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American Association for State and Local History

A A S L H A N N UA L M E E T IN

Salt Lake City


O C T O B E R 3 6 , 2 0 12

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Includes updates noted throughout and additions (last page).

Exploring Vibrant Connections Between People and Place

CROSSROADS:

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crystal clear mountain lake, an Ame rican Indian cliff dwelling, a railw ay crossroad, a farmstead, your home. Each evokes an emotional response; each stirs the human spirit; and each reminds us that history is, at its core, about the powerful connections between people and place. The 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Associati on for State and Local History will consider the som etimes empowering, sometimes chal always special connection between lenging, but people and place. Guided by the them e, Crossroads: Exploring the Vibrant Connections Between People and Place, AASLH will focu s on the personal, communal, and organizational journeys that lead to vibrancy, authenticity, health, and happiness, and how these journeys allow us to achieve meaning ful and impactful social change. Located at a physical and intellect ual crossroads of access and idea s, Salt Lake City provides the perfect setting for this dialogue. In Utah, one cant escape the beauty, majesty, and overwhelming presence of place. Digging deeper, one recognizes that life in Salt Lake City is entwined with mountains, meadows, rivers, dese rts, and yes, snow. But when one digs deeper, the journey becomes even more revealing. First, Utah deri ves its name from the Ute Tribe and presently Utah is home to ve distinct American Indian cult ures. Additionally, when the rst Mor mons arrived in 1847 they announced, This is the place, and settled in the Salt Lake region. The many interpretations of our them e are richly demonstrated by the varie ty of venues visited in the area. Utahs natural and American Indian history is on view at the new Natural History Museum of Utah and at Red Butte Gardens. Utah s Mormon history is glimpsed at historic Temple Square, the LDS Church History Museum, and Brigham Youngs Beehive and Lion houses. One can sense the early conict between Mormon sett lers and federal authority at the Fort Douglas Military Museum. The magnicent historic mansion s and the Masonic Temple introduc e us to early mining barons, and a visit to the Park City Museum prov ides insight on the continuing stor y of mining in Utah. Perhaps the most powerful and evocative pres ence in Utah, beyond the mountai ns and regardless of ones personal story, is family. Who does nt want to know more about their family history? A compelling focus on family, volunteerism, civic pride, cross-generational relationship s, and genealogy is omnipresent in Utah. The 2012 AASLH Annual Meeting will include enriching educational sessions, pleasurable evening even ts, and exciting tours packed with opportunities to learn, network, and enjoy. The Annual Meeting also provides the opportunity to be insp ired and energized by our keynote speaker, Pat Croce. Listen to plen ary speaker Laurel Thatcher Ulrich who will talk about her recent study of nineteenth-century Mormon diaries, a project that returns her to her wes tern roots. Make plans to attend the awards banquet to hear Utah hist orian and writer Will Bagley, and honor the best in the eld of state and loca l history. We look forward to seeing you in Salt Lake City at the Crossroads: Exploring Vibrant Connections Betw een People and Place. Sincerely, Scott M. Stroh, III Program Chair Milwaukee County Historical Society

IN S A LT L A K E C IT Y !

JO IN AA SL H AN D YO UR CO LL EA GU ES

Cover and Page 1 Bacgrounds: SLCVB/Adam

Robert Voyles Host Committee Co-Chair Utah Museums Association

ake your reservations now to join us in Salt Lake City for an exciting week of networking, tours, events, and professional development that will energize you, expand your knowledge, help you make connections between the present and the past, and allow you to discover resources for the work you do in the eld of state and local history.

Barker; Program Design: Go Design, LLC

BINGHAM CANYON

WHY ATTEND?
Choose from more than 70 sessions that will show you the latest in developing, delivering, and connecting to history. Find colleagues who share your specic and unique challenges by participating in an AASLH Afnity Group event. Learn how journeyspersonal, professional, and historiccan lead to vibrancy, authenticity, health, and happiness, and how these journeys allow us to achieve meaningful and impactful social change. Explore the newest products and services that directly improve the way history professionals operate by visiting the AASLH Exhibit Hall. Have fun and explore the history of Salt Lake City and the American West through evening events and engaging tours.

ABOUT SALT LAKE CITY


Combining the amenities of a major metropolitan area with the friendliness of a small, western city, Salt Lake City is an ideal location for AASLHs 2012 Annual Meeting. A beautiful, safe, and vibrant city, Salt Lake combines unparalleled access to natural recreation, a bustling economy, dynamic nightlife, remarkable history, and warm hospitality.

WHO ATTENDS?
The AASLH Annual Meeting provides the following new and experienced history professionals with the networking and resources they need to succeed and become leaders in the eld: Archivists CEOs Curators Directors Educators Librarians Museum Administrators Preservationists Registrars Students and More

PRE -ME ETI NG WO RKS HO PS


12 Wednesday, October 3 __ ________________________________

3 Featured Speakers 5 Annual Meeting Highlights 6 ce Schedule at a Glan 8 City Tours Salt Lake 11 ts Evening Even______________________ ____________

CONTENTS

SES SIO NS AND PRO GRA M

14 Thursday, October 4 18 y, October 5 Frida 22 Saturday, October 6 __ ________________________________ 25 Hotel and Travel 27 Registration Information

TURED SPEAKERS FEA


Friday, October 5
2:303:45 pm

Thursday, October 4

10:45 am12 pm

Friday, October 5

6:309:30 pm

PLENARY

LAUR EL TH AT CH ER UL RIC H

W IL L BAGLEY
BANQUET SPEAKER

PAT CR OC E
KEYNOTE

Pat Croce and Company; Stephanie

Service; Laura Bayer Mitchell, Harvard University News

graced the cover of Success magazine as the rst person to ascend from the training room to the boardroom of a professional sports team. His remarkable success as a physical therapist and pioneer in the sports medicine eld to the colorful leader responsible for the resurrection of the Philadelphia 76ers as an NBA championship contender has been dened as one of the most amazing stories in sports history. He also has a deep interest in the eld of history, especially pirate history. Croce is the founder of the world-renowned St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum. He is Chairman of Pat Croce & Company and a nationally known motivational speaker.

PAT CROCE , our keynote speaker,

Steve Greewood

address in Salt Lake City. She grew up in the Rocky Mountain west, but has spent most of her adult life in New England. She is the author of many articles and books on early American history, including A Midwifes Tale, which won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1991 and became the subject of a PBS documentary and an awardwinning website, dohistory.org. She has frequently consulted for museums and historical societies and during the last ten years has written and taught courses on the use of ordinary objects as sources for history. Her 2001 book, The Age of Homespun, is organized around fourteen domestic items, including a linen tablecloth, two Indian baskets, and an unnished stocking. Her recent work includes Well-behaved Women Seldom Make History (Knopf 2007) and Tangible Things, a 2011 exhibit of artworks and artifacts from Harvards many collections. She is now completing a study of nineteenthcentury Mormon diaries, a project that returns her to her western roots and provides the material for her plenary address. Professor Ulrich is past President of the American Historical Association and is currently 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard University.

LAUREL THATCHER ULRICH will deliver the plenary

Awards Banquet Speaker WILL

BAGLEY has written and edited

more than twenty books on overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, the creation of digital search engines, and the Mormons. Born in Utah, he attended Brigham Young University and was a Presidents Scholar at the University of California at Santa Cruz, where he studied writing. Between 2000 and 2004, the Sunday Salt Lake Tribune published more than 200 of his columns and articles. His work has received awards from many organizations including Western Writers of America, Western History Association, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum and he received the Merrill J. Mattes Award for Excellence in Writing. Mr. Bagley was a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University. He has appeared in more than two-dozen documentary lms, notably Helen Whitneys The Mormons on PBSs The American Experience. He lives and works in Salt Lake City.

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Exploring Vibrant Connections Between People and Place

CROSSROADS:

CONNECTING TO COLLECTIONS

epresentatives of the Institute of Museum and Library Services Connecting to Collections Statewide Planning and Implementation Grants are invited to the Continuing Conversation Exchange at the 2012 AASLH annual meeting. Following the informative and inspirational convening in 2011, this years gathering will feature a full-day preconference and two sessions scheduled during the Concurrent Sessions. Participants will learn about a range of successful statewide initiatives being implemented across the country and will have an opportunity to share results of their project during a lunchtime poster session. The preconference day will be capped off with a tour of the Church History Library and Archives, which in 2009, opened a new building with state-of-the-art archival facilities for its collection. The Continuing Conversation Exchange is a project of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission, in partnership with the American Association for State and Local History, Heritage Preservation, and state partners and is made possible through funding from IMLS Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians Program.
COST: BY INVITATION ONLY

CONTINUING CONVERSATIONS EXCHANGE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3
8:30 am 9:3010:45 am 11 am 12:30 pm 12:301:45 pm 1:45 2:45 pm 3:305 pm 5:158 pm Convene Building Regional Networks Taking Disaster Planning to the Next Level Lunch with Poster Session Group Discussion on C2C Statewide Project Sustainability Private tour of Church History Library and Archives Dinner at Alta Club with Keynote Speaker

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
8:309:45 am C2C Statewide Planning Tools You Can Use: The Sequel

Registration: http://tinyurl.com/6prrd3y Questions: Contact Kristen Laise at klaise@heritagepreservation.org or Terry Jackson at Jackson@aaslh.org More information: https://sites.google.com/site/c2cexchanges

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
8:309:45 am Boots on the Ground: C2C Outreach Projects

Coope r s t own G R A DUAT E


P ROG R A M

T HE

photos: richard walker

training museum leaders since 1964 | www.oneonta.edu/academics/cgp

HIGHLIGHTS
SHARING YOUR
UTAH CA PI TO L
Corporate History Museums and Archives Court and Legal History
Sean Buckley

AAS LH ANN UAL MEE TIN

Salt Lake City

Exploring Vibrant Connections Between People and Place

CROSSROADS:

IDEAS AND OPPORTUNITIES

The Annual Meeting includes activities and networking especially for the eld of state and local history! In addition to sponsored sessions throughout the meeting, youre invited to attend the following AASLH Afnity Group events to discuss the latest issues, share ideas, and to be inspired: Tour on Wednesday and Lunch on Thursday Lunch on Friday Breakfast Roundtable and Educators Showcase on Thursday Breakfast on Friday Breakfast and Tour on Saturday Luncheon and Small Museums Day on Thursday Breakfast on Friday

Educators and Interpreters Historic House Museums

BE EH IV E HO US E

Military History Small Museums Visitors Voices

CANT TRAVEL TO SALT LAKE CITY?


Gary L. Boatwright, Jr.

