo Park,
assistant to the city man-
ager in Palo Alto and
assistant to the San Mateo
County manager.
Ramberg also holds
degrees from Stanford and
Duke universities and was
founder/director of
Peninsula Partnership for
Children, Youth and
Families.
Ramberg said the city is an excellent t
with her experience and interests.
I want to work with people who thrive on
continuous improvement, who take very seri-
ously their commitment to the community,
and who are proud of the excellent services
they provide and that describes the people
who work for Redwood City, Ramberg said
in the announcement of her hiring.
Rambergs role includes strategic planning
and citywide process improvement initia-
tives. She will also serve in the city managers
absence.
Ramberg will earn $191,112 and receive
the same city benets as other executive-level
employees.
New assistant manager named in Redwood City
Advertisement
Audrey
Ramberg
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4
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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5
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Bob Matoso
Belmont- Bob Matoso, 72, passed
peacefully Saturday, February 16,
2013 with his family at his side.
Bob leaves behind his loving wife
of 53 years, Diane (Dee) Matoso.
His children Gary, David, Linda
and Michael; their spouses Chantal,
Mary, Matt and Kelly; Grandchildren
Caitlyn, Louise, Jack, Tim, Stella,
Ryan, Abigail, Brody and Coloman.
Bob worked as a draftsman for over
50 years. A perfectionist, he took
great pride in his drawings. He was
lucky enough to love what he did, as well as, the people he did it with.
Bob was an amazing husband, father and coach who taught us the value
of hard work and that there was a right way to do everything. He also
passed on his passion for baseball. We are forever grateful to you Dad.
Simply known as G-Pa, he was an amazing grandfather who shared
a special relationship with ALL his grandchildren. He loved them so
much. They could always count on him to be at a game or special
event. Bob looked forward to one week a year more then any other,
Pine Grove week. G-Pa was happiest when surrounded by family and
the simple things in life. In hindsight, thats all he ever needed. On a
beautiful day, look up and think of Bob, remembering, Its a great day
to play two!
Visitation will be Wednesday February 20
th
, from 6-8 PM @ St.
Charles (San Carlos) with a Vigil at 7 PM. A Funeral Mass will be
Thursday, February 21st at 10:30 AM followed by a reception. Due
\W\PMWJ[MZ^IVKMWN 4MV\_M_QTTJM]VIJTM\WIKKMX\W_MZ[
1VTQM]WNW_MZ[LWVI\QWV[KIVJMUILM\W"
Martha Vargas (Girls Softball)
2072 Eucalyptus Ave, San Carlos, Ca, 94070
Sign the guestbook at ___KZQXXMVaVVKWU
Crippen & Flynn Carlmont Chapel 650) 595-4103
Obituary
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Redwood City man facing a potential life
sentence for the beer bottle face slashing of a
man celebrating his 21st birthday with three
female friends accepted a felony assault plea
deal that sends him to prison for up to four
years.
Ismael Cruz, 36, was expected to start trial
Monday on charges stemming from the June 11
altercation outside Mazzoccos Bar on
Middleeld Road but instead settled the case.
Prosecutors sought a ve-year maximum term
but Judge Jonathan Karesh capped it at four
years when Cruz is sentenced April 11.
Prosecutors say the fracas began around 2
a.m. when the victim and his three female
companions left the bar and encountered Cruz
and his friends outside. Cruz reportedly made
vulgar remarks to the women and when the
victim asked him to calm down the two
exchanged punches. Cruz
broke a beer bottle, charged
forward and slashed the
man in the face leaving him
with a pronounced and per-
manent 7-inch scar from
the top of his head to his
neck and a second 3-inch
scar near his ear, said pros-
ecutors.
The man required hospi-
talization to remove the glass and close the
wounds.
The permanent disgurement led to Cruz ini-
tially being charged with aggravated mayhem
which carries up to a life sentence.
Prosecutors agreed to settle the case rather
than pursue trial because there was some con-
cern about how a jury would perceive the vic-
tim and the circumstances of the bar ght, said
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Face slashing brings four years prison
Ismael Cruz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Police are seeking two men who tried to
steal $2,000 worth of power tools from Home
Depot in San Carlos Sunday before assaulting
two employees who were able to get back the
merchandise.
Deputies from the San Carlos Police Bureau
were called to Home Depot, 1125 Old County
Road, at about 6 p.m. Sunday. Reports had
come in that an employee, the store loss pre-
vention ofcers, had been assaulted, according
to police.
About 10 minutes prior to the call to police,
the rst suspect described as a Hispanic
man in his late 20s, about 5 feet 8 inches tall
and weighing more than 300 pounds wearing a
black short sleeve shirt and blue jeans
placed about $2,000 worth of power tools into
a shopping cart then left the store without buy-
ing them, according to police. Once outside,
the man walked toward a black, newer model
Honda Accord with tinted windows and a large
spoiler that had the second suspect
described as a white man in his mid to late 20s
with blond hair, about 6 feet tall and weighing
185 to 200 pounds in the drivers seat,
according to police.
The stores loss prevention ofcers identied
themselves to the men and told them to stop,
after which the men started a physical ght
with the store employee. At the end of the
ght, both store employees sustained minor
injuries from being struck with a small wood-
en bat. The loss prevention ofcers successful-
ly recovered the stolen merchandise. Both sus-
pects ed the scene.
Anyone with any information about this
crime should contact Detective Matthew Broad
at (650) 363-4363 or the San Mateo County
Sheriffs Ofce Anonymous Tip Line at (800)
547-2700.
Brother imprisoned nine months
for shooting at sisters boyfriend
A South San Francisco man accused of shoot-
ing at his sisters boyfriend through a broken
window was sentenced yesterday to nine
months in jail and ordered to complete an anger
management program.
Fealofai Laiafa, 31, faced up to two years in
prison after pleading no contest in November to
discharging a rearm and possessing drugs
rather than standing trial on other weapons
charges. He must also spend three years on
supervised probation.
Authorities say, on May 16, Laiafa was in an
angry argument with his sis-
ters boyfriend when the
boyfriend went outside the
home and broke a window.
Laiafa responded by ring
one gunshot out the broken
window at the boyfriend but
did not strike him, accord-
ing to the District Attorneys
Ofce.
South San Francisco
police found both Laiafa
and the gun at the scene.
Two assaulted in attempted
$2,000 Home Depot robbery
Local brief
Fealofai Laiafa
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A Daly City teenager who bound and
gagged a 68-year-old man during a home inva-
sion robbery last year was sentenced to seven
years in prison in San Mateo County Superior
Court on Tuesday.
Jose Antonio Rodriguez, 18, lowered his
head as Judge Craig Parsons handed down the
maximum sentence for the July 2012 robbery.
Deputy District Attorney Sharon Cho said
Rodriguez scoped out the victims Daly City
home before the crime, and knew that he used
a walker.
Rodriguez enlisted the help of a teenage boy
and forced his way into the residence after
knocking on the door and asking to use the
bathroom, Cho said.
Rodriguez then used duct tape to tie up the
victim and cover his eyes and mouth, Cho
said.
The two intruders stole the mans laptop,
money and his 2008 Honda. The victim man-
aged to struggle free and call police.
One day later, Rodriguez and his accom-
plice were pulled over in the victims car in
San Francisco. Cho said the two were cele-
brating with the victims stolen property.
In December, Rodriguez pleaded no contest
to ve felonies, including robbery of a victim
over 60 years old, false imprisonment of an
elder and car theft.
At Tuesday mornings sentencing, Parsons
called the robbery an incredibly serious
crime against a helpless victim in his home.
Parsons said the robbery was extremely
egregious and warranted the maximum sen-
tence.
Consumers may see
rebate from energy crisis
SACRAMENTO California electricity
consumers could see $1.6 billion in refunds
from energy wholesalers that proted from the
states energy crisis more than a dozen years
ago, if an administrative law judges recom-
mendation holds up under review, regulators
said Tuesday.
The California Public Utilities Commission
praised the judges interim ruling as a victory
for a state that saw energy prices spike to
unprecedented heights amid rolling blackouts
in the summer of 2000. The state itself bought
billions of dollars worth of electricity to keep
the lights on.
The judge sided with the state in nding that
more than a dozen electricity wholesalers arti-
cially drove up energy prices.
There was massive manipulation going on
in the market by virtually all these sellers,
said Frank Lindh, the commissions general
counsel.
State pension fund
moves to divest from firearms
SACRAMENTO Californias largest pub-
lic pension system has approved divesting from
companies that make guns and high-capacity
ammunition magazines that are illegal in the
state.
State Treasurer Bill Lockyer made the motion
Tuesday as a board member of the California
Public Employees Retirement System.
Lockyer had requested a review of CalPERS
investments after it was revealed that the state
teachers retirement fund invested in the owner
of a company that manufactured one of the
weapons used in the Connecticut school shoot-
ing.
The California State Teachers Retirement
System last month approved Lockyers motion
to divest from companies that manufacture
assault weapons, Saturday Night Specials or
high-capacity ammunition magazines.
Teen given maximum term
for home invasion robbery
Around the state
6
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
1840 Gateway Drive, Suite 200, San Mateo, CA 94404
27281 Las Ramblas, #150, Mission Viejo, CA 92691
,
Wednesday February 27
th
10:00AM to 12:00PM
Biltmore Hotel & Suites - San Jose Room
2151 Laurelwood Road
Santa Clara, CA 95050
Wednesday February 27
th
2:00PM to 4:00PM
Hampton Inn & Suites - Sahara Room
55 Old Tully Road
San Jose, CA 95111
Thursday February 28
th
10:00AM to 12:00PM
Jewish Center of San Francisco - Room 209
3200 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94118
THIS IS NOT A PROGRAMBY THE JCCSF
(Parking available under building, bring Self-Parking Ticket into Seminar for Validation)
Thursday February 28th
2:30PM to 4:30PM
Hilton Garden Inn - Orchard Room
2000 Bridgepointe Parkway
San Mateo, CA 94404
Tuesday March 5
th

10:00AM to 12:00PM
The Marina Inn-Marina East Room
68 Monarch Bay
San Leandro, CA 94577
Tuesday March 5
th

2:00PM to 4:00PM
Hotel Sotel Salon 1 Room
223 Twin Dolphin Drive
Redwood City, CA 94065
Wednesday March 6
th

10:00AM to 12:00PM
Hilton Garden Inn Garden Room AB
10741 N. Wolfe Road
Cupertino, CA 95014
Wednesday March 6
th

2:00PM to 4:00PM
Courtyard Marriott
4700 Lakeview Blvd.
Fremont, CA 94538
Thursday March 7
th

2:30PM to 4:30PM
Addison-Penzak Jewish Community Center
14855 Oka Road, Los Gatos, CA 95032
Activity Room A
Tuesday March 19
th
10:00AM to 12:00PM
City of Belmont Twin Pines Lodge
40 Twin Pines Lane
Belmont, CA 94002
Tuesday March 19
th
2:00PM to 4:00PM
Lake Merced Golf Club Merced Sur Room
2300 Junipero Serra Blvd.
Daly City, CA 94015
LOCAL/STATE 7
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Childrens Concerts at Kohl Mansion

Music at Kohl Mansion presents


Based in New York City, Classical Jam
1

M k C C
1
C C

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Monday,
March 11, 2013
1

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A D
8
150 Anza Blvd Burlingame, CA 94010
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County seeks volunteers
for caterpillar release
Volunteers are needed this week and next to
help reintroduce the Bay Checkerspot Buttery
to a historic range at Edgewood County Park
and Natural Preserve by placing caterpillars.
The San Mateo County Department of Public
Works and Parks in partnership with volunteers
with the Friends of Edgewood County Park and
Natural Preserve, the California Native Plant
Society and San Mateo County Parks
Foundation have been working on reintroduc-
tion for years following the populations extinc-
tion in 2003.
Habitat restoration efforts aimed at increasing
Plantago, the favorite food of the butteries, has
been the primary focus of thousands of volun-
teer hours. Successful work included spring
mowing to remove plants that crowd out
Plantago as well as hand weeding, goat grazing
and the removal of Eucalyptus stands. For the
past three years, volunteers have carefully trans-
ported Bay Checkerspot Buttery larvae and
caterpillars from Coyote Ridge in south San
Jose to Edgewood County Park and Preserve in
Redwood City.
This has been an excellent example of suc-
cessful restoration efforts reversing the damage
done to a rare species, said Parks
Superintendent Gary Lockman in a prepared
statement. This project has been a cooperative
effort among scientists, San Mateo County
Parks, volunteers and local funders. These part-
nerships are invaluable in our efforts to enhance
the ecosystem during these difcult nancial
times. A call is now out for volunteers to place
buttery caterpillars Feb. 21 and Feb. 25. Space
is limited.
For more information or to register as a vol-
unteer visit www.friendsofedgewood.org.
Reservations are required and while the event is
free donations are suggested to support the but-
tery restoration program.
For more information about Edgewood
County Park and Natural Preserve visit the Bill
and Jean Lane Education Center located at
Edgewood Road and Old Stage Road in
Redwood City or go to
www.co.sanmateo.ca.us/portal/site/parks.
Local brief
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO The benefits of
expanding health care for Californias poor
under the Affordable Care Act far outweigh
the costs to the state, according to a report
released Tuesday by the nonpartisan
Legislative Analysts Ofce.
Legislative analyst Mac Taylor urged law-
makers to adopt an optional Medicaid expan-
sion that features an enhanced cost match
from the federal government, meaning Uncle
Sam will pick up most of the tab and send bil-
lions of dollars owing into the state.
Taylor says the additional money can be
used improve health care in California even
though the state will take on additional costs
down the road. The report estimated that by
taking on new enrollees, the state could be on
the hook for between $300 million and $1.3
billion a year starting in 2020.
Gov. Jerry Brown has committed to expand-
ing Medicaid, known as Medi-Cal in
California, for people who make up to 138
percent of the federal poverty line, or about
$15,400 a year for an individual. The analyst
estimated the expansion will bring 1.2 million
new enrollees by 2017.
The program already serves about 8 million
adults and children, nearly 1 of every 5
California residents.
Analyst says California should expand Medicaid
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO A mid-winter storm
brought colder temperatures, a rare tornado
and much-needed rain to California on
Tuesday and left light snow dustings on even
relatively low-elevation San Francisco Bay
Area mountain peaks.
The storm came out of the Gulf of Alaska,
bringing the rst signicant rainfall to the
region in several weeks, the National Weather
Service said.
Periodic showers, including bits of hail, hit
the Bay Area in time for the morning com-
mute while a batch of new snow fell in the
Sierra Nevada where ski resorts around Lake
Tahoe were expecting up to 8 inches of snow.
Light snow urries were spotted high in the
hills in Oakland and in neighboring Berkeley,
said Rick Canepa, a National Weather Service
meteorologist based in Monterey. The storm
also left a dusting of snow on the top of Mt.
Hamilton near San Jose and on the tips of Mt.
Diablo in the East Bay by early Tuesday after-
noon.
In the Sacramento area, a tornado with
winds speeds between 40 to 70-miles-per-
hour was spotted north of Red Bluff shortly
after 1:30 p.m., according to the weather serv-
ice. It caused little or no damage.
Even though San Francisco saw highs in the
70s last week, California has been experienc-
ing a colder-than-normal winter overall.
Winter storm brings rain and hail
ERIK OEVERNDIEK/DAILY JOURNAL
A rain system quickly swept through the Bay Area yesterday with strong winds and a little hail.
LOCAL 8
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Suspects sought in armed robbery
Redwood City police are searching for two
suspects who assisted a third man in an armed
robbery of a 79-year-old
woman in her home Feb.
7.
Police have arrested 21-
year-old Jovanni Martinez
Aguilar, a Redwood City
resident, and are searching
for Luis Martinez Trujillo,
21, and an unnamed juve-
nile Hispanic female, who
allegedly assisted in rob-
bing the woman at gunpoint and ransacking
her house on the 900 block of 10th Avenue,
according to police.
The victim phoned police while she was
locked in a bedroom and police arrived in
time to apprehend Aguilar.
