Sei sulla pagina 1di 28

www.smdailyjournal.

com
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 79
CAP-AND-TRADE
STATE PAGE 7
BULLDOG BOWL
IS UNDER WAY
SPORTS PAGE 11
CALL OF DUTY TOPS
MEDAL OF HONOR
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 17
BROWN DEFENDS STATES STEPS TO FIGHT CLIMATE
CHANGE
CONSULTATION
(800) 308-0870
Fighting for victims
and their families
FREE
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON
Congressional leaders from both
parties voiced fresh optimism
Friday after meeting with newly re-
elected President Barack Obama
about avoiding year-end fiscal
cliff tax increases and spending
cuts that would hammer the middle
class and risk plunging the economy
into recession.
House Speaker John Boehner of
Ohio said Republicans are willing to
c o n s i d e r
increased rev-
enue as long as
it is accompa-
nied by spending
cuts as leaders
in a divided gov-
ernment get to
work on a possi-
ble deal after a
fierce election
campaign.
He presented a framework that
Confidence
for a deficit
deal grows
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Success in academics starts early and
requires many people to work together, a
message that was discussed at length
during the Connecting Ready Kids to
Ready Schools event held in San Mateo
Thursday.
Sponsored by the Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, Thursdays
gathering at the San Mateo Marriott was
part of the nonprots campaign for third
grade achievement. The half-day forum
showcased how even students who start
kindergarten prepared can fall behind by
third grade if teachers dont work
together and curriculum isnt aligned.
Such success is more easily achieved
when parents are also engaged. Making
that happen is a national challenge.
Educators came together to discuss the
issues challenges and possible solu-
tions.
Student achievement in San Mateo
and Santa Clara counties has grown in
recent years, said Michelle Sioson
Hyman, initiative ofcer for the Silicon
Valley Community Foundation.
However, the gap in achievement
between different ethnic groups remain.
One way to combat that is to work with
children at a younger age, she said.
Sixty-one percent of children in the
region are not prepared when they enter
kindergarten, Hyman said.
Local numbers are following a nation-
al achievement gap trend.
Kristie Kauerz, research assistant pro-
fessor at the University of Washington,
Educators focus on school readiness
Nonprofit event takes on national school challenges
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Children play at Family Connections in Redwood City.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
As shopping begins for a holiday
focused on food and family, consid-
er doing a little something for others
by donating to a local nonprot.
Thanksgiving is a time to give
thanks. For many, its a struggle to
get the traditional meal together.
San Mateo County nonprots are
working to meet the need. But the
organizations have yet to collect
whats needed. There are many
opportunities to help.
Despite an uptick in the economy,
Burlingame-based CALL Primrose
continues to see a strong demand for
Congressional leaders optimistic
tax increases, cuts can be avoided
Donations sought for holiday
Nonprofits gear up for yearly food drive
John Boehner
See CLIFF, Page 20
See HOLIDAY, Page 8
See SCHOOL, Page 8
Sacred Heart Schools Third Annual Olive Festival will be held Sunday,Nov.18 from 8 a.m.to dusk.The oil pressing
will be around 3 p.m.The school is located at 150 Valparaiso Ave. in Atherton.
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
When Nancy and Paul Sallaberry
dropped their children off at Sacred
Heart Schools, they noticed an
untapped resource. The Sallaberrys,
who have their own olive orchard in
Carmel, looked at the olive trees lin-
ing the west side of the school and
saw an opportunity.
They approached the school lead-
ership about possibly getting the
students involved in making olive
oil. The school directors embraced
the idea, and were happy to perhaps
reduce the amount of olives that
were being tracked into the carpeted
classrooms each year. The nuns
were excited to bring back an old
school tradition.
They almost had tears of joy in
their eyes, said Sallaberry, who
studied environmental science at the
University of California at Davis. In
previous years, some elderly nuns
told the harvesters stories of using
canes to hit branches to make the
olives come down, he said.
The faculty has estimated that the
trees are more than 100 years old.
The last time the olives were picked
was in the 1950s.
During the year, students in the
schools sustainability classes are
involved in orchard maintenance
and inspecting the trees.
On Sunday, students, parents, fac-
ulty and community members will
participate in Sacred Heart Schools
Third Annual Olive Harvest. A
mobile mill will be at the school and
the olive will be pressed and bottled
Olives from tree to table
Sacred Heart puts on third annual olive festival
See OIL, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
REUTERS
An eagle takes off after feeding on a salmon along Squamish River, north of Vancouver in Squamish, British Columbia.
Saturday: Showers likely. Highs in the
upper 50s. South winds 10 to 20 mph. Gusts
up to 35 mph in the morning.
Saturday night: Showers in the
evening...Then showers likely after mid-
night. Lows in the upper 40s. South winds
around 20 mph...Becoming southwest 10 to
15 mph after midnight.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Highs in the
upper 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of showers
50 percent.
Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Lows in
the upper 40s. South winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of showers 40
percent.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Highs
around 60.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No.
3, in rst place; BIg Ben, No. 4, in second place;
and Money Bags, No. 11, in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:43.06.
(Answers Monday)
ODDLY PRONG ACCUSE ABRUPT
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The nursery owner told her new employee
the GROUND RULES
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TENIP
SLUKL
CREBAH
YENANO
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
A:
1 4 5
5 24 26 29 53 36
Mega number
Nov. 16 Mega Millions
4 26 27 31 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 7 7 0
Daily Four
0 8 8
Daily three evening
In 1986, the World Cup was held in
Mexico. Colombia was the original host
country of the tournament but they had
to step down because they could not
afford to host the event. Mexico was
Colombias replacement.
***
Mexico City is the highest city in North
America and is the worlds largest capi-
tal. Approximately one-fth of Mexicos
population lives in Mexico City.
***
Benjamin Franklin (17006-1790) helped
establish Americas rst hospital. The
Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia
opened in 1751. The hospital was found-
ed to take care of the sick poor and the
insane. In 1883, a training school for
nurses was established at the hospital.
***
The rst American in space was Alan
Shepard (1923-1998), on May 5, 1961.
In 1971, he was the rst and only person
to play golf on the moon.
***
The footprints left by astronauts on the
moon will last about 10 million years.
***
Do you know what the following words
have in common? Racecar, kayak, radar,
level, sagas. See answer at end.
***
An average yawn lasts about 6 seconds.
***
Dream analysts claim that a dream with
a doctor in it represents an improvement
in all departments of your life.
***
The National Football League originated
the college draft in 1936 in an effort to
better distribute the incoming talent of
college football players throughout the
league.
***
May 5, 1921 is one of the most impor-
tant dates in the world of high fashion.
That is the date the worlds best selling
perfume Chanel No. 5 was introduced
by Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
***
The literal translation of haute couture
translated from French is high sewing.
Fashion giants Coco Chanel, Christian
Dior (1905-1957) and Pierre Cardin
(born 1922) were all haute couture
designers. To be called a haute couture
designer, a business must belong to the
Syndical Chamber for Haute Couture in
Paris, which is regulated by the French
Department of Industry. Haute couture
clothing is made from scratch for each
customer. It takes from 100 to 400 hours
to make one dress.
***
The movie One Flew Over The
Cuckoos Nest won five Academy
Awards in 1975. Best Picture, Best Actor
(Jack Nicholson, born 1937), Best
Actress (Louise Fletcher, born 1934),
Best Director (Milos Forman, born
1932) and Best Adapted Screenplay
(Lawrence Hauben, 1931-1985 and Bo
Goldman, born 1932). The author of the
book One Flew Over The Cuckoos
Nest was Ken Kesey, 1935-2001.
***
Jack Nicholson used to be a messenger
boy for MGMs cartoon department. His
full name is John Joseph Nicholson.
***
There are 2.7 million registered nurses
in the United States. Of that, 2.2 million
of them are actively employed.
***
Corn was domesticated about 10,000
years ago in the highlands of central
Mexico. Corn, also known as maize, has
been found at archeological sites in
Mexico.
***
An ear of corn never has an odd number
of rows of corn. The average ear of corn
has 800 kernels, arranged in 16 rows.
***
An adult human brain is about 2 percent
of total body weight. The average
human brain weighs about 3 pounds.
The heaviest human brain ever recorded
weighed 5 pounds 1.1 ounces.
***
Answer: Each word is a palindrome. A
palindrome is a word or phrase that
reads the same forward and backward.
Im alas a salami.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
11 15 25 31 32 18
Mega number
Nov. 14 Super Lotto Plus
Entertainer RuPaul
is 52.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
Washington Dulles International
Airport was dedicated by President
John F. Kennedy.
Prejudice is a raft
onto which the shipwrecked
mind clambers and paddles to safety.
Ben Hecht, American author and screenwriter (1893-1964)
Actor Danny
DeVito is 68.
Actress Rachel
McAdams is 34.
Birthdays
In 1558, Elizabeth I acceded to the English throne upon the
death of Queen Mary.
In 1800, Congress held its first session in Washington in the
partially completed Capitol building.
In 1869, the Suez Canal opened in Egypt.
In 1911, the African-American fraternity Omega Psi Phi was
founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
In 1917, French sculptor Auguste Rodin died in Meudon at
age 77.
In 1934, Lyndon Baines Johnson married Claudia Alta
Taylor, better known as Lady Bird, in San Antonio, Texas.
In 1962, the musical comedy Little Me, starring Sid
Caesar in seven roles, opened on Broadway.
In 1969, the first round of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks
between the United States and the Soviet Union opened in
Helsinki, Finland.
In 1973, President Richard Nixon told Associated Press
managing editors in Orlando, Fla.: People have got to know
whether or not their president is a crook. Well, Im not a
crook.
In 1979, Irans Ayatollah Khomeini ordered the release of 13
black and/or female American hostages being held at the
U.S. Embassy in Tehran.
In 1987, a federal jury in Denver convicted two white
supremacists of civil rights violations in the 1984 slaying of
radio talk show host Alan Berg. (Both men later died in
prison.)
In 1997, 62 people, most of them foreign tourists, were
killed when militants opened fire at the Temple of
Hatshepsut in Luxor, Egypt; the attackers were killed by
police.
Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., is 78. Rock musician Gerry McGee
(The Ventures) is 75. Singer Gordon Lightfoot is 74. Singer-song-
writer Bob Gaudio is 71. Movie director Martin Scorsese (skor-
SEH-see) is 70. Actress Lauren Hutton is 69. Saturday Night
Live producer Lorne Michaels is 68. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Tom
Seaver is 68. Movie director Roland Joffe is 67. Former Democratic
National Chairman Howard Dean is 64. House Speaker John
Boehner (BAY-nur) is 63. Actor Stephen Root is 61. Rock musi-
cian Jim Babjak (The Smithereens) is 55. Actress Mary Elizabeth
Mastrantonio is 54. Actor William Moses is 53. Actor Dylan Walsh
is 49. U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice is 48.
3
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
www.greenhillsretirement.com
1201 Broadway Millbrae, CA 94030
Lic. 4150600292
CALL TODAY
FOR A FREE TOUR
(650) 742-9150
The Care You
Can Count On
RN on sta full time
Licensed vocational nurses available 7 days a week
24 hour CNA certied caregivers for your daily needs
Memory Care available for Alzheimers and Dementia residents
Centrally located near two major hospitals
A full calendar of social events, activities, and entertainment
Delicious meals served restaurant-style three times daily
Emergency call systems in bedrooms and bathrooms
On-site beauty salon
Please call to ask
about our special rates for
INDEPENDENT
LIVING
HALF MOON BAY
Arrest. A man was arrested after being caught
driving a stolen vehicle he obtained from a res-
idential burglary on the 400 block of Myrtle
Street before 9:53 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 12.
Petty theft. A wallet containing $230 was
stolen on the 200 block of San Mateo Road
before 9:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10.
Arrest. An intoxicated male and female drove
into a stop sign and re hydrant then attempted
to ee from police on the 1000 block of Pear
Street in Moss Beach before 1:54 a.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 10.
Grand theft. An unlocked vehicle was stolen
from the 800 block of Airport Street in Moss
Beach before 5:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Disturbance. A transient outside of a Dennys
Restaurant was reportedly harassing customers
and refusing to leave the premises on Airport
Boulevard before 6:41 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10.
Stolen vehicle. A beige Honda Accord was
stolen from Baden Avenue before 10:24 a.m.
Friday, Nov. 9.
Juvenile case. A BB gun was conscated from
a student at South San Francisco High School
on B Street before 3:36 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9.
Petty theft. A laptop was stolen at Parkway
School on Park Way before 7:46 a.m. Friday,
Nov. 9.
Police reports
Wanted to go for a little drive
A 13-year-old girl stole her mothers
vehicle and was caught driving with four
passengers at Pescadero Creek Road and
Highway 1 before 7:01 p.m. on Sunday,
Nov. 12.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Woodside man accused of staging his
wifes fatal shooting as a suicide to collect
millions of dollars in insurance payouts
cemented the start date of his potentially cap-
ital murder trial, withdrawing his previous
waiver of a speedy prosecution to make sure
the proceeding starts in January.
The move Friday by Pooroushasb Peter
Parineh, 67, means his Jan. 22 trial date can-
not be delayed because a defendant who has-
nt waived his right must be heard within 60
days.
Given Peters age and physical condition,
he wants to go to trial and wants to go trial
when its set, said defense attorney Dek
Ketchum.
Parineh is charged with murder, gun use and
murder for nancial gain. If convicted, he
faces life in prison without parole or the death
penalty. Prosecutors have
not said yet formally
which they will pursue.
Ketchum said, with that
in mind, the case remains
in death penalty status but,
regardless, his defense
strategy will not change.
Parineh has pleaded not
guilty to the Aug. 13, 2010
death of Parima Parineh,
56, who was shot twice in
the head in the bedroom of the couples multi-
million dollar home on Fox Hill Road in
Woodside.
At a preliminary hearing last fall, the prose-
cution argued Parineh stood to benet from
$31 million in life insurance policies and, out-
side court, said he also had a longtime mis-
tress.
Parineh allegedly gave authorities differing
stories; once, he said he found his wife dead
and, another time, that he found her wounded
and nished the job at her request.
At the time of his wifes death, Parineh was
$13 million to $14 million in debt and his list
of foreclosures included the Fox Hill home
and several properties scattered throughout
the state. His wife had a number of life insur-
ance policies totaling $31 million but they had
a lien against them and were about to end
without payment.
In April, the Parineh children sued their
father for wrongful death, claiming that she
survived the attack for some period of time
before dying as a result and that they also
believe his purpose in willfully and mali-
ciously murdering her was to benet nan-
cially from certain life insurance payouts.
Parineh remains in custody without bail.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Accused wife killer gets murder trial date
Pooroushasb
Parineh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The teenage girl who used a fellow stu-
dents email to send Burlingame High School
administrators a false bomb threat that put
the campus on lockdown earlier this year
must repay nearly $5,000 for the cost of the
public safety response.
Christine Nicole Azzolino, 19, was sen-
tenced in September to 15 days jail, 32 hours
of counseling and three years of probation
for making a false explosives report. On
Friday, a court commis-
sioner also ordered her to
pay $3,426 to Central
County Fire, $771 to the
Burlingame Police
Department and $795 to
the San Francisco Police
Department.
Azzolino sent the
threatening email at
approximately 2 p.m. Feb.
10 and school officials
immediately locked down the campus. They
tracked the message back to a male student
from whose account it originated and police
swept the campus and the boys possessions
with four bomb-sniffing dogs. No bombs
were found and no one was injured.
Police ultimately figured out that Azzolino
actually sent the message from the boys
account and she was arrested the following
Monday, according to prosecutors who say
she said there was no intent to actually carry
out the threat.
Teen bomb suspect ordered to repay response costs
Christine
Azzolino
4
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
)ust be age 62+ and own your own home:
Turn home equIty Into cash
Pay oII bIIIs & credIt cards
No more mortgage payments
RemaIn In your home as Iong as you IIve
You retaIn ownershIp (tItIe) to your home
FHA Insured program
Call today for a free, easy to read quote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
Carol ertocchini, CPA
NMLS D #455078
Reverse Mortgage
SpecIaIIst and a CPA
wIth over 25 years
experIence as a
IInancIaI proIessIonaI
S1L NMLS D 98161
CA DRE #01820779
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
An Authenti c
CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE
HAPPY THANKSGIVING WEEKEND
Sold Out
Lic: 41560033
MILLS ESTATE VILLA
24 Hour Assisted Living Care
Vacation and Short Term Respite
Stays Always Welcome
650.692.0600
1733 California Drive, Burlingame
www.CiminoCare.com
Gmj^Yeadq
nY[YlagfoYk
[Yj]%^j]]o`ad]
EgeoYkaf
_gg\`Yf\kYl
Eaddk=klYl]NaddY
^gjYo]]c&
5
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Caltrain, SamTrans to adjust
schedules for Thanksgiving holiday
Caltrain and SamTrans will operate on a Sunday schedule
Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 22.
On Thanksgiving Day, Caltrain will operate a regular Sunday
schedule of 32 trains between San Francisco and San Jose, with
shuttle service to the Tamien station. Train service will not oper-
ate south of San Jose. On Friday, Nov. 23, Caltrain will run a
Saturday schedule with 36 trains operating between San
Francisco and San Jose. The schedule will include weekend bul-
let express trains in the morning and early evening. SamTrans
will operate on a Sunday schedule Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 22.
The Sunday schedule includes the new El Camino Real route,
which operates between the Palo Alto Caltrain Station and the
Daly City BART Station only on weekends. The route operates
every 20 minutes throughout most of the day, serving all of the
BART stations, Muni and Caltrain connections along the line.