TRY AASLHS ONLINE CONFERENCE


o money in the budget for travel? Cant come to Salt Lake City but still want to attend? Need a way to provide low cost training for employees? Sign up now to hear six of the best sessions from the AASLH Annual Meeting by participating in the AASLH Online Conference. AASLH will broadcast six of the best sessions presented in Salt Lake City so you can participate, ask questions, and make comments from your desk or your kitchen table. With the Online Conference, you can provide training for all your employees and volunteers and hear what experts from the eld are talking about, all for one low price. AASLH will air three sessions per day during the conference on Thursday and Friday, October 45. Read blogs from the presenters and other history professionals before the conference. Participants will also have access to the session handouts. The recordings will be available to the online participants for reviewing for six months after the broadcast through LearningTimes. See the session schedule and register for the online conference at www.aaslh. org/online2012. You will receive instructions by email about how to log on to the LearningTimes site and information about technical issues and requirements. If you have any questions, please email Terry Jackson at jackson@aaslh.org. 2012 ANNUAL MEETING BLOG EXPLORE NEW PRODUCTS AND SERVICES IN THE EXHIBIT HALL

OLYM PI C CAUL DR ON PA RK

Eric Schramm

et excited about the conference by visiting the 2012 Annual Meeting Blog. Prepare for the conference with posts on the theme of crossroads, place, and connections. Also, keep up with what is going on throughout the conference as attendees provide a man/woman on the ground perspective of conference sessions and events. www.aaslh.org/am2012

n Thursday, October 4 and Friday, October 5, dont miss your chance to visit the AASLH Career Kiosk and meet more than sixty vendors and suppliers at this years annual meeting. The Exhibit Hall is your place to network, check out the latest technology and services being offered, and WIN lots of great prizes!

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C H E D U L E AT A G L A N C E S
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
REGISTRATION
Tour: History and Faith: Historic Temple Square, Cost: $15 Breakfast: Educators and Interpreters Breakfast and Roundtable, Cost: $30 7 am6 pm 78 am 8:30 9:45 am 8:30 9:45 am

35 pm

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2
Registration

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Bad Board, Bad Boards, Whatcha Gonna Do: Strategies for Fixing Poorly Functioning Museum Boards Connecting to Collections: Tools You Can UseThe Sequel! The Importance of a Digital Strategy New Crossroads at the Intersection of Public and Private Passing the Torch of Leadership to a Younger Generation Save Time with Effective Meetings Small Museums, Big Impact! Thinking About Grad School? What, Where, and How? Twilight at Conner Prairie: The Creation, Betrayal, and Rescue of a Museum When History Hits the Road: Mobile Museums Tour: South Temple: Utahs Millionaire Row, Cost: $30 Morning Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall Reception: First Time Attendees, Cost: Free; Preregistration Required

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3
7 am6 pm 8 am5 pm

REGISTRATION
Tour: Park City, Cost: $75 Tour: Rails2Rockets: Utahs Transportation Crossroads, Cost: $75

Connecting Visitors to Your Site through Inspired Front-Line Staff, Cost: $45 Moved to 1:30 - 5:00 pm StEPs Curriculum Train-the-Trainer, Cost: Free; Preregistration Required Emergency Preparedness/Crisis Planning, Cost: $45 8:30 am 5 pm

8:30 am 12:30 pm

WORKSHOPS

8:30 am 12:30 pm 9:45 10:45 am 10:45 am12 pm 12 1:15 pm 122:45 pm 1:306:30 pm 1:30 2:45 pm

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: PAT CROCE


Corporate History Luncheon, Cost: $35 Small Museums Luncheon, Cost: $35 Directors Luncheon and Session, Cost: $40 Tour: Three Billion Years of History on One Island, Cost: $30

WORKSHOPS
Best Practices for Slavery Interpretation, Cost: $75 Interpretive Exhibits: Telling Our Stories on a Shoestring, Cost: $75 New Roles for Small Museums: Engaging Community and Moving Toward Relevance, Cost: $75 The Rembrandt Rule Workshop, Cost: $75 By Invitation Only: CEO Forum, Cost: $150/$220 for two from same organization Tour: Corporate History Tour, Cost: $30

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
AASLH, Your Guide Along the Career Path, Part I Beyond History: Expanding Your Education Offerings Empowering Small Museums on Main Street, USA FSA Tips: Improving Your Online Presence History in 4D: Sharing Content on Historypin Making Room for SHA Opportunities and Resources from IMLS Reproductions: How, When, and Where to Use Them What Do History Museums Really Need to Know About Their Visitors? Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

9 am3 pm

15 pm 1:305 pm

WORKSHOPS
Inquiry-Based Learning and 21stCentury Skills, Cost: $45 Field Services Alliance Meeting, Cost: Free; Preregistration Required Nomenclature 3.0 for Users of PastPerfect 5, Cost: $45 2:453:45 pm 45:15 pm

CANCELED

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
AASLH, Your Guide Along the Career Path, Part II At the Crossroads: A Conversation on Adult Learners Canaries in Our Mine: Embezzlement at History Organizations Corporations Connecting with Their Communities Facilitating Conversations with Visitors Places of Note: Musical Venues as Windows on History Technology in History Institutions: Four Perspectives Too Important to Fail: Historic House Museums Meet Communities Needs The Toolkit Talks: Collections Care Basics, Advocacy, and Visitor Studies Uncovering Local History with National History Day

24 pm 6:309 pm

Tour: To Dance, To Sing, To Live: A Cultural Tour, Cost: $30 Evening Event: Historic Capitol Hill, Cost: $45

The name Utah comes from the Native American Ute tribe and means people of the mountains.
6

5:45 6:30 pm 6:309 pm

Reception: Developing History Leaders @SHA, Cost: Free Evening Event: A Stroll through Time: The Natural History Museum of Utah, Cost: $45

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
7 am6 pm 78:15 am 8 am5 pm 8:30 9:45 am

REGISTRATION
Breakfast: Historic House Museums and Visitors Voices, Cost: $30 Tour: Wendover and the Mysterious West Desert, Cost: $75

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6
7:30 8:45 am 8 am12 pm 8:30 am 5 pm Breakfast: Military History and Religious History, Cost: $30 Registration Workshop: Getting Things Done: The AASLH Project Management for History Professionals Program, Cost: $75

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Banish the Boring: Creating Great Presentations Beyond Counting Visitors: Four Examples of Evaluation in History Museums Boots on the Ground: C2C Outreach Projects Business Models and Earned Income for Historic Houses Negotiated Spaces: The Commodication of Space and Role of Multiple Histories NEH and Historical Organizations: Exploring Connections People, Place, and What Matters in Your Community Taking History to the Streets What Can We Do About Our Public Misconceptions About Our Past? Yield to On-Coming Trafc: No Stopping Strollers or Small Feet Tour: Religious Intentions and Interactions: Architecture and City Planning, Cost: $30 Morning Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall

910:15 am

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
A Measured Approach to Integrating Sustainability in History Organizations Communities and Archives: Exploring New Uses for Old Records From Sustenance to Relevance: Reinterpreting Food, Place, and Local History Growing Awareness and Creating Change: Museums and the Disability Community Localizing Difcult Histories Meshing Mission and Community: Identifying Strategies for Engagement Secrets from the Lodge: Identifying and Demystifying Fraternal Objects Serious Play: Interpreting History for Young Audiences Telling a Good Story

8:30 am 12:45pm 9:4510:45 am 10:45 am 12 pm

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
African American Culture and Place-Making in a National Museum Are Your Docents Dwindling, Dull, or Dying? We Can Help! Context Is the Key: Exploring Meaning and Relevance at Sites of Tragedy Do History Museums Still Need Objects? Marketing, Education, and Access: Perspectives on Web Resources Putting Meat on the Bones: Using Genealogy to Personalize History Reenactments: Solid Interpretation or Edu-tainment? Re-imagining Historic Sites: Three Roads to the Same Destination The West: Where Women and the Law Meet Your Turn: Answers about StEPs, MAP, and CAP Assessment Programs AASLH Membership and Networking Luncheon, Cost: Free Court and Legal History Luncheon, Cost: $35 AASLH Meeting of the Membership Tour: Fellowship andCANCELED South Temple, Cost: $30 Camaraderie on Afternoon Break

9 am6 pm 10:15 10:45 am 10:45 am 12 pm

Tour: Utahs Military History, Cost: $75 Morning Break

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
21st-Century Roundtable for Museum Professionals The Civil War Cache Project: Mapping and Sharing Local Soldiers and Stories Journey for Justice: Local History, Civil Rights, and the Power of Place Integrating a National Institution with the Local Community Long Term Sustainability Issues with Online Reference Works Paranormal Policies Presidential Sites and Libraries Roundtable When One Wins, We All Win: Synergistic Marketing in a Metropolitan Area

CANCELED

121 pm 121:15 pm 12 pm 1:305:30 pm 22:15 pm 2:153:30 pm 3:304 pm 4 pm 45:15 pm

PLENARY ADDRESS: LAUREL THATCHER ULRICH


Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall and Book Signings Exhibit Hall Closes

CONCURRENT SESSIONS
2013 Annual Meeting Roundtable The Changing Web: The Future of the (History) Website Historic Places as Museums: Crossroads of Expectations Lyres and Tires and Barns, Oh My! Using Nomenclature 3.0 for Museum Cataloging Reinventing Your Museum: New Audiences, Great Expectations Standing at the Crossroads of Diversity: Creating Pathways to Employment for Under-represented Communities Visitors to Religious Sites: The Whos and Whys Wrestling with Issues of Change and Controversy

15 pm 14:30 pm

Tour: Richest Hole on Earth: The Bingham Canyon Mine, Cost: $30

WORKSHOPS
Connecting Visitors with Inspired Staff: Training Front-Line Staff and Volunteers, Cost: $45 Gems in the Rough: Mining Social Media for Local History Information, Cost: $45 Putting Your Board to Work to Build a Financially Sustainable Organization, Cost: $45

6:309:30 pm

Evening Event: AASLH Leadership in History Awards Banquet, Cost: $55

tober 3 Wednesday, Oc PROMON

8 am5 pm

TOURS
Thursday, October 4
78 am

Saturday, October 6

8:30 am12:30 pm

2 CK T TS R A IL STOR OPOINE RY

HISTORIC TEMPLE SQUARE

HIST ORY AND FAITH

BINGHAM CANYON

RI CH ES T HO LE ON EA RT H

m, Salt Lake City CVB; National Park Service; Eric Schram

City CVB Kennecott Copper Mine, Salt Lake

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3
Park City
8 am5 pm
COST: $75

Rails2Rockets: Utahs Transportation Crossroads


8 am5 pm
COST: $75

Spend the day discovering Park City and nd out how two small museums have reinvented themselves to deal with seasonal tourism while staying connected to the local community. First stop is the Utah Olympic Park. Visit the 2002 Olympic Museum, stand at the top of the K120 ski jump, and meet an Olympic athlete and hear their thrill in winning a medal. Next stop is Historic Park City. Visit the National Register listed Historic Main Street on a docent-led tour, explore about the towns silver mining history at the Park City Museum, and go shopping in the beautiful resort town.

Utah has served as the crossroads of the West and a connection to the cosmos. The Transcontinental Railroad was joined here and Space Shuttle rockets were developed here. All Aboard for this exciting tour that will take you from the driving of the Golden Spike to blast off of the Space Shuttle in the span of a single day. Be guided through a century of railroad history at the Union Station Museum and the Golden Spike National Historic Site and then talk to real Rocket Scientists about their work while exploring ATKs Rocket Garden.

and new voices in American lm. Attendees will learn of its beginnings, holdings, and future plans. The tour will next travel to the University of Utah and examine the records of the Rocky Mountain Power and the Kennecott Company housed at the modern facilities of the Marriott Librarys Special Collection. Enjoy a behind the scenes view of its holdings, operations, policies, and its interaction with its corporate clients. The tour will be followed by a reception.

To Dance, To Sing, To Live: A Cultural Tour


24 pm
COST: $30

Corporate History Tour


15 pm
COST: $30

Utah is the only state whose capitals name is made of three words.