The other two suspects ed the scene, how-
ever.
Arrest warrants have been issued for both
suspects and police believe the suspects are
still together, are aware they are being sought
by law enforcement and are taking steps to
avoid detection and arrest. An associated
vehicle is a black Volkswagen Jetta,
California license number 5TGT848.
Anyone with information regarding the
whereabouts of these suspects or this incident
is encouraged to contact Detective Mark
Alifano at (650) 780-7677.
Girls saved from fire on coast
San Mateo County Sheriffs deputies are
credited with saving two young girls from a
burning home in Moss Beach Monday night.
County Dispatch received the report of a
house re on the 500 block of Lancaster
Street. Upon arrival, deputies learned from
the homeowner that his two daughters were
still asleep in their beds in an upstairs bed-
room.
They entered the smoke-lled residence
and retrieved the two girls. All family mem-
bers and the pet dog were taken to safety and
the fire quickly extinguished. The family
members plus the ofcers were given medical
treatment at the scene and later transported to
area hospitals as a result of smoke inhalation.
The re was contained to the garage but
there was smoke damage throughout the
home, according to the Sheriffs Ofce.
The cause of the re is under investigation.
Burlingame officers recognized
Avoid the 23, San Mateo Countys multi-
jurisdictional effort against impaired drivers,
honored police ofcers, California Highway
Patrol ofcers and sheriffs deputies for their
DUI expertise.
Among those recognized for their individ-
ual efforts were Burlingame police ofcers
Nick Kempel who made 28 arrests, and Dan
Forbes with 20 arrests.
The event took place at the Crowne Plaza
Hotel in Foster City and was sponsored by
Mothers Against Drunk Driving and the
California Ofce of Trafc Safety, which
funds the Avoid the 23 through the National
Highway Trafc Safety Administration.
Caada College introduces African
wasp to help control the olive fruit fly
A small African wasp that is the natural
enemy of the olive fruit fly appears to be
gaining a toehold in the olive trees on the
campus of Caada College in Redwood City
which could bring good news to Californias
olive growers.
Diego Nieto, an adjunct biology professor
at the college, and students in biology 110,
are part of a statewide effort to find a way to
control the olive fruit fly, whose larvae feed
on the fruit of olive trees and is considered a
serious pest. California produces more than
95 percent of the olives grown in the United
States.
The olive fruit fly was first discovered in
California in 1998 and was later found in
San Mateo County in 2001. California is the
only area in the Western Hemisphere where
the olive fruit fly has been found. Scientists
discovered that natural predators in
California were largely ineffective in con-
trolling the spread of the fruit fly.
The olive fruit fly is in the family
Tephrididae, which is home to several seri-
ous agriculture pests, including the
Mediterranean fruit fly, Mexican fruit fly,
and oriental fruit fly, said Nieto. These
flies are capable of utilizing ripening fruit
for oviposition, which makes them especial-
ly damaging to fruit production. The fruit
flies we commonly encounter, on the other
hand, are in the family Drosophilidae, and
are only capable of laying eggs in overripe
fruit.
The wasps are very small and look like lit-
tle ants with wings. They are also incapable
of stinging people. And while they pose no
threat to people or animals, they pose a
major threat to olive fruit flies.
These wasps are specialists, Nieto said.
They have co-evolved with the olive fruit
fly and are well-suited to utilize the fruit fly
larvae for reproduction.
Female wasps deposit eggs into a fruity y
maggot inside of an olive. The egg hatches
into a smaller larva that feeds internally on
the maggot. After this maggot pupates,
instead of a y emerging, a wasp emerges to
seek out additional maggots.
Since being released on campus, Nieto and
his students have been monitoring the
progress of the little African wasp.
Local briefs
Edward F. Austin
Edward F. Austin died Feb. 13, 2013. He was
95.
Austin was born May 26, 1918 and raised in
Scarsdale, N.Y. After high school, he became a
mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service. He
married Irene Piva, who preceded him in death,
in 1940. Shortly after the couple transferred to
Los Angeles. Austin served proudly in the
Navy during WWII and Korea. After an honor-
able discharge, he transferred to the Redwood
City Post Ofce and settled in Los Altos for 52
years. Austin was appointed postmaster of
Moffett Field in 1963. A few years later, he was
promoted to postal service ofcer and worked
in the western region ofce in San Francisco
until his retirement in 1971. He was a founding
member of Saint Williams Parish and remained
active in the church. Austin was also a member
of Knights of Columbus, Saint Sebastian
Council. He leaves behind three sons, Wayne
(Linda), James (Victoria) and Edward; and two
grandchildren, Michael and Teresa
Rosary and funeral mass will be held at 10:30
a.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, St. William Parish, 611
S. El Monte Ave., Los Altos. The burial will be
held at the Gates of Heaven Cemetery, followed
by refreshments at the church hall.
Eileen Pueyo
Eileen Pueyo died at her Burlingame home
Feb. 17, 2013 after a long illness. She was 74.
She was born Eileen Donnelly in Dublin,
Ireland on June 5, 1938. Eileen will be espe-
cially remembered for her quick wit, spirit of
adventure and her affection to cherished friends
and family. Eileen had a deep commitment to
her faith and raising her precious boys.
She is survived by her sons Martin Pueyo, of
Phoenix; Michael Pueyo, of Burlingame; and
Brendan Pueyo, of San Francisco; and her
brother Andrew Donnelly, of Dublin, Ireland.
She was the mother-in-law of Christine Pueyo
and Sylvia Yu. Eileen was the grandmother of
Joseph, Theresa, Vincent, Thomas, Steven,
Anthony, Kelly and Brian.
Eileen is preceded in death by her husband
Tony Pueyo, sons Anthony and Robert Pueyo
and her sister Ettie Nalty.
Friends and family are invited to a visitation
at 2 p.m. and rosary service at 4 p.m. on
Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013 at Crosby N. Gray &
Co., 2 Park Road, Burlingame. A funeral mass
will be held 10 a.m.Monday, Feb. 25, 2013 at
St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in
Burlingame. Burial will take place after the
funeral mass at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.
Timothy J. Guiney Jr.
Timothy J. Guiney Jr., died at his Millbrae
home on Feb. 16, 2013 after a two-year strug-
gle with cancer. Guiney began his career in
1969 as a full-time reserve deputy sheriff for
the San Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce. He later
joined the Brisbane Police Department. In
1990, Guiney became the
chief of police for the
Broadmoor Police
Department until his retire-
ment in 2002.
Guiney was the husband
of the late Kate Bray
Guiney. He was the father
of Michelle Fogarty and
son-in-law Bill Fogarty,
and Katie Guiney; papa of his grandson, Will;
brother of Susan Paden, Ted Guiney and broth-
er-in-law Randy Houston, and Peggy Guiney
Fry; and uncle of Sean and Matt Paden and
Shannon and Colleen Fry.
A memorial mass celebrating Guineys life
will be held at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 20
at St. Roberts Church, 1380 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno.
In lieu of owers, memorial donations may
be sent to the 100 Club of San Mateo County,
100clubsmc.org, or The Service League of San
Mateo County, serviceleague.org.
Horacio Freitas
Horacio Freitas died at his San Mateo home
Feb. 6, 2013.
Horacio was born Aug.
30, 1942 in San Miguel,
Azores, Portugal and came
to the United States in
1967. He worked as an
auto mechanic at Howards
Auto Repair in Burlingame
for 20 years.
He was well-known for
joking and making people
laugh. He was also a show-
off on his motorcycle back in Azores which
was what caught the eye of his wife, Maria. His
garden and 24 Hour Fitness were his second
homes.
He is survived by his wife, Maria Noeima;
his daughter, Rosemary; son, Horacio Jr. and
wife Michelle; and his sister, Maria Jose
Mederios of Gustine; and grandchildren,
Tommy, Cassy, Zain, Sherri, Doina, Fith and
Adrianna.
Services will be held 1 p.m. Saturday, March
2 at St. Gregory Church, 2715 Hacienda St.,
San Mateo.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the fami-
lys choosing. To submit obituaries, email infor-
mation along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
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advertising department at ads@smdailyjour-
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Obituaries
Luis Trujillo
OPINION 9
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Regional government
Editor,
Andy and Kerry Patterson, not to
worry, (Regional Government
Merger in the Feb. 14 edition of The
Daily Journal) local city and county
governments will ght tooth and nail
against becoming irrelevant and cer-
emonial. I had a chuckle when I read:
We are the USA, not the United States
of Socialist Nations. We were the
USA until the Great (Socialist) Society
programs of President Lyndon Baines
Johnson in the 1960s. We have become
the United Socialist States of America,
a Plutocracy. Thats USSAP, pro-
nounced you-sap. Want proof? Just
watch Obama ght budget cuts for his
programs.
Morris Stevens
Redwood City
Meeting on regionalization
Editor,
I think the Silicon Valley Network
and the Silicon Valley Community
Foundations idea to regionalize the
101 cities and nine counties is social
engineering (Bay Area leaders consid-
er merger in the Feb. 9 edition of the
Daily Journal). This will take away the
voice of each person in these location
and make each city and their elected
ofcials irrelevant.
Ken Paxton
Redwood City
Gun control?
Dear editor,
In a recent guest perspective, in the
Feb. 18 edition of the Daily Journal,
state Sen. Mark Leno outlined his per-
spective on Keeping our communities
safe from gun violence. Lenos Senate
Bill 140 intends to strengthen the
armed prohibited person system. This
automated system tracks gun owners
who have crossed the line due to men-
tal illness, felony, domestic violence or
violent misdemeanor offenses. Under
such circumstances, these individuals
are required to surrender their rearms
but do not do so. This system allows
agents from the Department of Justice
to legally conscate any rearms being
held by such individuals.
On the other side of the aisle, are a
number of senators, both state and
national, along with certain major met-
ropolitan mayors, (you know who they
are) who are trying everything in their
elected power to burden law abiding
gun owners with additional fees (taxes)
and multiple restrictions in order to dis-
courage gun ownership. This, on top of
current regulations, puts California at
the top of the list for most restrictive
gun laws.
In the middle of all this are those
persons of interest who own rearms
and commit crimes, that havent been
caught, or turned in their guns. These
individuals are the responsibility of the
local police department.
In conclusion, based on being sensi-
ble and responsible where would you
apply your tax dollars?
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Pasadena Star-News
I
t has been clear to many
Californians of all political stripes
for some years now that the
California Environmental Quality Act is
in need of reform.
Its also clear that the act at its best
has protected our state from untold des-
ecration over the decades since it was
signed into law by Gov. Ronald
Reagan.
But its been equally clear that a rush
job is worse than prescriptions that
would be more harmful than the dis-
ease. Thats why we noted in August
that while reforms are needed, it is cru-
cial to get them right. That meant not
hashing them together into a last-
minute bill without public scrutiny in
the rush last fall to pass such bills.
That makes now a good time to start
the discussion about how best to revise
the important environmental quality
laws.
There is a renewed effort early in the
2013 session and it is welcome. Gov.
Jerry Brown discussed CEQA reform in
his January State of the State address.
He noted, as many have, that its hard
to think of a CEQA exemption in
recent years including the wholesale
one for a proposed football stadium in
downtown Los Angeles that hasnt
been necessary if anything is to get
done. When regular exemptions are the
correct political stance to apply a law,
something is wrong.
Enacted in 1970, CEQA has done a
lot of good by requiring the proponents
of land development and construction
projects to document the expected
impact on the surroundings and lay out
plans to limit damage.
However, it is one of those laws
whose effects sometimes stray beyond
the intent. It has been used by local
governments, by labor unions, by own-
ers of agriculture land, and by business
rivals to try to block projects they dont
like. Whether or not their objections are
really about the environment, theyve
been able to use CEQA as a legal speed
bump.
Even when CEQA lawsuits have
failed to stop projects, theyve too often
added delays and costs.
Fortunately, a rush reform effort that
did indeed come along late in the last
legislative year was not passed by the
California Legislature.
Now, just a few months after the last
legislative reform effort was quashed,
some of those who have been pushing
in Sacramento for reform believe the
dynamics have changed.
And one of the leaders of that effort,
moderate Democratic state Sen.
Michael Rubio of the Central Valley,
could be the appropriate Nixon-in-
China gure to lead the reform. While
the need to reform CEQA has tradition-
ally been a Republican issue, Rubio
took it on last legislative session and
saw his effort put down by the
Democratic leadership when Senate
President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg
declined to advance it.
But Steinberg just appointed Rubio
chairman of the Environmental Quality
Committee, and the Senate leader has
said he will make reviewing updates to
the CEQA law a priority this session,
according to the Sacramento Bee.
The Sierra Club and other traditional
CEQA proponents continue to say that
even now is not the time for a total
overhaul of the law. But even they
allow that some of its low-hanging
fruit particularly egregious bureau-
cratic language in its latest update to a
grand 399 pages just two years ago
might be ripe for picking.
It is indeed not the time, nor will it
ever be, to gut Californias environmen-
tal protections against inappropriate
development. But, given how often
CEQA is either entirely thrown out or
merely bogs down a process, this leg-
islative session is the time to nally
strike the right balance.
This is year for CEQA reform
Role Models?
T
he nature of man is always the same. It is their
habits that separate them. Confucius.
Did you watch the Super Bowl? If you did, did you give
any thought to the gratuitous violence and the possibility of
serious or permanent brain damage caused by concussion?
Did you think about all of
those ex-pro football players
who are preparing to sue
because of their continuing
problems from concussion?
Maybe Im an old fuddy-
duddy, but Ill never be able
to understand why many par-
ents are still pressuring their
young sons to play the game
and to hope for eventual fame
and fortune in the pros.
A few questions: What
does all of that obsession
with power, strength, vio-
lence and winning at any cost
say about us? Why are warriors and such extremely violent
athletics so revered? Is it a good idea to teach our children
that real men indulge in violent activities and risk serious
injury or even death? Even Bob Costas, NBC sports com-
mentator, said on Meet The Press Feb. 3, that the way
football is played now even legal hits are frightening and
illegal hits are worse. How can there be any hope to live
in peace and harmony when such violence and aggression
remain such an integral part of our sports and entertain-
ment culture?
Seems George Orwell caught on long ago. Serious sport
has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred,
jealousy, boastfulness, disregard for all rules and sadistic
pleasure in witnessing violence: In other words, it is war
minus the shooting.
About those rules, think Lance Armstrong that All-
American Bike Racer. This married man with children lied
and cheated about his drug enhancement for years in his
obsession with winning and staying in the limelight. Is
there no conscience, no decency, no shame, no punishment
for such dishonesty besides taking some of his awards
away? Is this the type of role model we want for our chil-
dren? What happened to integrity, honor and humility?
Theres an old saying: Sports do not build character, they
reveal it.
When it comes to role models, we cant overlook all of
those priests who were molesting young boys for so many
years while the Catholic Church hierarchy covered for
them. And they profess to be Christians! It makes you won-
der what kind of men go into the priesthood. What are they
escaping by cloistering themselves in the sanctuary of the
church? After all, they come from parochial schools where
children learn not to question, to believe what has been
drummed into their heads by catechism and look up to
those pious men in their ecclesiastical robes who apparent-
ly have immersed themselves in a fantasy world in order to
escape reality. Now that so many of the transgressors are
being exposed, you wonder what Catholic parents are
telling their kids.
We are in desperate need of providing heroes that
demonstrate good morals, good values and good deeds and
thats where parents come in. Not only is it essential for
them to be good role models, they have to try to counteract
all of the cultural garbage that bombards their kids on a
daily basis. Thats why they need to spend time with their
kids and talk to them about why so many things that are
considered desirable these days are not conducive to a good
life and what things contribute. Its not easy, but parents
need to be there for their kids physically and psycholog-
ically after having worked on developing some sustaining
values of their own. Unfortunately, too many of todays
children do not have responsible, caring and involved par-
ents in their lives.