The San Bruno and South San Francisco BART stations are
served from El Camino Real, to save travel time for the vast
majority of passengers. On the day after Thanksgiving, Friday,
Nov. 23, SamTrans will operate regular non-school day service.
Local brief
Salvatore Mike Cozzolino
Salvatore Mike Cozzolino, an early pioneer of Millbrae and
founding family member, died in Millbrae Nov. 15, 2012.
Husband of Alma Cozzolino since 1941 and father of Robert
Cozzolino (his wife, the late Dena), Diane Jennings (her husband
Rich) and the late Michael Cozzolino. Brother of Molly Figone,
Peach Harp, Marie Davis, Jim Cozzolino and the late Alexander.
He is also survived by his grandchildren Sandra; Sheri; Dawn;
Tracy; Tina along with his ve great-grandchildren.
A native of San Francisco, age 101 years.
He was a past president of the Optimist Club in Millbrae;
member of SIRS; Native Sons of the Golden West and former
ower grower with ranches in Half Moon Bay, Millbrae, Daly
City, among others. Family and friends are welcome to attend a
celebration of the funeral mass 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 24 at Saint
Dunstan Catholic Church, 1133 Broadway in Millbrae, and will
conclude afterward.
Obituary
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A request by prosecutors to set an exe-
cution date for a San Mateo County
death row inmate whose appeals have
expired wont be heard until Monday
because the judge assigned to hear the
matter had the day off.
Judge Barbara Mallach was assigned
the case of Robert Green Fairbank which
was scheduled for Friday but she had a
long-standing day off unfortunately,
nobody informed his attorneys or any-
one else involved ahead of time, accord-
ing to prosecutors.
Instead, Mallach on Monday morning
will consider whether to set a date for
Fairbank, who was convicted of tortur-
ing and murdering a young graduate stu-
dent in 1985, or follow the lead of other
courts that rst want clarity on the use of
lethal injection.
California executions have essentially
been on hold for years while the courts
wrangle with the question of cruel and
unusual punishment. A court has ruled
the states previous use of a three-drug
cocktail could not continue and a judge
in a different case also declined to set an
execution date for a condemned inmate
despite that prosecutor maintaining a
single drug would bypass the concern.
The local District Attorneys Ofce is
expected to make a similar argument in
Fairbanks case.
The request comes almost two weeks
after California voters afrmed the death
penalty by rejecting Proposition 34. An
early hearing for Fairbank was delayed
until after the Nov. 6 election in case
voters had felt otherwise, making the
request moot.
Fairbank, now 58, was sentenced to
death for the Dec. 12, 1985 attempted
sexual assault and murder of San
Francisco resident Wendy Cheek, a
graduate student. Cheeks partially
burned body was found near
Hillsborough off Interstate 280. Cheek
had been stabbed repeatedly with a bar-
becue fork, knife and screwdriver before
being set on re. Two days into his 1989
trial, Fairbank, already a convicted
felon, pleaded no contest.
Death penalty decision delayed
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
CuriOdyssey, the San Mateo-based
childrens science education center, shat-
tered previous attendance records by see-
ing more than one-third more visitors the
last scal year than in any other in its his-
tory.
More than 135,000 people visited the
science and native animal center at
Coyote Point between Oct. 1, 2011 and
Sept. 30, 2012. The gure is 32 percent
more than the previous scal year and a
77 percent increase over the lowest point
of 2008. CuriOdyssey attributes the sig-
nicant hike to the organizations focus
on highly interactive experiences for
children, the science exhibitions, popular
camps, daily wildlife encounters and the
mobile museum.
We are thrilled that our approach to
science education has resonated with the
community, said Executive Director
Rachel Meyer in a prepared announce-
ment.
The news comes on the heels of word
the museum is planning for an updated
facility to accommodate even more
exhibits and programs. Last month, the
county Board of Supervisors signed off
on an agreement to transfer ownership of
the facility to CuriOdyssey and estab-
lished a new 30-year lease. The building
gives CuriOdyssey an asset on which to
raise capital for the new building whose
design is still in the early planning
stages. The plan also calls on better inte-
grating both the indoor and outdoor
experiences.
Meyer said the communitys amaz-
ing response to CuriOdysseys offerings
is what puts it in a position for growth.
CuriOdyssey is the modern incarnation
of the former Coyote Point Museum
which nearly closed six years ago but has
since reemerged as a science-centric
draw for the entire region.
For more information about
CuriOdyssey visit www.curiodyssey.org.
CuriOdyssey is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday to Saturday and noon to 5 p.m.
Sunday. Admission is $8 for adults, $6
for students and seniors and $4 for chil-
dren 2-12.
Judge backs California
high-speed rail over farmers
A judge denied a request Friday from
Central Valley farmers who sought to
halt work on Californias ambitious
high-speed rail project, allowing work
on the $68 billion project to continue at
an aggressive pace.
Sacramento County Superior Court
Judge Timothy Frawley denied a request
for a preliminary injunction, saying that
the agency overseeing the project acted
reasonably and in good faith in trying
to comply with California environmental
law.
Childrens museumshatters attendance record
Around the state
6
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
702 Marshall St., Ste. 400, Redwood City
650.369.8900
Fighting for victims
and their families
FREE CONSULTATION
(800) 308-0870
Motor Vehicle
Accidents

Wrongful Death

Traumatic Brain
Injuries

Spinal Cord Injuries

Survivors of
Domestic Violence
and Rape

Uninsured Motorist
Claims

Insurance Bad Faith


Led by former prosecutor
Todd Emanuel, Emanuel
Law Group fghts for
victims and their families.
RECENT RESULTS
$6.35 million: Settlement
afer Motor Vehicle Accident
$1.00 million: Judgment for
rape victim
$1.00 million: Settlement for
Uninsured Motorist Claim
$405,000: Judgment for
Domestic Violence Survivor
Its Almost
Turkey Time!
Our culinary team at the Hilton
San Francisco Airport Bayfront is busy
planning a grand Thanksgiving feast.
Gather your friends and family and
leave the cooking to us. Our buffet
will feature seafood starters, roasted
turkey, stuffing, brunch favorites, hearty
vegetables, holiday desserts and more!
Seatings from 10:30AM2:30PM
To reserve, call 650.340.8500
Adults: $39.95 Seniors: $35.95
Children 512: $19.95 (Under 5 free)
Tax & 20% gratuity added to the check
600 Airport Boulevard, Burlingame www.hiltonsfo.com
Friends or family visiting during the holiday? Ask about special room rates.
COUNTY
GOVERNMENT
The Board of
Supervisors will
consider an
urgency zoning ordinance specic
to the parcel at 3821 Fair Oaks Ave.
in response to neighborhood con-
cerns over noise, garbage and odor
from a catering business located
there. Planning staff and the county
managers ofce has met with the
business owners but there needs to
be clear performance standards
established for the zone regarding
commercial activities, according to
the staff report. If passed by a four-
fths vote, the ordinance will be
effective 45 days but can be extend-
ed for 10 months and 15 days and
then one extra year.
The board meets 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 20 in Board Chambers, 400
County Government Center,
Redwood City.
CITY GOVERNMENT
The Millbrae Planning
Commission will hold a public
hearing for an application to open a
49-seat Asian-fusion restaurant
called Wonderful at 270
Broadway. The commission meets
7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19 at City
Hall, 621 Magnolia Ave.
The San Carlos Planning
Commission will hold a public
hearing on the nal environmental
impact report of the proposed
Transit Village. The proposed
development concerns a 10.53-acre
strip of land within the existing
Caltrain station and running paral-
lel to the railroad corridor. The pro-
posal by Legacy, the developer,
envisions eight four-story buildings
with 281 housing units among a
mix of 407,298 square feet of resi-
dential, 23,797 square feet of ofce
space and 14,326 square feet of
retail space. The project would also
include 667 parking spaces and a
new SamTrans Transit Center on
4.29 acres. The commission meets
7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19 at City
Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
S
equoia High School is
proud to present Cabaret,
which began as a
Broadway musical and since then
has been adapted multiple times.
The musical is set in 1929 Germany
during the Nazi era when the Kit
Kat Klub was a cross-section of
Berlin night-life: thronged with the
otsam and jetsam of a doomed
city. The story unfolds with
Germans and visitors living togeth-
er during a changing world full of
intrigue, romance, entertainment
and political unrest.
Shows are 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16
and Saturday, Nov. 17 and 3 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 18. All performances
will be held in Carrington Hall at
Sequoia High School, 1201
Brewster Ave., Redwood City.
Tickets are $10 to $15. Tickets can
be purchased at
www.showtix4u.com or one hour
before show time at the box ofce.
***
Want to help children get the help
they need with their homework? For
15 years, San Mateo-based nonprof-
it Homework Central has assisted
local children in developing their
capacity to learn and achieve
through homework assistance, tutor-
ing and family support. The group
works primarily with low-income,
Hispanic families. It currently
serves ve schools in San Mateo at
three sites with 20 to 27 students at
each site. With more volunteers and
funding, the nonprot could help
more children. Its currently work-
ing to open a fourth location at Park
Elementary School.
Those interested in supporting
the organization by sending dona-
tions to Homework Central, P.O.
Box 6687, San Mateo, CA, 94403.
Donations for the silent auction, to
be held in March, are also welcome.
For more information visit
www.homework-central.org or
email hwcexecdirector@aol.com.
***
Torika Baleilekutu of
Hillsborough was awarded the
Ozarks Medical Center Grizzly
Volleyball Scholarship, Grizzly
Commemorative Scholarship,
Robert Neathery Grizzly
Scholarship and Edward L.
Harry Reavis Grizzly
Scholarship from Missouri State
University-West Plains.
Baleilekutu, a 2012 graduate of
Carlmont High School in
Belmont, is a freshman at Missouri
State-West Plains and plans to pur-
sue a degree in medicine. Her
guardians are Jeff and Charlotte
McFadden.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by educa-
tion reporter Heather Murtagh. You can
contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105
or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 7
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes Mu|ti-Fami|y Mixed-Use Commercia|
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Renance / Cash Out
Investors We|come Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
advertisement
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
One of two men who torched two parked cars
in Redwood City over an apparent dispute with
one vehicles owner was sentenced Friday to a
year in county jail followed by three years of
probation.
Prosecutors asked that Moris A. Pena instead
receive 16 months in prison for the felony arson
charges but Judge Craig Parsons declined.
We felt an arsonist belongs in prison but
Judge Craig Parsons felt the public was better
served by him being supervised by probation
officers, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Pena has 289 days credit against his sentence
and must also pay more than $10,000 in resti-
tution.
Co-defendant Raul Gomez pleaded no con-
test to similar charges and will be sentenced
Nov. 27. Like Pena, he faces up to 16 months in
prison and remains in custody in lieu of
$100,000 bail.
Redwood City police arrested the men June
26 after responding to reports of a vehicle re
at 210 Linden St. Two vehicles were found on
re, one parked on the street in front of that
location and a second vehicle parked on the
property and next to a carport. Both vehicles
were destroyed. A third car was also damaged
because of its proximity.
Ofcers checking nearby gas stations for sur-
veillance footage found a witness who recalled
selling gas to a man with a can. They located
Pena, the man in the video, walking nearby and
arrested him. Further investigation led to
Gomez.
Prosecutors say Gomez and Pena had prob-
lems with one of the cars owners which is why
they set the re.
Car torcher gets jail, probation
By Jason Dearen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Gov. Jerry Brown
told attendees at an environmental conference
Friday that climate change must be prevented
or humans might one day be forced to live on
another planet.
Addressing the Greenbuild Expo in San
Francisco, Brown lauded Californias cap-
and-trade auction for greenhouse gas emis-
sions, which began this week. It was the for-
mal launch of the nations most ambitious car-
bon-trading market, which for the rst time
established a market-based system to put a
price on greenhouse gas emissions.
The Democratic governor said future gener-
ations will be living indoors ... or well be
living on some other planet. He urged other
states and the nation to fol-
low Californias lead, say-
ing the state can only do so
much by itself.
Human impact on cli-
mate is real, Brown said.
It is growing, and we
need to take steps to stop it
or there will be catastroph-
ic consequences.
Brown said he has
always been a steward of the environment,
saying he earned the nickname Gov.
Moonbeam decades ago during his first
gubernatorial stint in part because of his inter-
est in solar energy.
That was not a term of endearment, the
governor joked. The people who invented
that term arent around anymore, but I am.
Hamas targets Jerusalem
in major escalation
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip Palestinian
militants took aim at Jerusalem for the rst
time Friday, launching a rocket attack on the
holy city in a major escalation of hostilities
as Israel pressed forward with a relentless
campaign of airstrikes in the Gaza Strip.
Israel called up thousands of reservists and
massed troops along the border with Gaza,
signaling a ground invasion of the densely
populated seaside strip could be imminent.
The attack on Jerusalem, along with an earli-
er strike on the metropolis of Tel Aviv, raised
the likelihood that Israel would soon move in.
Israel launched its military campaign
Wednesday after days of heavy rocket fire
from Gaza by assassinating the military chief
of the territorys ruling Hamas militant
group. Since then it has carried out hundreds
of airstrikes on weapons-storage facilities
and underground rocket-launching sites.
It has slowly expanded its operation
beyond military targets and before dawn on
Saturday, missiles smashed into a small
Hamas security facility as well as the sprawl-
ing Hamas police headquarters in Gaza City,
setting off a massive blaze there that threat-
ened to engulf nearby houses and civilian
cars parked outside. No one was inside the
buildings at the time.
Petraeus: CIA blamed
terrorists for Libya attack
WASHINGTON Testifying out of sight,
ex-CIA Director David Petraeus told Congress
Friday that classied intelli-
gence showed the deadly
raid on the U.S. Consulate
in Libya was a terrorist
attack but the administra-
tion withheld the suspected
role of al-Qaida afliates to
avoid tipping them off.
The recently resigned spy
chief explained that refer-
ences to terrorist groups
suspected of carrying out
the violence were removed from the public
explanation of what caused the attack so as not
to alert them that U.S. intelligence was on their
trail, according to lawmakers who attended
Petraeus private briengs. He also said it ini-
tially was unclear whether the militants had
inltrated a demonstration to cover their attack.
The retired four-star general addressed the
House and Senate intelligence committees in
back-to-back, closed-door hearings as questions
persist over what the Obama administration
knew in the immediate aftermath of the Sept.
11 attacks and why its public description did
not match intelligence agencies assessments.
Brown defends steps
to fight climate change
Jerry Brown
Around the world
David Petraeus
LOCAL 8
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
COMMUTE
TO THE CITY?
Need car service?
Drop off your car on
the way to work!
Domestic Foreign
Excellent, High Quality Service
SCHWERIN AUTO SERVICE
1430 Bush Street, SF
415-673-9333
Quality Servic
WERIN AUTO SERVIC
COMMUTER
SPECIAL
Oil Change
$19.99
Most Cars Bring This Ad
help, said Executive Director Mary Watt. And
for existing clients, the monthly allocations
seem to be going faster and faster, indicating
a greater reliance on the food CALL provides.
The organization could use donations of
turkeys and chickens. This year, the focus is
on a program called Fill a Box, Feed a Family.
Simply ll a sturdy copy-paper-sized box with
non-perishable food and add a $20 pre-paid
grocery card for recipients to purchase items
that are appropriate for their holiday celebra-
tion. CALL Primrose will see that it gets to a
local family in need. Pre-registration is impor-
tant to the success of this program. Those
interested in participating should email con-
tact@CALLPrimrose.org. Then, a list of
items to purchase will be emailed back, said
Watt.
Turkeys are denitely in demand.
Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara
and San Mateo counties needs turkeys so that
local pantries and soup kitchens that depend
on Second Harvest for food can provide their
clients with a traditional Thanksgiving meal.
This years goal is 12,000 turkeys and
Second Harvest still needs about 5,000
turkeys.
Enjoying a turkey dinner during the holi-
days, particularly at Thanksgiving, is an
important tradition for many local families,
said Kathy Jackson, CEO of Second Harvest
Food Bank. We need to meet our turkey goal
so that families who want a turkey this holiday
season can get one. We are also looking for
cash donations because the families and indi-
viduals we serve will continue to need food
after the holidays are over. With our purchas-
ing power, Second Harvest can turn one dollar
into two nutritious meals. A monetary dona-
tion will help us feed people all year long.
Turkeys can be dropped off at Second
Harvest Food Banks Curtner Center in San
Jose, 750 Curtner Ave., and Bing Center in
San Carlos, 1051 Bing St. The Food Bank has
extended its dock hours to make donating eas-
ier. Turkeys should not be placed in the food
collection barrels located throughout the com-
munity. Second Harvests Bing Center dock is
open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17.
For more information about holiday hours
or to make a donation visit www.SHFB.org or
call (866) 234-3663.
Each year, Samaritan House cooks a meal
offered on Thanksgiving at the King Center in
North Central San Mateo. The event is fully
staffed with volunteers but the nonprot could
still use food donations, said Communications
Specialist Marcy Spiker. Specifically,
Samaritan House could use: chicken, ham and
turkeys. Individuals can drop off donations at
the administrative ofces located at 4031
Pacic Blvd. in San Mateo.
For more information visit www.samaritan-
house.com.