Join the AASLH Corporate History Afnity Group to investigate the records of two corporate archives. The tour will rst visit the archives of the nonprot Sundance Institute located in downtown Salt Lake City. Robert Redford and some friends and colleagues founded the Institute in 1981 to create an environment to foster independence, discovery,

This walking tour of downtown Salt Lake City will introduce the story of its founding and spotlight the people and places that reect its cultural heritage. The tour will spotlight the citys rst mansion, performance centers including the Capitol Theater and the Mormon Tabernacle, historic homes, important business and nance structures, LDS Church buildings, and many more.

These events are not included in the annual meeting registration fee and require preregistration. See the registration form for details.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
History and Faith: Historic Temple Square
78 am
COST: $15

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
Wendover and the Mysterious West Desert
8 am5 pm
COST: $75

Fellowship and Camaraderie on South Temple


1:305:30 pm
COST: $30

Located in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City, Temple Square is the most visited site in the state of Utah. Join colleagues for an early morning walk, tour the historic buildings of the block, including the world-famous Tabernacle, home of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, and learn of the story of the construction of the Salt Lake Temple. A quick visit to the Beehive House, the home of Brigham Young, will conclude the tour.

South Temple: Utahs Millionaire Row


8:30 am12:30 pm
COST: $30

Named as one of the Best Streets in America in 2009, South Temple has been known as Utahs rst prominent residential address. Beginning in 1855, merchandisers, mining magnates, and bankers started construction of architectural masterpieces on South Temple to display their wealth including the Kearns Mansion, Walker Mansion, Downey Mansion, and Armstrong House. Enjoy a stroll up South Temple while touring several of these restored mansions within one of Utahs earliest historic districts and come away knowing why South Temple is Utahs Millionaires Row.

Spend a day investigating the mysteries of the Great Salt Lake, Utahs West Desert, and the community of Wendover. The tour will begin at the Great Salt Lake with a presentation on its historical and geological signicance. The tour will continue with a visit to a National Historic Site, the Benson Gristmill. Continue across the West Desert viewing the remnants of the ancient Lake Bonneville to Wendover. Attendees will see Danger Cave, a cluster of dry caves that contained archaeological remains dating more than 11,000 years ago. Next experience the Bonneville Speedway, the site of countless land speed records. Enjoy lunch at a West Wendover casino followed by a tour of the World War II Wendover Aireld where air crews trained to drop atomic bombs on Japan. Finally, the tour will return to West Wendover to spend time for a little gambling and shopping time.

Starting in the early twentieth century, South Temple Street evolved from the premiere residential address to a center of Salt Lake Citys social scene. Through the continued dedication of several of the citys leading membership organizations and adaptive use of historic structures, the street continues to be a central focus of social life. This walking tour will provide an insiders view to the social and architectural history of South Temple through prominent historic structures including the Elks Club, Alta Club, Masonic Temple, and Ladies Literary Club.

CANCELED

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6
Utahs Military History Tour
9 am6 pm
COST: $75

Religious Intentions and Interactions: Architecture and City Planning


8:30 am12:45 pm
COST: $30

Three Billion Years of History on One Island


1:306:30 pm
COST: $30

Situated in the middle of the remnants of an ancient ocean, Antelope Island boasts three billion-year-old geologic formations, a unique salt water/ freshwater ecosystem, world class bird-watching, one of the countrys largest bison herds, a historic ranch, and the longest continually-occupied EuroAmerican residence in the state of Utah. Explore all these things and more in this afternoon tour. There is something here to fascinate everyone.

This tour examines the interaction and reaction between Mormons, Roman Catholics, Protestants, and other faiths evidenced in the religiously constructed environment in Salt Lake City. The tour will be led by three subject specialists in local and American architecture and preservation including Brad Westwood, former Chair of Special Collections, Brigham Young University, and historian, Paul L. Anderson, architect, exhibit designer, and historian, and Ray Luce, former state preservation ofcer, historian, and now volunteer employee for the LDS Church Historic Sites Division.

This tour, sponsored by AASLHs Military History Afnity Group, will visit signicant sites in Utah military history. Begin your experience at the Hill Aerospace Museum located at Hill Air Force Base, then visit Tooele and see the third largest military vehicle collection in the United States. After lunch, the afternoon tour will pass the Tooele U.S. Army Depot and the Chemical Weapons Destruction Center. Finally, visit the Fort Douglas Military Museum on the University of Utah campus.

Richest Hole on Earth: The Bingham Canyon Mine


15 pm
COST: $30

Spend Saturday morning examining Utahs mining history and seeing a working mine. This tour will visit Bingham Canyon Mine, (the worlds largest human excavation), the community of Copperton which was constructed as a company town for the miners of the Bingham Canyon Mine, and the Bingham Cemetery.

AAS LH ANN UAL ME ETI

Salt Lake City

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Exploring Vibrant Connections Between People and Place

CROSSROADS:

M.A. in Museum Studies

Make your mark.


vpa.syr.edu

AN INFALLIBLE TRANSCRIPTION SERVICE? HOW ABOUT JUST SHORT OF INFALLIBLE?


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10

EVENING EVENTS
Thursday, October r Wednesday, Octobe 3
6:309 pm

and require preregistration. the annual meeting registration fee These events are not included in ils. See the registration form for deta

N AT U R A L H IS T O RY M U S E U M
OF UTAH

6:309 pm

Wednesday, October 3

6:309 pm

CHURCH H IS T O RY MUSEUM
AUGUST 1913

M CC UN E M AN SI ON
LDS Church History Museum; Utah

State Historical Society; Natural History

Museum of Utah

WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 3
6:309 pm
COST: $45

Historic Capitol Hill

Explore the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at The Church History Museum located in Temple Square. In the exhibit, A Covenant Restored, see artifacts documenting the history of the Church from its beginnings in upstate New York, the publication of the Book of Mormon, the efforts of Joseph Smith to establish communities Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, and its westward trek to the Great Basin under the leadership of Brigham Young. Attendees will enjoy light appetizers and nonalcoholic drinks before proceeding to the historic McCune Mansion for hors doeuvres, dessert, and beverages. Early American entrepreneur and railroad tycoon Alfred W. McCune

built the Mansion as his family home. The building of the McCune Mansion began in 1898 and was completed at a cost of $1,000,000.00 in 1901. Noteworthy interior details, shipped from around the world, include rare materials, such as Utah onyx, Nubian and Irish marble, French tapestries, and South American mahogany. The exterior was built of native Utah sandstone and the roof, covered with tiles made in the Netherlands. Admire gold leaf hand gilding, exquisite murals, decorative scagliola, and detailed artwork echoing centuryold brushstrokes. The McCarthey Family purchased the Mansion in 1999 and generously returned the mansion to its original architectural splendor and exemplary workmanship while faithfully preserving its historical legacy and community prominence.

THURSDAY,
OCTOBER 4

FRIDAY,

OCTOBER 5

A Stroll through Time: The Natural History Museum of Utah


6:309 pm
COST: $45

Leadership in History Awards Banquet


6:309:30 pm
COST: $55

Cross the threshold into the newly opened Natural History Museum of Utah and enter the soaring sixtyfoot Canyon atrium that forms the centerpiece for the nine terraced exhibition galleriesincluding Past Worlds through the Native Voices and upward to the Sky Terrace. In November 2011, the Natural History Museum of Utah opened a new facility, the Rio Tinto Center, with entirely new exhibit galleries, engaging programs for the public, and state-of-the-art collections care and research facilities. Enjoy regional food, performances, and music, andabove allmarvel at the panoramic valley vistas as the sun sets in the western sky over the Great Salt Lake.

Join AASLH in honoring the best in state and local history at the 2012 Leadership in History Awards. Will Bagley, one of Americas foremost authorities on western trail history and the Mormon settlement of the Great Basin, will provide the banquet address. The evening will also include dinner and a lively awards presentation.

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8:30 am5 pm

Best Practices for Slavery Interpretation


COST: $75

Interpretive Exhibits: Telling Our Stories on a Shoestring


COST: $75

New Roles for Small Museums: Engaging Community and Moving Toward Relevance
COST: $75

Increase your capacity to create comprehensive and conscientious interpretations of slavery. Learn tips for connecting to and extending beyond your sites complex history of slavery; training to help staff achieve a greater understanding of the difcult knowledge and navigate surrounding complicated emotions; and tools to inventory current interpretations and how to evaluate new techniques.
Chair: Krisin Gallas, Director of Education and Public History, The Tracing Center on Histories and Legacies of Slavery, Watertown, MA

Museums of any size can create inexpensive interpretive exhibits that excite, engage, and educate visitors. This hands-on workshop geared to small history museums shows an integrated approach to telling the stories of collections and communities. Learn how to research, design, and produce interpretive exhibits supported by best practice educational strategies.
Chair: Megan van Frank, Historical and Museum Programs, Utah Humanities Council, Salt Lake City, UT

Designed for teams of board members, directors, staff, and volunteers, explore the content in the new AASLH Toolkit chapter on New Roles for Small Museums. This interactive workshop covers forces for change, what community engagement is, who we should engage, guidelines and steps, case studies, evaluation, dialogue tools, and new roles.
Chair: Candace Tangorra Matelic, Ph.D., President, CTM Professional Services, Santa Fe, NM

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These events are not included in the annual meeting registration fee and require preregistration. See the registration form for details.

The Rembrandt Rule Workshop


COST: $75

StEPs Curriculum Train-theTrainer


COST: FREE; PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED

1:305 pm

Do you want to violate the Rembrandt Rule in your museum, but dont know how to structure your collections or collections policy to do so? If you answered yes, then this workshop is for you. Attendees will explore tiered collections and collections policies, tracing collections, and creating handson educational programs.
Co-Chairs: Joanna C. Arrieta, Director of Interpretation, Atlanta History Center, Atlanta, GA, and Michelle Zupan, Curator and Director, Hickory Hill/Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc., Thomson, GA

Inquiry-Based Learning and 21st-Century Skills


COST: $45

This workshop consists of StEPs curriculum training for staff and representatives of state and regional museum associations, eld service ofces, and other service organizations. Travel stipends may be available. To register and request information about travel stipends, contact Cherie Cook, AASLH Senior Program Manager, at cook@aaslh.org or 573-893-5164.

8:30 am12:30 pm

Emergency Preparedness/Crisis Planning


COST: $45

This workshop will explore a variety of approaches for using inquiry-based learning for the study of history and history education. Techniques for school and family programs from the New-York Historical Societys recently opened DiMenna Childrens History Museum and the Kentucky Historical Society will be discussed. Participants will then practice a number of inquirybased models as a group.
Chair: Mike Deetsch, Student and Family Programs Manager, Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort, KY

Connecting Visitors to Your Site through Inspired Front-Line Staff


COST: $45

Front-line staff are one of our greatest resources for connecting visitors to our sites. Develop your skills on how to attract and hire candidates that are connected to your site through personal inspiration.
Chair: Tanya Brock, Visitor Services Manager, Minnetrista, Muncie, IN

Companion session previously scheduled for Saturday morning will now take place Wednesday afternoon 1:30 - 5:00 pm 9 am3 pm

A very topical, nationally acclaimed program discussing recommended methods to reduce injury, loss of life, and loss of collections. National leaders in emergency preparedness walk you through step-by-step procedures for assuring that necessary arrangements are in place to prepare any institution for dealing with emergency evacuations, transportation and protection of assets, working with emergency response organizations, and more.
Chair: Rob Layne, CIPM, Executive Director, International Foundation for Cultural Property Protection, Denver, CO

Field Services Alliance Meeting


COST: FREE; PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED

Members and interested colleagues of FSA will gather to receive an update on a variety of issues facing local grassroot history organizations. The Field Services Manual will be debuted at this meeting. Visit www.aaslh.org/FSA for more information.