Children need to see and live with good examples not
narcissistic sports figures, not inebriated football fans who
riot and destroy after a victory (or a loss), not bike racers
with absolutely no ethical standards or seriously dysfunc-
tional, hypocritical men of God. They need to experience
and observe men who contribute to the support material-
ly and psychologically of their families, concentrate on
setting a good example for their children and take part in
the community. They need to experience decent, responsi-
ble and compassionate men who face life with courage,
integrity and determination and do their part to make this
world a better place for their children and grandchildren
men who dont get their thrills from violence and mayhem,
exploiting others or cheating the establishment but from
doing the right thing.
In writing about the preying priests, David Weigand of
The Chronicle, described some deaf boys who were so
egregiously violated. For years, their unspoken voice fell
on intentionally deaf ears in the church and law enforce-
ment. But they never gave up, simply because they knew
right from wrong. Maybe theres hope!
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 650
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Talk of more
deal-making sent the stock market
higher Tuesday, putting the Dow
Jones industrial average within
close reach of its all-time high.
Reports that retailers Office
Depot and OfficeMax are dis-
cussing a merger came after big cor-
porate deals for Heinz and Dell
were announced in recent weeks.
Some investors are betting that
more deals could be on the way as
buyers pay premium prices for pub-
licly traded companies.
The Dow rose 53.91 points to
close at 14,035.67. All it would take
now is one good day to push the
average above 14,164, the record
high reached in October 2007.
It seems that investors are more
comfortable with taking risk right
now, said Jack Ablin, chief invest-
ment ofcer at BMO Private Bank
in Chicago. Thats despite the $1.2
trillion in automatic federal spend-
ing cuts that are scheduled to start
March 1 unless Congress and the
White House nd a way to avoid
them. Congress returns from vaca-
tion next week.
Previous budget battles in
Washington have rattled nancial
markets. But this time out, many
investors seem unfazed by the
prospect that Congress wont stop
the sequester from kicking in.
One reason is that the cuts are
spread across the board for a
decade, instead of all at once.
I think investors are actually
comforted by it, Ablin said. Its
not ideal. But if Congress cant do it
when left to their own devices, this
is the next best thing.
In other trading Tuesday, the
Standard & Poors 500 index rose
11.15 points to 1,530.94. The tech-
nology-heavy Nasdaq composite
index gained 21.56 points to
3,213.59. Google crossed $800 for
the rst time.
The gains were widely shared, if
slight. Nine of the 10 industry
groups tracked by the Standard &
Poors 500 index inched higher, led
by energy companies. More than
two stocks rose for every one that
fell on the New York Stock
Exchange.
Markets were also higher in
Europe following news that the
German economy is picking up
steam. Indexes rose more than 1
percent in Germany and France.
Stocks of ofce supplies stores
jumped following a report in The
Wall Street Journal that OfceMax
and Ofce Depot were considering
a deal to merge. The paper said an
announcement could come as early
as this week.
OfficeMax soared $2.25 to an
even $13, a gain of 21 percent, and
Ofce Depot shot up 43 cents to
$5.02, a gain of 9 percent. Staples
also rose as investors anticipated
that more mergers could be on the
way.
Analysts cautioned that antitrust
regulators could block mergers in
the ofce-supply business. Staples,
for instance, tried to buy Ofce
Depot in 1997, but was stopped by
the Federal Trade Commission.
Health insurers fell after the
release of preliminary government
data that suggests rate cuts to
Medicare Advantage plans for next
year will be steeper than anticipat-
ed.
The two largest Medicare
Advantage providers, Humana and
UnitedHealth, sank. Humana had
the biggest loss in the S&P 500,
dropping 6 percent, or $4.98, to
$73.01. UnitedHealth fell 66 cents
to $56.66.
The government says it expects
costs per person for Medicare
Advantage plans to fall more than 2
percent in 2014. The government
uses this gure as a benchmark to
determine payments for these pri-
vately run versions of the govern-
ments health care program for the
elderly and disabled.
In the market for U.S. govern-
ment bonds, the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note rose to 2.03 percent
from 2 percent late Friday.
Talk of corporate deals sends stocks higher
Dow 14,035.67 +0.39% 10-Yr Bond 2.03 +0.95%
Nasdaq3.213.59 +0.68% Oil (per barrel) 97.14
S&P 500 1,530.94 +0.73% Gold +0.04%
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Googles stock
price topped $800 for the rst time
Tuesday amid renewed condence in the
companys ability to reap higher prots
from its dominance of Internet search and
prominence in the growing mobile mar-
ket.
The milestone comes more than ve
years after Googles shares initially hit
$700. Not long after breaking that barrier
in October 2007, the economy collapsed
into the worst recession since World War
II and Googles stock tumbled into a pro-
longed malaise that eventually led to a
change in leadership.
Besides enriching Googles employees
and other shareholders, the companys
resurgent stock is an implicit endorse-
ment of co-founder Larry Page. He
replaced his managerial mentor, Eric
Schmidt, as CEO in April 2011. Googles
stock has risen by 36 percent since Page
took over. By contrast, the benchmark
Standard & Poors 500 index has climbed
by 15 percent over the same stretch.
Most of Googles gains have occurred
in the past seven months a period that
has overlapped with a sharp downturn in
the stock price of rival Apple Inc. The
iPhone makers market value has plunged
by about $230 billion, or 35 percent,
since late September.
All that Apple money had to go some-
where, said BGC Financial analyst Colin
Gillis.
Standard & Poors Capital IQ analyst
Scott Kessler concurred, reasoning that
many investors who have abandoned
Apple are gravitating to one of its biggest
rivals.
Google makes and distributes its free
Android software to Samsung Electronics
Co., HTC Corp. and other mobile device
makers looking to compete with Apples
iPhone and iPad. Since its 2008 introduc-
tion, Android has established itself as the
most popular mobile operating system,
partly because the free software makes it
easier for device makers to undercut
Apples prices for iPhones and iPads.
Android is set up to feature Googles
search engine and other services, giving
the company a chance to sell more ads.
If you are looking at Apples peers in
its space and see who seems to be really
doing well right now, it makes a lot of
sense to invest in Google now, Kessler
said.
Despite its diminished luster, Apple
remains the most valuable U.S. company
with a market value of $432 billion.
Google now ranks third with a market
value of $266 billion, with Exxon Mobil
Corp. holding the spot in between at $402
billion.
Google lifts stock above $800
Homebuilder confidence
slips from six year high
By Alex Veiga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Condence among U.S. homebuilders
slipped this month from the more than six year high it reached
in January, with many builders reporting less trafc by prospec-
tive customers before the critical spring home-buying season.
The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo
builder sentiment index released Tuesday dipped to 46 from 47
in January. It was the rst monthly decline in the index since
April.
Readings below 50 suggest negative sentiment about the
housing market. The last time the index was at 50 or higher was
in April 2006, when it was 51. It began trending higher in
October 2011, when it was 17.
The latest index, based on responses from 402 builders,
comes as the U.S. housing market is strengthening after stag-
nating for roughly ve years after the housing boom collapsed.
Steady job gains and near-record-low mortgage rates have
encouraged more people to buy homes. Prices have been rising.
In part, thats because the supply of previously occupied homes
for sale has thinned to the lowest level in more than a decade.
And the pace of foreclosures, while still rising in some states,
has slowed sharply on a national basis.
Microsofts Outlook takes aim at Googles Gmail
SAN FRANCISCO Microsoft is so condent it has
the Internets best email service that it is about to spend at
least $30 million to send its message across the U.S.
The barrage began Tuesday when Microsofts twist on
email, Outlook.com, escalated an assault on rival services
from Google Inc., Yahoo Inc., AOL Inc. and a long list of
Internet service providers.
As part of the process, all users of Microsofts Hotmail
and other email services operating under different domains
such as MSN.com will be automatically converted to
Outlook.com by the summer, if they dont voluntarily
switch before then. All the old messages, contacts and set-
tings in the old inboxes will be exported to Outlook.com.
Users will also be able to keep their old addresses.
Email remains a key battleground, even at a time when
more people are texting each other on phones.
HTC shows off new phone for One line
NEW YORK HTC Corp., the struggling Taiwanese
maker of smartphones, is taking a page from longtime part-
ner Microsoft Corp. as it launches a new phone under the
One brand.
The phone runs Google Inc.s Android software, but HTC
is grafting its own home screen on the phone, one thats sim-
ilar to that of Microsofts Windows Phone software.
Apple says Macs at its offices were hacked
NEW YORK Apple says a small number of Mac com-
puters at its ofces were infected by malicious software, in
an attack similar to the one Facebook acknowledged last
week.
In both cases, computers were infected through software
downloaded from a site for software developers. The attacks
took advantage of aws in the Java plug-in for Web
browsers.
Business briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Floyd Mayweather Jr.
will ght Robert Guerrero
on May 4, and hes chang-
ing television networks to
do it.
The biggest star in box-
ing dropped a surprise
Tuesday while announc-
ing his long-rumored next
bout: After several years
on HBO, Mayweather is
moving to Showtime with a lucrative multi-
ght deal.
Mayweathers move is a coup for
Showtime, the CBS-owned network that has
always trailed behind HBO in boxing promi-
nence. Mayweather (43-0, 26 KOs) is the
sports biggest moneymaker, and his new rev-
enue-sharing deal with Showtime could
include up to six ghts over 30 months.
They were extremely aggressive from the
start, and they made it clear they want Floyd
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Reserved for the better part
of February for the con-
tentious process of salary
arbitration, the Ellis East
Room on the second oor
of the Hyatt Regency
Phoenix went unused. For
the rst time since arbitra-
tion began in 1974, none
of the players who led
wound up arguing their
cases.
After peaking at 35 hearings in 1986, the
number of salary arbitration cases argued has-
nt reached double digits since 2001. The total
dropped to a record low of three in 2005, 2009
and 2011, and then there were none at all this
year.
All 133 players who led last month settled,
gaining an average increase of 119 percent,
according to a study by The Associated Press.
San Francisco catcher Buster Posey, the NL
batting champion and MVP, led the way with
a 13-fold hike to $8 million.
While I do believe that this year was an
aberration, the salary structure for arbitration-
<< Sharks take down the Blues, page 13
Warriors drop sixth straight in Utah loss, page 16
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013
ROMO IS BACK: GIANTS CLOSER SAYS HES CARRIED BY HIS SAN FRANCISCO TEAMMATES >>> PAGE 12
Wildcats take it in OT
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Woodsides Josh Holman goes up and scored two of his six points in Tuesdays overtime win.
See BOXING, Page 14 See POSEY, Page 14
See CCS, Page 14 See CATS, Page 14
Money heads back to ring
Local boxer, Robert Guerrero, gets first shot
Posey earns steep raise in arbitration
PAL boys go
4 for 5 in CCS
Buster Posey
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
No Central Coast Section seeding? Not a
problem.
Both Sequoia and Carlmont high schools
went into the 2013 CCS boys basketball play-
offs unseeded and came out with victories
Tuesday night to kick off rst round action in
Division I.
The Scots traveled to Santa Clara and took
down the home team 51-44, extending head
coach Dave Lows stay at the helm for
Carlmont at least another game.
I thought the key was Yash Malik hitting
those three 3-pointers in the rst quarter,
Low said. That set the tone offensively for
us.
Malik finished with 14 points while
Michael Costello led the Scots with 20 huge
points.
Defensively Carlmont held Santa Clara to
just ve points in the rst period and eight in
the fourth. We really clamped down on their
best shooters, Low said. Carlmont takes on
No. 7 Milpitas next on Thursday night.
Sequoia, also unseeded, took down No. 11
Independence High School. The Cherokees
will visit No. 6 Fremont next.
Also in Division I action, Menlo-Atherton
could not overcome a scrappy Wilcox team.
The No. 9 seeded Bears fell 61-54. Theyre a
very athletic team, M-A head coach Mike
Molieri said of Wilcox. And we had to get
our of game plan early with such a high-scor-
ing game. I was proud of the way we came
back but give Wilcox credit. Theyre a good
team.
Over in Division III, No. 11 Terra Nova
defended its home court and took down
Sobrato 66-62. It was one of those game
where the Tigers were forced to hit clutch free
throws down the stretch to hold off Sobrato.
Jaylend Jones was a perfect 10 for 10 from the
charity stripe.
We were able to pound the ball inside,
said Terra Nova head coach Kenny Milch.
And we did a good job on the boards. And
then, we hit some timely 3s. The Tigers take
on No. 6 Aptos in the second round, Thursday.
In girls basketball action, No. 9 Menlo-
Atherton trounced Independence 53-25. Erin
LaPorte and Katherine Hayse hit 3-pointers
on M-As rst two possessions and the Bears
never looked back.
Emma Heath scored eight of her game-high
13 points in the rst quarter as the Bears built
a 20-6 lead after one period and led by 23 at
the half.
LaPorte nished with 10 points for M-A
while Dana Nguyen led the 76ers with eight.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Woodside High School guard Mitchell
Hickman knows a thing of two about the gym-
nasium hes called home the last four years of
his basketball life.
And when he sits back years from now to
tell heroic tales, he and the rest of the 2013
Wildcat seniors can say they said goodbye to
their home oor in style.
It took No. 12 Woodside overtime but they
overcame a late surge by unseeded Overfelt,
winning 66-59 to open Central Coast Section
Division II play. The Wildcats held the Royals
to just four point in the OT frame and just one
eld goal which actually came as the
triple-zeroes hit the scoreboard.
We wanted to come out with a win,
Hickman said. It feels good to get it. To go
out in your last game with a win, its all we
want. Its what we play for. Im going to miss
it so much. Its been a good four years. Its
been a lot of fun.
The CCS fun isnt over yet for the Wildcats.
Theyll travel to No. 5 Leland on Thursday
night for second round action.
This is a good senior class, said Woodside
head coach Doug Fountain. They have no
quit in them. Thats been the thing all season.
Were not a dominant team and we have to
out-hustle, we have to out-defend the teams,
but they just dont quit. They never believe
theyre out of a game. So, my hats off to them.
Im proud of them tonight. I thought they
showed their true grit.
Grit is what it took because Overfelt erased
a lead that was as big as 10 at one point in the
third quarter. Come the fourth, the Royals
were down 49-44 and a couple of minutes into
the period, they took the lead 50-49.
It was a game of runs, Hickman said. We
started really well, theyd come back. Wed
have another run and theyd come back. We
were just making some stupid plays that did-
nt turn out well. We nally decided to come
together and play some team basketball. Get
some real buckets.
They dont get much more real than the
three in fourth quarter. With 19.4 seconds left
and Woodside down 55-53, Fountain called a
timeout and drew up a Ryan Blocker to
Ryan Yedinak play that worked to perfection
and tied the game at 55.
I thought that was a good hustle play,
Fountain said. We practice that every day and
that is one we actually practiced yesterday.
So, Im not sure if it was good foresight or just
plain luck. Ill take either.
In overtime, the key was defense.
We just wanted to play some solid D,
because we had been making silly fouls, silly
turnovers, Hickman said. It wasnt going to
well. We decided to play solid D and lock
down.
I told them, lets get back to Woodside bas-
ketball, Fountain said of the pre-OT huddle.
Robert
Guerrero
PAL girls get wins from
Terra Nova and M-A
SPORTS 12
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Sergio Romo took the mound to
face a hitter for the rst time since sneaking a fastball past
Miguel Cabrera for the nal out of the World Series.
This time, he was facing teammate Pablo Sandoval in
spring training batting practice.
Same result: called strike.
Only a lot less drama.
It was a lot of fun to get out there again, Romo said
Tuesday. It got my competitive juices
going. I wanted to stay focused and be in
the zone.
Romo said watching his teammates let
loose after the last out of each clinching
game the NL West title and the three
postseason series were his top four
memorable moments of last season. He
wants a repeat.
Sure, it was emotional for me at the
moment, he said. But then I was able to
take a step back and watch my team cel-
ebrate. I wanted them to enjoy what we worked so hard to
get. Those are the most gratifying moments to me.
Romo shut his eyes while talking, as though he were
reecting back to those moments. His face contorted, his
hands rolled into sts. He wore a broad smile.
It was sheer euphoria, Romo said. An unbelievable feel-
ing.