Shoppers might notice high schoolers out-
side grocery stores this weekend. This year,
San Mateo High School, as part of the
Jefferson Public Service Awards Youth
Service Challenge, will be conducting its
annual holiday food drive through Dec. 3 to
benet Samaritan House in San Mateo and
Second Harvest Food Bank. The students
goal this year will be to collect more than
300,000 pounds.
Community members who wish to donate
can bring canned food or monetary donations
to San Mateo High School, 506 N. Delaware
St., San Mateo, from 7:45 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
Monetary donations are tax-deductible and
checks should be made out to Samaritan
House.
After-school hours and weekends, students
will be collecting donations at local supermar-
kets throughout the Peninsula from San Bruno
to Palo Alto. For more information about
ways to donate email smhs.communityser-
vice@gmail.com.
Continued from page 1
HOLIDAY
specializes in pre-kindergarten to third grade
approaches and reform efforts. One problem
she noted is a lack of consistency in what chil-
dren are exposed to prior to starting traditional
school. Once in school, the quality of education
children are receiving is also inconsistent. A
study of Chicago schools found students were
more successful when in programs in which
teachers worked together to align curriculum
through third grade. That kind of success starts
with leadership, she said.
In San Mateo County, one thing being done to
foster such collaboration is the Bridges to
Success Initiative focusing on Ready Schools
Teams. In ve districts Cabrillo, Jefferson,
La Honda Pescadero, Pacica and Redwood
City teams are made up with educators from
local schools and early childhood educators and
families to create a stronger team so children
are better prepared for school.
Elizabeth Schuck, assistant superintendent of
curriculum and instruction for Cabrillo Unied,
said she always assumed that public and private
preschools in the area were working together to
assure similar quality and topics were covered.
Turns out that wasnt the case, she said.
By bringing preschool representatives togeth-
er with district staff, the group has created a
plan to foster engagement by all teachers,
parents, community organizations in hopes
of supporting children earlier. Now, incoming
kindergarten students will take part in a com-
mon assessment at the start of school. That way,
the student needs are known right away and
support can start immediately, she said.
Earlier this year, Nobel Laureate economist
James Heckman made the argument that creat-
ing a successful workforce starts by investing in
children before they are 5 by supplementing
resources of disadvantaged families.
By age 3, gaps in achievement and under-
standing are set. Statistically, those remain
throughout education, Heckman said while he
was in San Mateo in March. To make effective
change, the United States needs to start talking
about prevention rather than remediation, he
said. Basically, he said focusing on children
who have successful social-emotional skills,
cognitive skills and are in good health allows
for success in the future.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
Olson Dental is teaming up with CALL Primrose and will
sponsor a food drive to feed families for the Thanksgiving
holiday. Since 1983 CALL Primrose has helped thousands of
people throughout the mid-Peninsula who are in need.
Donations received through the drive will help feed families
throughout San Mateo, Foster City, Belmont, San Carlos, San
Bruno, Millbrae and Burlingame.
Donations will be collected through Nov. 21 at the ofce, 36
N. San Mateo Drive, Suite B, San Mateo. Hours of dropoff are:
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Wednesday.The ofce will
be closing at 2 p.m. Nov. 21. For more information or a list of
needed items visit www.facebook.com/OlsonDental or call
342-0474.
***
Socks for Seniors, an annual community service project
organizes collecting new socks to be distributed to elderly in
local area nursing homes around the holidays.
The volunteer-based organization is looking for local area
coordinators in San Mateo County to help by hosting a drive.
It startswithoneperson,withaboxinonelocation.Volunteers
can choose the nursing home,assisted living center or other
senior community that would benet from the drive.Or,help
can be provided with that. To get started visit
http://www.socksforseniors.com/register.html.
***
Although the nations economy is improving, Burlingame-
based CALL Primrose is still seeing record numbers of new
clients on a weekly basis.And for existing clients,the monthly
allocations seem to be going faster and faster, indicating a
greater reliance on the food CALL provides.
Help families in the local area enjoy the blessings of this
holiday season by simply lling a sturdy copy-paper-sized
boxwithnon-perishablefoodandadda$20pre-paidgrocery
card for recipients to purchase items that are appropriate for
their holiday celebration. CALL Primrose will see that it gets
to a local family in need. Pre-registration is vitally important
to the success of this program. Those interested in
participating should email contact@CALLPrimrose.org
Want to help?
OPINION 9
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Dwight L. Schwab Jr.
I
never thought I would see the day
where half of America has grown into a
mass of greedy, lazy, self-serving
socialists. I never thought I would see the
day where the once-powerful and respectable
news media would cave to the love of money
and ideology more than the truth.
I never thought I would see this once great
nation, the envy of all nations on earth,
crumble to the depths of socialism with noth-
ing but a massive pile of debt that looms over
our heads and no plan in sight to rid us of
this burden.
What we have just witnessed is the end of
the United States of America as we knew it.
We will never recover from this.
We have tipped the 50 percent mark and
will now pay the price of our greed. We have
reached the point that Thomas Jefferson pre-
dicted would happen. Once people are able
to vote themselves free money at the expense
of other, hard-working people, we are done.
The people have spoken. They obviously
dont care.
Twenty trillion dollars
will be what we owe at
the end of this Obamas
next term. That will be $1
trillion in interest every
year. Unemployment will
hit 15 percent and that
will be the new normal. It
will be OK with every-
one, because this guy is ...
cool. Gas will be $6-$7 a gallon.
Businesses, those that are left, will leave the
country in droves. It will no longer be feasi-
ble to conduct business in the United States
any more.
We will no longer be a manufacturing
country. We will be nothing more than a con-
sumer nation that will leach off of the rest of
the world.
How pathetic have we become?
We have allowed a decent, God-fearing,
caring man like Mitt Romney, who has more
knowledge in his little ngernail about how
to return this nation to health, go down to a
self-serving, lying, Constitution-hating,
Declaration of Independence-loathing, racial-
ly dividing, class-envying socialist.
Nice work, America. Good luck.
God help us all.
Dwight L. Schwab Jr. is a moderate conserva-
tive who looks at all sides of a story, then
speaks his mind. His BS in journalism from
University of Oregon with minors in political
science and American history stands him in
good stead for his writing. Dwight has 30
years in the publishing industry, including
ABC/Cap Cities and International Thomson. A
native of Portland, Oregon, and now a resident
of the San Francisco Bay Area. His websites
include NewsBlaze.com and u-Follow.com.
2012 California election
Editor,
I commend city, county and California vot-
ers for bequeathing us with one of the high-
est sales tax rates in the nation. Its a pity
that we neglected to endeavor for a higher
city sales tax to achieve national attention.
Such triumphs provide work-around incen-
tives, however. I may be excoriated in reveal-
ing that a locally purchased $14 product can
be procured on the Internet for $10 with free
delivery to your door sans sales tax. Another
enterprising website, for triing cost, pro-
vides a sales tax free out-of-state address to
reship any items you desire to purchase,
which includes anything acquired on Amazon
or elsewhere. This works well, especially if
the purchase amount is several hundred dol-
lars or more. The reship costs are much
lower than our local sales taxes. I suspect
that local contractors and others may use or
are already using such stratagems to sustain
lower expenditures and enhanced prots.
Yes, it is laudable to contribute to the local
economy, but the last election nds
California off the rails to this observer. A 10
percent unemployment rate, a full one-third
of Americans on welfare residing here, a
rank of 48th from the Tax Foundations 2012
State Business Climate Index, a $68 billion
high-speed rail boondoggle to nowhere, a
deteriorating credit rating, unrestrained
unions and $6 billion raised by Proposition
30 already spent and doing zilch to diminish
the decit. Welcome to California, the
American Greece. As in Greece, rejoice in
the Pyrrhic victory, raise a glass of ouzo and
shout Opa!
Tony Favero
Half Moon Bay
National anthem at sporting events
Editor,
Some notes to celebrities singing the
national anthem at athletic events:
1). It is best to sing the notes as written.
And it would be very different, also.
2). Screaming is not singing, no matter
what you see and hear on television.
3). Resist the temptation to add your own
frills and trills to demonstrate your great
artistry. I know it is hard to believe, but it is
not about you it is about the nation.
Darwin Patnode
San Carlos
Self-inflicted damage
Editor,
The military leader of Hamas, Ahmed
Jaabari, is dead. He was killed in a surgical
strike on his car by Israel. Jaabari was a ruth-
less murderer who got what he deserved.
Hamas response was to say it has declared
war on Israel. If peace means having rockets
red at you without retaliating, then war
tragically seems a better alternative. Israels
2005 withdrawal from Gaza was taken by
Hamas as an opportunity to attack. Stupid
idea.
During the past ve days alone, more than
125 missiles and mortars fell in Israel, red
from Gaza from residential areas by people
who deliberately endanger their own civilians
in doing so, let alone the ones theyre ring
at. Other rockets were stopped by Israels
Iron Dome anti-missile system, which is cali-
brated to destroy incoming projectiles likely
to hit populated areas. More than 800 rockets
have been red since January. Israeli civil-
ians and military personnel have been killed
and wounded, homes have been destroyed
and other property damage has been suffered.
The lives of 1 million Israelis are threatened
by this onslaught and countless thousands
suffer from post-traumatic stress.
The most heinous form of discrimination is
to deny people the right to defend them-
selves. Israelis have had to get used to the
double standard imposed on them by a world
that seemingly wants them to disappear. Its a
pity that its self-defense requires Israel to act
harshly, but thats what you get when you elect
and support the murderers who run Gaza.
Desmond Tuck
San Mateo
First strike
Editor,
Lets be clear about who started this round
between Israel and Gaza. Since the beginning
of the year, more than 800 rockets and mortar
shells have been red at Israel. This never
seems to make the news until Israel nally
says, Enough! and res back.
Ahmed Jabri, the head of Hamas military
wing, was targeted because he was directly
responsible for executing terror attacks. But
the rst strike was those 800 rockets over the
course of a year on Israeli civilians, and that
should be noted in every report.
So, if you read in the papers or hear on tele-
vision or radio the claim that Israel, by
responding to terror in its borders, is squander-
ing peace and reacting disproportionately, I
hope that you consider that Israel cannot afford
restraint when its children are eeing for their
lives at the sound of warning sirens, and the
sound of falling missiles are overhead.
Sheree Roth
Palo Alto
The next four years
Other voices
Californians cautious
with criminal justice
The Sacramento Bee
A
t first glance, observers might con-
clude that California voters exhib-
ited symptoms of schizophrenia on
law and order issues this election season.
While they overwhelmingly approved
Proposition 36, a measure that softens
Californias tough Three Strikes law, they
narrowly rejected Proposition 34, a fairly
well-funded death penalty repeal initiative.
Upon closer examination, the two meas-
ures were fundamentally different, appeal-
ing to different constituencies for different
reasons. Proposition 36 was not a full-out
repeal of Three Strikes but a nuanced
adjustment of a sentencing regime that pro-
ponents argued persuasively was just flat
unfair. They successfully documented the
extreme excesses of Three Strikes in
California. It was not an urban myth, for
instance, that under the states Three Strikes
law, pizza thieves are serving life sentences.
Also, the changes approved do not auto-
matically free repeat offenders, but they
ensure that petty criminals are no longer
condemned to spend the rest of their lives in
prison as a matter of law.
It certainly didnt hurt that the initiative
had the backing of veteran Los Angeles
District Attorney Steve Cooley, who helped
draft it. The current Los Angeles police
chief as well as a former one support-
ed it as well. Remarkably, it won majorities
in every county in the state, from conserva-
tive Kern, where it racked up a healthy 55
percent of the vote, to liberal San Francisco,
where it garnered 84 percent approval.
Considered something of a third rail of
California politics for so long political
suicide for any elected official who dared to
suggest softening it Three Strikes reform
proved to be widely popular.
Unlike Proposition 36s nuanced adjust-
ment of Three Strikes, Proposition 34
sought an outright repeal of the death penal-
ty. While supporters included many who
were morally opposed to capital punish-
ment, the campaign stressed other issues,
primarily the high cost and the dysfunction
of the death penalty in this state.
Voters in 40 of Californias 52 counties
rejected those arguments, defeating
Proposition 34.
Predictably, repeal of the death penalty
won majorities in the San Francisco Bay
Area. Los Angeles, the states most popu-
lous county, also approved the measure, but
Yolo was the only inland county where
Proposition 34 got more than 50 percent of
the vote.
Capital punishment is a criminal justice
issue, but it is one that cannot be divorced
from emotion and hard-held personal
beliefs. Supporters of the death penalty did
not need to spend much energy countering
arguments about the costs and unequal
application of executions. They knew they
could sway voters by painting Proposition
34 supporters as sympathizing with child
murderers, torturers and cop killers, the
worst of the worst, despite the fact that a
life sentence is an extremely harsh punish-
ment.
Some supporters of Proposition 34 think
they may have waited too long to get their
key messages before voters. Many people
who cast ballots against Proposition 34 did
so before campaign ads aired stressing the
number of innocent people mistakenly con-
demned to death and the high cost of capital
punishment. Perhaps that would have made
a difference, but probably not. California
remains a strong supporter of capital pun-
ishment, although that support is gradually
eroding because of generational change and
a wider recognition of how challenging it
will be to fix a broken system.
Overall, Californians appear open to mod-
est reform on law and order issues . But
they are not ready at least not yet to
join 17 other states in ending the ultimate
form of punishment.
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those
who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis
and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state,
national and world news, we seek to provide our readers
with the highest quality information resource in San
Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and
we choose to reect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Blanca Frasier
Charles Gould Gale Green
Jeff Palter Bryan Sims
Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Kore Chan Elizabeth Cortes
JD Crayne Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Brian Grabianowski
Ashley Hansen Erin Hurley
Melanie Lindow Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Sally Schilling
Kris Skarston Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not
be accepted.
Please include a city of residence and phone number where
we can reach you.
Emailed documents are preferred. No attachments please.
Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are
those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent
the views of the Daily Journal staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors. If you question the
accuracy of any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,588.31 +0.37% 10-Yr Bond 1.574 -0.94%
Nasdaq2,853.13 +0.57% Oil (per barrel) 86.50
S&P 500 1,359.88 +0.48% Gold 1,717.50
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Optimism that
President Barack Obama and
Congressional leaders will reach a deal on
the budget decit and avoid the scal
cliff helped stocks notch their first
advance in four days.
The market started lower Friday but
spiked higher shortly before midday as
the top members of the House and Senate
spoke at the White House following a
closed-door session with Obama. House
Speaker John Boehner and Senate
Minority Leader Mitch McConnell both
said they offered higher tax revenue as
part of a deal. Boehner said he outlined a
framework that is consistent with
Obamas call for a balanced approach
of both higher revenue and spending cuts.
Its a good start ... the fact that they
were all standing together, said Ben
Schwartz, the chief market strategist at
Lightspeed Financial, a New York-based
broker.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed up 45.93 points, or 0.4 percent, at
12,588.31, after falling as much as 71
points at mid-morning. The Standard &
Poors 500 index rose 6.55 points, or 0.5
percent, to 1,359.88 and the Nasdaq rose
16.19 points, or 0.6 percent to 2,853.13.
Investor concern that Obama and
Congress wont reach a deal on how to
cut the decit has caused a sell-off in
stocks since Election Day. Stocks fell
Wednesday after Obama insisted that
higher taxes on wealthy Americans would
have to be part of any deal and that he
would not cave to Republicans who have
pressed for tax cuts first passed by
President George W. Bush to be extended
for all income earners.
The Dow is down 5 percent since Nov.
6. If an agreement isnt made, automatic
government spending cuts and tax
increases are set to kick in at the begin-
ning of next year. The measures total
about $700 billion for 2013 and could
send the country back into recession.
Mitch Stapley, chief investment ofcer
at Fifth Third Asset Management, says
that investors and traders are likely to be
in for a rough ride until the politicians
have brokered a deal.
Volatility is going to be the hallmark
as we go through this process ... Its going
to be a very choppy period coming up,
said Stapley, who is based in Grand
Rapids, Mich.
The Dow still ended lower for the
week, logging a fourth straight weekly
decline. That slump has pared the indexs
gains for the year to 3 percent. The S&P
500 also ended the week lower, and has
fallen three of the last four weeks.
Stocks finish higher
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange
and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Foot Locker Inc., up $1.42 at $33.27
Higher sales at its existing stores boosted the
sporting goods retailers net income 61 percent
during its third quarter.
The J.M. Smucker Co., down $1.52 at $83.86
The maker of Jif peanut butter said its second-
quarter earnings rose 17 percent,but its results
still missed expectations.
OfceMax Inc., up 99 cents at $9.22
Boise Cascade LLC, a wood products company
that the ofce supplies retailer has a stake in,
led for an initial public offering.
Suntech Power Holdings Co.Ltd.,down 4 cents
at 77 cents
Citing higher production costs and global
oversupply,the solar panel company is slowing
production at its Goodyear, Ariz., facility.
Schiff Nutrition International Inc., up $9.84 at
$43.76
The nutritional supplement maker received a
second takeover offer from Reckitt Benckiser.
The rst offer was from Bayer AG.
Nasdaq
Dell Inc., down 70 cents at $8.86
The personal computer maker posted weak
third-quarter results,as more consumers opt to
buy smartphones and tablet computers.
Sears Holdings Corp., down $10.99 at $47.49
The retailer said that third-quarter sales in stores
open at least one year fell at both its Kmart and
Sears stores.
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $15.22 at
$157.69
The drug maker said that European ofcials
recommended granting marketing
authorization for its colorectal cancer treatment.