Nomenclature 3.0 for Users of PastPerfect 5


COST: $45

CANCELED

2012 CEO Forum Crossroads: Exploring Vibrant Connections Between People and Place
PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $150 ($220 FOR TWO FROM THE SAME ORGANIZATION)

This workshop will teach PastPerfect 5 users the best practices for converting to and utilizing Nomenclature 3.0. Participate in step-by-step demonstrations and instruction for upgrading and managing legacy data as well as offer helpful hints and advice collected from user institutions.
Chair: Sarah Kapellusch, Curator and Collections Manager, Outagamie County Historical Society, The History Museum at the Castle, Appleton, WI

This years Annual Meeting theme, Crossroads: Exploring Vibrant Connections Between People and Place invites us to think about our organizations: the places they hold within their communities; their value and distinctiveness; their connections to individuals and to constituents; and their ability to effect change and to be affected by change. In this vein, this years CEO Forum will encourage the leaders of large history organizations to think about their place or role within the organization, how they impart value, how they can bring about change, and how they connect both internally (governing boards, employees, and volunteers), and externally as the personication of the organization. Registration is open to CEOs and Senior Executives of large history organizations. Please consider bringing along a staff member or sending one in your place if you cannot attend.
Chair: Burt Logan, CEO, Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

: The AASLH Project Management for History OCTOBER Professionals Program Connecting Visitors with Inspired Staff: Training Front-Line Staff and Volu nteers Gems in the Rough: Mining Soci al Media for Local History Information Putting Your Board to Work to Buil da Financially Sustainable Organiza tion

POST-MEETING WORKSHOPS Getting Things Done


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AB JEN KIN S AN D TH E M OR MO N ME TE OR ON TH E SA LT FL AT S. UNDATED

8:309:45 am

Educators and Interpreters Breakfast and Roundtable


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $30

boards with solutions that include team building, community involvement, and the difcult issue of removing a member from the board.
Chair: Janice Klein, Consultant, EightSixSix Consulting, Tempe, AZ

strategy you can maintain and will help identify potential funding sources.
Chair: Tim Grove, Chief of Education, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC

Begin the annual meeting at this engaging breakfast where you can network with your peers in the eld of education and interpretation. The breakfast will include discussions about current issues facing museum educators and interpreters. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss their questions, concerns, and dilemmas. The roundtable will have something for educators at all stages of their careers and from institutions large and small.
Chair: Tobi Voigt, Director of Education, Detroit Historical Society, Detroit, MI

Connecting to Collections: Tools You Can UseThe Sequel!


Building on the success of the 2011 AASLH Annual Meeting session Connecting to Collections: Tools You Can Use, this sequel provides information on new initiatives/key developments from existing statewide preservation programs. Speakers will discuss advances in preservation fundraising, disaster planning, and collections value assessment, and how results can benet the community.
Chair: Tom Clareson, Senior Consultant for Digital and Preservation Services, LYRASIS, Westerville, OH

New Crossroads at the Intersection of Public and Private


Public-private partnerships are often cited as the solution to current institutional and nancial constraints and the reduction of government support for history. Leaders of public and private history organizations discuss old and new models and the opportunities and challenges they present for the future.
Chair: Barbara Franco, Executive Director, Gettysburgs Seminary Ridge Museum, Gettysburg, PA

8:309:45 am CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Bad Boards, Bad Boards, Whatcha Gonna Do: Strategies for Fixing Poorly Functioning Museum Boards
Directors of small history museums will share their experience in making positive changes in poorly functioning

The Importance of a Digital Strategy


Most history institutions do not follow a technology strategy and as a result they ounder in the constantly changing technology landscape. All institutions, whatever size or budget, need to think strategically about technology. Indepth conversation with two leaders in the eld will help you craft a digital

Passing the Torch of Leadership to a Younger Generation


Small museums with few full-time staff members usually rely on postretirement age volunteers. When the individuals who have run these institutions for many years step down, many are replaced with professionallytrained paid staff. Also, many seasoned professionals are planning for retirement and younger professionals are moving into leadership positions.

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Join this session and learn how these different generations learn from each other and work together to make for a smooth transition for the organization.
Chair: Daniel Schlegel, Jr., Executive Director, Scurry County Museum, Snyder, TX

Sponsored by the National Council on Public History.


Chair: Melissa Bingmann, Assistant Professor of History/Director of Public History, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV

121:15 pm LUNCHEONS

Corporate History Luncheon


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $35

Save Time with Effective Meetings


Do you feel that most meetings at your institution are a waste? Do you want to gain at least four hours of productive time a week? Let us show you how! Everyone complains about meetings, but few work to improve them. Learn easy steps to make meetings both shorter and more effective.
Chair: Trevor Jones, Director, Museum Collections and Exhibitions, Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort, KY

When History Hits the Road: Mobile Museums


Learn from Pennsylvanias and Virginias mobile museum experiences as staff talk about their goals for the mobile museums and lessons from their travels. The IMLS-funded evaluator for the Pennsylvania project will share what the project has learned about maximizing public interest in the Civil War for new audience development.
Chair: James M. Vaughan, Executive Director, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, PA

Join the Corporate History Museum and Archives Afnity Group for lunch and meet with other professionals who work in the corporate history eld. Discuss hot topics in the eld, network with fellow professionals, and bring home great ideas for telling your corporations story.
Chair: Gregory Vadney, Executive Director, Rahr-West Art Museum, Manitowoc, WI

Small Museums Luncheon


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $35

Small Museums, Big Impact!


Representatives from three small museums will share their successful experiences in developing exhibitions focused on members of their local community. These exhibits serve as role models of how a small museum can play a signicant role in recognizing the achievement of local residents in, or their connections to, the wider world.
Chair: Paul Katz, Ph.D., Principal, PRIAM, Panhandle, TX

9:4510:45 am

Morning Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall First Time Attendee Reception
PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: FREE

Thinking About Grad School? What, Where, and How?


The graduate school options available to history professionals are bewildering. MA, MAT, MBA, MPH, Ph.D.? History, American studies, museum studies, public history, archives, museum education? Full or part-time? Live or online? This is not a showcase for graduate programs, but a frank discussion of options and their pros and cons.
Chair: Laura Roberts, Adjunct Faculty, Bank St. College of Education and Harvard Extension School, Cambridge, MA

First-time meeting attendees are invited to attend a special reception in their honor to meet new colleagues and learn tips for getting the most out of their annual meeting experience. Sponsored by the AASLH Mentor Committee. 10:45 am12 pm

Bring your appetite and join fellow small museum colleagues for an upbeat luncheon where together you can sample the key ingredients for authentic networking and plan a menu that will help make your museum the toast of the town! Be inspired and entertained by self-proclaimed expert in comfort food, Kent Whitworth who also serves as the executive director for the Kentucky Historical Society.
Chair: Stacy Klingler, Assistant Director, Local History Services, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, IN

122:45 pm

Keynote Address: Pat Croce

Directors Luncheon and Session


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $40

Twilight at Conner Prairie: The Creation, Betrayal, and Rescue of a Museum


This session is a book discussion on Twilight at Conner Prairie: The Creation, Betrayal, and Rescue of a Museum by Berkley W. Duck, III. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss issues raised and lessons learned from this case study of Conner Prairie and its split from Earlham College in 2005.
Pat Croce and Company

KEYNOTE

PAT CR OC E

Directors and CEOs of organizations of all sizes are invited to lunch for networking and discussion. The Center for the Future of Museums recently issued TrendsWatch 2012 on seven trends that will shape our future. Consultant Laura Roberts will lead attendees in a discussion on these hot topics. Topics will include how can we monitor changes in our community and the wider society and consider the implications for our organizations and how can board and staff help scan the horizon and think about creative responses?
Chair: D. Steven Elliott, Executive Director and CEO, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN AAS LH ANN UAL ME ETI NG

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1:302:45 pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS

See last page for additions for Oct. 4


FSA Tips: Improving Your Online Presence
This session will demonstrate through the on-the-spot creation of a website, several inexpensive and easy-to-use digital media tools that historical organizations can use to create a dynamic, user-friendly online presence with everyday hardware such as mobile phones, video cameras, and laptops. Sponsored by the Field Services Alliance and AASLH Professional Development and Small Museums Committee.
Chair: Mike Frohlich, Multimedia Developer/ Web Manager, State Historical Society of North Dakota, Bismarck, ND

program staff will share insight on the strategic plan and the associate changes in museum funding programs for 2013, along with dialogue with the audience on submitting a successful application for funding.
Chair: Christopher J. Reich, Associate Deputy Director for Museums, Institute of Museum and Library Services, Washington, DC

AASLH, Your Guide Along the Career Path, Part I


Concerned about where your career is headed by dont know where to turn? This panel, the rst of a double session, will examine job prospects and choices at various points along the career path and discuss how the AASLH Mentor Program and training opportunities can help guide your way. Sponsored by the AASLH Mentor Program and Professional Development Committee.
Chair: Karen Graham Wade, Director, Homestead Museum, City of Industry, CA

Reproductions: How, When, and Where to Use Them


Do you use reproductions in your museum? Four museum professionals share their experiences in creating, managing, as well as why and how to use reproductions successfully in your institution. Presentations include discussions on theory and practical examples. Sponsored by the AASLH Military History Afnity Group.
Chair: Carrie Gutierrez, Museum Curator, U.S. Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC

History in 4D: Sharing Content on Historypin


In this tutorial, participants will learn from fellow state and history organizations how they can easily use Historypins free Web and mobile app tools to engage their audiences. See augmented reality in action and learn tips on tech implementations and community engagement strategies.
Chair: Jon Voss, Strategic Partnerships Director, Historypin, San Francisco, CA

Beyond History: Expanding Your Education Offerings


The Creative Learning Factory, the professional development arm of the Ohio Historical Society, will demonstrate ways participants can utilize their history collections to provide education opportunities beyond history by focusing on the arts and humanities. While the emphasis will be on outreach to K-12 educators, the programming examples may also be used directly with students.
Chair: Stacia Kuceyeski, CEO of Creative Learning, Creative Learning Factory at the Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

What Do History Museums Really Need to Know About Their Visitors?


