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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes | Global Oneness .

Archive 1009 II Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes A Wisdom Archive on Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes A selection of articles related to Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes: Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 September 21, 1860) was a German philosophe r. He is most famous for his work The World as Will and Representation. He is co mmonly known for having espoused a sort of philosophical pessimism that saw life as being essentially evil, futile, and full of suffering Greek literature boasts three great writers of tragedy whose works are extant: S ophocles, Euripides and Aeschylus. The largest festival for Greek tragedy was th e Dionysia, for which competition prominent playwrights usually submitted three tragedies and one satyr play each. The Roman theater does not appear to have fol lowed the same practice See this and more articles and videos below. Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes Archives on Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes Honor has not to be won; it must only not be lost.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Ar thur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes Mostly it is loss which teaches us about the worth of things.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes Compassion is the basis of morality.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenha uer, Philosophy Quotes, Compassion Life is a business that does not cover the costs.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Art hur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Life The two foes of human happiness are pain and boredom.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Pain Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the worl d.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, World The effect of music is so very much more powerful and penetrating than is that o f the other arts, for these others speak only of the shadow, but music of the es sence.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the sa me is true of fame.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Q uotes, Money Because people have no thoughts to deal in, they deal cards, and try and win one

another'ss money. Idiots!Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philo sophy Quotes, Money Every parting gives a foretaste of death; every coming together again a foretast e of the resurrection.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosoph y Quotes, Death and Dying National character is only another name for the particular form which the little ness, perversity and baseness of mankind take in every country. Every nation moc ks at other nations, and all are right.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schope nhauer, Philosophy Quotes This actual world of what is knowable, in which we are and which is in us, remai ns both the material and the limit of our consideration.Arthur Schopenhauer Quot es, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, World A man'ss face as a rule says more, and more interesting things, than his mouth, for it is a compendium of everything his mouth will ever say, in that it is the monogram of all this man'ss thoughts and aspirations.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes Rascals are always sociable more'ss the pity! and the chief sign that a man has an y nobility in his character is the little pleasure he takes in others's company. Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Pleasure All religions promise a reward for excellences of the will or heart, but none fo r excellences of the head or understanding.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Sc hopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Heart, Religion Men of learning are those who have read the contents of books. Thinkers, geniuse s, and those who have enlightened the world and furthered the race of men, are t hose who have made direct use of the book of the world.Arthur Schopenhauer Quote s, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, World A man can be himself only so long as he is alone; and if he does not love solitu de, he will not love freedom; for it is only when he is alone that he is really free.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Love, F reedom In early youth, as we contemplate our coming life, we are like children in a the atre before the curtain is raised, sitting there in high spirits and eagerly wai ting for the play to begin.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Phil osophy Quotes, Life, Children Two Chinamen visiting Europe went to the theatre for the first time. One of them occupied himself with trying to understand the theatrical machinery, which he s ucceeded in doing. The other, despite his ignorance of the language, sought to u nravel the meaning of the play. The former is like the astronomer, the latter th e philosopher.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes Great minds are related to the brief span of time during which they live as grea t buildings are to a little square in which they stand: you cannot see them in a ll their magnitude because you are standing too close to them.Arthur Schopenhaue r Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Live, Mind Opinion is like a pendulum and obeys the same law. If it goes past the centre of gravity on one side, it must go a like distance on the other; and it is only af ter a certain time that it finds the true point at which it can remain at rest.A rthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Past, Time

if anyone spends almost the whole day in reading, and by way of relaxation devot es the intervals to some thoughtless pastime, he gradually loses the capacity fo r thinking; just as the man who always rides at last forgets how to walk. This i s the case with many learned persons: they have read themselves stupid.Arthur Sc hopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Past The discovery of truth is prevented more effectively, not by the false appearanc e things present and which mislead into error, not directly by weakness of the r easoning powers, but by preconceived opinion, by prejudice.Arthur Schopenhauer Q uotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Present Moment, Truth Do not shorten the morning by getting up late, or waste it in unworthy occupatio ns or in talk; look upon it as the quintessence of life, as to a certain extent sacred. Evening is like old age: we are languid, talkative, silly. Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a litt le youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.Arthur Schopenhauer Quote s, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Life, Birth In youth it is the outward aspect of things that most engages us; while in age, thought or reflection is the predominating quality of the mind. Hence, youth is the time for poetry, and age is more inclined to philosophy. In practical affair s it is the same: a man shapes his resolutions in youth more by the impression t hat the outward world makes upon him; whereas, when he is old, it is thought tha t determines his actions.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philos ophy Quotes, World, Mind If two men who were friends in their youth meet again when they are old, after b eing separated for a life-time, the chief feeling they will have at the sight of each other will be one of complete disappointment at life as a whole; because t heir thoughts will be carried back to that earlier time when life seemed so fair as it lay spread out before them in the rosy light of dawn, promised so much and then performed so little.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philos ophy Quotes, Friend, Life Epicurus, the great teacher of happiness, has correctly and finely divided human needs into three classes. First there are the natural and necessary needs which , if they are not satisfied, cause pain. Consequently, they are only victus et a mictus [food and clothing] and are easy to satisfy. Then we have those that are natural yet not necessary, that is, the needs for sexual satisfaction. ... These needs are more difficult to satisfy. Finally, there are those that are neither natural nor necessary, the needs for luxury, extravagance, pomp, and splendour, which are without end and very difficult to satisfy.Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes, Arthur Schopenhauer, Philosophy Quotes, Sex * Encyclopedia - Arthur Schopenhauer Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 September 21, 1860) was a German philosophe r. He is most famous for his work The World as Will and Representation. He is co mmonly known for having espoused a sort of philosophical pessimism that saw life as being essentially evil, futile, and full of suffering. However, upon closer inspection, in accordance with Eastern thought, especially that of Buddhism, he saw salvation, deliverance, or escape from suffering in aesthetic contemplation, sympathy for others, and ascetic living. His i ... Including: * Arthur Schopenhauer - Life * Arthur Schopenhauer - Philosophy * Arthur Schopenhauer - Psychology

* Arthur Schopenhauer - Aesthetics * Arthur Schopenhauer - Politics * Arthur Schopenhauer - Schopenhauer on women * Arthur Schopenhauer - Schopenhauer on homosexuality * Arthur Schopenhauer - Schopenhauer on Hegel * Arthur Schopenhauer - Common Misconceptions * Arthur Schopenhauer - Influence * Arthur Schopenhauer - Bibliography + Arthur Schopenhauer - Major works + Arthur Schopenhauer - Online texts * Arthur Schopenhauer - Source Read more here: Arthur Schopenhauer: Encyclopedia - Arthur Schopenhauer * Encyclopedia II - Tragedy - Greek tragedy Greek literature boasts three great writers of tragedy whose works are extant: S ophocles, Euripides and Aeschylus. The largest festival for Greek tragedy was th e Dionysia, for which competition prominent playwrights usually submitted three tragedies and one satyr play each. The Roman theater does not appear to have fol lowed the same practice. Seneca adapted Greek stories, such as Phaedra, into Lat in plays; however, Senecan tragedy has long been regarded as closet drama ... Read more here: Tragedy: Encyclopedia II - Tragedy - Greek tragedy Home P Home