Big movers
Animal abuse settlement reached
FRESNO A California slaughterhouse where video-
taped mistreatment of cows prompted the largest meat
recall in U.S. history has reached a symbolic $500 million
settlement with an animal welfare group and the federal
government.
The record penalty for the animal abuse case is not
expected to be paid because Riverside County-based
Hallmark Meat Co. is bankrupt.
The tentative settlement of the civil lawsuit was
announced Friday by the Humane Society of the United
States, which led the case and later was joined by the
U.S. Department of Justice.
Its a deterrence judgment, HSUS attorney Jonathan R.
Lovvorn said. It informs other federal government con-
tractors that when your contract says you provide humane
handling, if you dont do that youre likely to end up bank-
rupt as well.
The case marked the rst time federal fraud statutes
were used in an animal abuse case, the HSUS said. As a
supplier of meats for the national school lunch program,
the company had signed federal contracts certifying that it
would provide humane treatment of animals sent to the
company for slaughter.
The widely circulated video shot by an undercover oper-
ative in 2007 showed downer cows those too weak or
sick to walk being dragged by chains, rammed by fork-
lifts and sprayed with high-pressure water by employees
who wanted them to stand and walk to slaughter.
The video sparked the largest beef recall in U.S. history
in 2008. Nearly 37 million pounds of the 143 million
pounds recalled had gone to school lunch programs, and
most had been eaten by the time of the recall. The recall
cost taxpayers $150 million.
The settlement announced Friday is with the two main
defendants in the case.
Under the terms, father and son Donald Hallmark Sr. and
Donald Hallmark Jr., general partners of Hallmark Meat
Co., have ve years to pay a separate settlement of
$316,802, or the bulk of their remaining personal assets.
Business briefs
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Threatened with
repeal just weeks ago, President Barack
Obamas health care law now appears on
track in close to half the states, with oth-
ers playing catch-up and the administra-
tion readying a fallback for states not
wishing to participate.
Friday was the original deadline for
states to notify Washington if they would
play a role in building new health insur-
ance markets through which the unin-
sured can get coverage starting in 2014.
Though the administration granted a
months extension, most states have
already made their intentions known.
As of Friday, 23 states plus
Washington, D.C., were proceeding; 15
said theyd defer to the federal govern-
ment to run their markets and 12 were
still mulling over their options. The most-
ly blue group proceeding included ve
Republican-led states. The undecided
included several states that seemed to be
moving toward an active role.
Postelection its really been game
on, said Kelly Barnes, leader of the
health care group at the
PricewaterhouseCoopers consulting rm.
Republican presidential candidate Mitt
Romney had vowed to begin dismantling
Obamacare his rst day in ofce. But
Romney lost, and instead GOP governors
are scrambling to see if they can nd an
accommodation with the administration
after two years of ghting the presidents
signature law.
The president won the election...and
New Jersey is going to comply with the
Affordable Care Act, Republican Gov.
Chris Christie said Friday. Christie said
he still has questions about costs and is
weighing his decision. Earlier this year he
vetoed legislation creating a state
exchange, as the new insurance markets
are called.
A check by the Associated Press found
that 16 states plus Washington, D.C.,
want to build their own exchanges.
Starting Jan. 1, 2014, individuals, fami-
lies and small businesses will be able to
buy private coverage through an
exchange in their state, with most con-
sumers getting government assistance to
pay premiums.
Obamas health care law advances
By Candice Choi and Tom Murphy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Twinkies may not last
forever after all.
Hostess Brands Inc., the maker of the
spongy snack with a mysterious cream
lling, said Friday it would shutter after
years of struggling with management
turmoil, rising labor costs and the ever-
changing tastes of Americans even as its
pantry of sugary cakes seemed suspend-
ed in time.
Some beloved Hostess brands such as
Ding Dongs and Ho Hos likely will be
snapped up by buyers and nd a second
life, but for now the company says its
snack cakes should be on shelves for
another week or so. The news stoked an
outpouring of nostalgia around kitchen
tables, water coolers and online as peo-
ple relived childhood memories of their
favorite Hostess goodies.
Customer streamed into the Wonder
Hostess Bakery Outlet in a strip mall in
Indianapolis Friday afternoon after they
heard about the companys demise.
Charles Selke, 42, pulled a pack of
Zingers raspberry-avored dessert cakes
out of a plastic bag stuffed with treats as
he left the store.
How do these just disappear from
your life? he asked. Thats just not
right, man. Im loyal. I love these things,
and Im diabetic.
After hearing the news on the radio
Friday morning, Samantha Caldwell of
Chicago took a detour on her way to
work to stop at a CVS store for a pack-
age of Twinkies to have with her morn-
ing tea and got one for her 4-year-old
son as well.
This way he can say, I had one of
those, Caldwell, 41, said.
Its a sober end for a storied name.
Hostess, whose roster of brands dates as
far back as 1888, hadnt invested heavi-
ly in marketing or innovation in recent
years as it struggled with debt and man-
agement changes.
Twinkie maker Hostess reaches the end of the line
By Robert Jablon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES California contin-
ued its economic recovery as the unem-
ployment rate dipped to 10.1 percent in
October, led by increases in private sector
jobs such as construction, retail and well-
paying professional work.
The state added 48,500 nonfarm jobs
last month compared with September and
the jobless rate dipped a tenth of a percent
in one month, according to the California
Employment Development Department.
About 14.4 million people were work-
ing.
The private sector is adding a healthy
number of jobs, department spokesman
Kevin Callori said. Definitely some
good trends (are) being seen.
The department also sharply revised
previous gures, showing that California
gained 32,000 jobs in September instead
of 8,500.
Californias jobless rate has fallen 1.4
percent since October of last year as the
state added 295,300 nonfarm jobs.
Overall, California continues an eco-
nomic turnaround that began in February
2010. The state has gained nearly
575,000 jobs since then, Callori said.
It was the 16th consecutive month of
private job growth.
Construction added 4,100 jobs in
October and some 27,700 jobs over 12
months.
Compared to recession years, thats
very good because we were losing many,
many jobs each month, Callori said.
The category of trade, transportation
and utilities gained the largest monthly
increase, adding 24,700 jobs.
Unemployment rate dips to 10.1 percent in state
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The thought of another football team using its locker room
bothered every single man on the College of San Mateo football
team.
Especially, the sophomores some who have been with the
prideful program for three years.
As far as CSM is concerned, the Bothman Bulldog Bowl is
a party reserved for them and a guest
no Bulldogs? No party.
It was the mantra we were beating
all week, said Tim Tulloch, CSM
defensive coordinator and assistant
head coach. 5-5 is average and
if we do that, theres going to
be another team in your locker room another
player using your locker. If thats the way we want
to nish, then so be it.
In its seven-year existence, the Bulldogs have
played in their home bowl game six times. The
only time they havent was in 2008 when
Shasta College and Monterey Peninsula
made themselves at home through the blue
door that leads into the CSM locker room.
Tulloch and the players recall that 2008
CSM vs.
Sierra College
1 p.m. kickoff
IF YOU GO
See BOWL, Page 16
Menlo cruises in CCS opener
Sequoia dominates M-A
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It rained Friday night at Sequoia High School
during the Central Coast Section Division IV
opener between No. 4 Menlo School and No. 5
Monte Vista-Christian.
Water fells from the heavens.
And so did Jack Heneghan passes.
The Menlo quarterback was a rainmaker in a
blue uniform and shoulder pads Friday night,
carrying the Knights to an overwhelming 42-14
win over the Mustangs. Before Monte Vista
could take cover from the storm, Heneghan had
already ooded its defense with 294 yards
passing on 14 completions to take a 35-0 lead
at the half.
From then on, it was a matter of watching the
last 24 minutes drip off the clock as a formali-
ty.
Hes a great player, said Menlo head coach
Mark Newton of his quarterback. He has a
great understanding of our offense. He has a
great understanding of defensive fronts and
coverages. Hes got great pocket presence.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Sequoia football team had been missing
a big part of its offense for most of the season
as running back Matt Jenkins was banged up
for most of the season.
But the junior showed how good the
Cherokees offense can be when hes healthy.
Jenkins rushed for 159 yards on 20 carries,
Dylan Anderson scored on runs of 19 and 35
yards and quarterback Mike Taylor accounted
for 122 yards of offense as Sequoia dominat-
ed Menlo-Atherton 27-7 in the rst round of
the Central Coast Section Division I playoffs.
[The game] played out like I thought, said
Sequoia coach Rob Poulos. I felt if we could
get through the rst quarter without any hic-
cups, wed be OK.
With the win, fth-seeded Sequoia moves
into the seminals where its will face top-
seeded Milpitas (8-3) next week. Milpitas
crushed No. 8 Silver Creek 56-7.
Not even three first-half turnovers was
enough to derail Sequoia (9-2 overall). Mainly
because the Cherokees defense played lights
See MENLO, Page 14
See SEQUOIA, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bears Cutler to miss 49ers game with concussion
LAKE FOREST, Ill. The Chicago Bears were bracing for
an injury to Jay Cutler long before the season started.
Now, theyll see just how prepared they are.
Cutler will miss Mondays game at San Francisco because of
a concussion, leaving the Bears without their starting quarter-
back. The team announced the decision
Friday, meaning Jason Campbell is the like-
ly starter against the 49ers.
Star receiver Brandon Marshall said
Cutler is getting better, but he also said
theres a bigger picture that goes beyond
this weeks game.
Our life, our health, is more important
than football, Marshall said. I think well
get Jay back sooner than later.
For now, the Bears believe they have
enough to get by. They brought in Campbell
in the offseason for a situation like this, and he found out before
Thursdays practice that hell be starting.
You denitely dont want to see anyone get hurt or injured in
this business, said Campbell, whos made 70 starts in his career
with Washington and Oakland. We understand it is a tough
sport. Sometimes, things like that happen.
Cutlers status was in question after he sat out the second half
of Sunday nights loss to Houston. The Bears believe he was
injured on a helmet-to-helmet hit by the Texans Tim Dobbins,
who was ned $30,000 by the league, late in the second quarter.
Sports briefs
Jay Cutler
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO President
Barack Obama has already given his
hometown Chicago Bears the nod for
best defense in the NFL.
San Francisco linebacker Patrick
Willis insists he is hardly one to argue
with the commander in chief, especially
considering Obama will be running the
country from the oval ofce for another
four years.
I saw that, Willis said, laughing.
Chicagos defense, theyre playing
very well right now. They have some
tremendous talent on that side of the
ball, but theyre playing great team
defense right now. Kudos to them. But
at the same time, too, we have our own
defense to worry about that were trying
to continue to make better. Thats our
focus.
San Francisco defensive tackle Ray
McDonald will let the president have his
say, too.
Hes the man, McDonald said. You
cant argue with him. His opinion mat-
ters.
Chicagos dominant defense is cer-
tainly playing the very smothering, run-
stopping style of football the 49ers did
last season and the form San
Francisco hopes to get back to in the
seasons second half as it tries to lock up
a rst-round playoff bye.
On Nov. 5 during Monday Night
Football, a night before he was re-elect-
ed, Obama said the ball-hawking Bears
have the best defense in the league
right now led by coordinator Rod
Marinelli who calls his units chem-
istry special.
The Bears (7-2) boast the talented
linebacker tandem of Brian Urlacher
and Lance Briggs. On the 49ers side, its
the duo of Willis and NaVorro Bowman.
Not that Briggs is paying too much
attention to who has the best linebackers
or defense, for that matter. He knows
everyone will get a glimpse come
Monday at Candlestick Park.
By ranking this week, the 49ers stand
third in the league with the Bears two
spots back at No. 5 in overall defense.
Chicago is fourth at stopping the run,
San Francisco sits at seventh. Defending
the pass, the Niners are fth and the
Bears 10th.
How do I feel about it? Doesnt
change the way I play, doesnt change
the way we play over here, Briggs said.
Thats the ranking. And the thing about
a ranking is, the ranking doesnt mean
anything if you dont get to that Super
Bowl. Thats the goal, going to the
Super Bowl.
The Bears have an NFL-best 19 inter-
ceptions. No arguing these teams are
awfully close. San Francisco (6-2-1)
allows an NFL-low 14.1 points per
game, followed by Chicago at 14.8. The
Bears have 26 sacks tied for sixth
to San Franciscos 17.
49ers general manager Trent Baalke
kept his entire starting 11 intact from
last seasons defense, though linebacker
Parys Haralson was lost for the season
with a torn triceps muscle.
As far as the president goes, hes our
president so you cant say much about
who he says is the best, Willis said.
Its his hometown, so he has every right
to say them, but I guess well see when
its all said and done.
Both teams are eager to bounce back
the 49ers from a disappointing 24-24
tie, the NFLs rst in four years, at home
against the division rival Rams last
week, and the Bears a 13-6 loss at
Houston.
On the offensive side, both teams
were busy this week preparing their
backups for the key NFC matchup on
the big stage after starters Jay Cutler of
Chicago and San Franciscos Alex
Smith each was lost to a concussion last
Sunday.
49ers, Bears meet in key NFC showdown
49ers Harbaugh back
to work after heart procedure
SANTA CLARA Jim Harbaugh
practically galloped through the lock-
er room, lively as ever, offering a
wave and a smile to long snapper
Brian Jennings before putting his arm
around right guard Alex Boone.
The San Francisco 49ers coach was
back at work Friday and red up to
be there a day after undergoing a
minor procedure for an irregular
heartbeat that kept him away for all
of half a day.
Im fine, Im fine, Harbaugh
said. No limits. Going about every-
thing as normal. Had a little irregular
heartbeat. Ive had that before. Now
that I have the procedure, a car-
diovert, its amazing. It gets the heart
rate back to normal. Atrial utter is
something Ive had for a while, most
of my life.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In 2006, Decensae White was one
of the highest prole basketball
recruits to come out of San Mateo
County in recent memory when the
former Serra standout decided to play
for legendary coach Bobby Knight at
Texas Tech University.
Things didnt turn out the way
White had planned. He appeared in 30
games for the Red Raiders his fresh-
man season, but that number dwin-
dled to 10 the following season. Two
games into his junior year, he decided
to transfer to Santa Clara University.
After sitting out the NCAA-man-
dated one season as a Division I trans-
fer, the move quickly zzled without
him playing a game for the Broncos.
According to a quote from the San
Jose Mercury News Jon Wilner,
White was giving up basketball.
But when youve done something
nearly your entire life, its hard to stay
away. Plus, there was some unnished
business for White. Thats why this
year, he enrolled at San Francisco
State University and is playing for the
Division II Gators.
The Gators struggled last year, n-
ishing with an overall record of 10-17.
I just decided to come back to
school and found out I was eligible to
play. I called the coaching staff and
they told me if I was willing to come
in and work hard I had a chance to
come and be on the team, White said.
Its denitely been a process getting
back to playing basketball. I took a lot
of time off. Not playing and just get-
ting away from it for a little bit and
then watching on TV, I just wanted to
get back into it.
A big factor in Whites decision to
return was the birth of his son. Now a
year old, White decided, if nothing
else, he would go back to school to
earn his degree in communications.
Anything to better not only his life,
but that of his young sons life.
That was probably the major fac-
tor, White said.
At the same time, however, he was
itching to get back on the court. The
re was really re-stoked after he
played in the San Francisco Pro-Am
league this past summer. He initially
went back to Kezar Pavilion to watch
former teammates play. White had
played for the South Bay team previ-
ously, so he went up to the coach and
asked for a jersey.
He let me on the team, White
said. I just played the rest of the pro-
am season and said, OK, lets see
what I can do to getting back into
playing.
He initially chose San Francisco
State mainly because it was close to
his Pacica home. When he decided
he wanted to give basketball one last
shot, he contacted the Gators coach-
ing staff and school administration
and began the process to check his eli-
gibility. Once he got all that squared
away, there was a familiarity level on
the San Francisco State campus, espe-
cially in the Gators gym. There are a
number of familiar faces and names
on the Gators roster, including Steve
Sanders, who spent two years at
Caada, and Alli Austria and Art
Fodor, transfers from Skyline.
Another former Serra player, Jordan
Reudy, transferred from Foothill
College and former Bellarmine stand-
out Max Fodor is in his third year with
the Gators.
While White has never played with
or against any of teammates previous-
ly, just seeing familiar high school and
college names provided comfort for
White.
Basically, rst and foremost, I
wanted to go back to school and San
Francisco State was just the school
down the street (from where I live),
White said. As I got there and talking
with Reudy and having that relation-
ship at Serra and other guys I played
AAU with, everything is familiar and
basically comfortable. My dad went
there, and my former (Serra) team-
mate Chaz Thomas dad used to coach
here and we used to play in the gym
when we were kids.
White has one year of college eligi-
bility remaining and he doesnt have
tremendous individual goals. Taking
the winding path he has, the 24-year-
old doesnt want to be the star of the
team, he just wants to help out in any
way he can whether on the court or
in the locker room.
It helps me more than anything not
taking anything for granted and prac-
ticing hard every day. This is my sec-
ond and third and last chance to do
something with basketball, White
said. I want to do things the right
way and play as hard as I can and
hope that can rub off on the rest of the
team.
Not that White doesnt still have the
game to help the Gators win. He is
already a key member of the squad
and expects to see plenty of playing
time. He had 19 points, seven
rebounds and three blocks in an 89-80
SPORTS 13
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
Former Serra star returns to local court
TYLER DENISTON/SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY
After stops at Texas Tech and Santa Clara University,former Serra standout
Decensae White is nishing up his college career withSanFranciscoState
University.