Discuss what history museums need to know about their visitors and how they can use that information to improve the visitor experience. The Small Museums and Visitors Voices Afnity Groups will share a pilot project of an off-the-shelf visitor study that will be further rened by participants during the session.
Co-Chairs: Conny Graft, Principal, Conny Graft Research and Evaluation, Williamsburg, VA, and Stacy Klingler, Assistant Director, Local History Services, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, IN

Making Room for SHA


Have you ever considered attending or sending a staff member to attend Developing History Leaders @SHA? This session provides an opportunity to have your questions answered, how to complete a successful application, how to survive away from the ofce or without a staff member for three weeks (its easier than you think), and how the program develops history leaders.
Chair: Donna K. Sack, Executive Director, Illinois Association of Museums, Springeld, IL

Empowering Small Museums on Main Street, USA


Exhibitions and humanities programs in community-based museums help connect people to the place they call home. Come hear about a Smithsonian exhibition project that inspires a fresh look at local history and how handson facilitated training by the Utah Humanities Council leaves staff and volunteers of small museums with the knowledge and skills needed to create vibrant interpretive exhibits that inspire local audiences to learn and be proud of their own history.
Chair: Carol Harsh, Director, Museum on Main Street, Smithsonian Institution (SITES), Washington, DC

2:453:45 pm

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall


45:15 pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Opportunities and Resources from IMLS


Grant awards offered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services advance the museum eld by supporting a range of activities, from professional development to conservation and educational programming, in a wide variety of museums. IMLS has adopted a new mission, vision, and ve-year strategic plan that will support its continuing efforts to assist museums in connecting with their communities. In this discussion-focused panel, IMLS

AASLH, Your Guide Along the Career Path, Part II


Building on the rst session, sit down with colleagues to discuss what you can do to get ahead in the history eld. Learn more about the AASLH Mentor Program, training programs that are right for you, ways to improve your resume and interviewing techniques, and characteristics of different jobs in and outside the eld. Opportunities for

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one-on-one counseling sessions will be available for those attending. Sponsored by the AASLH Mentor and Professional Development Committees.
Chair: Karen Graham Wade, Director, Homestead Museum, City of Industry, CA

Facilitating Conversations with Visitors


Our audiences expect to be part of the conversation, but how do we make that happen? What are the skills that museum professionals need to facilitate conversations? Three experienced facilitators will review the basics of facilitation, work with participants to identify attributes of good facilitation, and give participants a chance to practice their skills.
Chair: Sandra Clark, Director, Michigan Historical Center, Lansing, MI

Co-Chairs: Kendra Dillard, Director of Exhibits, Capital District, California State Parks, Sacramento, CA, and Kenneth C. Turino, Manager of Community Engagement and Exhibitions, Historic New England, Boston, MA

At the Crossroads: A Conversation on Adult Learners


Adult learners are among our most important and loyal audiences. Yet, what do we know about their learning styles? Have we effectively integrated current research about adult visitors into our exhibits and programs? Join the experts for a provocative conversation about these essential members of your museum audience.
Chair: Beverly Sheppard, Consultant, Centreville, MD

The Toolkit Talks: Collections Care Basics, Advocacy, and Visitor Studies
Running a small museum is like trying to juggle a dozen balls and when youre a new or terribly over-worked leader, how do you know what you are responsible for or where to start? Three contributors to the newly-released Small Museum Toolkit will share some of their insights into mission-based planning and implementation for small museums, as well as offer practical strategies for success in collections care basics, advocacy, and visitor studies.
Chair: Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko, CEO, Abbe Museum, Bar Harbor, ME

Places of Note: Musical Venues as Windows on History


Where do we go to nd the range of music that people encountered every day? What can these settings tell us about the communities that created, performed, and heard that music? Panelists will discuss locations such as churches and concert halls, bandstands and parade grounds, clubs and coffee houses.
Chair: Kathleen J. Barker, Assistant Director of Education and Public Programs, Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, MA

Canaries in Our Mine: Embezzlement at History Organizations


Just as canaries warned miners of impending danger, this session will feature a certied fraud examiner and panelists whose organizations were hit by embezzlement, including fraud and identity theft. This must-attend session will help your organization identify what policies and procedures you need to have in place. What are the warning signs of criminal activity? What do you do if you suspect a problem? How do you handle the aftermath, if it does happen to your organization?
Chair: Donna K. Sack, Executive Director, Illinois Association of Museums, Springeld, IL

Uncovering Local History with National History Day


You know those WWII infantry division photographs or troop movement records in your collections? Dig out the nding aids. Students will be looking for information on local soldiers for National History Days Fallen Soldier Project. You can provide connections to a students soldier of interest. Attend to learn more.
Chair: Kim Fortney, Deputy Director, National History Day, College Park, MD

Technology in History Institutions: Four Perspectives


Join a discussion about Conner Prairie Interactive History Park and vendor BPI, Indiana Historical Society, and Follett House Museum incorporating technology such as QR codes, holograms, and theater effects combining video and audio, into interpretive guest experiences. Participants will discuss how to determine what technology is right for their institution.
Chair: Trina Nelson Thomas, Senior Director, Public Programs, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, IN

Corporations Connecting with Their Communities


Corporate museums and archives collect and interpret the history of business. While often structured as a branch of their parent companies, corporate museums can offer valuable resources to other museums and the general community. This session will focus on what kind of resources corporate museums and archives have available and what we can do within the community. Speakers will talk about their experiences working within the museum community and with the general public. At the end, there will be an open forum to encourage dialogue about what works and what doesnt within corporate museums.
Chair: Tiffany Meng, Director, Delta Air Transport Heritage Museum, Atlanta, GA

5:456:30 pm

Reception: Developing History Leaders @SHA


If you aspire to be a better leader in your institution, community, and the eld of public history, join SHA alumni and faculty to learn about this unique professional development program. Hosted by the SHA Alumni Afnity Group.
Chair: Donna K. Sack, Executive Director, Illinois Association of Museums, Springeld, IL

Too Important to Fail: Historic House Museums Meet Communities Needs


At a crossroads and facing an uncertain future, many historic house museums are reimagining themselves in response to specic needs in their communities. This panel will examine how several historic sites from around the country are creating vibrant connections with their constituents while ensuring their own long-term sustainability in the process.

6:309 pm

Evening Event: A Stroll through Time: The Natural History Museum of Utah
COST: $45

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8:309:45 am CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Breakfast: Historic House Museums and Visitors Voices


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $30

Boots on the Ground: C2C Outreach Projects


This panel will focus on the tribulations and triumphs of statewide eld services that have been implemented through the IMLS Connecting to Collections grants. It will feature four states that have conducted on-site assistance, training, and fundraising for collections care.
Chair: LeRae Umeet, C2C Project Director and ND DCR Chief of Collections Management, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Raleigh, NC

Banish the Boring: Creating Great Presentations


Want to create a really great presentation? Tired of boring, bulletlled Powerpoints? Join us for a lively session that demonstrates techniques and approaches to create memorable presentations. Itll be fun, fast-paced, and challengingand hopefully, inspire participants to create their own good sessions.
Chair: Linda Norris, The Uncataloged Museum, Treadwell, NY

Get up early for a joint breakfast with the AASLH Historic House Museum Afnity Group and Visitors Voices Afnity Group. Join speakers Conny Graft and Max van Balgooy for a presentation of Are You in Jeopardy? Visitors Experiences in Historic Houses as they explore what visitors are thinking and doing in your historic house museum (and its not just to look in the closets!).
Co-Chairs: Kendra Dillard, Director of Exhibits, Capital District State Museums, and Historic Parks, California State Parks, Sacramento, CA, and Conny Graft, Principal, Conny Graft Research and Evaluation, Williamsburg, VA

Business Models and Earned Income for Historic Houses


This session will look beyond traditional models for historic houses and discuss examples of ways small institutions are addressing the issue of earned income through creative programs and new revenue streams. The importance of business plans will be discussed and participants will be involved in a case study to solve problems and create a plan for a ctional historic site.
Chair: Kenneth C. Turino, Manager of Community Engagement and Exhibitions, Historic New England, Boston, MA

Beyond Counting Visitors: Four Examples of Evaluation in History Museums


AASLHs Visitor Counts! program provides the who, where, when, and how of a visitors experience. The work of Visitor Studies Association (VSA) members gives shape and esh to the Visitor Counts! frame to demonstrate how visitors use museums to make sense of history through ideas and objects and how that engagement enriches their lives.
Chair: Cheryl Kessler, Principal, Blue Scarf Consulting, LLC, Minnetonka, MN

Utah is the site of the nations rst department store: Zions Co-operative Mercantile Institution was established in 1870.

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See last page for additional tour for Oct. 5


Negotiated Spaces: The Commodication of Space and Role of Multiple Histories
The past does not change, but the chronicling of it is dynamic. The meanings people assign places and events make up the history we tell at historic sites. Learn how collaborative, interdisciplinary research and programming has led to the inclusion of multiple pasts in reinterpreting the Mann-Simons site in Columbia, SC.
Chair: John Sherrer, Director of Cultural Resources, Historic Columbia Foundation, Columbia, SC

What Can We Do About Public Misconceptions About Our Past?


We are often confronted with the reality and consequences of public misconceptions of the past, whether the result of education, experience, or memory. This has become a critical issue in the age of shared authority and user-generated content. Join a discussion of how we can help the public develop a more holistic and critical understanding of history.
Co-Chairs: Anita N. Durel, CFRE, and John W. Durel, Ph.D., Principals, Durel Consulting Partners/Qm2, Baltimore, MD

Are Your Docents Dwindling, Dull, or Dying? We Can Help!


Have you ever thought, If only we had more or better tour guides, docents, or interpreters, we could improve our audience experiences? Hear some tested ideas you can adapt to develop your programs or increase the pool of presenters in your galleries or site.
Chair: Erik Holland, Curator of Education, State Historical Society of North Dakota, Bismarck, ND

NEH and Historical Organizations: Exploring Connections


Learn about NEH support for museums and historical organizations, including special initiatives and funding trends. Emphasis will be on smaller institutions. NEH program ofcers representing three funding areas will describe their programs and present case studies.
Chair: Andrea Anderson, Senior Program Ofcer, Ofce of Challenge Grants, National Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC

Yield to On-Coming Trafc: No Stopping Strollers and Small Feet


Many museums are developing programs to engage young children. Motivations for doing so and levels of success vary. Some museums are thoughtfully incorporating young audiences into a larger planning process. Others are responding to new needs and interests that have evolved. Panelists will share perspectives based on experiences. Participants will consider the direction of their own early childhood programming.
Chair: Betsy Bowers, Deputy Director of Museum Education, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, Washington, DC

Context Is the Key: Exploring Meaning and Relevance at Sites of Tragedy


How does the passage of time alter how we remember events that hold broad meaning for communities? This roundtable uses case studies to explore how we memorialize the past and create relevance at sites of tragedy. Breakout sessions address how these lessons apply to any history deemed uncomfortable or challenging. This session supported by The International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.
Chair: Sharron Wilkins Conrad, Curator of Education, The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, Dallas, TX

People, Place, and What Matters in Your Community


The current, multidisciplinary scholarship on place will frame a forum about community engagement strategies in museum practice. Topics will include: the role of place as an effective community engagement tool, strategies for museum professionals to engage communities through place, and the concept of civic tourism.
Chair: Donna R. Braden, Curator/Experience Developer, The Henry Ford, Dearborn, MI

Do History Museums Still Need Objects?