After Brian Wilsons season ended last April because of an
elbow injury that required surgery, Romo eventually took
over as closed and saved 14 games in 15 chances during the
regular season.
Giants manager Bruce Bochy said Romos next step is
learning to deal with the ups and downs that go along with
being the last man on the mound. Sometimes it leads to fail-
ure.
Its going to be an adjustment for him, Bochy said. He
does take it hard. He feels like hes let his teammates down.
Youre going to go through that, and he has to understand it.
We know hes not trying to make a mistake, but it happens to
everybody. You have to put that behind you. When you
bounce back as much as we did last year, you need to be
resilient.
Romo credited most of his success to his teammates belief
in him. His resources are Wilson, who struck out Nelson
Cruz to complete the Giants 2010 World Series over Texas,
and Robb Nen, who won a World Series with the Florida
Marlins and helped the Giants reach Game 7 of the 2002
World Series. Nen has become a Giants instructor.
Brian helped me with little questions down the stretch,
Romo said. It basically came down to: Get your outs and
then go celebrate. Having Nen around last year was huge for
me, just to be able to talk to him.
For Romo, just glancing at his teams dugout or turning
around to look at his elders gives him a lift.
Romos trust in
teammates made
him better pitcher
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY California coach
Mike Montgomery said Tuesday there
was no excuse for him shoving his star
player during a game and that the action
was completely out
of character for him.
The fact was, I
was wrong,
Montgomery said on
a Pac-12 conference
call Tuesday.
Looking back, you
cant do that.
Montgomery has
been publicly repri-
manded by the Pac-
12 conference and
his own athletic director for pushing
Allen Crabbe with both hands during a
timeout in the second half of Cals 76-68
win over Southern California on Sunday
night.
After initially downplaying the event
by calling it a motivational tactic and
saying he would do it again because it
worked, Montgomery issued an apology
statement later that night and then
expanded on that Tuesday.
Theres no excuse, he said. Ive
been doing this 31 years. Theres no
excuse. I know better. Its totally out of
character for me. I think things have
changed in terms of how you can deal
with kids. Theres a heightened sensitiv-
ity to these kind of things but that does-
nt change it. But theres nothing that
makes it right. I was wrong. You have to
just acknowledge that and push for-
ward.
Montgomery said he called Crabbes
father to tell him he was out of line and
that he will address the issue with his
team at practice later Tuesday.
Montgomery said this incident can be a
learning experience for him and his
players about the scrutiny they are under
and the importance of controlling emo-
tions.
Montgomery said his talk with
Crabbes father was all positive and that
his relationship with his star player is
good. Crabbe said after the game that
emotions were high at the time and
Montgomery was just trying to motivate
him. Crabbe, the leading scorer in the
Pac-12 with an average of 19.8 points,
scored 14 points after the shove and led
the Bears back from a 15-point decit to
win.
To try to mitigate or nd an excuse or
a reason why something like that might
happen, doesnt work right now,
Montgomery said.
Lost in the hubbub from the contro-
versy of the shove Sunday night is the
fact that Cal has been playing its best
basketball of late. The Bears have won
ve of the past six games to get into con-
tention for an at-large bid to the NCAA
tournament and to move into a tie for
fourth in the conference with Arizona
State.
Cal has quality wins over Oregon and
Arizona when both teams were ranked
in the top 10 and gets another shot at the
Ducks on Thursday night when the
Bears begin their weekend trip to
Oregon.
Cal coach says no excuse for shoving player
Mike
Montgomery
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX Bartolo Colon knew he
had failed a drug test for about six weeks
before he got hit with a 50-game sus-
pension last season. He made several
starts for the Oakland Athletics while
knowing he probably wouldnt partici-
pate in the pennant race.
I continued to pitch, but my mind
wasnt good, he said.
Now that Colon is back in the club-
house at spring training with the team-
mates he let down, the 39-year-old right-
hander knows he can only earn peace of
mind and forgiveness by getting back in
top form on the mound.
Colon nally spoke Tuesday about his
season-ending suspension for a positive
testosterone test. Through a translator,
the former Cy Young Award winner with
171 career victories expressed regret for
his past mistakes and hope for his future.
The only thing I can say about last
year is I apologize to everybody, even
the fans, the team, the front ofce about
what happened, he said.
The As organization already has for-
given the veteran starter whose rst sea-
son with Oakland ended prematurely.
Not only did the unlikely AL West
champions re-sign Colon, they gave him
a raise with a $3 million, one-year con-
tract.
I feel loved, because Oakland gave
me the opportunity to come back and be
part of it again, he said.
The Dominican veteran doesnt intend
to call a team meeting to apologize to
everybody. He said hell speak to the As
individually about his past mistake and
their future.
I talked to him beforehand, and I
thought that was the proper way to go
about it, Oakland manager Bob Melvin
said. Hes not a guy that wants to call a
team meeting. Thats not his personality,
but its his personality to deal with guys
individually, and hes done that to this
point. I think hes handled everything so
far to this point very well.
Colon still must serve the last ve
games this season, costing him a turn in
the rotation. Colon is expected to be a
calming veteran presence in one of the
majors youngest starting rotations, but
Oakland has plenty of starting depth
with Brett Anderson, Jarrod Parker,
Tommy Milone, A.J. Grifn and Dan
Straily.
Colon went 10-9 with a 3.43 ERA in
24 starts last season, his 15th in the
majors. He pitched fairly well after
learning of his positive test, going 4-2
after July 1 while presumably not using
banned substances.
The As were frustrated after losing
Colon in mid-August, yet they stuck
with him.
Bartolo Colon returning to As with regrets
Sergio Romo
SPORTS 13
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Warriors out of All-Star
gate with loss at Utah
Sharks 2 goals are enough
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS Tim Kennedy and the San
Jose Sharks were happy to end their long win-
less streak.
Kennedy scored on a wobbling shot in the
third period and Antti Niemi made 25 saves to
help the Sharks end a seven-game winless
streak with a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis
Blues on Tuesday.
The seven-game streak was the Sharks
longest since a 10-game run Nov. 5-30, 2005.
Joe Thornton also scored for San Jose,
which began the season with a franchise-
record seven successive wins.
St. Louis has dropped five consecutive
home games for the rst time since losing ve
in a row Dec. 18, 2009, to Jan. 2, 2010. The
Blues also had a three-game winning streak
halted. They were coming off a perfect road
trip with wins in Detroit, Calgary and
Vancouver.
Kennedy scored the go-ahead goal at 13:02
on a shot from the left faceoff circle that elud-
ed goalie Jake Allen, who had won the rst
three starts of his career.
I dont know how that quite went through
him but its a goal, Kennedy said. The
puck came off the wall and I just red it. You
cant score if you dont shoot.
Kennedy scored for the second time in just
three games this season. His uttering shot
seemed to surprise Allen.
It was kind of a knuckler, it sort of wob-
bled on me, Allen said.
The Sharks were 0-for-February entering
the game, including four one-goal losses.
This time, San Jose made the most of a
lucky bounce.
Finally, we got a uke goal that went our
way, Thornton said. It was nice to get out of
a streak like that. Its huge to get back on the
winning side of things.
Niemi improved to 7-2-3. He made 11 saves
in the opening period.
The relief is there, its (nally) over, San
Jose coach Todd McLellan said. Now, we
cant let our game slip.
Patrik Berglund scored his team-high ninth
goal for St. Louis in the rst period. He has
tallied in the past four games, a career best.
Thornton then tied the game early in the
second period jumping on a rebound from
close range.
San Jose, which outshot the Blues 9-5 in the
third period, held St. Louis without a shot for
the rst 12:17 of the nal period.
The Sharks were playing for the rst time
since Friday while St. Louis arrived home at
6:30 a.m. on Tuesday after a 14-hour travel
delay in Vancouver.
Yet the Blues werent using fatigue as an
excuse.
Too many people not pulling their
weight, Coach Ken Hitchcock said. Too
many passengers.
NOTES: Kennedy led all players with ve
shots on goal. ... This was the rst meeting
between the teams since St. Louis beat San
Jose in ve games in the Western Conference
playoffs last season. ... G Jaroslav Halak is
expected to start for the Blues on Wednesday
in Colorado. ... San Jose played the fourth
game of a six-game road trip. The Sharks
return home Jan. 26 to face Colorado.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALT LAKE CITY Al Jefferson scored
24 points, Gordon Hayward added 17 in his
return from a shoulder injury and the Utah
Jazz defeated Golden State 115-101 Tuesday
night to extend the Warriors losing streak to
six games.
Seven Jazz players scored in double gures
and Utah got 47 points from its reserves.
The Jazz made 10 of 21 3-pointers, includ-
ing three by Randy Foye.
Stephen Curry led Golden State with 29
points, Jarrett Jack had 19 off the bench and
David Lee contributed 18 on 9-of-13 shoot-
ing.
Lees runner and Currys fourth 3-pointer
pulled the Warriors within 93-87 with 9:47
remaining.
Thats as close as they would get.
Paul Millsaps turnaround jumper ignited a
6-0 Utah run and the Jazz held the Warriors to
30 percent shooting in the fourth.
The Warriors were within one point in the
third several times, including 66-65 after
Currys third 3-pointer.
Utah countered with a 15-4 run, with 3-
pointers by Foye and Marvin Williams and
nine more points for Jefferson, who had a
dunk and three-point play in ve minutes to
bump Utahs lead to 81-69 with 3:36 left.
Jacks 9-foot runner with 2.6 seconds left in
the fourth pulled Golden State within 87-79.
Utah led by as many as 12 in the second
quarter only to see Golden State rip off an 8-0
run, with a pair of 3-pointers by Curry sand-
wiched around two more shots by Jack, who
opened 5 of 5.
Utah countered with its own 8-2 run, with
3-pointers by Hayward and Foye giving Utah
a 50-40 advantage.
The Warriors closed the half on a 13-8 run,
shooting 67 percent in the quarter to get with-
in 58-53 at the break.
The Jazz led 26-19 after one despite shoot-
ing just 36.4 percent. It helped that they got to
the free throw line 10 times and made eight.
They shot 33 free throws overall, making
27, compared to 18 of 24 for the Warriors.
Utah led 19-9 seven minutes in as Golden
State opened 4 of 13.
The Jazz second unit, led by Hayward, kept
it going. He checked into the game with 4:35
remaining in the quarter to loud applause after
missing the last 10 games because of a
sprained right shoulder.
Two minutes later, he drove the lane and
took a shot to the same shoulder by Andris
Biedrins. Hayward sank both free throws for a
23-13 Utah lead.
Jack pulled Golden State within 26-19 after
the rst after hitting 3 of 3 shots off the bench.
NOTES: Utah assistant Sidney Lowe was
on the Jazz bench, coaching his rst game
since being arrested over the weekend in
North Carolina for failing to le his state
income tax returns for 2009, 2010, 2011. The
team is referring all legal questions to Lowes
attorney, but head coach Tyrone Corbin said,
We support him wholeheartedly. He under-
stands and has taken responsibility for where
he is in it. Well support him and move on. .
Corbin wouldnt talk specifics about
Thursdays trade deadline, but said, I love
everybody on this team. Love what these guys
bring, love how they stayed focused and try to
get better. . These are Utah Jazz kind of guys.
. Warriors F David Lee was called for a tech-
nical foul with 9:33 left in the second quarter
for arguing a non-call on the defensive end. .
Second-year Jazz G Alec Burks had the drive
of the game, with a twisting reverse layup
over the outstretched arms of 6-foot-11 C
Festus Ezeli late in the third.
SPORTS 14
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Mayweather to be the face of Showtime,
Mayweather adviser Leonard Ellerbe told The
Associated Press. Its the ultimate compli-
ment to a ghter like Floyd. They were
aggressive, and the deal that they put on the
table was essentially a deal that you cant
refuse.
Mayweathers rst bout
is against Guerrero (31-1-
1, 18 KOs), the WBCs
interim welterweight
champion. The ght likely
will be at the MGM Grand
Garden in Las Vegas.
Mayweather turns 36 on
Sunday, but the unbeaten
WBC 147-pound champi-
on has shown no signs of
age in the ring. He hasnt
fought since beating Miguel Cotto last May 5,
and he spent two months in jail last summer
after his conviction in a misdemeanor domes-
tic battery case.
He has a renewed motivation to stay active
and to take on everybody out there, Ellerbe
said. When Floyd is more active, hes going
to be beyond untouchable. Hes proved he can
stay sharp with those layoffs in the past, but
hes going to be more active now.
Guerrero beat out several contenders to get
the biggest payday of his career and a long-
awaited shot at his sports biggest name.
Guerrero, from Gilroy, Calif., is a onetime
featherweight champion who hasnt lost since
2005, beating welterweight Andre Berto in a
thrilling ght last November.
On May 4th Im going to shock the world,
Guerrero tweeted.
Ellerbe said Mayweather chose Guerrero as
his next opponent because of his toughness
and crowd-pleasing style.
He denitely earned the right to ght
Floyd, Ellerbe said. He won the
Mayweather sweepstakes, so now he gets to
see what the grand prize is, and when he
opens up that grand prize, its going to be a
can of (tail) whooping.
Mayweather has been on HBO for essen-
tially his entire professional career, which
began after the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.
HBO has been the home for nearly all of
boxings biggest stars and biggest fights
over the past three decades.
The pay-cable network has an extensive
array of boxing-related programming along
with hundreds of ghts on its regular network
and pay-per-view arm. Mayweather starred in
HBOs popular 24/7 reality series before
each of his last six bouts, further growing his
celebrity with the four-episode showcases of
his Vegas lifestyle and irrepressible personali-
ty.
We made an aggressive and responsible
pay-per-view offer, HBO said in a statement
from spokesman Kevin Flaherty. Now we
move on. We are focused on the best boxing
franchise in the television business. We are
proud of the roster of superstar ghters and
emerging stars who are scheduled to appear
on the multiple HBO television platforms this
year.
Manny Pacquiao was Mayweathers only
rival for boxing supremacy in recent years
before the Filipino congressmans back-to-
back losses last year.
Continued from page 11
BOXING
Floyd
Mayweather Jr.
eligible players has become more well-
dened over the last decade or so as clubs and
player agents have become more sophisticat-
ed in valuing players, MLB senior vice pres-
ident Dan Halem said. That factor, combined
with the relatively recent trend of locking up
pre-arbitration and arbitration-eligible players
to multiyear contracts, probably has con-
tributed to the decline in the number of hear-
ings.
Relatively few big-name stars even led.
Giants pitcher Tim Lincecums nal two sea-
sons of arbitration eligibility were covered by
a $40.5 million, two-year contract agreed to in
January 2012. Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher
Clayton Kershaw agreed the following month
to a two-year deal guaranteeing $19 million
that leaves him with just one more arbitration-
eligible season.
Clubs have been more aggressive in recent
years to sign players under control to multi-
year contracts, agent Seth Levinson said, to
not just obtain cost certainty but to also
acquire the nancial benets that are derived
when the players value increases beyond the
salaries actually paid over the term of con-
tract.
Evidence of the change is that the highest
salary awarded in arbitration remains $10 mil-
lion, to Alfonso Soriano in 2006 and to Ryan
Howard and Francisco Rodriguez two years
later Howard was the only winner among
the three.
Conict had been replaced by concord.
I dont think Id draw any trend from zero,
players association head Michael Weiner
said. Its always been the unions view that if
the arbitration system works properly, there
should be no hearings. We should get all set-
tlements. But its unusual for that to happen. I
dont expect that to happen on an ongoing
basis going forward.
The increase for this years arbitration
group was up from 89 percent last year but
down from 123 percent in 2011. In addition to
Posey, big raises were obtained by Baltimore
catcher Matt Wieters (11-fold to $5.5 mil-
lion), Cincinnati pitcher Mat Latos (10-fold to
$5.75 million).
Latos was the only player who even got out-
side the Ellis room the pitcher and the Reds
settled on an $11.5 million, two-year deal
before the hearing before a three-person panel
to was start on Feb. 12.