See WHITE, Page 16
out. The Cherokees held M-A (6-5) to 281
yards of total offense, with only 12 yards
coming on the ground. Sequoia also forced
three M-A turnovers and turned those into 13
points. In the second half, the Cherokees
stopped the Bears on downs three times and
sacked M-A quarterback Zack Moore four
times.
Our defense has been doing that all year,
Poulos said. Theres been a number of games
where we stopped guys.
Neither team managed to nd the end zone
in the rst quarter, although the Cherokees
turned the ball over twice once at the M-A
23-yard line and again at the Bears 1 on the
rst play of the second quarter.
M-A, however, could not take advantage.
After the Bears were forced to punt on their
rst drive of the second quarter, Sequoia nal-
ly stuffed the ball into the end zone. A 24-yard
punt gave Sequoia the ball at the Bears 29
and the Cherokees needed just two plays to
nd hit pay dirt. Jenkins gained 10 yards on
the rst play before Anderson bolted up the
middle for a 35-yard score to put Sequoia up
7-0.
The teams then exchanged punts before a
fumble recovery by Sequoias Eduardo
Alvarado gave Sequoia another short eld
with which to work this time taking over at
the Bears 9. The M-A defense stiffened, how-
ever, and held the Cherokees to just a 36-yard
Tommy Lopiparo field goal for a 10-0
Sequoia lead with 4:55 left in the rst half.
Despite controlling the rst half, it appeared
M-A would make a game of it. On the Bears
ensuing drive, they marched 78 yards on 12
plays, with the key being a 48-yard Moore to
Ryan Roberts catch-and-run, taking the ball
down to the Sequoia 8-yard line. Tasi Teu then
bulled his way into the end zone on the next
play and Sequoias lead was cut to 10-7 at
halftime.
Turns out that would be last time the Bears
would sniff the end zone.
Sequoia took the kickoff to start the second
half and drove 75 yards on seven plays, cul-
minating with a 35-yard touchdown run by
Anderson to put the Cherokees up 17-7.
Alvarado came up with an interception on M-
As next drive, but Sequoia had to settle for a
32-yard Lopiparo eld goal to go up 20-7.
Sequoias defense set up the Cherokees last
score when Kite Lauese blasted Moore from
the blind side, which knocked the ball loose.
Gabe de los Reyes scooped up the fumble and
rumbled to the Bears 2-yard line. Two plays
later, Taylor clawed his way into the end zone
for the nal margin of victory.
SPORTS 14
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Continued from page 11
SEQUOIA
The entire Menlo offense deserves credit for
executing in the rst half and all-but burying
the Mustangs. The Knights amassed 344
yards of total offense in the games rst 24
minutes, scoring on all ve of their posses-
sions.
Offensively, the game was sound, Newton
said. Monte Vista is a very well coached
team. They have good players. We played
very, very well in the rst half to make it look
like it wasnt close. Our guys did a great job.
Our coaches did a great job preparing them.
Thats a good football team we handled pretty
effectively in the rst half.
While Heneghan marched the Knights up
and down the eld, it was Heru Peacock car-
rying Menlo into the end zone time and time
again. Peacock gained just 48 yards on eight
touches in that rst half, but four of those
ended with Peacock handing the ball to a man
in a striped shirt following a touchdown.
It was good, Peacock said of the Menlo
offense. I had all my boys blocking for me.
Our quarterback was doing well. It was just
really nice to see everyone gelling together
and nding our groove. I think the key is that
our coaches prepared us really well. We also
had a lot of sophomores step up.
Peacock found glory four plays into the
game on a six-yard touchdown run to make it
7-0. Less than three minutes later, a three-yard
run doubled the lead and ve minutes after
that, Peacock caught a little Heneghan shovel
pass and turned it into a 23-yard touchdown
catch to make it 21-0 with 2:36 left in the rst
quarter.
I felt really good, Peacock said. I felt like
everyone on my team had my back. We had
guys like Max Parker making catches down
the eld to open up the defense all our
great receivers running deep routes really
opens it up for the run game, too. So I really
feel like it was a team effort.
Heneghan found Connor Stastny on an
eight-yard touchdown pass with 9:01 left in
the rst half to cap off a ve-play drive. And
then following a Monte Vista turnover on
downs, the Menlo offense ate up the last ve
minutes of the half with Peacock punching the
ball into the end zone from three yards out to
make it 35-0 and deate the Mustangs almost
completely.
Monte Vista gained 144 yards in the rst
half.
We knew they were dangerous and could
throw the ball down the eld, Newton said.
They have a couple good backs. Our guys
did a good job on defense dealing with the
rush lanes and the angles and were happy
with that.
Up comfortably, the Menlo defense did ease
up and allow a 13-play, 80-yard Mustang
drive to start the second half and make it 35-
7. But Jack Katzman and Jack Marren hooked
up on the rst play of the fourth quarter for an
18-yard touchdown pass and a 42-7 lead that
began the running clock with 11:43 left in the
game.
Monte Vista added another score late.
Heneghan nished 15 of 20 for 311 yards
and two touchdowns. Peacock added 31 yards
rushing in the second half to nish with 79 for
the game.
Menlo moves on to face No. 1 seed Seaside
next week.
ELSEWHERE IN CCS FOOTBALL
Eric Redwood rushed for a Serra single-
game record 288 yards in the No. 5 Padres
52-35 Open Division win over Palo Alto.
Redwood also broke the career rushing mark
in the rst quarter and added four touchdowns
(1, 43, 3 and 2 yards). The Padres outscored
the Vikings 24-7 in the second half to break a
28-28 tie. ... No. 8 Terra Nova fell to No. 1
seed Bellarmine 33-14 in Open Division play.
... In Division II, No. 5 Aragon upset No. 4
Leland 35-21. ... No. 6 South City saw its sea-
son end at the hands of No. 3 Wilcox, 38-14.
... In Division IV, Justin Ewing rushed for 169
yards to break the CCS record for most rush-
ing yards in a single season, but No. 8
Capuchino lost to No. 1 Seaside 56-21. The
new CCS rushing record stands at 2,918.
Continued from page 11
MENLO
SPORTS 15
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Sports Teams, Clinics, Camps, Classes & Training
Serving Peninsula Youth since 2002
PAYES CLUB BASKETBALL
Winners of
West Coast National Championships
Teams forming now for Winter Season
Beginners to Elite
Join Us!
Winter Programs
PENINSULA JUNIOR BASKETBALL
Boys & Girls K-HS grade
Team Basketball
Professional Coaches
November through February
PAYES WINTER AAU BASKETBALL
Boys & Girls 5th-8th grade
Advanced Level Competition
Tournament Play
November through February
Basketball Classes, Clinics & Private Lessons
www.payesplace.com
650-654-4444
595 Industrial Road, San Carlos 94070
(Mid-Peninsula at Hwy 101 & Holly Street)
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Warriors dominate paint
in win over Minnesota
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MINNEAPOLIS Mark
Jacksons Golden State Warriors have
started exing their muscles and pick-
ing up steam after being pushed
around in a loss to Denver last week-
end.
Rick Adelmans magnicent nine
Minnesota Timberwolves have nally
started to wear down after a spirited
start to the season and desperately
need the break they have coming up.
David Lee had 18 points and 13
rebounds and the Warriors dominated
inside during a 106-98 victory over the
Timberwolves on Friday night.
Carl Landry added 15 points and
seven boards and Stephen Curry had
17 points and six assists for the
Warriors (5-4), who outscored
Minnesota 58-22 in the paint.
After the Nuggets owned them
inside in a double-overtime win on
Saturday, the Warriors have responded
with two decisive performances in the
paint in wins over the Hawks and
Wolves.
We talked about it losing to Denver
a couple of games ago because they
outrebounded us and they dominated
us, Jackson said. So we made the
adjustments and fortunately the last
two games weve been doing a good
job of securing the basketball, closing
out defensive possessions.
Alexey Shved had 22 points and
seven assists and Derrick Williams had
23 points and seven rebounds for the
Timberwolves (5-4), who are starting
to succumb to the injuries that have
ravaged them early this season. Now
they have four much-needed days off
to try to recuperate.
Were running out of gas a little
bit, said Andrei Kirilenko, who had
18 points, six rebounds and four
blocks.
The Wolves have been playing with
just nine players for the last three
games. Nikola Pekovic (sprained left
ankle), J.J. Barea (sprained left foot)
and Brandon Roy (sore right knee) are
out for the short term. Kevin Love
(right hand) and Ricky Rubio (left
knee) arent expected to make their
season debuts until December and
Chase Budinger (left knee) is out for
three to four months.
Harrison Barnes had 18 points and
nine rebounds and the Warriors outre-
bounded Minnesota 50-34. Golden
State led 90-76 with eight minutes to
play, but the scrappy Wolves clawed
back in it, just as theyve done all sea-
son.
Shveds runner cut it to 92-89 with
four minutes to go, but the short-hand-
ed Wolves just didnt have enough in
the tank to nish it off.
Lee hit a short jumper and Charles
Jenkins and Barnes both scored on
easy drives to close it out. It was a nice
win for the Warriors to start a tough
three-game road trip that includes
games at Oklahoma City and Dallas.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 6 1 .857
Brooklyn 5 2 .714 1
Philadelphia 5 4 .556 2
Boston 5 4 .556 2
Toronto 2 6 .250 4 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 7 3 .700
Charlotte 4 3 .571 1 1/2
Atlanta 4 4 .500 2
Orlando 3 5 .375 3
Washington 0 7 .000 5 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 5 2 .714
Chicago 5 3 .625 1/2
Indiana 4 6 .400 2 1/2
Cleveland 2 6 .250 3 1/2
Detroit 1 9 .100 5 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 7 1 .875
San Antonio 7 2 .778 1/2
Dallas 5 5 .500 3
Houston 4 5 .444 3 1/2
New Orleans 3 4 .429 3 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 7 3 .700
Minnesota 5 4 .556 1 1/2
Denver 4 5 .444 2 1/2
Portland 4 5 .444 2 1/2
Utah 4 6 .400 3
PacicDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 6 2 .750
Golden State 5 4 .556 1 1/2
L.A. Lakers 4 5 .444 2 1/2
Phoenix 4 6 .400 3
Sacramento 2 7 .222 4 1/2
FridaysGames
Philadelphia 99, Utah 93
Indiana 103, Dallas 83
Orlando 110, Detroit 106
Golden State 106, Minnesota 98
Oklahoma City 110, New Orleans 95
Memphis 105, New York 95
Portland 119, Houston 117, OT
Atlanta 112, Sacramento 96
L.A. Lakers 114, Phoenix 102
SaturdaysGames
Toronto at Boston, 9:30 a.m.
Utah at Washington, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Memphis at Charlotte, 4:30 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.
Chicago at L.A. Clippers, 6 p.m.
Miami at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 6 3 0 .667 299 201
Buffalo 4 6 0 .400 230 299
Miami 4 6 0 .400 187 205
N.Y. Jets 3 6 0 .333 175 228
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 8 1 0 .889 250 143
Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 186 201
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 219 311
Jacksonville 1 8 0 .111 127 246
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 7 2 0 .778 254 196
Pittsburgh 5 3 0 .625 191 164
Cincinnati 4 5 0 .444 220 231
Cleveland 2 7 0 .222 169 211
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 6 3 0 .667 271 189
San Diego 4 5 0 .444 209 191
Oakland 3 6 0 .333 191 284
Kansas City 1 7 0 .125 133 240
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 267 216
Dallas 4 5 0 .444 188 204
Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 156 221
Washington 3 6 0 .333 226 248
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 8 1 0 .889 247 174
Tampa Bay 5 4 0 .556 260 209
New Orleans 4 5 0 .444 249 256
Carolina 2 7 0 .222 163 216
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 7 2 0 .778 242 133
Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 239 187
Minnesota 6 4 0 .600 238 221
Detroit 4 5 0 .444 216 222
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 6 2 1 .722 213 127
Seattle 6 4 0 .600 198 161
Arizona 4 5 0 .444 144 173
St. Louis 3 5 1 .389 161 210
Sunday, Nov. 18
Cleveland at Dallas, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 10 a.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 1:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 1:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 19
Chicago at San Francisco, 5:30 p.m.
NFL STANDINGS CCS PAIRINGS
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
FIRST ROUND
Division III
No. 6 Burlingame (5-5) at Valley Christian (4-6),
7 p.m
Division IV
No. 7 Pacific Grove (7-3) at No. 2 Sacred Heart
Prep (9-1), 1 p.m.
VOLLEYBALL
FINALS
At Independence High
Division I
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (26-7) vs. No. 4 Homstead
(23-8), 7 p.m.
Division IV
No. 2 Sacred Heart Prep (29-5) vs. No. 1 Harbor
(30-5), 4:30 p.m.
BOYS WATER POLO
FINALS
At Santa Clara Swim Center
Division I
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (14-12) vs.
No. 1 Bellarmine (17-11), 2:30 p.m.
Division II
No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (24-4) vs. No. 3 Los Altos
(18-11), 11:30 a.m.
GIRLS WATER POLO
FINALS
At Santa Clara Swim Center
Division II
No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (19-7) vs.
No. 2 St. Ignatius (11-14), 10 a.m.
NFL
NFL Fined referee Tony Corrente one game
check for uttering obscenities with his microphone
on during a Nov.4 game in Indianapolis.Fined Jack-
sonville DT Terrance Knighton $25,000; San
Francisco DL Ray McDonald and Minnesota LB
Jasper Brinkley $21,000; and Jacksonville S Dawan
Landry $10,000 for their actions during last weeks
games. Fined Jacksonville DT Terrance Knighton,
Kansas City LB Tamba Hali and New England LB
Brandon Spikes $25,000; Oakland LB Aaron Curry
$15,750 and $7,875; San Francisco DL Ray McDon-
ald, Minnesota LB Jasper Brinkley, Denver LB Von
Miller and Indianapolis DE Jerry Hughes $21,000;
Cincinnati LB Rey Maulaluga and Denver DT Kevin
Vickerson $15,750; Jacksonville S Dawan Landry,
Detroit WR Ryan Broyles, New England LB Jerod
Mayo and Miami G Richiee Incognito $10,000; and
Oakland LB Phillip Wheeler, Kansas City DE Justin
Houston and New England CB Alfonzo Dennard
$7,875 for their actions during last weeks games.
DENVER BRONCOS Released LB Mike Mo-
hamed from the practice squad. Signed S Duke
Ihenacho to the practice squad.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Active Independent & Senior Living
Day trips & 50+ activities every week
Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
Secured underground parking
Luxurious apartments with full kitchens
$
$
wasnt the proudest day in CSM football
history as the team watched from out-
side the chain linked fence as the squads
played to a 33-31 outcome.
And so, with the possibility of re-liv-
ing that moment, the Bulldogs played
like a team that had no intention of see-
ing its season end just yet, beating up on
Santa Rosa 54-30 in the NorCal confer-
ence closer last weekend.
They stepped up and they played
well, Tulloch said. Santa Rosa came
out very spirited. It was their bowl
game. They were kind of letting it all
hang out there, throwing a bunch of dif-
ferent things at us. Our guys fought
through it and really nished strong.
The Bulldogs set the tone from the
open when Sam Atoe turned an inter-
ception into a 61-yard touchdown. And
after Santa Rosa took the lead by con-
trolling the ball and the clock, the CSM
offense went to work, picking apart the
Santa Rosa defense with the run game.
We completely controlled the clock
and the game and took over, Tulloch
said. They couldnt stop Blake
[Plattsmier] and our rushing attack.
George Naufahu ran so hard, so physi-
cal. At some point, you can see them
wear down. So, it was good to see us
take control like that.
Plattsmier had his best game since
taking over the quarterback reins. He
minimized his mistakes throwing the
ball and rushed for 194 yards and four
touchdowns.
He did a great job. He read it really
well, Tulloch said. Every time he
touched it, he ran with more and more
condence. To see him, as a quarter-
back, you put a lot of pressure on your-
self and the last couple of weeks, hes
been really hard on himself with some
of the games and the nishes, and to see
him really take control and take the lead
was big.
Defensively, the Bulldogs bent but did
not break.
Theyre (Santa Rosa) always going
to get yards, Tulloch said. But, that
doesnt always translate into points. Our
main thing was, give them the short
stuff, were going to run to and were
going to make sure to keep them out of
the end zone.
And so, with their sixth win in hand,
the Bulldogs are set to play their seventh
Bulldog Bowl where theyll welcome
Sierra College, a team that nished 5-5
on the year.
Were excited about this one,
Tulloch said. I think this team has a lot
of character. A lot of young men have
been with us for two or three years. Its
a really special group of sophomores.
When you look at all these guys
theyre greyshirt kids. I was really
happy for them that we were able to get
into this bowl game. They deserve it.
They put so much work in over the last
couple of years. We want to make sure
we nish that thing strong.
Sierra, much like Santa Rosa, is a fan
of the pass. Theyve thrown for an aver-
age of 242 yards a game this season.
The throw the ball a lot, Tulloch
said. They have to two great receivers.
Theyre as good as advertised. Theyre
as good as any receiver tandem weve
seen this year. Were going to have our
hands full with them. They run the ball
at times very effectively.
Tulloch is talking about Vince Mayle
and Frankie Gomes, who combined for
102 catches and over 1,600 yards in
2012. Myles McKee pulls the trigger
from the quarterback position. He threw
27 touchdowns in the regular season, but
also 20 interceptions.
Defensively, Sierra features a monster
on the defensive line in Devante Bond
and his 17 sacks. Hes third on the team
in tackles with 74.
Kickoff for the 2012 Bothman
Bulldog Bowl is set for 1 p.m.