This session, based on the History News article Do History Museums Still Need Objects? (download at bit/ ly/pNvb8M), considers seven major issues facing museums as they seek to make their collections meaningful and accessible to the public. Join us to discuss these issues and how they affect your daily work.
Chair: Rainey Tisdale, Independent Curator, Rolindale, MA

9:4510:45 am

Morning Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall


10:45 am12 pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Taking History to the Streets


In the program If This House Could Talk , residents post handmade signs in their yards and the neighborhood itself becomes an exhibit. In associate PopUp Performances, actors present stories where they happened. ITHCY organizers from Cambridge, MA, and Sacramento, CA, will share these novel approaches to connecting people to place.
Chair: Cathie Zusy, Originator and Organizer, If This House Could Talk, Cambridge, MA

African American Culture and Place-Making in a National Museum


In 2015, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture will open in one of the most auspicious locations in the United States, the National Mall in Washington, DC. What can we learn from the ways a national museum deals with issues of place, tradition, and identity?
Chair: William Pretzer, Senior History Curator, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, DC

Marketing, Education, and Access: Perspectives on Web Resources


This session will explore how historical organizations are using websites for marketing, collections access, and educational purposes, where these functions diverge and intersect. The panelist will lead a discussion with the audience on how which use, if any, should lead and when, and how the others can support.
Chair: Mike Frohlich, Multimedia Developer/ Web Manager, North Dakota State Historical Society, Bismarck, ND
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Putting Meat on the Bones: Using Genealogy to Personalize History
History and family history, or genealogy, go hand-in-hand, supporting and enriching each other. This panel will discuss their experiences using family history in historical research and writing in order to more fully understand the subject. Suggestions will be given on how to incorporate genealogical sources in historical research.
Chair: Laurie Hillier, Research Consultant, US/ Canada Reference, Salt Lake City, UT

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exhibits and historic site interpretation. Particular areas of focus include early women lawyers in Utah, and the arrest of women under Utahs polygamy laws. Sponsored by the AASLH Court and Legal History Afnity Group.
Chair: Dr. Elizabeth R. Osborn, Assistant to the Chief Justice for Court History and Public Education, Indiana Supreme Court, Indianapolis, IN

12 pm

AASLH Meeting of the Membership


22:15 pm AFTERNOON BREAK 2:153:30 pm

Your Turn: Answers about StEPs, MAP, and CAP Assessment Programs
Staff from each of the national assessment programs will answer moderator and audience questions and discuss strengths and unique attributes that each program offers.
Chair: Cherie Cook, Senior Program Manager, AASLH, Jefferson City, MO

Plenary Address: Laurel Thatcher Ulrich


ity News Service Stephanie Mitchell, Harvard Univers ity News Stephanie Mitchell, Harvard Univers Service

Reenactments: Solid Interpretation or Edu-tainment?


History is a blend of truth and fancy, or what professional educators may distinguish as fact and interpretation. Historical reenactments carried out before our eyes more or less on the sacred eld or on the television or movie screen too often fades our ability to be analytical. Instead our judgment is swayed by emotional engagement with the past real or ctionalized.
Chair: Gary Walrath, Executive Director, Rocky Mount Historical Association and Museum, Piney Flats, TN

121 pm

AASLH Membership and Networking Luncheon


COST: FREE

LAUR EL TH AT CH ER UL RIC H
PLENARY

Open to all, this is your chance to check out the latest and greatest products available in the exhibit hall while grabbing a complimentary lunch. 121:15 pm

3:304 pm

Re-imagining Historic Sites: Three Roads to the Same Destination


The declining economy, changing audiences, and a renewed emphasis on mission and impact are prompting many historic sites and house museums to consider new ways to be more relevant and engaging. Learn how three organizations have rethought their historic sites through visitor research, expert charettes, and community workshops, and discover what worked (and what didnt).
Chair: Max van Balgooy, President, Engaging Places, LLC, Rockville, MD

Court and Legal History Luncheon


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $35

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall and Book Signings


4 pm EXHIBIT HALL CLOSES 45:15 pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS

The West: Where Women and the Law Meet


This session will present research about womens legal history in Utah and the American West and lead a forum exploring how it can be used in

Join one of AASLHs newest afnity groups for a stimulating program and help welcome them ofcially to the AASLH afnity group family. This group is comprised of individuals working in state legal history societies, circuit court libraries, and the U.S. Supreme Court Historical Society. The luncheon speaker will be Thomas Alexander, Professor Emeritus of Western American History at Brigham Young University. He will be speaking on Carpetbaggers, Reprobates, and Liars: Federal Judges and the Utah War, 185758. If you want to know how carpetbaggers, reprobates and liars became federal judges, this is the man to tell you.
Chair: Bradley B. Williams, Director, Ninth Judicial Circuit Historical Society, Pasadena, CA

2013 Annual Meeting Roundtable


We want to hear from you! The program committee for the 2013 AASLH Annual Meeting in Birmingham, AL, wants to hear your ideas for making the next meeting better. What did you like about the meeting? What should we have done differently? Members of the 2013 Annual Meeting program committee should attend. All meeting attendees are welcome.
Chair: Katherine Kane, Executive Director, Harriett Beecher Stowe Center, Hartford, CT

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The Changing Web: The Future of the (History) Website


How are websites changing in the future? What should history organizations be doing to ensure the broadest access and maximum engagement? From the rise of user-generated content to the explosion of mobile technology, we will ponder the changing landscape of the Internet. Attendees will be invited to join in the discussion.
Chair: Tim Grove, Chief of Education, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC

WE ND OV ER GR IST MI LL

Pat Scott

The session will focus on three specic roles played by religious properties: pilgrimage sites, destinations of historic interest, and places of community gathering. Sponsored by the AASLH Religious History Afnity Group.
Chair: Karen Graham Wade, Director, Homestead Museum, City of Industry, CA

Wrestling with Issues of Change and Controversy


This panel will highlight issues that developed as the Atlanta History Center undertook a museumwide three-year initiative to transform its visitor experience for all ages and tell a more complete history inclusive of previously unheard voices that reect the diversity of Atlantas past, present, and future.
Co-Chairs: Kate Whitman, Vice President of Public Programs, and Catherine Hughes, Project Director, Meet the Past, Atlanta History Center, Atlanta, GA

Historic Places as Museums: Crossroads of Expectations


Using historic properties to teach history sounds like a win-win as a historic site or local museum. However, historic properties became a crossroads of people with certain expectations and places intentionally constructed with others. Learn about considerations in reusing historic places as sites or small museums.
Chair: David Grabitske, Manager of Outreach Services, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN

managers from the Public Programs, Education and Youth Programs, Exhibits, and Advancement Departments, each of whom will candidly share their experiences in re-visioning an established historical society and metropolitan museum.
Chair: Dr. Lorraine McConaghy, Public Historian, Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, WA

6:309:30 pm

Lyres and Tires and Barns, Oh My! Using Nomenclature 3.0 for Museum Cataloging
As museums turn to technology to share their collections, cataloging standards are more important than ever. Learn how the recently published Nomenclature 3.0 for Museum Cataloging is meeting this need. Panelists will discuss Nomenclatures new structure, format, conventions, and general use. Learn how the accompanying website and other supplementary materials can help museums adopt Nomenclature 3.0.
Chair: Paul Bourcier, Chief Curator, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, WI

Standing at the Crossroads of Diversity: Creating Pathways to Employment for Underrepresented Communities
Most organizations make commitments to staff diversity in their strategic plans, but these aspirations often fail to be realized. This session will look at how the Minnesota Historical Society has developed replicable strategies for pre-professional development that is creating pathways to employment for minority and American Indian students.
Chair: Tim Hoogland, Director of Education Outreach Programs, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN

AASLH Leadership in History Awards Banquet


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $55

WI LL BA GL EY
BANQUET SPEAKER

Reinventing Your Museum: New Audiences, Great Expectations


Faced with impending demolition, Seattles Museum of History and Industry began a daring reinvention. This panel discussion will feature

Visitors to Religious Sites: The Whos and Whys


By examining sites associated with Mormon history, discover how historic properties associated with a variety of faith traditions might expand their mission and attract new audiences.

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Utah State Historical Society

IN UTAH SY MP HO NY PE RF OR MI NG 1947 RN AC LE . TH E SA LT LA KE TA BE

7:308:45 am

910:15 am CONCURRENT SESSIONS

challenges in educating new audiences in the uses of these records.


Chair: Karri Krattley, Archives Manager, Salt Lake County Archives, West Valley City, UT

Breakfast: Military History and Religious History


PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED COST: $30

Join these two AASLH afnity groups (including the newest AASLH afnity group, Religious History) as they explore the complex and intertwined religious and military history of Utah. Bob Voyles of the Ft. Douglas Military Museum will discuss the Utah Wars and their impact on the state and the LDS Church.
Co-Chairs: Gordon Blaker, Director/Curator, U.S. Army Military Museum, Ft. Sill, OK and Gary L. Boatwright, Jr., Historic Sites Researcher and Writer, LDS Church History Department, Salt Lake City, UT

A Measured Approach to Integrating Sustainability in History Organizations


For many organizations, integrating sustainability reduces impacts on the environment and saves operating costs. This forum introduces how organizations can evaluate sustainability and incorporate strategies that t their needs. Attendees will work with different scenarios, which will demonstrate the benets and accessibility of sustainability for large to small history organizations.
Chair: Shengyin Xu, LEED AP BD+C, Institutional Sustainability Specialist, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN

From Sustenance to Relevance: Reinterpreting Food, Place, and Local History


Food history is a powerful pathway to community connections. Transcending nostalgia, local history museums can serve as educational clearinghouses for vital knowledge that not only illuminates the past and celebrates place, but demonstrates relevance today and generates solutions for community resilience in the face of future challenges. Sponsored by the National Council on Public History.
Chair: Michelle Moon, Assistant Director of Education for Adult Programs, Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA

Womens Suffrage was won twice in Utah. First in 1870 by the territorial legislature but revoked by Congress in 1887, and then restored in 1895 when the right to vote and hold ofce was written into the constitution of the new state.

Communities and Archives: Exploring New Uses for Old Records


Local records can be found in state, university, or government archives. The panelists will discuss interpretations of community past and present through traditional and dynamic new uses of local records. Panelists will highlight the multiple research uses and the

Growing Awareness and Creating Change: Museums and the Disability Community
On July 26, 1990, Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act, the disability communitys civil rights act. Today, museums are only beginning to realize the implications of creating environments that connect to people with disabilities. Panelists will discuss

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their museums efforts to commit to full accessibility and challenge other museums to do the same.
Chair: Sharon Smith, Curator of Civic and Personal Identity, Missouri History Museum, St. Louis, MO

Localizing Difcult Histories


Want to broaden your impact with your communities? This session examines how programming and exhibitions related to slavery, nuclear weapons, the Holocaust, and even controversy itself have been used to successfully engage local communities with histories that extend far beyond their borders, yet may hit much closer than they realize.
Chair: Cynthia Capers, Associate Director of Education and Changing Exhibitions, Holocaust Museum Houston, Houston, TX

learn? When theyre older (and a little surly) how can we get them truly interested? Panelists will share the results of two pilot projects, one geared toward four to seven year olds and the other to high school students, to get the conversation started.
Chair: Laura Koloski, Senior Program Specialist, Heritage Philadelphia Program, Philadelphia, PA

session presents a model and process to help your schools and community connect with each other and their Civil War heritage.
Chair: Sarah Rooker, Director, The Flow of History, Hartland, VT

Journey for Justice: Local History, Civil Rights, and the Power of Place
This sixty-minute documentary on the work of the late New Orleans civil rights attorney, Alexander Pierre Tureaud, Sr., will be followed by a discussion with his son, A.P. Tureaud, Jr., and historian Rachel Emanuel. The power of place was in-turn the source of power for civil rights change led by Tureaud, Sr., who worked to better Louisiana rather than move north or accept Jim Crow oppression.
Chair: Julie Rose, Ph.D., Director, West Baton Rouge Museum, Port Allen, LA