Continued from page 11
POSEY
ArbitrationStudyChart
The 2012 and 2013 salaries of the 133 players in salary ar-
bitration, as obtained by The Associated Press from player
and management sources.The 2012 salaries include
earned bonuses. For players with multiyear contracts
(x-ending multiyear contract; y-beginning multiyear con-
tract), the salaries listed are the average annual values of
the contracts. (w-arbitration winner; l-arbitration loser).
SanFrancisco
Joaquin Arias 525,000 925,000
Gregor Blanco 516,000 1,350,000
Jose Mijares 1,000,000 1,800,000
Hunter Pence 10,400,000 13,800,000
Buster Posey 615,000 8,000,000
Sergio Romo 1,575,000 4,500,000-y
Oakland
Jerry Blevins 490,000 1,100,000
John Jaso 495,200 1,800,000
Jed Lowrie 1,175,000 2,400,000
Brandon Moss 480,000 1,600,000
Seth Smith 2,415,000 3,675,000
The ninth-seeded Bears travel to No. 8
Milpitas on Thursday at 5:30 p.m. in the sec-
ond round action.
No. 10 Terra Nova took down Del Mar 54-
33 in Division III play.
We played solid defense, said Terra Nova
head coach Kareem Summerville. Today was
more of team win. We made the extra passes
and got some easy lay-ups on the back door. It
was a well-balanced game.
Lynette Mackey led the way with 19 points.
Sophomore Arianna Sheehy scored 15 while
Autumn Ragler added nine. The Tigers travel
to No. 7 Saratoga on Thursday night.
In boys Division III soccer action, Sacred
Heart Prep got two timely headers by Robert
Hellman to overcome a one-goal decit and
beat No. 12 Carmel 2-1.
Carmel opened the scoring in the 28th
minute. But the Gators perservered and broke
through with two big headers.
The Gators are the No. 5 seed in DIII and
will take on either No. 13 Santa Cruz or No. 4
San Mateo in the quarternals.
Continued from page 11
CCS
Start playing with each other. I thought we got
away from that a little bit. And we had to
intensify our defense. I think we did that. I
think the defense really made the difference in
the overtime. It really stepped up I thought.
With the game still tense, Woodside got a
bit 3-pointer by David Lopez midway through
OT to add some distance. The senior guard
nished with six 3s for the game.
David is a pure shooter, Fountain said.
Hes the hardest working team on our team.
We have to encourage David to shoot. Hes
unselsh. Hell pass the ball but we tell him,
you have to shoot the ball. As far as Im con-
cerned, hes got the green light all the time.
Hes that good a shooter.
Woodside had all eight of its players who
saw oor time get on the scoresheet in the rst
half. They started a hot 9 of 14 from the oor
to begin the game but cooled off in the second
period when the Royals made their rst run of
the game.
Hickman nished with nine points. Fellow
senior Blocker scored 14 including four huge
points in the OT before fouling out. Lopezs
point total was 18.
Continued from page 11
CATS
SPORTS 15
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 32 18 .640
Brooklyn 32 22 .593 2
Boston 28 25 .528 5 1/2
Philadelphia 22 29 .431 10 1/2
Toronto 22 32 .407 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 36 14 .720
Atlanta 29 22 .569 7 1/2
Washington 15 37 .288 22
Orlando 15 38 .283 22 1/2
Charlotte 13 40 .245 24 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 32 21 .604
Chicago 31 22 .585 1
Milwaukee 26 26 .500 5 1/2
Detroit 21 34 .382 12
Cleveland 16 37 .302 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 43 12 .782
Memphis 34 18 .654 7 1/2
Houston 29 26 .527 14
Dallas 23 29 .442 18 1/2
New Orleans 19 35 .352 23 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 39 14 .736
Denver 34 21 .618 6
Utah 31 24 .564 9
Portland 25 29 .463 14 1/2
Minnesota 19 31 .380 18 1/2
PacicDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 17 .696
Golden State 30 23 .566 7 1/2
L.A. Lakers 25 29 .463 13
Sacramento 19 36 .345 19 1/2
Phoenix 18 36 .333 20
TuesdaysGames
Charlotte 105, Orlando 92
Toronto 96,Washington 88
Brooklyn 113, Milwaukee 111, OT
Memphis 105, Detroit 91
Chicago 96, New Orleans 87
Denver 97, Boston 90
Utah 115, Golden State 101
Phoenix 102, Portland 98
San Antonio 108, Sacramento 102
WednesdaysGames
Detroit at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Memphis at Toronto, 4 p.m.
New York at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland 5 p.m.
Orlando at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
Miami at Chicago, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE NHL GLANCE CCS WHATS ON TAP
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 16 9 3 4 22 42 38
Pittsburgh 16 11 5 0 22 52 38
N.Y. Rangers 15 8 6 1 17 39 38
Philadelphia 17 7 9 1 15 45 49
N.Y. Islanders 16 6 9 1 13 46 57
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 16 11 4 1 23 46 35
Boston 13 9 2 2 20 37 31
Ottawa 17 9 6 2 20 40 32
Toronto 17 10 7 0 20 48 40
Buffalo 17 6 10 1 13 47 56
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 14 8 5 1 17 41 40
Tampa Bay 15 8 6 1 17 59 47
Winnipeg 15 6 8 1 13 37 47
Florida 15 4 7 4 12 35 56
Washington 15 5 9 1 11 41 51
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 16 13 0 3 29 55 34
Nashville 17 8 4 5 21 39 38
St. Louis 16 9 6 1 19 53 50
Detroit 16 7 6 3 17 43 48
Columbus 16 4 10 2 10 36 51
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 15 8 3 4 20 44 37
Minnesota 15 7 6 2 16 33 38
Edmonton 15 6 6 3 15 36 41
Calgary 14 5 6 3 13 39 51
Colorado 14 6 7 1 13 37 43
PacicDivision
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 15 12 2 1 25 53 39
San Jose 15 8 4 3 19 39 34
Phoenix 16 8 6 2 18 44 41
Dallas 16 8 7 1 17 41 43
Los Angeles 14 6 6 2 14 33 37
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
MondaysGames
Ottawa 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Islanders 0
Colorado 6, Nashville 5
Montreal 3, Carolina 0
Toronto 3, Florida 0
Phoenix 4, Calgary 0
Anaheim 3, Columbus 2
TuesdaysGames
Chicago 4,Vancouver 3, SO
Winnipeg 2, Buffalo 1
Montreal 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Islanders 1
Tampa Bay 4,Toronto 2
San Jose 2, St. Louis 1
Nashville 4, Detroit 3, OT
Los Angeles 3, Edmonton 1
WednesdaysGames
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 10 p.m.
@Stars
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/23
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/22
vs.Suns
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
2/20
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/22
SATURDAY CONT.
DIVISION V
TBD vs. No. 4 Crystal Springs at Castilleja High
School,TBA
BOYS SOCCER
DIVISION I
TBD vs. No. 2 Carlmont, site and time TBA
DIVISION III
TBD vs. No. 1 Half Moon Bay, site and time TBA
GIRLS SOCCER
TBD vs. No. 2 Woodside, site and time TBA
WRESTLING
CCS championships at Independence High School
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMORE ORIOLESPromoted Brady Ander-
son to vice president of baseball operations, Ned
Rice director of major league administration, Mike
Snyder assistant director of player personnel andBill
Wilkes manager of baseball operations.
SEATTLEMARINERSAgreed to terms with RHP
Carter Capps, RHP Brandon Maurer, INF Alex Liddi
and OF Michael Saunders on one-year contracts.
TORONTOBLUEJAYSNamed Paul Quantrill as
a consultant to the organization.
National League
PITTSBURGHPIRATESExercised the 2014 club
option for manager Clint Hurdle and have added
a club option for 2015.
BASKETBALL
WomensNational Basketball Association
ATLANTADREAMAcquired G Jasmine Thomas
and a 2013 second-round draft pick from Wash-
ington for its 2013 rst- and second-round draft
picks.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFLNamed Alberto Riveron senior director of
ofciating.Fined Calgary D Mark Giordano $10,000
for tripping Dallas F Antoine Roussel in a game on
Feb. 17.
BUFFALOBILLSRe-signed OL Colin Brown.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFSReleased TE Kevin Boss
and WR Steve Breaston.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTSSigned DL Jason
Vega.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTSReleased TE David
Thomas and CB Johnny Patrick.
NEWYORKJETSReleasedLBBart Scott,LBCalvin
Pace,SEricSmith,OLJasonSmith,andTEJoshBaker.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
NHLFined Minnesota F Devin Setoguchi
$8,108.11 for high-sticking Detroit D Kyle Quincey
in a Feb. 17 game at Minnesota.
ANAHEIMDUCKSAssigned D Nate Guenin and
D Hampus Lindholm to Norfolk (AHL).Reassigned
G Jeff Deslauriers to Fort Wayne (ECHL).
BOSTONBRUINSCalled up F Lane MacDermid
from Providence (AHL).
NASHVILLEPREDATORSAcquired D Scott Ford
from St.Louis for F Jani Lajunen and assigned Ford
to Milwaukee.
TUESDAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
DIVISION I
Sequoia beats Independence, NR
Carlmont 51, Santa Clara 44
Wilcox 61, Menlo-Atherton 54
DIVISION II
Woodside 66, Overfelt 59
DIVISION III
Terra Nova 66, Sobrato 62
GIRLS BASKETBALL
DIVISION I
Menlo-Atherton 53, Independence 25
Sequoia vs. Homestead, NR
DIVISION III
Terra Nova 54, Del Mar 33
DIVISION IV
Harker at No. 11 Oceana, NR
Carmel at No. 10 Half Moon Bay, NR
BOYSSOCCER
DIVISION III
Sacred Heart Prep 2, Carmel 1
WEDNESDAY
BOYS SOCCER
DIVISION I
No. 11 Watsonville at No. 6 Sequoia, 4 p.m.
No. 12 Menlo-Atherton at No. 5 Mountain View, 3
p.m.
DIVISION II
No. 10 Los Gatos at No. 7 Serra, 3 p.m.
DIVISION III
No. 10 Menlo School at No. 7 Burlingame, 6 p.m.
No. 13 Santa Cruz at No. 4 San Mateo, 3 p.m.
GIRLSSOCCER
DIVISION I
No. 10 Leland at No. 7 Menlo-Atherton, 6 pm.
No. 13 San Clara at No. 4 Carlmont, 6 p.m.
No. 9 Alisal at No. 8 Sequoia, 6 p.m.
DIVISION II
No. 11 Burlingame at No. 6 Saratoga, 6 p.m.
No. 12 Aragon at No. 5 Los Altos, 3 p.m.
DIVISION III
No. 9 Live Oak at No. 8 Sacred Heart Prep, 3 p.m.
THURSDAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
DIVISION II
TBD at No. 6 Aragon, 7 p.m.
TBD at No. 8 Hillsdale, 7 pm.
DIVISION IV
TBD at No. 5 Sacred Heart Prep, 5 p.m.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
DIVISION II
No. 11 El Camino at No. 6 Woodside, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Leland at No. 7 South City, 7 p.m.
DIVISION III
No. 9 Santa Cruz at No. 8 San Mateo, 7 p.m.
DIVISION IV
No. 9 Notre Dame-Belmont at No. 8 Seaside, 7 p.m.
TBD at No. 5 Sacred Heart Prep, 6:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
OPEN DIVISION
No. 7 El Camino vs. No. 2 Serra at Santa Clara High
School,TBA.
WRESTLING
CCS championships at Independence High School
SATURDAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
DIVISION II
TBD vs.No.1 Westmoor at Santa Clara High School,
TBA
DIVISION III
TBD vs. No. 3 Mills at St. Ignatius High School, TBA
at
TBD vs. No. 2 Burlingame St. Ignatius High School,
TBA
DIVISION IV
TBD vs. No. 4 Half Moon Bay at Menlo School,TBA
TBD at No. 3 Menlo Schoo,TBA
GIRLS BASKETBALL
DIVISION II
TBD vs.No.2 Westmoor at Oak Grove High School,
TBA
DIVISION III
TBD vs. No. 4 Mills at Christopher High School,TBA
TBD vs. No. 1 Burlingame at Christopher High
School,TBA
DIVISION IV
TBDvs.No.2MenloSchool at NotreDame-Belmont,
TBA
DIVISION V
TBD vs. No. 4 Crystal Springs at Castilleja High
School,TBA
BOYS SOCCER
DIVISION I
TBD vs. No. 2 Carlmont, site and time TBA
DIVISION III
TBD vs. No. 1 Half Moon Bay, site and time TBA
GIRLS SOCCER
TBD vs. No. 2 Woodside, site and time TBA
WRESTLING
CCS championships at Independence High School
CCS WHATS ON TAP
16
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Allen retirement opens
Europe command slot
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama is looking for a new
candidate to
lead American
and allied
forces in
Europe after his
first choice,
Marine Gen.
John Allen,
bowed out
Tuesday and
announced his
intention to retire for what he
called personal reasons.
The move further clouds the pic-
ture for Obama as he repositions
key figures on his national security
team and in key military leadership
roles. The White House is fighting
for Senate confirmation of Chuck
Hagel as defense secretary; a con-
firmation vote was stalled last
week by Republicans but is expect-
ed to happen next week.
Obama also is switching com-
manders at Central Command,
which is responsible for U.S. mili-
tary operations throughout the
greater Middle East, and Africa
Command.
Sunni protesters dig in
as tensions flare in Iraq
RAMADI, Iraq Sunni protest-
ers are camped out in dozens of
tents festooned with tribal banners
on the edge of this one-time Iraqi
insurgent stronghold. They are dig-
ging in and growing more organ-
ized, vowing to keep up their
demonstrations against a Shiite-led
government they feel has left them
behind.
The protesters will seek to bring
down the government if their
demands arent met, warns a
prominent Sunni sheik who once
helped Americans battle al-Qaida
in Iraq. He speaks ominously that
armed militants who once fought
U.S. troops could rally to the
cause.
When we give up hope that the
government can reform itself, we
will call for toppling it, Sheik
Ahmed Abu Risha said in his well-
guarded family compound near the
banks of the Euphrates.
$50 million in diamonds
stolen at Brussels airport
BRUSSELS When the
armored car set off for the Brussels
airport carrying $50 million worth
of precious stones from Antwerps
diamond district, eight gunmen
knew all about it.
One of the biggest diamond
heists in recent memory was about
to go down.
The thieves surely knew it would
be too risky to make their move in
Antwerp, which is the world capi-
tal of diamond-cutting, 43 kilome-
ters (27 miles) from the airport.
The citys diamond industry has
some 2,000 surveillance cameras,
police monitoring and countless
identity controls to protect its $200
million in daily trade of rough and
polished gems.
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The White
House on Tuesday sought to keep
delicate immigration negotiations
on track, as a key Republican sena-
tor distanced himself further from a
draft bill President Barack Obamas
aides are readying in case congres-
sional talks crumble.
Florida Republican Sen. Marco
Rubios ofce said Obamas plan
injected additional partisanship
into an already difcult process.
The White House, following the
weekend leak of its draft legislation,
insisted the president wants the
bipartisan Senate group Rubio is a
member of to put forward its own
bill instead.
Obama spoke with Rubio on
Tuesday to reiterate his commitment
to the Senate process and to make
clear that he had his own legislation
ready, the White House said. The
president also called Republicans
Sens. Lindsey Graham of South
Carolina and John McCain of
Arizona, two other GOP lawmakers
involved in the immigration negoti-
ations.
It is, by far, the presidents
preference that the Senate process
move forward, that the bipartisan
group of eight have success, and
that they produce a bill that wins
the support of Democrats and
Republicans in Senate, White
House spokesman Jay Carney
said.
Senate aides said privately
Tuesday that bipartisan negotiations
are in a good place and they did not
feel as though the disclosure of
details in Obamas draft bill would
disrupt their process. In fact,
Obamas backup bill could end up
spurring GOP lawmakers to rally
behind a congressional plan with
many similarities rather than sup-
port legislation attached to the pres-
ident.