Continued from page 11
BOWL
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND The New Orleans Saints have
overcome an 0-4 start and the distractions from
the bounty scandal to ght their way right back
into position for a possible late-season playoff
run.
First they have to get their record back to .500.
All that stands between the high-powered
Saints and that modest goal is a struggling
Oakland Raiders team that has allowed 97
points the past two weeks and matched a fran-
chise-worst for points allowed in last weeks 55-
20 loss at Baltimore.
Man, if Baltimore can put up 55, you dont
even want to see what New Orleans can do,
Raiders defensive tackle Tommy Kelly said.
The Saints (4-5) have done quite a bit since the
0-4 start under a cloud from the bounty allega-
tions that led to a season-long suspension for
coach Sean Payton and other punishments that
have been a distraction all year. With four wins in
the past ve games, including a 31-27 victory last
week over previously unbeaten Atlanta, New
Orleans has worked its way back into contention.
But there is little margin for error. The sched-
ule gets much tougher after Sundays game in
Oakland (3-6) with the following three games
against division leaders, meaning the Saints can
ill-afford a slipup against the struggling Raiders.
When you dig yourself a hole like we have,
every game you play is going to be critical,
interim coach Joe Vitt said. Anything other than
our best effort and were going to have a long
Sunday.
The Saints have been close to their best in
recent weeks. After uncharacteristically throw-
ing ve interceptions the rst three games, Drew
Brees has completed 71 percent of his passes the
last two weeks with ve TDs and only one inter-
ception. The running game, energized by Chris
Ivory, has produced 288 yards on the ground the
past two weeks.
And even the porous defense has stepped up
of late, holding Philadelphia to 13 points two
weeks ago and coming up with the late goal-line
stand that sealed the win against the Falcons.
Theyre back in the groove, Raiders corner-
back Ron Bartell said. Theyre doing what they
normally do. ... Hes putting up huge numbers.
Theyre doing a better job of protecting him.
Hes getting the ball out of his hands. His
receivers are making plays. Basically the normal
New Orleans Saints offense.
Which is whats so scary for the Raiders.
The Raiders have been up-and-down defen-
sively this season, getting gashed on the ground
early in the season by Miami and then getting
overwhelmed by Peyton Manning and Denver
before a bye week.
Oakland then put together a fairly strong
three-week stretch, holding down Matt Ryan
and the Falcons to one offensive touchdown and
beating one-win Jacksonville and Kansas City in
back-to-back weeks.
But the last two weeks have been as bad as its
ever been defensively in Oakland. Tampa Bay
rookie Doug Martin ran for 251 yards in a 42-32
win two weeks ago. That was followed by the
drubbing in Baltimore when Joe Flacco picked
the Raiders apart for 341 yards and three touch-
downs as the Ravens matched the most points
ever allowed by the Raiders.
I know the team that were going to face is
not the team that gave up 55 points last week or
42 points against Tampa, Brees said.
Its a play here, its a play there, its a big play
here, a big play there that can typically affect the
outcome of a game. This defense has a lot of
very talented players on it. They have played
very, very well at times. I know that, for us,
were going to have to play our best game and
worry about our execution, and thats what
were focused on.
That Oakland is struggling so much on
defense comes as a bit of a surprise for the
Saints, who know Oakland rst-year coach
Dennis Allen so well. Allen spent ve years as a
defensive assistant in New Orleans, helping the
team win the Super Bowl following the 2009
season as defensive backs coach.
After spending one year as defensive coordi-
nator in Denver the 40-year-old Allen got his
rst head coaching gig this year in Oakland.
He deserves it, man, Saints safety Roman
Harper said. Hes a great coach. He under-
stands everything it takes to win and I know hell
get those guys going. Theyve had some ups and
downs but at the end of the day thats going to
happen, especially when youre a new coach
somewhere. Hes going to have them just ne
though.
High-powered Saints visit struggling Raiders
exhibition loss to Cal. He said he has worked a lot as the back-up
point guard, which at 6-6, could be a major mismatch for any
other point guard in the California Collegiate Athletic
Association. He also gotten time at the small forward spot and
will also see time at shooting guard as well as power forward.
Heck, even some time at center is not out of the question.
Im the second-tallest guy on the team, White said. We have
a good, competitive team. I just want to get out there and compete.
Individually, I dont have any individual goals, whatever I can
give to the team will be good. Its been a long time coming just
getting to this point, as far as working every day.
There are obvious differences (between playing Division I and
Division II). But basketball is basketball. Its a different situation,
but its a great situation for me, just the coaching staff giving me
the opportunity to play again.
Continued from page 13
WHITE
By Sangwon Yun
T
his past weekend, approxi-
mately 900 students partici-
pated in the Stanford Model
United Nations
Co n f e r e n c e .
Schools from as
near as the San
Mateo Union
High School
District to as far
away as Canada,
Boston and
Mexico were
represented amongst the 43 in atten-
dance. As a simulation of the United
Nations, the conference did justice
to the actual organizations diversity
and scale of operations. Yet, in tak-
ing this years proceedings with a
fourth-year participants grain of
salt, I was left questioning the
integrity of, not so much the confer-
ence, but the institution of Model
United Nations itself.
The basic premise of Model
United Nations is to emulate the
United Nations. Thus, participants
assume the role of a country and rep-
resent that countrys foreign policy
while debating a myriad of global
Learning where
to draw the line
for competition
Wilder Times
Play saves the
best act for last
SEE PAGE 19
Music from Venezuela
VNote Ensemble gives voice to
the hidden treasure of Venezue-
lan music by fusing Latin and folk
rhythms with adventurous jazz
explorations. Enjoy a one-hour
concert followed by Meet-the-
Artists reception.The concert
takes place 3 p.m. Saturday at the
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. No tickets
are required. Admission is rst-
come, rst-served. Free.
Fall regatta
Bair Island Aquatic Center Fall Re-
gatta kicks off at 8:30 a.m. Sunday
with an awards ceremony at 2:30
p.m.The regatta takes place at
1450 Maple St., Redwood City.
www.GoBair.org. Free.
Pet Photos with Santa
Families are welcome to bring
their furry friends for photos with
Santa. Sunday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. For more infor-
mation call 345-8222.
Best bets
See STUDENT, Page 18
Choices lift Call of
Duty: Black Ops II
By Ryan Pearson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Youve always had to play the good soldier in Call of
Duty games: The only path to the end was to follow
orders, from defending a key position to killing off certain
enemies.
The restricted approach meant that while the military
shooter franchise skyrocketed to massive popularity
through immersive graphics and innovative online multi-
player battles, its single-player campaigns got rightly knocked
as linear and forgettable.
By adding the element of choice, Call of Duty: Black Ops II
(Activision, for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U, PC, $59.99)
has revitalized the brand to become the best CoD since 2007s
Modern Warfare.
The game leaps back and forth from CIA and U.S. mili-
tary missions in the 1980s to an interna-
See COD, Page 18
Medal of Honor a missfire
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES The punishment of Navy SEALs who worked on the
video game Medal of Honor: Warghter is the latest in a series of misres
for the interactive mediums popular military shooter genre, which continues
to face scrutiny as high-denition graphics become more lifelike and
gamemakers attempt to create the most authentic experiences possible.
These games are now trying to portray things and tell stories
around current events, said Casey Lynch, editor-in-chief of the
gaming site IGN.com. When youre dealing with current
topics, theres a higher level of sensitivity. I think most peo-
ple would agree theres not the same level of sensitivity
when compared to old World War II or Vietnam War
games.
Navy ofcials said last week that seven mem-
bers of the secretive Navy SEAL Team 6,
including one involved in the mis-
sion to take down Osama bin
Laden, were reprimanded for
See MOH, Page 18
18
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
issues. To do so successfully demands a thor-
ough knowledge of the said country, the issue
at hand and debate. Thus, in accordance with
the Aragon clubs established culture of peda-
gogy, we attempt to teach delegates these
skills to better prepare them for conferences,
such as the one which took place at Stanford
University. Conferences ultimately serve as a
testing ground to apply fostered skill sets in
the hopes that students will improve through
practice.
And yet, in considering Model U.N., one
must also consider the matter of awards. For
at conferences like Stanford, each committee
recognizes a small fraction of participants.
Honorable Mentions. Outstanding
Delegate. And, of course, the coveted Best
Delegate.
As in any case, awards beget competition.
And I have no problem with competition: The
edge serves to inspire even the most sedate to
invest a little more of himself. Yet, I do have a
problem with awards when competition
begets unethical, manipulative behavior.
Consider the following. Saturday morning,
a fellow Aragon student in the 6th Legal
Committee approached me and proudly
reported that he had stayed up until 2 a.m.
nalizing preparations for that days debate.
After nishing the previous evenings session
at 10:30 p.m. and presumably returning home
no earlier than 11 p.m., he had jammed out
another three hours. He was exhausted, but
clutching a McCafe Frappe, he was ready to
go.
Later that evening, he emerged from the
nal session 15 minutes late. He was clearly
agitated. A few questions revealed that two
other individuals who had collaborated on the
same document had decided to omit the
names of its authors one by one, including this
student. Doing so would have placed them in
a more advantageous position to receive an
award. This student had effectively been a vic-
tim of intellectual property theft.
While whether the perpetrators were ulti-
mately not penalized or deemed ineligible for
any recognition remained ambiguous, whats
sad is the fact that such breaches in ethical
conduct are not the exception. Though they
are certainly not the norm, they have become
more commonplace, at least in my eyes. And
in the overwhelming majority of cases, the
impetus behind such behavior traces back to
the incentive of winning.
Thus, returning to the idea that Model U.N.
is a catalyst for improving public speaking
and debate. Recognizing that participants are
rst and foremost students and, in this case,
students of foreign policy, current events and
international relations. Appreciating that
Model U.N.s nominal creed is one of diplo-
macy and compromise.
Is Model United Nations a conference or a
competition?
In my experience, it can be one or the other,
but not consistently both. Instead of an award,
give all students a certicate of merit and eval-
uate each individual according to a set of cri-
teria. Allocate time for each student to meet
with the committees chair to discuss the mer-
its of his performance. And by and large, reaf-
rm MUN educational utility as an extra-
curricular, not as a medium to enable petty
politics and immoral behavior.
Sangwon Yun is a senior at Aragon High School.
Student News appears in the weekend edition. You
can email Student News at news@smdailyjour-
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
disclosing classied information to the cre-
ators of Warghter, a modern-day, rst-per-
son shooter from developer Danger Close
Games and publisher Electronic Arts Inc.
We worked really closely with more than
two dozen operators on the mission objec-
tives, operations, maneuvers and various ele-
ments in the game that helped shape our sin-
gle-player campaign, things like the weapon-
ry, the gear, the way these operatives perform
door breeches, said Luke Thai, producer at
Danger Close Games, ahead of the games
Oct. 23 debut.
Thai noted that both the gamemakers and
military personnel who consulted on
Warghter were cognizant about not detail-
ing too much about current conicts or
making them boring in virtual form. One of the
games missions tasks players with explosive-
ly battling a band of Somali pirates. Thai said
the real-world inspiration for that level was far
less ery.
In terms of the various conicts that are still
going on throughout the world, we touch upon
those, but we dont replicate them exactly, he
said. They serve as dotted-line inspiration for
things that go on in the game. For instance, our
overarching single-player campaign story
revolves around a global hunt to shut down a
ctional terror network.
Still, to ramp up the games realism,
Warghter creators mimicked real-world
weaponry and centered the plot on the ripped-
from-the-headlines threat of an industrial
explosive known as PETN, or pentaerythritol
tetranitrate, the same material used in 2001 by
convicted shoe bomber Richard Reid when he
tried to destroy a trans-Atlantic ight.
The tactic doesnt seem to have helped fuel
Warghter sales. The NPD Group, which
tracks sales of new physical products, said last
week that Warghter ranked eighth in over-
all game sales in October, behind such titles as
NBA 2K13 and Resident Evil 6. EA noted
in an earnings call last month that Warghter
had a weaker than expected performance.
(EA spokesman Peter Nguyen said last
Friday the company has no plans to recall or
alter Medal of Honor: Warghter in light of
the SEALs punishment.)
Continued from page 17
MOH
tional crisis in 2025. Your moral decisions and
successes or failures in both settings determine
your ending and whether some of the main
characters live long enough to see it.
The narrative is framed by conversations
between elderly Frank Woods and David
Mason, son of his former partner Alex Mason.
The younger Mason is out to stop supervillain
Raul Menendez, with missions in under-siege
Los Angeles, ooded Lahore, Pakistan, and
elsewhere. Woods recounts his own history with
Menendez in ashbacks to Nicaragua, Panama
and an exhilarating Afghanistan level where you
re RPGs on horseback.
The branching narrative is complemented by
two more wrinkles. Strike force missions add
in optional real-time strategy and can end in
success or failure, leading to different outcomes
in the endgame. And for the rst time in CoD,
players get to choose their weapons before each
mission, including unique perks inspired by the
series stellar multiplayer options.
What-ifs abound. What if I had disobeyed that
shoot command? What if I had started that
level with a sniper rie instead of a pistol? What
if Id let invaders blow up that base?
These are the types of questions that elevated
the lauded Mass Effect trilogy, one of many
sources of inspiration for Black Ops II cre-
ators. There are sticky frog gloves as seen in
the fourth Mission: Impossible lm, ying
wingsuits from the third Transformers and a
superrare element called celerium that remind-
ed me of the unobtanium in Avatar. Theres
even a feisty computer whiz named Chloe, a la
24.
So sure, not everything is fresh here.
Gameplay is still mostly of the run and shoot-
everything-that-moves variety. Articial barriers
keep you moving in the right direction despite
the illusion of open space. Your allies some-
times still wait for you to kill the last in a wave
of enemies, just because.
But after completing the campaign in around
seven hours at a review event, I spoke with a fel-
low reviewer and was deeply impressed by how
different our experiences had been. I had
spoiler alert saved the USS Barack Obama
aircraft carrier while shed seen it destroyed.
Likewise, our endings had almost no overlap:
Shed let certain characters die that I had spared
or rescued.
Continued from page 17
COD
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
THE
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
A community of caring Christians
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD
CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
THE SNOWY DAY IN SAN
FRANCISCO. The Snowy Day and
the Art of Ezra Jack Keats at the
Contemporary Jewish Museum is the
rst major exhibition in the United
States to pay tribute to this award-
winning author and illustrator,
whose beloved childrens books
include Whistle for Willie, Peters
Chair and The Snowy Day. The
Snowy Day, the Caldecott Medal-
winning tale of a little boys adven-
tures in the deep, deep snow, was
published in 1962, at the height of
the civil rights movement in
America. The rst modern full-color
picture book to feature an African-
American protagonist, The Snowy
Day went on to become an inspira-
tion for generations of readers, trans-
forming childrens literature forever.
The exhibition at the Contemporary
Jewish Museum features more than
80 original works by Keats, from
preliminary sketches and dummies
or preparatory books, to nal paint-
ings and collages, including exam-
ples of Keatss most introspective but
less-known output inspired by Asian
art and poetry.
The author and illustrator was
born Jacob Ezra Katz in Brooklyn in
1916. His parents were Eastern
European Jewish immigrants and
very poor. Primarily self-taught, he
drew upon memories of growing up
in East New York, one of the most
deprived neighborhoods in the city.
Yet his work transcends the personal
and reects the universal concerns of
children. Keatss experience of anti-
Semitism and poverty in his youth
gave him a lifelong sympathy for
others who suffered prejudice and
want. If, he once remarked, we all
could really see (see as perceive,
understand, discover) each other
exactly as the other is, this would be
a different world. A visit to Keatss
neighborhood is restorative: Peter
and his friends remind us of the sim-
ple joy of being alive. In his illustra-
tions Keats makes dilapidated urban
settings beautiful through his mas-
tery of collage as well as his dramat-
ic use of color. By the end of his life
in 1983, he had illustrated over 80
books, 22 of which he also authored.
To coincide with the exhibition,
Penguin Young Readers Group has
published The Snowy Day: 50th
Anniversary Special Edition, a spe-
cial edition featuring eight pages of
bonus material that include photo-
graphs of Keats and early sketches
for the book.
The Contemporary Jewish
Museum is located at 736 Mission
St. between Third and Fourth streets
in San Francisco. Open daily (except
Wednesday) from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. For
information call (415) 655-7800 or
visit www.thecjm.org. The Snowy
Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats
runs through Feb. 24, 2013.
***
CHRISTIAN MARCLAY,
CREATOR OF THE CLOCK,
BRINGS NEW WORK TO STAN-
FORD. Across a bank of four
screens, Maria Callas, Jimi Hendrix,
Marilyn Monroe and scores of other
musicians and actors make some
kind of sound, seemingly in response
to each othermuch like players in
a musical ensemble. This is Christian
Marclays Video Quartet, a 14-
minute DVD projection, on continu-
ous view at the Cantor Arts Center at
Stanford University.
Marclay, born in San Rafael,
California, is a 57-year-old Swiss-
American who has enthralled the art
community for years with his musi-
cal, sculptural and video collage
work. He has performed or recorded
with Sonic Youth, Kronos Quartet
and Merce Cunningham. His pieces
are in the permanent collections of
the San Francisco Museum of
Modern Art, the Museum of Modern
Art, the Whitney Museum of
American Art and the Centre
Pompidou. In 2011, he was recog-
nized as the best artist in the Venice
Biennale, winning the Golden Lion
for his 24-hour, real-time synchro-
nized video collage, The Clock.