Telling a Good Story


This session will focus on the importance of nding key stories to engage audiences at history museums and historic sites. Using models from within and outside the eld, we will discuss why stories matter, what makes a good story, and how to engage our organizations in the development of compelling stories.
Chair: Linda Norris, The Uncataloged Museum, Treadwell, NY

Meshing Mission and Community: Identifying Strategies for Engagement


Engaging your community can be challenging when the neighbors think that local history doesnt matter if they can visit anytime (so why visit today?). Three history organizations of vastly different sizes and types share whats worked (and what hasnt) to uncover the ingredients for success and identify the next step for your museum.
Chair: Max van Balgooy, President, Engaging Places, LLC, Rockville, MD

10:1510:45 am MORNING BREAK 10:45 am12 pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Integrating a National Institution with the Local Community


This session will explore the unique opportunities and challenges presented for national museums located outside of the typical geographic areas for national institutions, such as Washington, DC, or New York. Specic themes that will be addressed are: audience attraction and retention, interpretation, fundraising, and community perception and marketing.
Chair: Dina Bailey, Director of Exhibitions and Collections, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Cincinnati, OH

21st-Century Roundtable for Museum Professionals


Museums and the museum profession are changing. What are these changes and how should museum professionals prepare themselves? Issues to be discussed include: visions for the future of museums, preparing both professionally and personally for these changes, and how various levels and generations of museum leadership are meeting these changes.
Chair: Kyle McKoy, Director, Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park, Tempe, AZ

Secrets from the Lodge: Identifying and Demystifying Fraternal Objects


By 1900, over 250 American fraternal groups existed, numbering six million members. The regalia, badges, souvenirs, and ritual objects used by these groups have made their way to local historical societies and museums ever since. This session will offer practical information on how to identify, interpret, and exhibit the Masonic and fraternal objects in your collection.
Chair: Aimee E. Newell, Ph.D., Director of Collections, Scottish Rite Masonic Museum and Library, Lexington, MA

The Civil War Cache Project: Mapping and Sharing Local Soldiers and Stories
How do you connect schools, history, and community in a dynamic way? This panel will lead participants through one project that does just that. The Civil War Cache project helps schools and communities adopt local Civil War soldiers, study them with primary, secondary, and online resources, and share learning via handheld and Web-based technologies. This

Serious Play: Interpreting History for Young Audiences


Most of us want to engage young audiences with history at our sites and museums, but what are we really hoping theyll get from these programs? When those audiences are pre-literate, what, if anything, can we hope theyll

CANCELED

UTAH CA PIT OL DO ME

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Long Term Sustainability Issues with Online Reference Works
If you have an online encyclopedia or other reference work, or plan on starting one in the future, join members of the Internet Digital Encyclopedia Alliance for conversation, networking, and lots of ideas. The program will include an update on activities of AASLHs IDEA group as well as reports on digital projects around the country. The roundtable will include a special focus on sustainability issues with online reference works.
Chair: Douglas E. Barnett, Chief of Staff, University of Texas Libraries, Austin, TX

POST-MEETING WORKSHOPS
These events are not included in the annual meeting registration fee and require preregistration. See the registration form for details. Saturday, 8:30 am5 pm
COST: $75

Getting Things Done: The AASLH Project Management for History Professionals Program
This workshop teaches the basics of project management for history professionalstaking projects through the phases of conception, planning, implementing, and closingand offers a preview of the newest component of the well-received program, a ten module AASLH Introduction to Project Management course offered completely online to history professionals (available November 2012).
Chair: Steven Hoskins, Project Director, AASLH Project Management for History Professionals Program, AASLH, Nashville, TN

Saturday, 14:30 pm

COST: $45

Connecting Visitors with Inspired Staff: Training Front-Line Moved to Wednesday 1:30 pm - 5 pm Staff and Volunteers
Hiring inspired volunteers is only one of the process of connecting visitors to our sites. Develop your skills in training staff and volunteers to lead high-quality tours and programs that put visitors needs and interests rst.
Chair: Rebecca Martin, Volunteer and Tour Coordinator, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC

Paranormal Policies
From facility use policies that cover the Ghost Hunters to the discussion of who owns the ndings, dealing with press, and marketing about possible haunting or not, this session is an opportunity to actually discuss how museum staff deal (or not) with paranormal researchers.
Chair: Kat Burkhart, Executive Director/ Curator, Carnegie Museum of Montgomery County, Crawfordsville, IN

Gems in the Rough: Mining Social Media for Local History Information
Learn to use social media in an entirely new wayas a source of raw history content, ready to rene into compelling museum projects. This interactive workshop delves into real user-generated content from several platforms to reveal the power of social media to create genuine multi-vocal conversations about place and the past.
Chair: Michelle Moon, Assistant Director of Education for Adult Programs, Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA

Presidential Sites and Libraries Roundtable


Join colleagues in the PS&L eld as we discuss strategies for service to the afnity group and prepare for the 2014 Presidential Sites and Libraries conference in Little Rock, AR.
Chair: Nicola Longford, Executive Director at The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, Dallas, TX

Putting Your Board to Work to Build a Financially Sustainable Organization


The board should connect your organization to its community in ways that build reputation and bring in nancial resources. This workshop will present strategies for engaging the board in this challenging work. We will cover the key elements of sustainability, practical ways to help the board meet its responsibilities, and the executive directors role in leading and supporting the board.
Co-Chairs: Anita N. Durel, CFRE, and John W. Durel, Ph.D., Principals, Durel Consulting Partners/QM2, Baltimore, MD
Utah State Historical Society

When One Wins, We All Win: Synergistic Marketing in a Metropolitan Area


Learn how an idea shared at a national museum conference created an unlikely collaboration that is bearing fruit today! Come see how three very different museums in single metropolitan area utilized creative marketing partnerships to increase patron trafc and boost museum awareness within their communities.
Chair: D. Kurt Graham, Director, LDS Church History Museum, Salt Lake City, UT

PEOPLE WAITING TO ENTER THE SALT LAKE THEATRE. MAY 3, 1910


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O T E L A N D T R AV E L H

Eric Schramm

eeting Location: All concurrent sessions, general sessions, and exhibit hall will be held at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, UT. Select meal and pre- and post-conference workshops will be held at the Radisson Hotel Salt Lake City Downtown. Full location information will be provided at on-site registration in the Salt Palace Convention Center.
HEADQUARTER HOTEL The Radisson Hotel Salt Lake City Downtown is the host hotel for the conference. Visit www.aaslh.org/anmeeting for more information. Be sure to mention the AASLH group rate to receive the discounted single/double rate of $127 plus tax. NOTE: the cut-off date is September 10 or when the block is full whichever date occurs rst. Radisson Hotel Salt Lake City Downtown 215 West South Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 Reservations: 1-800-395-7046 US and ask for the AASLH room block Telephone: (801) 531-7500 Fax: (801) 328-1289 E-mail: rhi_slcu@radisson.com Hotel Reservation link: http://www.radisson.com/aaslh Room rate: $127 single/double; $137 Triple; $147 Quad Room block cut-off date: September 10 or when the block is full, whichever date occurs rst. Overow Hotel: Hyatt Place Salt Lake City/ Downtown/The Gateway 55 North 400 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 Telephone: (801) 456-6300 Hotel Reservation Link: http://tinyurl.com/8xa7pso Room Rate: $124 King/Queen Room block cut-off date: August 27 or when block is full, whichever date occurs rst.

NOTE: There are two large, city-wide events scheduled for the same time as the AASLH Annual Meeting. Please make your hotel reservations early as the room block will sell out quickly. ROOMMATE NEEDED? If you are looking for a roommate for the Annual Meeting, please contact Mattie Rose at rose@aaslh.org or 615-3203203. AASLH will maintain a rooming list for interested attendees. AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION The Salt Lake City International Airport is located approximately eight miles from downtown Salt Lake City. Several shuttles offer shared service from the airport for approximately $16 round-trip. For information about taxi and shuttle service from the airport, visit www.slcairport.com/ limos.asp. TRAX Ride TRAX or city buses free of charge within UTAs downtown free-fare zone, and area spanning from the Salt Lake Central Station to 200 East and from the State Capitol Building to 500 South. TRAX runs in front of the host hotel and convention center. REGISTRATION INFORMATION All attendees, speakers, and exhibitors must register for the Annual Meeting. Registration and all concurrent and general sessions and the exhibit hall along with most meal functions for the AASLH Annual Meeting will take place at the Salt Palace Convention Center. Select meal functions and workshop will be located at the Radisson Hotel Downtown. When you receive your registration AAS LH ANN UAL ME ETI materials, please consult the Program NG Update for the location of each Salt Lake City activity you plan to attend.
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HO TE L AN D TR AV EL
MEMBERSHIP AND NONMEMBER You may become a member or renew your membership with AASLH when you register for the annual meeting by checking the appropriate box on the registration form. Institutional members of AASLH may send two attendees with waiver of individual membership, and Institutional Partners (institutions that join AASLH at $1,000 or more) may send an unlimited number of attendees with waivers of individual memberships. Institutional members sending three or more people at the rate of $200 or $265 will receive a 10% discount for each registration when such registrations are submitted as a package. Nonmembers may attend the annual meeting. Please see the appropriate fee on the registration form. SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES There are three opportunities for scholarships to attend the AASLH Annual Meeting. AASLH Small Museum ScholarshipNow in its sixth year, AASLHs Small Museums Committee is offering scholarships to any AR TS AASLH members who are full-time, part-time, paid, or volunteer employees of small museums. The $500 scholarship will cover the cost of registration. Any remaining funds can be used to offset travel and/or lodging expenses. To qualify, the applicant must work for a museum with a budget of $250,000 or less and either be an individual member of AASLH or work for an institutional member. Deadline for applications is June 30, 2012. The application form is available at www.aaslh.org/ SmallMuseums.
Dana Sohm

REGISTRATION DEADLINES Early Bird RegistrationAugust 17, 2012 Preregistration DeadlineSeptember 7, 2012 If you are unable to register by mail before the preregistration deadline, September 7, plan to register on-site at the Salt Palace Convention Center. Registrations received by the AASLH ofce after September 7 will be taken to the meeting and treated as on-site registrations. ONE-DAY TICKETS AND ON-SITE REGISTRATIONS One-day registrations received by the AASLH ofce after September 7 will be taken to the meeting and treated as onsite registrations. One-day tickets are valid only for the day of issue for program sessions, general sessions, coffee breaks, and admission to the exhibit hall. On-site registrations will be available. STUDENT VOLUNTEERS Any full-time student who is a member of AASLH may volunteer to work eight hours during the Annual Meeting in exchange for a complimentary full meeting registration. Each volunteer will be assigned to FE ST IVA L work two, four-hour shifts during the meeting. For more information on student volunteer opportunities, please contact Terry Jackson, at jackson@ aaslh.org or 615-320-3203. SPECIAL EVENTS, WORKSHOPS, AND LABORATORIES Tickets are available in advance and require preregistration. AASLH reserves the right to cancel workshops, labs, and special events if minimum numbers are not met. Refunds will be made after the meeting for any canceled event. PROGRAM UPDATES Attendees will receive a program update at the registration desk with any program or activity changes. The update will also list meeting room locations for all sessions and activities. AASLH reserves the right to make changes in programming as necessary. ACCESSIBILITY AASLH is committed to providing access to all individuals attending the Annual Meeting. Please mark the appropriate box on the registration form if you have special needs that require our consideration. Send your request to AASLH no later than September 7, so that we have adequate time to prepare for your accommodations. CANCELLATION/REFUNDS All cancellations must be in writing. Cancellations postmarked on or before September 7 will be subject to a $55 processing charge on the cancelled registration fee and a 50% cancellation fee on all special events, including workshops. No refunds for registration, workshops, and special events will be made after September 7. AASLH is not responsible for cancellations that were mailed or faxed but never received. If you do not receive conrmation from AASLH within three weeks, please contact the AASLH ofce at 615-320-3203 or membership@aaslh.org.