White House tries to keep immigration on track
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Ten days
before a new deadline for broad,
automatic government spending
cuts, the sense of urgency that sur-
rounded other recent scal crises is
absent. Government agencies are
preparing to absorb an $85 billion
hit to their budgets, and politicians,
at least for now, seem willing to
accept the consequences.
President Barack Obama, back
from a Florida golng weekend,
warned Tuesday that people will
lose their jobs if Congress doesnt
act. But lawmakers werent in ses-
sion to hear his appeal, and they
arent coming back to work until
next week.
Still dividing the two sides are
sharp differences over whether tax
increases, which Obama wants and
Republicans oppose, should be part
of a budget deal.
Obama cautioned that if the
immediate spending cuts known
as sequestration occur, the full
range of government will feel the
effects. Among those he listed: fur-
loughed FBI agents, reductions in
spending for communities to pay
police, reghters and teachers, and
decreased ability to respond to
threats around the world.
So far at least, the ideas that the
Republicans have proposed ask
nothing of the wealthiest Americans
or the biggest corporations, Obama
said at a White House event against
a backdrop of reghters and other
emergency personnel. So the bur-
den is all on the rst responders, or
seniors or middle class families.
Not much urgency to avoid automatic spending cuts
It is, by far, the presidents preference that the Senate
process move forward, that the bipartisan group of eight
have success, and that they produce a bill that wins the
support of Democrats and Republicans in Senate.
White House spokesman Jay Carney
Around the world
John Allen
FOOD 17
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: February 28, 2013
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W
hen is a recipe that takes
many hours a fast and easy
recipe? When it takes just
10 minutes of your time to prepare.
Admittedly, this
recipe for roasted
goat isnt week-
night-friendly. But
it is ideal for a
weekend when
you want a bold,
richly avored
dinner that sports
tons of slow-roast-
ed deliciousness
without needing to
spend the day
slaving in the
kitchen.
But rst, we must address the issue of
goat. Plenty of people think its a little
sketchy. But when properly prepared it
is crazy delicious, akin to the best dark
meat turkey youll ever taste. You prob-
ably wont nd it at most mainstream
grocers; farmers markets or ethnic mar-
kets are where to go to hunt down this
dinner. For this recipe, ask for the
shoulder roast, sometimes labeled leg
roast.
In fact, getting the meat probably is
the hardest part of the whole recipe.
Once youve got it, all you do is trim
off any fat, rub it with an herb and
spice blend, then pop it in a Dutch oven
with some carrots and white wine, then
ignore it for several hours (or until the
meat is so tender you can cut it with a
spoon).
If you want to add some roasted pota-
toes to the mix, add 1 pound of lightly
oiled new potatoes to the pot (around
the goat) during the last hour of cook-
ing.
SLOW ROASTED
ROSEMARY LEG OF GOAT
This recipe was written for a 2 1/4-
pound bone-in leg of goat, which will
make about 4 servings. If you cant nd
that size, or need a larger one in order
to feed more people, estimate about 2
hours of roasting per pound. We also
found that using a ceramic Dutch oven
slowed the cooking slightly; a cast-iron
pot accelerated it. Its best to check the
meat about every 30 minutes after it has
roasted for 3 hours.
Start to nish: 4 hours (10 minutes
active)
Servings: 4 servings
3 large carrots, cut into 2-inch lengths
1 medium yellow onion, roughly
chopped
2 large sprigs fresh rosemary, leaves
only
Stewed rosemary goat
that takes 10 minutes
Getting the meat is probably the hardest part of the goat stew recipe.
J.M. HIRSCH
See STEW, Page 18
Vermont hopes syrup grade
changes will sweeten sales
By Dave Gram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTPELIER, Vt. Would fancy grade maple syrup by
any other name taste as sweet?
Vermont lawmakers are pondering that question as they con-
sider whether to drop the states traditional maple labeling sys-
tem in favor of an international one.
The change pits tradition versus a desire to be a bigger play-
er in world markets. Vermont is the No. 1 maple syrup pro-
ducer in the United States, but its unique labeling standards
put it at odds with the other big producers, including Canada.
The state Senate last week passed and sent to the House a
measure to drop fancy, grade A medium amber, dark amber
and grade B. (Fancy is the lightest and mildest, while grade B
is the darkest and has the strongest maple avor.) In their place
would be several types sharing a grade A label, with descrip-
Vermonts syrup production has roughly doubled in the past
decade,to the extent that supply vastly exceeds any demand
that would come from a state of about 626,000.
See SYRUP, Page 20
18
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD/LOCAL
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/2 teaspoon ground dried sage
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/4-pound bone-in goat leg
2 1/2 cups white wine
Heat the oven to 425 F. Arrange the
carrots and onion in a Dutch oven.
In a mini processor or spice grinder,
combine the rosemary, garlic, thyme,
fennel, cumin, salt, peppercorns, papri-
ka, sage, coriander and cloves. Grind
until a coarse paste forms, then transfer
to a small bowl. Add the olive oil and
mix to form a loose paste. Set aside.
Use a knife to trim away any fat on
the exterior of the meat. Rub the oil-
and-spice blend thoroughly over the
meat, massaging it into any splits or
separations. Set the meat on top of the
carrots and onions in the pot. Pour the
wine into the pot (not over the goat,
which would wash away the seasoning
rub).
Set in the oven and cook for 30 min-
utes. Reduce the heat to 300 F, then
cook for another 3 1/2 hours, or until
the meat falls away easily from the
bone.
Continued from page 17
STEW
Defense attorney Chuck Smith said he was
disappointed in the sentence, calling the case
a sad, unfortunate situation in which his
client didnt prot a nickel but insurance com-
panies will now receive an extra $2 million.
Prison was never a realistic concern, he said,
but ve years incarceration rather than the
nancial penalty would affect the life of her
husband and three children much less signi-
cantly.
She was given nancial penalties akin to an
inside trader, Smith said. This is unfair and
far beyond the conduct that she committed.
Smith had requested house arrest for Reif
and said the Probation Department recom-
mended the same.
The prosecution was pleased with the out-
come, said District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Reif has operated the business with her
brother since 2003 as the fourth-generation off-
shoot of the family business, according to the
companys website. The site also notes it has
grown by providing superior service, at a rea-
sonable price, with honesty and reliability for
over 80 years.
Between 2004 and 2009, Reif purchased
workers compensation insurance through
Redwood Fire & Casualty Insurance Company
and the State Compensation Insurance Fund for
her business, Genesis Building Services.
In 2008, the insurance company said it
received conicting data from Genesis staff
about the number of employees and began sus-
pecting it was under-reporting its payroll by
approximately $544,440. Further investigation
by the California Department of Insurance
placed the under-reported amount at
$10,657,776.69 which resulted in Reif avoid-
ing paying $2,957,089.20 in insurance premi-
ums.
The CDI claims Reif misrepresented both the
number of employees and its payroll when
applying for insurance, while insured and dur-
ing annual audits conducted by the carriers.
Genesis allegedly employed more than 140
employees but Reif reported less than half the
staff and gave auditors fraudulent paperwork to
support the false monthly reports.
During a search of the business, investigators
actually found the fraudulent books, according
to prosecutors.
After Reif surrendered to authorities in April
2011, Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones
used the case as an example of what happens to
those who commit fraud.
Business owners should be on notice, egre-
giously under-reporting wages to avoid premi-
um payments will not go unpunished, Jones
said in a prepared statement. These violations
will be fully investigated by my department.
Reif was originally arrested on a $1 million
warrant citing suspicion of 44 counts of fraud
but was later released on her own recognizance.
Continued from page 1
FRAUD
Vasquez, 59, sister Lucia Aguilar Vazquez, 36,
and friend Teresita DeJesus Moran-Melchor,
18, accepted misdemeanors. Vasquez pleaded
no contest to misdemeanor battery for credit
of time served while the others pleaded no
contest to misdemeanor assault likely to pro-
duce injury. Moran-
Melcher received two
years court probation and
20 days jail and Vazquez
received credit for time
served while in custody on
$50,000 bail.
The four were arrested
after the Oct. 28 incident
which prosecutors say
started when Aguilar con-
fronted the neighbor in front of a Geneva
Avenue apartment complex.
Around 12:30 p.m., Aguilar
allegedly asked the victim what
she said about Vasquez and
punched her repeatedly in
the face. Prosecutors say
the other three joined in
the attack with repeated
punching and kneeing and
Moran-Melchor hit her
several times in the fore-
head with what appeared
to be a ring on her nger.
The victim sustained
fractures, cuts and bruises
but were not as serious as originally thought
which played a role in the plea deal, said
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Four years previous, Aguilar was connected
to another assault on Geneva Avenue. In the
early hours of Aug. 9,
2008, she and another
woman had a scufe at a 7-
Eleven in Redwood City
and hours later that woman
and Ramon Buenrostro,
21, appeared outside
Aguilars apartment.
Aguilar and several others,
including her 16-year-old
boyfriend Adrian Sedano
who had escaped from a
youth detention camp, confronted them.
Sedano was later convicted of second-degree
murder for stabbing Buenrostro with a kitchen
knife. He received 16 years to life in prison.
Continued from page 1
FIGHT
Maria Vasquez Lucia Vazquez Teresita
Moran-Melchor
FOOD 19
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sometimes, even on a weeknight,
you really crave a little dessert. But
making dessert takes time, and you
already are spending time cooking
up the main event, namely dinner.
Thats where this recipe comes to
the rescue. Its a quick, easy and
delicious pear crisp that calls for
just ve ingredients pears, gra-
nola, lemon juice, apricot jam and a
pinch of salt.
Pears are just now at the tail-end
of their season. Yes, I know we can
nd pears all year these days. But
believe me, those specimens are
going to be nowhere near as electri-
fying as a fully-ripened in-season
local pear. The problem is the rela-
tive rareness of such pears. Ralph
Waldo Emerson was onto some-
thing when he wrote, There are
only 10 minutes in the life of a pear
when it is perfect to eat.
In other words, most of the time,
no matter where it comes from, our
pears arent at the peak of perfec-
tion. And for those times, when
pears are unripe and you dont have
time to let them ripen, this recipe
comes in mighty handy. Baking an
unripe pear not only makes it ten-
der, it also crystallizes and magni-
es the fruits avor. Happily, any
kind of pear and there are many
varieties will work in this recipe,
as will a mix of varieties.
Pears also have a lot to offer in
terms of health. Theyre a good
source of vitamin C and a great
source of ber.
As for granola, there are a zillion
brands in the cereal aisle of the
supermarket. The problem is that
many of them are laden with fat and
sugar even as they masquerade
under a healthy halo. Thats why
the recommended portion on the
back of most granola boxes is just
1/4 cup. Pour yourself a normal,
adult-sized portion and you might
as well be tucking into a breakfast
of wafes and sausage.
So when you shop for granola,
look for a brand thats lower in fat,
sugar and calories than the compe-
tition and which also contains
lots of nuts, seeds and dried fruit.
And if you want to bump up the
nutritional value of this recipe even
more, you also could add 1/4 cup of
ground axseed.
With all of that said, I wouldnt
worry too much about the amount
of granola in this recipe. Per serv-
ing, its about what the granola box
recommends, and mostly serves to
put the crisp on this pear crisp.
Heck, youd be much better off
serving this dessert for breakfast
than dogging a big bowl of nothing
but granola.
SPEEDY PEAR CRISP
Start to nish: 1 hour (15 minutes
active)
Servings: 8
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon apricot
preserves or sweetened fruit spread
4 pears (about 2 pounds), peeled,
cored and thinly sliced
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Table salt
2 cups purchased granola
Heat the oven to 350 F. Lightly
coat a shallow 6-cup baking dish
with cooking spray.
In a small saucepan over medi-
um-low, heat the preserves until
melted and easily stirred.
Set the sliced pears in a large
bowl, then drizzle the preserves
over them. Add the lemon juice and
salt, then toss well. Spread the
pears evenly in the prepared baking
dish.
Sprinkle the granola evenly over
the pears, then cover the dish loose-
ly with foil and bake 30 minutes.
Remove the foil and bake another
15 minutes, or until the pears are
tender. Serve hot or cold.
Nutrition information per serv-
ing: 210 calories; 25 calories from
fat (12 percent of total calories); 2.5
g fat (0.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats);
0 mg cholesterol; 50 g carbohy-
drate; 5 g ber; 27 g sugar; 3 g pro-
tein; 55 mg sodium.
Fast and healthy pear crisp for any season
Pears have a lot to offer in terms of health.Theyre a good source of vitamin C and a great source of ber.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan. 14
to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031
Pacific Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Job and Networking Fair. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Silicon Valley Community
Foundation, 1300 S. El Camino Real,
Suite 100, San Mateo. Open to all with
priority given to veterans. Free. For
more information call 330-6430.
Deadline to purchase tickets for
Bingo, Bunko and Bridge.Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Proceeds
from this event will go to support
families of veterans in recovery at
Fisher House in Palo Alto. Event from
11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lunch served from
11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. $35 per
person. To purchase tickets call 366-
6860.
Learn to use Facebook. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Learn about their
popular social networking site,
including how to create your own
account, nd helpful applications and
stay safe. Free. For more information
contact conrad@smcl.org.
1,000 Places to See BeforeYou Die
by Patricia Schultz. 7 p.m. Oshman
Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto.
$12 for members, $20 for non-
members, $7 for students (with valid
ID). For tickets call 1-800-847-7730.
For more information go to
www.commonwealthclub.org/events
/2013-02-20/patricia-schultz-1000-
places-see-you-diern.
Steve Freund (Club Fox Blues Jam).
7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information call (877)-435-9849 or go
to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, FEB. 21
Americas 6th Annual Quilt, Craft
andSewingFestival. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The San Mateo Events Center, Fiesta
Hall, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo.
Come enjoy exhibits,Make and Take
workshops and free educational
seminars. Free admission. For more
information visit quiltcraftsew.com.
Higher Education and the Life of
the Spirit: An Evening with
Alexander and Helen Astin. 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Sofia University, 1069 East
Meadow Circle, 1057-A Classroom,
Palo Alto. The latest book from
authors Alexander and Helen Astin
shows how cultivating the spirit
improves key academic and
developmental outcomes. General
admission, $30. Alumni/Faculty/Staff/
CACC Member, $20. Students, $10. $5
extra at the door. For more
information call 493-4430, ext. 269.
Screening of the animated zombie
movie ParaNorman. 3:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, Oak Room, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Ukulele Jamboree at Hillsdale
Shopping Center. 3:30 p.m. Hillsdale
Shopping Center, 60 31st Ave., San
Mateo. Local children are invited to
jam with musicians from Guitar
Center with sing-alongs, drums, egg
shakers, tambourines and more. Free.
For more information contact
shelbi@spinpr.com.
Teen OpenMic Night. 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Join us for another fun Open
Mic Night! You have six minutes to
show us what youve got. All acts
welcome. Refreshments will be
provided. For ages 12 and up. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
El Camino As Meeting. 7 p.m.
Burlingame Library, Community
Room, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Come to a monthly
meeting of a club organized for
exchange of ideas and information
about the Model A Ford. For more
information call 593-9239.
Dr. MaryEvelyn Tucker Lecture. 7:30
p.m. Cunningham Memorial Chapel,
Notre Dame de Namur University,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. Free. Dr.
Mary Evelyn Tucker presents An
Integrating Story for the Earth
Community.Tucker is a senior lecturer
in religion and ecology at Yale
University. She created the
multimedia project Journey of the
Universe with San Francisco-based
physicist and evolutionary
philosopher Brian Swimme. The
project includes an Emmy award-
winning film, companion book and
educational series. For more
information call 508-3713.
Kapala. 8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $20. For
more information call (877)-435-9849
or go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
FRIDAY, FEB. 22
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan. 14
to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031
Pacific Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Toddler Program. 9:15 a.m. to 10:30
a.m. Calvary Preschool, 401 Santa
Lucia Ave., Millbrae. An opportunity
for parents, grandparents or
caregivers to explore, create and
socialize with their toddlers. For
children 18 months to 2 years and 6
months of age. Meetings every Friday.