Marclay created Video Quartet
on a home computer, using an off-
the-shelf editing/composing pro-
gram. He sampled more than 700
Hollywood, animated or other
lmsrst scrolling through thou-
sands to collect footage of people
singing, playing instruments, tap
dancing, knocking on doors or some-
how making noise. He then choreo-
graphed the snippets into an entirely
new, owing narrative. His govern-
ing impulse as an artist, he has said,
is to take what people nd familiar
and create a new experience.
Connie Wolf, the John & Jill
Freidenrich Director of the Cantor
Arts Center, said shes never seen
anything like Video Quartet. Its
absolutely mesmerizing. Youre
lulled into this enchanting world of
beautiful music and favorite lms
and remarkable pairings of actors
and musicians. You wont want to
leave.
The Cantor Arts Center is open
Wednesday Sunday, 11 a.m. 5
p.m., Thursday until 8 p.m. Free. The
Center is located on the Stanford
campus, off Palm Drive at Museum
Way. Parking is free after 4 p.m.
weekdays and all day on weekends.
723-4177 or museum.stanford.edu.
Christian Marclays Video Quartet
is on view through Feb. 10, 2013.
Susan Cohn can be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com or
www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE UM
EZRA JACK KEATS FOUNDATION
The Snowy Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats,at the Contemporary Jewish
Museum in San Francisco.
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Versatile acting and inventive
staging are the hallmarks of Aurora
Theatre Companys production of
Wilder Times, a collection of four
short plays by Thornton Wilder.
Aurora chose the plays and titled
the show as a tribute to one of the
nations greatest playwrights.
According to artistic director Tom
Ross, the title illustrates that the
concept of time and how we human
beings move through it are major
themes in Wilders work.
The show is divided into two acts,
starting with the rst two plays from
a series, Seven Ages of Man, that
Wilder never nished. These two,
Infancy and Childhood pre-
miered in 1962. The Happy
Journey to Trenton and Camden
and The Long Christmas Dinner,
which comprise the second half,
were written in 1931, but both are
considered Wilders best known
short works.
The cast features six actors
Heather Gordon, Soren Oliver,
Marcia Pizzo, Stacy Ross, Patrick
Russell and Brian Trybom. Focused
direction by Barbara Oliver,
Auroras co-founder and retired
artistic director, lends unity. Before
each act, for example, the actors
sing simple songs like Row, Row,
Row Your Boat as they move set
pieces into place. Eric Sinkkonens
mostly unadorned set, Maggi Yules
color-coordinated costumes and Jim
Caves lighting also unify the show.
In terms of writing, the rst half is
the weaker of the two. Infancy is
set in an urban park where a nanny
(Gordon) and mother (Ross) tend to
infants (Russell and Trybom) in
baby carriages. While the women
talk, the babies alternate between
napping and being frustrated that
they cant understand the adults.
Oliver (son of the director) adds
some comic moments as a cop. Only
good acting and directing keep the
show moving.
The next part, Childhood, is
more interesting. Ross and Trybom
portray parents trying to gure out
what their children do when theyre
not around. The children are played
by Pizzo as the eldest and leader,
Gordon as the middle child and
Russell as the youngest.
In The Happy Journey to Trenton
and Camden, a family is on it way
to visit the eldest daughter, who is
married. Again Pizzo plays that eld-
est daughter, and Gordon and
Russell are the other two kids. Ross
is the mother again, while Oliver is
the father. In a technique developed
more fully in Wilders Our Town,
Trybom is the stage manager.
By far the most satisfying and
intriguing work is the last, The
Long Christmas Dinner, which
depicts a family gathered for
Christmas dinner through several
generations. It starts with Oliver and
Pizzo as a newlywed couple joined
by her mother (Ross), who recalls
Christmases past. From there the
action smoothly segues to births and
deaths as family dynamics change
and one generation gives way to the
next. Its a touching depiction of the
importance of family and family rit-
uals.
Playing roles that vary in age and
personality, the actors are outstand-
ing. Except for the last act, however,
the show doesnt have the heft of
Wilders most successful plays,
Our Town and The Skin of Our
Teeth.
Wilder Times will continue at
the Aurora Theatre, 2081 Addison
St., Berkeley, though Dec. 9. For
tickets and information, call (510)
843-4822 or visit www.aurorathe-
atre.org.
Wilder Times saves
the best act for last
Caroline and Dodie (front from left,
Marcia Pizzo, Heather Gordon) star
in in Childhood, part of Aurora
Theatre Companys Wilder Times.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula
Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
|ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
|ocrease mob|||ty & ex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
Look 8etter
Fee| 8etter
|mprove Post0re
|mprove 8a|aoce
8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. $ao Nateo 0r|ve, $te 3 $ao Nateo 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
on site.
The kids now have the opportunity to make
it, not just taste it, said Sallaberry. They will
see entire process from picking to processing
to how the oil comes out.
Participants will get to experience the taste
of fresh-pressed uorescent green olive oil.
Its a taste unlike any youve ever had, he
said. Its alive. It explodes in your mouth.
Theres that wow factor.
Once the liquid gold is produced, Sacred
Hearts Executive Chef Michael Schley, who
has worked with renowned chefs Michael
Mina and Thomas Keller, will present some
dishes highlighting olive oil.
Dan Flynn, executive director of the UC
Davis Olive Center, is an expert on the quality
of local versus foreign olive oils. The Olive
Center works hard to support increasing pro-
duction of extra virgin olive oil in California
by providing research on the relative quality
of local and imported extra virgin olive oils.
Flynn will host a brief tasting of three to
four different olive oils and discuss their prop-
erties.
Dan will explain what it means when the
olive oil burns in the back of the throat, said
Sallaberry.
Sacred Heart holds a student contest for
designing the bottle label. The nished prod-
uct is sold at school fundraisers for $20 a bot-
tle and is a hit with the school community.
The rst year we made 100 bottles and
they sold out within 15 minutes, he said. Its
just a great holiday gift for somebody.
What strikes Sallaberry most about the har-
vest is the idea of producing your own food
right in the middle of Silicon Valley.
Its a pretty cool deal for a high school in
an urban area, he said.
Dr. Stewart Slafter, who teaches geography
and sustainability at Sacred Heart, is also
looking forward to taking part in a communal
agricultural event. He has found that his stu-
dents enjoy getting out of the classroom and
getting into the schools organic garden and
orchard.
They love it, said Slafter who has been
teaching at Sacred Heart for 13 years. Even
the ones that dont like dirt are willing to give
it a try.
Along with growing organic produce, agri-
culture students raise dairy goats, turkeys,
chickens, rabbits, ducks and pheasants, said
Slafter.
Sundays harvest yield from the 50
Picholine French olive trees is expected to be
between 2 and 4 tons.
Continued from page 1
OIL
one ofcial said called for a decit down-pay-
ment of unspecied size by years end, to be
followed by comprehensive tax reform and an
overhaul of Medicare and other benet pro-
grams in 2013.
Democrats indicated some spending cuts
would be ne with them. I feel condent that
a solution may be in sight, said House
Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of
California.
The goal of the high-pressure talks to come
is to produce a multitrillion-dollar decit-
reduction plan that can take the place of the
across-the-board tax increases and spending
cuts that are slated to take effect on Jan. 1.
In remarks while reporters were present,
Obama stressed that time was short as he wel-
comed the leaders to the White House for the
first time since winning re-election this
month. We have urgent business to do, he
said.
If nothing else, the mood seemed good
around the table in the Roosevelt Room of the
White House. Obama noted that it would soon
be Boehners birthday and said he wasnt
going to embarrass him with a cake because
we didnt know how many candles were need-
ed.
Yeah, right, said Boehner, whos turning
63 on Saturday, chuckling as he playfully
poked the president in the elbow.
There was no indication that the meeting
touched on Obamas campaign-long call to
raise tax rates at upper incomes.
In their public comments, neither the presi-
dent nor the lawmakers dwelt on long-stand-
ing differences that doomed previous decit
negotiations. Senate Republican leader Mitch
McConnell came closest, telling reporters that
while Republicans are willing to discuss
increased revenue, most members of his party
believe we are in the dilemma we are in not
because we tax too little but because we spend
too much.
After the meeting, White House Press
Secretary Jay Carney said, Both sides agreed
that while there may be differences in our pre-
ferred approaches, we will continue a con-
structive process to nd a solution and come
to a conclusion as soon as possible.
For all the expressions of optimism, it was
unclear whether the Nov. 6 elections and the
prospect of the so-called scal cliff would
serve as a strong enough catalyst for these
talks to succeed where other recent attempts
have failed.
Obama ran for a new term calling for a bal-
anced approach to deficit reduction that
includes raising taxes on income over
$200,000 a year for individuals and $250,000
for couples. And while the president has stat-
ed a willingness to pull federal savings out of
benefit programs including Medicare and
Medicaid, Democratic leaders have been
reluctant to go along.
Raising taxes has long been anathema to
Republicans, who say governments spending
must be cut to reduce deficits and taxes
reduced to stimulate job creation in an econo-
my where unemployment is 7.9 percent.
Boehner told reporters after Fridays meet-
ing that he had outlined a framework for nego-
tiations that is consistent with the presidents
call for a fair and balanced approach. He did
not provide details, except to say it deals with
reforming our tax code and reforming our
spending, a reference to benet programs
such as Medicare and Medicaid.
Continued from page 1
CLIFF
SATURDAY, NOV. 17
KQEDsDr.SeusssTheCat intheHat
character meet and greet. 8:30 a.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st Ave.,
San Mateo. There will be a meet and
greet, photos and more. Free. For more
information visit hillsdale.com.
Thanksgiving Fun Run. 9 a.m.,
Genentech, 1 DNA Way, South San
Francisco. Runners, walkers, families and
kids are invited to participate in the 39th
Annual Thanksgiving Fun Run along the
beautiful Bay trail. Rain or shine. $20,
youth 13-17 $5, 12 and under are free.
To register and for more information
call 829-3800.
The Progressive International
Motorcycle Show. 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
San Mateo County Event Center, 2495
S. Delaware St., San Mateo. $15 for
adults. $6 for children ages 6 to 11. To
purchase tickets or for more
information visit
www.motorcycleshows.com.
Education Update with
Assemblyman Rich Gordon and
Senator JoeSimitian. 10 a.m. to noon.
Palo Alto Unied School District, 25
Churchill Ave., Palo Alto.All are welcome
to this legislative Q&A to discuss the
current and future state of K-12
education in California. Free. For more
information call 691-2121.
St.PetersHolidayBazaar. 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. St. Peters Episcopal Church, 178
Clinton St. Redwood City. A yearly
fundraiser that will provide assistance
to community organizations.There will
be crafts, jewelry, bake sale and a
luncheon served at 11:30 a.m. or 12:45
p.m. Free. $15 for the luncheon. For
more information call 367-0777.
Holiday Craft Faire. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Twin Pines Senior and Community
Center. Twin Pines Lodge, Twin Pines
Cottage,Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. Look
for holiday gifts and decorations.
Refreshments and entertainment. Free
admission. For more information call
595-7441.
Royal Treasure from the Louvre:
DocentLecture.Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. The
docent lecture will review Royal
Treasures from the Louvre: Louis XIV to
Marie Antionette on exhibit at the
Legion of Honor. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
Bottle Your OwnWine. Noon to 4 p.m.
La Honda Winery, 2645 Fair Oaks Ave.,
Redwood City. Entry and tasting is free.
$5 for those who bring their own
bottles. $6 for those using La Honda
Winerys bottles. For more information
visit lahondawinery.com.
Open House/Adoption Event. Noon
to 6 p.m. Nine Lives Foundation, 3015
Rolison Road, Redwood City. The Nine
Lives Foundation is a nonprot, no kill
cat shelter in Redwood City. Coffee and
desserts provided. Free admission. For
more information visit
ninelivesfoundation.org.
The Society of Western Artists
Watercolor Demonstration by Kay
Carrie. 1 p.m. SWA Headquarters
Gallery, 2625 Broadway, Redwood City.
Free. For more information call 737-
6084.
Peninsula Youth Theatre: Disneys
Beauty and the Beast Jr. Two shows
at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. For more information
and to order tickets call 903-6000.
Pied Piper Players presents The
Wizard of Oz. 2 p.m. Bayside
Performing Arts Center, 2025 Kehoe
Ave., San Mateo. $16 for adults, $11 for
children and seniors. For more
information visit
http://baysidetheater.com.
Marty Brounstein, Author of Two
Among the Righteous Few: A Story
of CourageintheHolocaust.2:30 p.m.
St. Matthias Catholic Community
Church, 1685 Cordilleras Road,
Redwood City. Marty Brounstein will
discuss his book. Free. For more
information call 366-9544.
Family Concert: VNote Ensemble. 3
p.m. San Mateo Main Library, 55 W.Third
Ave., San Mateo. The Ensemble will
perform Latin and folk rhythms mixed
with North American jazz, traditional
Venezuelan songs and original musical
ideas. Free admission. For more
information call 522-7808.
Blue Blanket Improve Troupe
Auditions. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Half Moon
Bay. Blue Blanket has monthly
performances and is looking for new
players. Teens and older. Previous
experience preferred but not required.
To sign up for an audition or to request
location information email
BlueBlanketimprov@hotmail.com.
Rumba. 5 p.m.to 6 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G,
Foster City. International Rumba Class.
For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Burlingame High School Presents:
WyrdSisters.7 p.m. Burlingame High
School Theater, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $12 for general admission
and $10 for students, seniors and
children. For more information or to
reserve tickets call 558-2854.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
Presents The Dracula Kidds. 7 p.m.
Mustang Hall, Central Middle School,
828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. $12 in
advance and $14 at the door. For more
information and to order tickets visit
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Preview Night: How To Succeed In
BusinessWithout ReallyTrying. 7 p.m.
Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. The
show is rated PG. $15 for adults and $10
for students and seniors online. $17 for
adults and $10 for students and seniors
at the door. For more information visit
aragondrama.com.
Dragon Productions Presents:
March. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 535
Alma St., Palo Alto. $25 general, $20
seniors, $16 student.To purchase tickets
go to www.dragonproductions.net. For
more information call 493-2006.
Fall Chamber Concert. 8 p.m. First
Baptist Church, 305 N. California Ave.
Palo Alto. There will be a diverse
performance with pieces by Barber,
Mozart and Shostakovich. $20 general
admission. $17 seniors. $10 students.To
purchase tickets or for more
information visit www.paphil.org.
SUNDAY, NOV. 18
Bair Island Aquatic Center 21st
Annual Fall Regatta. 8:30 a.m. 1450
Maple St., Redwood City. Free. The rst
race will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the
awards ceremony will be at 2:30 p.m.
For more information visit
www.GoBair.org.
The Progressive International
Motorcycle Show. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
San Mateo County Event Center, 2495
S. Delaware St., San Mateo. $15 for
adults. $6 for children ages 6 to 11. To
purchase tickets or for more
information visit
www.motorcycleshows.com.
Holiday Craft Faire. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Twin Pines Senior and Community
Center. Twin Pines Lodge, Twin Pines
Cottage,Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. Look
for holiday gifts and decorations.
Refreshments and entertainment. Free
admission. For more information call
595-7441.
Open House/Adoption Event. Noon
to 4 p.m. Nine Lives Foundation, 3015
Rolison Road, Redwood City. The Nine
Lives Foundation is a nonprot, no kill
cat shelter in Redwood City. Free. For
more information visit
ninelivesfoundation.org.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
Presents The Dracula Kidds. 1 p.m.
Mustang Hall, Central Middle School,
828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. $12 in
advance and $14 at the door. For more
information and to order tickets visit
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Third Book Sale. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. San
Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
There will be a wide variety of gently
used books, CDs and DVDs. Admission
is free. Prices for items vary. For more
information call 591-0341 or visit
friendsofscl.org.
Holiday Concert. 1:30 p.m. Memorial
Church, Stanford University, 450 Serra
Mall, Stanford. $20 general admission.
For more information call 941-5291 or
visit peninsulasymphony.org.
Burlingame High School Presents:
WyrdSisters.2 p.m. Burlingame High
School Theater, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $12 for general admission
and $10 for students, seniors and
children. For more information or to
reserve tickets call 558-2854.
Pied Piper Players presents The
Wizard of Oz. 2 p.m. Bayside
Performing Arts Center, 2025 Kehoe
Ave., San Mateo. $16 for adults, $11 for
children and seniors. For more
information visit
http://baysidetheater.com.
Dragon Productions Presents:
March. 2 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 535
Alma St., Palo Alto. $25 general, $20
seniors, $16 student.To purchase tickets
visit www.dragonproductions.net. For
more information call 493-2006.
Preview Night: How To Succeed In
BusinessWithout ReallyTrying.2 p.m.
Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. The
show is rated PG. $15 for adults and $10
for students and seniors online. $17 for
adults and $10 for students and seniors
at the door. For more information visit
aragondrama.com.
Peninsula Youth Theatre: Disneys
Beauty and the Beast Jr. Two shows
at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. For more information
and to order tickets call 903-6000.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
MusicStudentRecitals.2 p.m.and 3:30
p.m. The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music, 2575 Flores St., San Mateo. Free.
The 2 p.m. recital will feature piano and
violin performances.The 3:30 p.m.recital
will feature piano, violin and guitar
performances.For more information call
574-4633.
A talk and workshop on How to
Speak American About Peace and
Justice. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Unitarian
Universalists of San Mateo, 300 E. Santa
Inez Ave., San Mateo. Free, but
contributions will be requested. For
more information and to register visit
http://www.uusanmateo.org/COST/RE
GISTRATION.