$10 per session or $35 per month. For
more information call 588-8030.
Americas 6th Annual Quilt, Craft
andSewingFestival. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The San Mateo Events Center, Fiesta
Hall, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo.
Come enjoy exhibits,Make and Take
workshops and free educational
seminars. Free admission. For more
information visit quiltcraftsew.com.
Filolis 2013 Season Opening
Celebration Daffodil
Daydreams. 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Filoli, 86 Canada Road, Woodside.
Enjoy the Gardens early spring oral
display with almost a million daffodils
in bloom. Features three days of talks,
demonstrations, activities for children
and families and garden walks with
horticulturalists. Free parking. Free for
current members of Filoli. For non-
members, adults $15, seniors (ages 65
and older) $12, students (ages ve to
17 or with valid student ID) $5,
children four and under free. Groups
rates available for groups of 12 or
more adults. For more information call
364-8300 ext. 508.
Reel to Real Film Nights: The
Illusionist. 7 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
The story of a dying breed of stage
entertainer whose thunder is being
stolen by emerging rock stars. Second
film in the Reel to Real Film Nights
series. Our mission is to give deserving
films another chance. Refreshments
will be provided. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
Ballroom Dancing. 7:30 p.m. to 10
p.m.Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
There will be live music by the Fun
After Fifty Ten-Piece Band, led by
Dennis Berglund. There will also be
prizes, food, free punch, water and
coffee. $5 per person. $7 for non-
members. Dances held on the last
Friday of every month, with the
exception of November and
December. For more information call
747-0264.
Coastal Repertory Theatre
Presents: Tomfoolery. 8 p.m. 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Tickets are
$27-$45. This energetic music hall-
style revue features 28 of Tom Lehrers
wickedly witty and sometimes
naughty songs that satirize social ills
in a sassy way. The show runs until
March 2. For more information and to
purchase tickets call 569-3266.
Pear Theatre Presents: The Apple
Never Falls. 8 p.m. Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain
View. Tickets are $10-$30. The world
premiere of this play written by Paul
Bracerman will run from Feb. 22 until
March 10, with performances every
Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8
p.m. and every Sunday at 2 p.m. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 254-1148.
Live Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and
Cha Cha Cha with Orquesta
Soboriqua. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $15. For
more information call (877) 435-9849
or go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, FEB. 23
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled
eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or
sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee
or tea. $8 for adults and $5 for children
under 10. For more information call
583-1740.
E-Waste Collection Fundraiser. 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo High School,
506 N. Delaware St., San Mateo.
Entrance is on East Poplar Street. No
uorescent lights or alkaline batteries.
For more information call 520-0501.
Friends of the Millbrae Librarys
Outdoor Bargain Book/Media Sale.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. All adult books
will be 50 cents and childrens books
will be 25 cents. Vinyl records will also
be for sale. A bag of books will be $5
from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. For more
information call 697-7607.
Americas Sixth Annual Quilt, Craft
and Sewing Festival. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. The San Mateo Events Center,
Fiesta Hall, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San
Mateo. Come enjoy exhibits, Make
and Take workshops and free
educational seminars. Free admission.
For more information visit
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neering and math. Currently Parkside
operates two programs: Montessori and
a traditional school. The change would
be phased in allowing currently enrolled
Montessori students to nish their time
at Parkside. Parents are taking issue with
being told about the changes to come
rather than being part of the conversation
that led to the decision.
Shawn Fletcher, a Parkside parent who
serves as the Montessori Parent
Committee chair, said the groups goal is
to save the Montessori program. First,
theyd like to be part of the conversation
before any decisions are made.
We just want it to be a fair ght, he
said.
Trustee Ellen Mallory Ulrich said
shes sure a positive solution can be
reached. Ulrich added it is premature to
approve a plan for one magnet school
before the board can give direction on
the vision for all the magnet schools in
the district.
This year the district operates 16 ele-
mentary schools and four middle
schools. Eight of the districts elemen-
tary schools and two of its middle
schools offer magnet programs, accord-
ing to a staff report.
News of a change at the school has
been circulating for months. On Friday,
Feb. 8, parents got a voicemail from the
principal announcing a meeting
Monday, Feb. 11 to discuss changes.
During a special meeting, parents
learned that plans included phasing out
the Montessori program then introduc-
ing the STEM instruction during the
2014-15 school year.
The educational responsibility lies on
the shoulders of the district and school.
The recommendation was made by the
folks who are directly responsible for
student achievement. Parents will be
involved in the next steps of how to
implement a new program and transition
the school to a single focus, said Molly
Barton, assistant superintendent of stu-
dent services.
The original plan was to begin the
phase out in the 2014-15 school year,
she said.
That would have allowed another
Montessori class to start at Parkside in
the fall. However, as applications for the
program were reviewed during the rst
week of February only eight had applied
to the program for kindergarten.
With that small number, we decided
to begin the phase out in the 2013-14
school year. Eight students does not sus-
tain the program, Barton said.
Parents who had applied to the kinder-
garten for the upcoming fall will be put
into the lottery for North Shoreview
Montessori School.
Fletcher argued the program at
Parkside could grow. The North
Shoreview Montessori School often has
a wait list. Those on the wait list could
be offered a place at Parkside sustaining
the program, he said.
Also, Fletcher noted, that the district
has allowed the program to grow in
recent years. Changing the direction
altogether sends mixed messages, he
said.
If approved, next year will be a transi-
tion year but the school will soon start
introducing its STEM focus, which will
include training opportunities for teach-
ers. It would be the rst STEM elemen-
tary school within the district, which
already offers such a program at the
Bayside STEM Academy. The middle
school teachers can help with the transi-
tion, said Barton.
The new, single focus program will
allow more collaborative planning. Also,
it will allow the school to better imple-
ment the new common core standards,
Barton said.
The board meets 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
21 at the District Ofce, 1170 Chess
Drive, Foster City.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
family residential apartment units, some
live-work units, 17,000 square feet of
commercial space and a parking garage
on six acres of the property. An acre of
the property is committed to a plaza.
The Phase A development agreement
calls for a park fee payment of $4 mil-
lion plus construction, maintenance and
dedication of public access easement for
a .69-acre plaza. The deal calls for ve
moderate, 40 low- and 15 very-low-
income affordable units.
Its one of the last dying breaths of
RDA, Councilman Art Kiesel told the
Daily Journal about the citys effort to
support affordable housing. Were out
of dirt.
The project, Kiesel said, will put a
good face on the city.
It will also generate more property tax
revenue for Foster City, he said.
The Plaza is a four- and ve-story
complex surrounding a ve-story park-
ing garage where residents will park on
the same level as their apartment. There
is a limited retail component on the
ground oor adjacent to the leasing cen-
ter.
The planning for the Pilgrim-Triton
master plan has been in the works for
more than six years and ultimately will
include a total of more than 700 residen-
tial units along with almost 300,000
square feet of commercial ofce space.
The project took three separate prop-
erty owners to join together to turn the
industrial area into a residential com-
munity, said Vice Mayor Charlie
Bronitsky, who expressed pleasure with
the affordable-housing aspect of the
project.
Councilman Herb Perez praised for-
mer members of the council for helping
to bring the project to fruition.
I believe it will serve out community
well, Perez said about the project.
The fourth phase of the project, called
Triton Pointe, is seeking approvals from
the city now. It will include 43,000
square feet of ofce/commercial space
with 166 multi-family residential units
and 5,000 square feet of retail.
Continued from page 1
PLAZA
tive phrases following: golden color and
delicate taste; amber color and rich taste;
dark color and robust taste; very dark
color and strong taste.
Sen. Kevin Mullin, R-Rutland, initial-
ly argued against the measure before
reluctantly going along.
We should not be following everyone
else in lockstep and ... giving them the
ability to try to pretend that syrup made
in another state is anywhere near as good
as the syrup made in Vermont, he said.
Mullin later said he was mollied by
assurances that the changes would be
phased in over three years and that pro-
ducers wouldnt have to throw out con-
tainers already printed with the existing
labels.
State Agriculture Secretary Chuck
Ross said the changes have largely been
pushed by the industry, though the
agency has conducted a series of public
hearings to address the concerns of the
more reluctant producers.
Thanks to improvements in technolo-
gy and growing interest by landowners,
Vermonts syrup production has roughly
doubled in the past decade, to the extent
that supply vastly exceeds any demand
that would come from a state of about
626,000, Ross said.
Whats become clear is that the
majority of syrup produced in the state
of Vermont is sold in national and inter-
national markets, Ross said.
Vermont will maintain its distinct
branding by labeling its syrup as coming
from the state. Connoisseurs will contin-
ue to appreciate that Vermont regulations
will continue to require boiling sap for
longer than is the case elsewhere, pro-
ducing a slightly denser product, Ross
said. But to continue using a separate
grading system would lead to consumer
confusion, the secretary added.
Continued from page 17
SYRUP
COMICS/GAMES
2-20-13
tuesDAYs PuZZLe sOLVeD
PreViOus
suDOku
Answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACrOss
1 Fernando pop group
5 Shipyard relics
10 Seizes the throne
12 Pondering
13 Dark red
14 Egg dish
15 Governess in Siam
16 Lb. or tsp.
18 Coloring
19 Sheriffs sidekick
22 Formula One car
25 Gave an unwelcome poke
29 Wrestling venue
30 Gawked
32 Linoleum squares
33 City near Syracuse
34 Birch family trees
37 Casablanca cafe
38 Does a double-take
40 Weeding tool
43 San Francisco hill
44 Young horse
48 Joked around
50 Riddle
52 1950s records
53 Staggered
54 Tough question
55 Poems of praise
DOwn
1 Mighty -- -- oak
2 Smolder
3 Added a lane
4 GI address
5 Drone
6 Like many fea market
items
7 Fragrant blossom
8 Leg bend
9 Friday or Bilkos rank
10 -- Thurman
11 Fastener
12 Slogan
17 Coffee cup
20 Sketchers need
21 Healthy snack
22 Wharf denizen
23 Opera song
24 Honeycomb unit
26 Content
27 Homers opus
28 Pack of cards
31 -- Boot
35 Tears asunder
36 -- Paulo
39 Ten-four buddy
40 Port near Kilauea
41 Bookies fgures
42 Adams or Brickell
45 Leer
46 Iowa college town
47 Youngster
48 Keystone Konstable
49 Always, to Whitman
51 Opposite of paleo
DiLBert CrOsswOrD PuZZLe
future sHOCk
PeArLs BefOre swine
Get fuZZY
weDnesDAY, feBruArY 20, 2013
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Guard against a
strong inclination to reward the undeserving while
overlooking the virtuous. Theres a possibility you
could do so in two separate cases.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -- This could be a
disconcerting day, because you can quickly go from
being inspired to being disenchanted. Unless you get
a handle on your moods, theyll hamper you greatly.
tAurus (April 20-May 20) -- You could do yourself
a great disservice by reacting impulsively and blindly
allowing one of your hunches to direct your actions.
Check things out frst.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- If youve been
borrowing things lately, such as tools, materials or
even cash, its best to clear matters up by returning
everything as soon as possible. Youll feel better
about yourself.
CAnCer (June 21-July 22) -- Taken alone, your
judgment isnt too bad, but you must be careful not
to be swayed by another who doesnt have your best
interest in mind. Dont believe everything that youre
told.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Dont be impatient if your
fellow man doesnt grasp the essence of an idea as
quickly as youd like. It wont hurt you to repeat what
isnt understood at frst.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Normally, you are an
extremely prudent and pragmatic person, but today
you could become intrigued with a fnancial affair
that could be extremely risky. Tread slowly.
LiBrA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- When making a major
household purchase, you should take things slowly.
If youre unsure about your choice, temporarily walk
away and dismiss it from your mind until youre
positive.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- This could be one
of those days when you could beneft from putting
off what you dont feel like doing, especially if its
something extremely distasteful to you. Time will
take care of it.
sAGittArius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be extremely
careful when handling the resources of another as
well as your own. Indifference on your part could
prove to be more costly than you thought.
CAPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Although you are
usually a good salesperson, this might not be true
at present due to carelessness. You could do or say
something that would cause your prospect to back off.
AQuArius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- There is a strong
likelihood that you could reveal something that you
promised to keep secret. Keep a tight hold on your lips.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PLUMBING -
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Excellent Benefits
Apply in person at Rescue Rooter:
825 Mahler Rd, Burlingame
or at www.rescuerooter.com/about/careers.aspx
EEO
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CHILDCARE/HOUSEKEEPER LIVE-IN
position (private room, bath, TV) female
only, English speaking, good salary, San
Mateo, (650)678-6737
FULL CHARGE BOOKKEEPER
Established Accounting Firm
with multiple clients,
3-5 Yrs Experience Quickbooks, Excel
Resumes to:
Karen@tri-starfinancial.com
FAX 650-692-4201
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
150 Seeking Employment
AFFORDABLE ALTERATIONS
by Gloria, (650)281-5387
SEEKING YOUR PERSONAL HOUSE-
KEEPER? Weekly, Bi & Monthly, Per-
form Excellent work down the Peninsula.
Call Marilyn (650)638-1627
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519036
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Marcos A. Rodrguez
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Marcos A. Rodriguez filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Marcos A. Rodriguez
a.Proposed name: Mark A. Smith
b. Present name: Marcos Antonio Rodri-
guez
b. Proposed name: Mark Antonio Smith
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 27,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/30/2012
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/25/2012
(Published, 02/06/13, 02/13/13,
02/20/13, 02/27/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253940
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Those Are Nice, 2412 Wren
Court, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: John Cabiles, same address,
Edward Johnson & Myron Peralta, 377
Alta Vista, South San Francisco, CA
94080, and Albert Facultad, 2305 Olym-
pic Dr., South San Francisco, CA 94080.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ John Cabiles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519053
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Katherine Biller Freeman
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Katherine Biller Freeman filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Katherine Biller Freeman
aka Katherine B. Freeman
Proposed name: Katherine Newman Bill-
er
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 20,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/30/2012
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/25/2012
(Published, 02/06/13, 02/13/13,
02/20/13, 02/27/13)
CASE# CIV 519395
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Salih Oeztuerk
Agnieszka Hajdukiewicz
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Salih Oeztuerk, Agnieszka
Hajdukiewicz filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
a.Present name: Salih Oeztuerk
a.Proposed name: Salih Bazidi
b.Present name:Agnieszka Hajdukiewicz
b.Proposed name: Agnieszka Bazidi
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on April 11,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/15/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/07/2012
(Published, 02/20/13, 02/27/13, 3/06/13,
03/13/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254139
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Just in Case, 1322 El Camino
Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Gregory Tylavsky, 403 Upton St.,
Redwood City, CA 94062 and Gary Sax-
on, 1322 El Camino Real, Redwood City,
CA 94063. The business is conducted
by Copartners. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Gregory Tylavsky /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/13, 02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254299
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Glamour Limo, 2001 Spring
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Jorge Amaro, 643 Fairmont Ave.,
Apt. A, Mountain View, CA 94041 and
Ahmad Saleh, 2001 Spring Street, Red-
wood City, CA 94063. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Jorge Amaro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519457
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jamie Lynn Olivira
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jaime Lynn Oliveira filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Taylor Lynn Oliveira-
Nordman
Proposed name: Taylor Lynn Oliveira
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 05,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/25/2012
/s/ Robert J. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/25/2012
(Published, 01/28/13, 02/04/13,
02/11/13, 02/18/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254043
The following person is doing business
as: Foster City Athletic Club, 1159 Chess
Drive, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Va-
chani Athletics, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2006.
/s/ Mohan Vachani /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/13, 02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254121
The following person is doing business
as: Em the Gem, 1365 Geneva Avenue,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Emily
Scott, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Emily Scott /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/13, 02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254133
The following person is doing business
as: Quaci Press, 3137 Monterey St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Nicole Bor-
ello, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Nicole Borello /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/13, 02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254236
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Garden Supply & Repair, 221
El Camino Real, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Michael J.M. Chang, 126
Desmond St., San Francisco, CA 94134.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Michael J.M. Chang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254297
The following person is doing business
as: La Sini Skincare, Inc., 1725 El Cami-
no Real, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owner: La Sini
Skincare, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Yi Ting Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254274
The following person is doing business
as: G Flowers, 3745 Fairfax Way,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nimfa Torrijos-Fernandez, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Nimfa Torrijos-Fernande /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254397
The following person is doing business
as: MR Trucking, 1675 Rollins Road,
Suite A, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
MR Trucking Logistics, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/08/2007.
/s/ Mark N. Raboca /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254403
The following person is doing business
as: Friendly Skies Studios, 1544 Carol
Avenue, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Molly Choma, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Molly Choma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254273
The following person is doing business
as: AAA Hood & Duct, 516 Niantic Ave-
nue, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Kai
Yu, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Kai Yu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254293
The following person is doing business
as: Baywater Associates, 100 El Camino
Real, Suite 202, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Sandra C. Meyer, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/07/2003.
/s/ Sandra C. Meyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254352
The following person is doing business
as: Benice, 652 Masson Ave., #4, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Olga Mroz, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/02/2013.
/s/ Olga Mroz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/13, 02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254146
The following person is doing business
as: Parkview Produce Co., Inc., 125 Ter-
minal Ct #40 C, D, E, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Parkview
Produce Co., Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Robert Tantillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254436
The following person is doing business
as: Strands for Hair Inc., 44 42nd Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Strands for Hair Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/06/1986.
/s/ Lisa Loufas Molinari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
23 Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
NOTICE INVITING BIDS
HILLSBOROUGH CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
300 EL CERRITO AVE
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 90410
Bid Deadline: 10:00 AM on the 27th day of March 2013
Place of Bid Receipt: Hillsborough City School District
ATTN: Larry Raffo
300 El Cerrito Ave
Hillsborough, Ca 90410
All bids shall be made and presented only on the forms presented in the Contract Documents. Bids will be publicly opened
and read at 10:00 AM on the 27th day of March, 2013 at the Hillsborough City School District Office located at 300 El Cerrito Ave.,
Hillsborough, CA 94010. Any bids received after the time specified above or after any extensions due to material changes shall be
returned unopened.
Project Identification Name: Bid Package #13-01
District Office Parking Lot Project
Place Plans are on file: Barker Blue Digital Imaging, Inc.
363 N. Amphlett Blvd.
San Mateo, CA 94401
650/969-2100 (Office)
650/969-2199 (Fax)
plotting@barkerblue.com
Contractors License Classification Required: Class A or Class C-12 or Class C-27
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Governing Board of the Hillsborough City School District, hereinafter referred to as
DISTRICT, is calling for and will receive sealed bids for the award of a contract for the above project up to, but not later than, the
above-stated time.
Miscellaneous Information
Bids shall be received in the place identified above, and shall be opened and publicly read aloud at the above-stated
time and place.
Each bid proposal shall conform to the requirements of the Contract Documents, all of which may be obtained through
Barker Blue. No partial sets will be available.
There will be a Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference and Job Walk on Wednesday, March 20th at 4:00 PM at the Hillsborough
City School District Office, 300 El Cerrito Avenue, Hillsborough, 94010. Any Contractor bidding on the project who fails to attend
the entire job walk and conference will be deemed a non-responsive bidder and will have his bid returned unopened.
Each bidder shall be a licensed contractor pursuant to the California Business and Professions Code, and be licensed to
perform the work called for in the contract documents.
The successful bidder must possess a valid and active Class A or Class C-12 or Class C-27 Contractors License at the
time of award of the contract. The Contractors California State License Number and Classification shall be clearly stated on the
bidders proposal.
Subcontractors shall be licensed pursuant to California law for the trades necessary to perform the work called for in the
contract documents.
Each bid must strictly conform with and be responsive to the Contract Documents as defined in the General Conditions.
The DISTRICT reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to waive any irregularities or informalities in any bids or in the bidding.
Each bidder shall submit with his bid, on the form furnished with the Contract Documents, a list of the designated sub-
contractors on this project as required by the Subletting and Subcontracting Fair Practices Act, California Public Contract Code
Sections 4100 et seq.
Each bidders bid must be accompanied by one of the following forms of bidders security: (1) a cashiers check made
payable to the DISTRICT; (2) a certified check made payable to the DISTRICT; or (3) a bidders bond executed by a California ad-
mitted surety as defined in the Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, made payable to the DISTRICT in the form set forth in
the Contract Documents. Such bidders security must be in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the maximum amount of
bid as a guarantee that the bidder will enter into the proposed contract, if the same is awarded to such bidder, and will provide the
required Performance Bond and insurance certificates. In the event of failure to enter into said contract or provide the necessary
documents, said security will be forfeited.
The Department of Industrial Relations provides the general prevailing rate of per diem wages and the general prevail-
ing rate for holiday and overtime work in the locality in which this work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of
worker needed to execute the contract. These per diem rates, including holiday and overtime work, as well as employer payments
for health and welfare, pension, vacation, and similar purposes, are available from the Director of the Department of Industrial Re-
lations. Pursuant to California Labor Code Sections 1720 et seq., it shall be mandatory upon the CONTRACTOR to whom the con-
tract is awarded, and upon any subcontractor under such CONTRACTOR, to pay not less than the said specified rates to all work-
ers employed by them in the execution of the contract
No bidder may withdraw any bid for a period of ninety (90) calendar days after the date set for the opening of bids.
Separate Performance Bond and a Bond for Labor and Materials, each in an amount equal to 100% of the total contract amount,
are required, and shall be provided to the DISTRICT prior to execution of the contract and shall be in the form set forth in the con-
tract documents.
All bonds (Bid, Performance, and Labor and Materials) must be issued by a California admitted surety as defined in Cali-
fornia Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120.
Where applicable, bidders must meet the requirements set forth in Public Contract Code Section 10115 et seq., Military
and Veterans Code Section 999 et seq. and California Code of Regulations, Title 2, Section 1896.60 et seq. regarding Disabled
Veteran Business Enterprise ("DVBE") Programs.
No telephone or facsimile machine will be available to bidders on the DISTRICT premises at any time.
It is each bidders sole responsibility to ensure its bid is timely delivered and received at the location designated as specified
above. Any bid received at the designated location after the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids shall be returned to the bid-
der unopened.
The Hillsborough City School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254431
The following person is doing business
as: Eros Beauty Salon, 965 Ralston Ave-
nue, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Die-
mtuyen T. Truong, 2676 Orinda Dr., San
Jose, CA 95121. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Diemtuyen T. Truong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254329
The following person is doing business
as: Next Step, 702 Marshall St., Ste.
614, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Next Step Growth, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 10/01/2008.
/s/ Jennifer Vessels /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254499
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pure Beautiful Healing, 2) Pure
Beautiful Chi, 21 Eastwood Drive, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mary Minfong
Ho, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/ Mary Minfong Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254006
The following person is doing business
as: Couture Costumes & Cosetry, 349
San Bruno Ave. BRISBANE, CA 94005
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Barbara Ebel, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/02/2013.
/s/ Barbara Ebel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/24/13, 01/31/13, 02/07/13, 02/14/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Jose S. Talens, Jr.
Case Number 123048
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Jose S. Talens, Jr.. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by Jo-
selito V. Talens, III in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Joselito
V. Talens, III be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: March 04, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo, 400 County Cen-
ter, Redwood City, CA 94063. If you ob-
ject to the granting of the petition, you
should appear at the hearing and state
your objections or file written objections
with the court before the hearing. Your
appearance may be in person or by your
attorney. If you are a creditor or a con-
tingent creditor of the decedent, you
must file your claim with the court and
mail a copy to the personal representa-
tive appointed by the court within four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters as provided in Probate Code sec-
tion 9100. The time for filing claims will
not expire before four months from the
hearing date noticed above. You may
examine the file kept by the court. If you
are a person interested in the estate, you
may file with the court a Request for
Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing
of an inventory and appraisal of estate
assets or of any petition or account as
provided in Probate Code section 1250.
A Request for Special Notice form is
available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Jeffrey A. Miller, Esq. (144120)
Law Offices of Jeffrey A. Miller
209 W. Foothill Blvd.
GLENDORA, CA 91741
(626)331-1175
Dated: January 30, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on February 2, 9, 16, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call FOUND!
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
5 AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
296 Appliances
MICROWAVE OVEN - Sharp, 1.5 cubic
feet, 1100 watts, one year old, SOLD!
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR (HOT Point) runs
good $95 SOLD!
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
T.V. 19" Color3000, RCA, w/remote
SOLD!
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99
(650)365-3987
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. $35 (650)341-8342
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
24
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 When Romeo
meets Juliet
5 Crummy
10 His mausoleum is
in Tiananmen
Square
13 Close-Up, e.g.
15 Posterior
16 See 15-Down
17 Pro foe
18 Ready to pour
19 Paint as wicked
21 Peoria-to-Decatur
dir.
22 TDs six
25 Question eliciting
Lets!
26 Vital vessel
28 Tidy up
31 Stratfords river
34 Holm and
McKellen
36 Star Trek role
37 2011 film in which
Owen Wilson
says, Wonderful
but forgettable.
That sounds like
a picture Ive
seen. I probably
wrote it.
40 No __ sight
41 Letterman rival
42 99 Luftballons
singer
43 Thaw once more
45 Give a good
talking-to
47 In the lead
49 U2 producer or,
backwards, U2 hit
50 Aswan landmark
53 Gift of a sort
56 Simoleons
58 Justin Bieber or
the golden calf
59 Winner of
screenwriting
Oscars for the
three quoted films
62 Stax Records
genre
63 Titus __: 16th-
century play
64 Pre-LCD screen
65 Makes a home
66 Time in ads
DOWN
1 Oldest musketeer
2 Directing brothers
3 Rich cake
4 __ small world
5 12-in. albums
6 Cereal grain
7 Previously owned
8 Scatter, like petals
9 Sycophant
10 Lionel train, say
11 1998 animated
film released the
month before A
Bugs Life
12 Jim Davis dog
14 Fantasia tutu
wearer
15 With 16-Across,
1986 film in which
Dianne Wiest
says, But you
have to remember
while you read
and youre cursing
my name, you
know, that this is
my first script.
20 Outmaneuver
23 Calc prereq
24 Lesley of 60
Minutes
26 1977 film in which
59-Across says,
Awards! They do
nothing but give
out awards!
27 Starts the pot
29 Consumer
advocate
Brockovich
30 Mercury Seven
org.
31 From the U.S.
32 Hollywood crosser
33 Fifth wheel
35 From then on
38 Fjord, for one
39 High time?
44 Formosa, now
46 Willy, Biff or
Happy of drama
48 Blackmore
heroine
50 Sweets, in
Naples
51 Native Alaskan
52 Ministers house
53 Oft-burned object
54 Stench
55 Approves quietly
57 Lena of
Chocolat
60 Seusss The
5000 Fingers
of __
61 Rocky hellos
By Eric Williams
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
02/20/13
02/20/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17 Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, (650)290-1960
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
CHILDRENS VHS Disney movies, (4),
all $30., (650)518-0813
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
VINTAGE HAND Carved mallard duck
beautiful in a decoy $55., (650)341-8342
302 Antiques
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. SOLD!
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PANASONIC CAMCORDER- VHSC
Rarely used $60 obo, (650)341-1728
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers SOLD!
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
304 Furniture
1940S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CIRCA 1940 Mahogany office desk six
locking doors 60" by 36" good condition
$50., SOLD!
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE - pedastal, 42 round,
4 chairs & a leaf, $250., SOLD!
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - Medium brown, 50 x 39,
two swinging doors plus 6 deep drawers,
$65., (650)571-5790
DRESSER 6 Drawers $20
(650)341-2397
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
304 Furniture
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 6 $10
(650)341-2397
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50, SOLD!
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40, $30.obo, (650)571-5790
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVESEAT - 60 length, reupholstered
appoximately 4 yrs. ago in pink & white
toile, $75., SOLD!
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, SOLD!
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42H, 27 W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, SOLD!
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
306 Housewares
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2 polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36, SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SHOPSMITH, FOUR power tools and
one roll away unit $85 (650)438-4737
TABLE SAW (Sears) 10" belt drive new
1 horse power motor, SOLD!
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60 x 40 tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
310 Misc. For Sale
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CEILING FAN - 42, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30
(650)290-1960
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK unopened,
hard cover, Every Days a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10.,SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOME WINDOW air conditioner $75.00
(650)438-4737
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JACK LALANE juicer - never used,
$20., SOLD!
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., SOLD!
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
25 Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PET MATE Vari dog kennel large brand
new $99 firm 28" high 24" wide & 36"
length SOLD!
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SET OF MIRRORS (2) - 33 x 50, no
border, plain mirrors, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 SOLD!
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 SOLD!
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
(650)341-2181
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31 x 70 and (1) 29 x 69,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WOOL YARN - 12 skeins, Stahlwolle,
Serenade, mauve, all $30., (650)518-
0813
X BOX with case - 4 games, all $60.,
(650)518-0813
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
311 Musical Instruments
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. SOLD!
YELLOW LABS - 4 males, all shots
done, great family dogs/ hunters. Top
Pedigree, $800., (650)593-4594
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BABY CLOTHES boys winter jackets
and clothes, 1 box, $20. Gina
SOLD!
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WINTER coat - knee length,
size 14, rust color, $25., (650)515-2605
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MENS CLASSIC BOMBER JACKET -
Genuine cow leather, SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
316 Clothes
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2011 SCATTANTE CFR SPORT ROAD-
BIKE - Carbon, Shimano hardware,
$1400 new, now $700., SOLD!
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$50.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
HEAVY PUNCHING bag stand - made
out of steel, retail $200., used, $50.,
(650)589-8348
KR SKATES arm and knee pads, in box,
$15 (650)515-2605
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM Like new, $250
SOLD!
319 Firewood
FIREWOOD ALL KINDS- from 4 by 4
inches to 1 by 8. All 12 to 24 in length.
Over 1 cord. $50, (650)368-0748.
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
DOCTORS OFFICE SCALE - by
Health-O-Meter, great condition, SOLD!
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yad. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
REDWOOD CITY - 1 bedroom, $1250.
per month, $800. deposit, RENTED!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1993 HONDA Civic, sun roof, electric
windows, immaculate in and out, low mi-
lage, $3,400 obo, (650)368-6674
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, SOLD!
630 Trucks & SUVs
CHEVY 03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$18500. obo, (650)465-6056
DODGE 06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
FORD F150 front grill - fits 2002 and
other years. $20 SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
470 Rooms 318 Sports Equipment
Building/Remodeling
DRAFTING
SERVICES
for
Remodels, Additions,
and
New Construction
(650)343-4340
Cabinetry
Cleaning Cleaning
HOUSE
CLEANING
Homes, apartments,
condos, offices.
Call
Clean Superstar
(650)576-7794
Concrete
Construction
(650) 580-2566
Tacktookconstruction
@yahoo.com
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Construction
26
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)280-9240
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
FULL
HOME REPAIR
SERVICE
Painting - Interior/Exterior
Plumbing, Electrical, Flooring,
Decks, Fence, Tile, Pressure
Wash, Crown Moulding, Doors,
Windows, Roofing, and More!
Juan (650)274-8387
Henry, (650)520-4739
FREE ESTIMATES
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD
FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando
(650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 208-9437
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
27 Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr.,
San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Wednesday Feb. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Need Cash?
We do Collateral Loans
on your jewelry, gold, silver, coins, and better watches.
Loans any size! Cash on the spot! No credit checks!
ESTATE JEWELRY COINS BULLION PAWN
Safe Downtown Millbrae with plenty of free parking.
Come enter our
50th Anniversary
Monthly Drawing
Win $250 Gilt Certincate
Come in to enter. No purchase necessary
certincate towards jewelry only.
Drawing will be held last Thursday each month
We repair
gold jewelry
301 Broadway, Millbrae (650) 697-6570
Monday - Fr|day 9am-6pm Saturday 9am-2pm
www.Num|s|nternat|ona|.com
Family owned since 1963 Millbrae Business of the Year. Sell locally