Bays Got Talent: First Round. 2 p.m.
Serramonte Center, 3 Serramonte Court,
Daly City. From popular songs to
stunning dance moves, this thrilling
competition will tap into local Bay Area
talent and award a $1,000 shopping
spree to the grand prize winner. For
more information contact
shelbi@spinpr.com.
Traditions: Spiritual and Mystical. 3
p.m.First Congregational Church of Palo
Alto, 1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto. The
Congregational Oratorio Society and
Orchestra, conducted by Gregory Wait
with Joe Guthrie on the organ, will
perform three concert pieces. $15 for
general admission, $10 for students and
seniors. For more information call 856-
6662 or visit fccpa.org.
GeorgeBrooksandSummit. 4:30 p.m.
Douglas Beach House, 307 Mirada Road,
Half Moon Bay. Doors open at 3 p.m.
Jazz music will be performed.There will
be a food and beverage buffet available
from 3 p.m. through intermission. $35
for adults. $30 for students. For more
information and for tickets visit
brownpapertickets.com/event/271587.
Pet Photos with Santa. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st Ave.,
San Mateo. Families are welcome to
bring their furry friend for photos with
Santa. For more information call 345-
8222.
Country Two Step. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. $15 at 5
p.m. for Beginning Country Two Step.
$15 at 6 p.m. for Intermediate Country
Two Step. $10 after 7 p.m. for Country
Two Step and West Coast Swing Dance
Party. For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2012
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Perhaps your greatest
asset is your ability to think win when its important
to do so. Even if you should suffer a temporary
setback, achieving ultimate victory is likely.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you sense you
are on to something meaningful, follow your instincts
to their conclusions. Youll fnd that your perceptions
are exceptionally astute.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Conditions are a bit
unusual in that you can learn much from teaching
others. Imparting what you know about an issue
gives you a greater understanding of the subject.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You can be a good
achiever, provided you dont broadcast your inten-
tions prior to fulflling them. Once you have done
what you wanted, youll fnd no need to brag.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- There will be plenty
of justifcation for hope and optimism regarding
a current project. Youll sense youre in a cycle of
achievement, and youll work to capitalize on it.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Watching how others
do certain jobs will give you a few good ideas for
improving some of your own methods. Dont be
surprised when co-workers, in turn, copy your
resourcefulness.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- By opening up and be-
ing frank while discussing issues that are important
to you, you invite listeners to offer some solid sug-
gestions that could make your life a lot easier.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Making a major change
that youve long thought about but never had the
courage to initiate will prove to be a good move.
Youll be sorry you waited so long.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You have a marvelous
faculty for turning all of your involvements with oth-
ers into congenial, fun affairs. People will fnd it hard
to be cranky with you around.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- This is an excellent day to
take care of some pending problems that youve
been unable to fnalize to your satisfaction. The same
obstacles that once impeded your progress can eas-
ily be overcome now.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Youll enjoy friends drop-
ping in, or gadding around doing a little hobnobbing
yourself. Being with people and going to different
places will soothe your restlessness.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Being somewhat en-
terprising could double your chances for proft. The
secret for doing so is to be motivated enough to get
out of your rut.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
11-17-12
fRIDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n

is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
.
2
0
1
2
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
1
1
-
1
7
-
1
2
ACROSS
1 Ford a river
5 Prospect for gold
8 Ladys honorifc
12 Nile goddess
13 Ill temper
14 Woodys kid
15 GNP or ERA
16 Cops vehicle (2 wds.)
18 Greenish-brown
20 Kind of system
21 Scurry along
22 Figures out
25 Exec
28 Memo abbr.
29 Right now!
33 Pass, as time
35 Internet message
36 Send a check
37 Dwell
38 Empower
39 Pants purchase
41 Stripling
42 Of earthquakes
45 Green parrot
48 -- chi chuan
49 Enthusiastic
53 Adobe house
56 Quick snack
57 Wide sts.
58 Above, to Tennyson
59 Hideous giant
60 Snug retreat
61 Droop-nosed fier of yore
62 Neck and neck
DOwN
1 Daydream
2 Movie pooch
3 Cameron -- of flms
4 Organic compound
5 Apple seed
6 Detain
7 Political stance
8 -- de mer
9 St. Louis landmark
10 Jai --
11 Additional
17 Beat the feld
19 Part of LCD
23 Had food
24 Snead and Spade
25 Griffn of game shows
26 Unbounded joy
27 Rear-ends
30 Put to sea
31 Verdi opus
32 Implored
34 Quarries
35 Like a wolfs howl
37 Crater edge
39 Baby grands
40 Stage whispers
43 Monsieurs summer
44 Henry -- Lodge
45 Mongol ruler
46 Overhang
47 Snake eyes
50 Leslie Caron musical
51 French I verb
52 Cattail, e.g.
54 Adherents suffx
55 Louvre display
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNAs
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimers or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSE MANAGER
Hillsborough
20 hours per week, $16 per
hour, perfect for a retired cou-
ple. Responsibility includes car-
ing for executive property duties
include housekeeping, schedul-
ing, oversight of contractors,
and supervising the upkeep of
the property. Must have excel-
lent communication skills, be
computer literate and have at-
tention for details. Background
check and references are re-
quired. Must live in the San Ma-
teo Burlingame area
To apply email your resume to
box5711@live.com
HOUSEKEEPING - RETIREMENT
COMMUNITY. Full time, understand,
write & speak English. Experience re-
quired, $10.hr + benefits. FILLED!
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROPERTY MANAGER -
Growing R E Company seeks an experi-
enced, licensed Property Manager to
manage portfolio of properties. Base
monthly, commission, plus opportunioty
for commission sales. Call Rob Morley,
Nest Property, 650-483-5568
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part-time + Seasonal
Start up to $13 Exp up to $20
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY
RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252919
The following person is doing business
as: Nowras Consulting, 124 Barneson
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ayman
Asfour, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Ayman Asfour /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/27/12, 11/03/12, 11/10/12, 11/17/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 517228
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Cynthia Flynn
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Cynthia Flynn filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Cynthia Flynn, aka Cyn-
thia Macay
Proposed name: Cynthia Macay
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
13, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/19/2012
/s/ Joseph C. Scott/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/19/2012
(Published, 10/27/12, 11/03/12,
11/10/12, 11/17/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252995
The following person is doing business
as: Riverseine Productions, 534 Shore-
bird Circle, #17203, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94065 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Steven L. Pariseau, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Steven L. Pariseau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/03/12, 11/10/12, 11/17/12, 11/24/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252688
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Flocchini Wines, 2) Flocchini
Winery, 3) Flocchini Wine, 1001 Wash-
ington St., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Flo Enterprise, LLC. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
03/17/2011
/s/ Drea Helfer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/27/12, 11/03/12, 11/10/12, 11/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252955
The following person is doing business
as: Izanami Japanese Cuisine, 257
Grand Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Drapillar Corp., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Minh Qnang Le /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/03/12, 11/10/12, 11/17/12, 11/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253024
The following person is doing business
as: Memory Seen Center, 1900 S. Nor-
folk St., Ste. 350, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Patricia Marie Bruketta,
16129 Carolyn St., San Leandero, CA
94578. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Patricia Bruketta /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/10/12, 11/17/12, 11/24/12, 12/01/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253216
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Courier Express, 217 Hi-
gate Dr., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Joel Babanto. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Joel Babanto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/17/12, 11/24/12, 12/01/12, 12/08/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253053
The following person is doing business
as: Nor Cal Crossfit Redwood City, 3151
Edison Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Khalipa INC., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 11/05/2012.
/s/ Jason Khalipa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/17/12, 11/24/12, 12/01/12, 12/08/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253146
The following person is doing business
as: The Werx, 819 Oak Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Diego Per-
ez, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 11/07/2012.
/s/ Diego Perez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/17/12, 11/24/12, 12/01/12, 12/08/12).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Edward Darvell Burns
Case Number 122606
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Edward Darvell Burns.
A Petition for Probate has been filed by
Raymona Fisher-Burns in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that
Raymona Fisher-Burns be appointed as
personal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: November 20, 2012
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
23 Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alexandra Gadzo, #209127
Gadzo Law, P.C.
2600 El Camino Real, Suite #412
Palo Alto, CA 94306
(650)321-3050
Dated: 08/07/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 3, 10, 17, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CV 508579
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Caitlin Marie Roake, Timo-
thy Roake and DOES 1 TO 10
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): Gail Ryan
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
203 Public Notices
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo,
400 County Center Rd.,
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Susan Goldbeck, Attorney at Law
542 Lighthouse St.,
PACIFIC GROVE, CA 93950
(831)372-2615
Date: (Fecha) Dec. 09, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 17, 24, December1, 8, 2012.
203 Public Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE
OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE
COUNTY OF MONTEREY
CITATION FOR FREEDOM FROM
PARENTAL CUSTODY AND CON-
TROL OF PRESUMED FATHER
JONATHAN SIEDMAN
(Family Code 7666, 7882)
Case No.: A-4949
Petitioners: Benjamin and Jessie
Kreeger
In the Adoption of:
BABY GIRL KREEGER, a Minor.
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF
CALIFORNIA, to respondent JONA-
THAN SIEDMAN of San Mateo, Cali-
fornia:
Greetings:
YOU ARE HEREBY advised that you
are required to appear in the Superior
Court of the State of California, for the
County of Monterey, at the Court
Room of Department thereof, located
at 1200 Aguajito Road, Monterey, CA
93940, (831)647-5800, Monterey,
California, County of Monterey, State
of California, on December 19, 2012
at 8:30 a.m. of that day, then and
there to show cause, if any, why MI-
NOR ESTHER ROSE KREEGER (MI-
NOR) should not be declared free
from parental custody and control for
the purpose of placement for adoption
as prayed for in the petition on file
herein.
You are advised that if Petitioners and
MINOR are present at the time and
place above stated, the Judge will
read the petition and if requested may
explain the effect of the granting of
the petition and if requested, the
Judge shall explain any term or alle-
gation contained therein and the na-
ture of the proceeding , its procedures
and possible consequences and may
continue the matter for not more than
thirty (30) days for the appointment of
counsel or to give counsel time to pre-
pare.
The court may appoint counsel to rep-
resent MINOR whether or not MINOR
is able to afford counsel. If any parent
appears and is unable to afford coun-
sel, the court shall appoint counsel to
represent each parent who appears
unless such representation is know-
ingly and intelligently waived.
If you wish to seek the advice of an
attorney in this matter, you should
do so promptly so that your plead-
ing, if any, may be filed on time.
DATED: OCT. 26, 2012
Clerk of the Superior Court
SIgned by: J. Cedillo
Attorney for Petitioners:
David C. Laredo, CSBN 66532
Heidi A. Quinn, CSBN 180880
Alex J. Lorca, CSBN 266444
DeLAY & LAREDO
606 Forest Avenue
Pacific Grove, CA 93950
(831)646-1502
Published in the San Mateo Daily
Journal on November 3, 10, 17, 24,
2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
210 Lost & Found
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. SOLD!
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1 BAG of Hot Wheels and Matchbox
Cars, from the 70s, Appx 40, SOLD!
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, playgoer August pro-
gram, featuring Gloria Stuart, George
Sanders, Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20.,
San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE - Special Issue,
Off to the Moon, featuring Armstrong,
Aldrin, and Collins, and a special article
by Charles Lindburgh, $25., San Mateo,
(650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., SOLD!
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
LIONEL TRAIN Wall Clock with working
train $45 (650)589-8348
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
2 MODEL ships in box $30
(650)589-8348
PLASTIC ARMY MAN SET - from the
70s, set inludes tanks, soldiers, vehicles,
landscape, $75.obo, (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. SOLD!
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
303 Electronics
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (650)213-8713
304 Furniture
1940S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET, TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W $55
Call (650)342-7933
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH & LOVE SEAT- Floral Design.
Great Condition, $350.00, SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LARGE DESK, with 3 drawers, 1 in
center. Oak color, $150 obo,
(650)348-5169
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
24
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 My Dinner With
Andre co-star
Wallace __
6 Offensively blunt
14 Early Web
browser
16 Cadillac Ranch
site
17 Words of relief
19 Sanguine
20 Royal Scots for
more than three
centuries
21 Salon job
22 Not kosher
24 First name in
photography
25 Fit solidly
26 Mt. Carmel setting
28 Needle point?:
Abbr.
30 Food stamps,
e.g.
39 Contributing
factor in ozone
depletion
40 Without nostalgia
41 Chumleys title
friend in a 60s
cartoon series
42 1989 Jay
Presson Allen
monodrama
43 Bit of a laugh
44 Half of a
downpour?
47 Peg Woffington
author
51 Way up
55 Hop-__-thumb
56 Ulterior motives
58 Galley propeller
59 Leader elected in
2005
62 Catholic
recitation
63 Target of a
Pasteur/Roux
vaccine
harvested from
rabbits
64 Sycophant
65 Stripes
DOWN
1 Sharp
2 Big hit
3 Its not for
everyone
4 Comedian
5 Rocks Lofgren
6 Exit lines
7 Lelisir d__:
Donizetti
opera
8 Daydreams
9 Nevado __
Cruces: Andes
section
10 Pack item?
11 Stevens wife on
Family Ties
12 Tart fruit
13 Gray area?
15 Solution for lens
transparency
problems
18 Grayish brown
23 Furnishings
25 Cleavers
27 Commercial
fishing boat
29 Body of art?
30 Deer tail
31 Writing style
32 Professional gp.
33 Indian titles
34 Corresponding
35 French noodle
product?
36 Historic Egyptian
lifeline
37 How vichyssoise
is usually served
38 Greek war
goddess
44 Patient
responsibility
45 Dont make __!
46 Not at all laid-back
48 Selection word
49 Now seems it
far, and now __:
Scott
50 CD letters
52 Deadly agent
53 Hung over?
54 Schoolmarmish
type
56 Quatrain rhyme
scheme
57 Labor pain?
60 Common
pair?
61 Well let you
know letters
By Martin Ashwood-Smith
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
11/17/12
11/17/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
BUFFET SERVER, stainless, cook &
serve same dish, $20 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
306 Housewares
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, Italian, in original box, clear
color, $12., (650)578-9208
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size bed pillow. Allergy-free ticking.
Gently cushions pain, stiffness. Almost
new. $20.00 (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., SOLD!
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , elegant, durable. $25.,
(650)578-9208
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw, SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1 BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, SOLD!
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
310 Misc. For Sale
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK unopened,
hard cover, Every Days a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
310 Misc. For Sale
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case $75 OBO,
(650)345-7352
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
perfect condition ideal gift, SOLD!
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SMALL SIZE Kennel good for small size
dog or cat 23" long 14" wide and 141/2"
high $25 FIRM (650)871-7200
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEAMER TRUNK $65 OBO (650)345-
7352
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TOILET - very good condition, white,
SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, SOLD!
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
310 Misc. For Sale
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
SOLD!
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DESIGNER SHOES, Size 9 1/2 & 10,
many styles and colors, (650)580-3316
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MENS FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened package, XL, High Sierra, long
sleeves and legs, dark green plaid, great
gift, $12., (650)578-9208
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
25 Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13- 3/8 x 1 3/8, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
CALLAWAY GOLF Clubs Hawkeye
Irons, Graphite Shafts, # 4 thru P/W
Excellent Condition $79 SOLD!
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole , SOLD!
TREADMILL - Proform XB 550S, local
pickup, $100., SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, SOLD!
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS SALE!
Fri, Nov 23, 10 AM - 4 PM
Sat, Nov 24, 10 AM - 4 PM
Pro Dance Flooring
Large Wall Mirrors,
Sound & Lighting System,
Benches, Pub Tables,
Stools, Display Counters,
Large Metal Shelves,
Refrigerator & Microwave,
Kitchen & Janitorial
Supplies, Folding Tables &
CD players,
Office Equipment & Supplies
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!
Boogie Woogie Ballroom
551 Foster City Blvd, Ste. G
Foster City, CA 94404
650-627-4854
Find the IHOP,
Then Look Right
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money,
make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., SOLD!
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2000 CHEVY camaro standard transmis-
sion $2000 call dave at (650)344-9462
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
650 RVs
CHEVROLET RV 91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
Cleaning
Roses
HOUSE CLEANING
Affordable
Move In & Move Out
Discount
First Time Cleaning
Commercial & Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 847-1990
www.roseshousecleaning.com
BBB Lic. & Bonded
Ask about
our Holiday
Special
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Construction
26
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Construction
Decks & Fences
NORTH FENCE
& DECK CO.
Lic #733213
Specializing in:
Redwood Fences
Decks
Retaining Walls
650-756 0694
W W W .
N O R T H F E N C E C O
. C O M
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
LOPEZ HANDYMAN
Bath & Kitchen
Remodels
Specializing in granite,
tile & flooring.
(650)219-4050
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Hauling
Landscaping
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JM PAINTING &
PLUMBING
New Construction,
Remodel & Repair
(415)350-1908
Lic.# C36C33
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
27 Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
ERRANDS WITH
CARE
Housecleaning,
Cooking,
Appointments, Errands
Call anytime
(650) 271-2505
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
MANUFACTURED
HOME COMMUNITY
For Ages 55+
Canada Cove,
Half Moon Bay
(650) 726-5503
www.theaccenthome.com
Walk to the Beach
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Weekend Nov. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll808M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 11/30/12
WEBUY
$0
OFF ANY
$0
OFF ANY