Douglas Evelyn Scholarship for Minority ProfessionalsThe Evelyn Scholarship is named in honor of Douglas Evelyn, AASLH president from 199294, and recognizes Evelyns strong support of AASLHs professional development mission. A primary objective of the Douglas Evelyn Scholarship is to increase culturally diverse participation at the AASLH annual meeting and in all of the associations programs. The scholarship includes annual meeting registration fee, a oneyear individual membership in AASLH, and $500 toward travel and hotel expenses. Applications are due in the AASLH ofce by 5 pm CDT on July 1, 2012. Robert Richmond ScholarshipUp to $500 plus meeting registration for beginning professionals in Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, or Kansas to attend the 2012 AASLH Annual Meeting. A letter of application with resume and letter of support from the applicants supervisor or board of directors is due by July 1, 2012. The scholarship is sponsored by the Heritage League of Greater Kansas City in honor of Robert Richmond, former president of AASLH. Submit applications to Mindi Love, Johnson County Museum, 6305 Lackman Road, Shawnee, KS 66217.

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R E G IS T R AT IO N F O R M
PAGE 1 OF 2
We will produce the meeting participant list and your name badge directly from this form. Please type or print legibly. All correspondence and written conrmations will be sent to the address below.
Please do not include my information in the attendee directory. Nickname/Badge Name _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ First Name ____________________________________________ Last Name______________________________________________________________ Position/Title __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Institution_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City __________________________________________________ State __________ Zip ______________ Country ______________________________ Phone ________________________________________________ Fax ____________________________________________________________________ Email_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Guest Name (if attending any events/tours) ________________________________________________________________________________________

Organization Type ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Re

Re gi st er Ea rly and SAVE !

Job Type/Occupation____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ $ First Time Attendee Yes No

AASLH Membership Number ________________________ Expiration Date _____ / _____ / _____

SAVE 65 . Register online by Augu st 17 at www.aaslh.org an d


$ off the preregistration rate.

gister by fax or mail by August 17 and

SAVE 75

AASLH ANNUAL MEETING 2012

More Savings! Become an AASLH Member and Save $115!


AASLH New Members or Renewals (Check One)
Join Renew

REGISTRATION RATES

FULL MEETING RATE

Early Bird Rate by August 17


$ $ $ $

Preregistration Rate by Sept 7


$ $ $ $

On-site Rate

Member Rate Non-Member Staff of Institutional Partners Full-time Student Member Student Volunteer
Part-time students who are employed full-time do not qualify for the student rate

225 340 225 175 Free

290 405 225 175 Free

$ $ $ $

315 430 250 175 Free

AASLH Individual Memberships


Patron $250 Sustaining Member $125 Supporting Member $60 Basic Member $70 Retired Member $40 Student Member $30
(Receives electronic copy of Dispatch and History News. Send copy of student ID.)

DAILY RATE
Circle the day: Wed, Oct 3 Thur, Oct 4
$ $

Fri, Oct 5

Sat, Oct 6
$ $

AASLH Institutional Memberships


Institutional Partner $1,000 Sustaining Institutional Member $750 Supporting Institutional Member $500 Contributing Institutional Member $250 Basic Institutional Member $115

One Day: Member One Day: Non-Member One Day: Speaker


Additional days available at member rate

115 140
$

135 200
$

$ $

160 225
$

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SEND BOTH PAGES OF THE FORM!

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RE GI ST RATI ON FO RM
W E D N E S D AY, O C T O B E R 3
Tour: Park City Tour: Rails2Rockets: Utahs Transportation Crossroads CEO Forum: $150 for one $220 for two or more Workshop: Best Practices for Slavery Interpretation Workshop: Interpretive Exhibits: Telling Our Stories on a Shoestring Workshop: New Roles for Small Museums: Engaging Community and Moving Toward Relevance Workshop: The Rembrandt Rule Workshop Workshop: Connecting Visitors to Your Site through Inspired Front-Line Staff Workshop: Emergency Preparedness / Crisis Planning Workshop: Inquiry-Based Learning and 21st-Century Skills Workshop: NomenclatureCANCELLEDPastPerfect 5 3.0 for Users of Tour: To Dance, To Sing, To Live: A Cultural Tour Tour: Corporate History Field Services Alliance Meeting Evening Event: Historic Capitol Hill _____ x 75 _____ _____ x $ 75 _____
$

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PAY M E N T
All registrations must be prepaid by check or credit card. Please do not send registrations to AASLH ofcers, members, or meeting representatives for the conference. Send completed Registration Form (both Page 1 and Page 2) with payment by:

_____ x $ 150 ____ _____ x $ 220 ____ _____ x $ 75 _____ _____ x $ 75 _____ _____ x $ 75 _____ _____ x $ 75 _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ x 75 _____ x $ 45 _____ x $ 45 _____ x $ 45 _____ x $ 30 _____ x $ 30 _____ FREE _____ x $ 45 _____
$

Fax

You may fax your registration form with credit card information to 615-327-9013, 24 hours a day. If you fax your registration, PLEASE DO NOT MAIL IT.

Mail

AASLH Attention: Annual Meeting Registration 1717 Church St. Nashville, TN 37203

Online

Registrations can be submitted through the AASLH website at www.aaslh.org. You will receive an immediate conrmation and SAVE MORE MONEY!

Conrmation

T H U R S D AY, O C T O B E R 4
Tour: History and Faith: Historic Temple Square Educators and Interpreters Breakfast and Roundtable Tour: South Temple: Utahs Millionaire Row Tour: Three Billion Years of History on One Island First Time Attendee Reception Corporate History Luncheon Small Museums Luncheon Directors Luncheon and Session Reception: Developing Leaders @SHA Evening Event: A Stroll through Time: The Natural History Museum of Utah _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ x $ 15 _____ x $ 30 _____ x $ 30 _____ x $ 30 _____ FREE _____ x $ 35 _____ x $ 35 _____ x $ 40 _____ FREE _____
$

You will receive a registration conrmation from AASLH. If you do not receive conrmation from the AASLH ofce within three weeks of sending your registration, please contact our ofce.
AASLH is not responsible for registrations that were faxed or mailed and never received.

SPECIAL REQUEST
Accessibility (please explain) ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ Dietary Restrictions ______________________________

_____ x 45 _____

F R I D AY, O C T O B E R 5
Breakfast: Historic House Museums and Visitors Voices _____ Tour: Wendover and the Mysterious West Desert _____ Tour: Religious Intentions and Interactions: Architecture and City Planning _____ CANCELED Tour: Fellowship and Camaraderie on South Temple _____ Luncheon: Court and Legal History _____ Evening Event: AASLH Leadership in History Awards Banquet _____ x $ 30 _____ x $ 75 _____ x x x x 30 $ 30 $ 35 $ 55
$

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PAY M E N T I N F O R M AT I O N
Check # ______________________________________

S AT U R D AY, O C T O B E R 6
Breakfast: Military History/Religious History _____ x 30 _____ Tour: Richest Hole on Earth: The Bingham Canyon Mine _____ x $ 30 _____ Tour: Utahs Military History _____ x $ 75 _____ Workshop: Getting Things Done: AASLHs Project Management for History Professionals _____ x $ 75 _____ Workshop: Connecting Visitors with Inspired Staff: Moved to Wed. 1:30 - 5 p.m. Training Front-Line Staff and Volunteers _____ x $ 45 _____ Workshop: Gems in the Rough: Mining Social Media for Local History Information _____ x $ 45 _____ Workshop: Putting Your Board to Work to Build a Financially Stable Organization _____ x $ 45 _____
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(Make payable to AASLH ) MasterCard Visa AmEx Discover

Card Number ___________________________________ Security Code __________________________________ Exp Date _______________________________________ Signature ______________________________________

PAY M E N T E N C L O S E D
Registration Fees Membership Fees Special Event Fees Total Amount Due 28
$ $ $ $

Be sure to fax/mail BOTH pages of the registration form. Do not mail registration forms or payment after

______________ ______________ ______________ ______________

September 7. If payment has not been received by September 7, you will be responsible for payment at the registration desk. Check your registration forms carefully. An incomplete form could delay your registration.

their valuable time, many volunteers who contributed AASLH would like to recognize the ce. We appreciate you! of this years conferen energy, and expertise to the success

S P E C IA L T H A N K S !
AASLH MEETING SPONSORS
GOLD S I LV E R

AAS LH ANN UAL MEE TIN

Salt Lake City

Exploring Vibrant Connections Between People and Place

CROSSROADS:

DIAMOND

SUPPORTING

MCCUNE MANSION NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF UTAH

SELAGO DESIGN

ALTAMIRA PRESS ARCADIA PUBLISHING BACKSTAGE LIBRARY WORKS COOPERSTOWN GRADUATE PROGRAM LEARNING TIMES, LLC

ALEXANDER HAAS

PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Scott M. Stroh, III, Chair Milwaukee County Historical Society Milwaukee, WI David Allison Golden History Museums Golden, CO Laura Caldwell Anderson Birmingham Civil Rights Institute Birmingham, AL Dina Bailey National Underground Railroad Freedom Center Cincinnati, OH Jackie Barton Ohio Historical Society Columbus, OH Gordon Blaker U.S. Army Artillery Museum Ft. Sill, OK Gary L. Boatright, Jr. LDS Church History Department Salt Lake City, UT Catherine Burkhart Carnegie Museum of Montgomery County Crawfordsville, IN Meg Clovis Monterey County Historical Advisory Commission Salinas, CA Kendra Dillard Capital District State Museums and Historic Parks, California State Parks Sacramento, CA Anna Forgerson Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center Washington, DC Janet L. Gallimore Idaho State Historical Society Boise, ID Leigh Grinstead LYRASIS Denver, CO Amanda Gustin The Mary Baker Eddy Library Somerville, MA Carol Harsh Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibits Services, Museums on Main Street Washington, DC Tim Hoogland Minnesota Historical Society St. Paul, MN Lynne Ireland Nebraska State Historical Society Lincoln, NE Mark Jensen Dangberg Ranch Historic Park Minden, NV Jeremy Johnson Historical Society of Palm Beach County West Palm Beach, FL Trevor Jones Kentucky Historical Society Frankfort, KY Katherine Kane Harriet Beecher Stowe Center Hartford, CT Jeff Kollath Wisconsin Veterans Museum Madison, WI Nicola Longford The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza Dallas, TX Maggie Marconi Sandusky Library/Follett House Museum Sandusky, OH Dr. Lorraine McConaghy Museum of History and Industry Seattle, WA Tiffany Meng Delta Air Transport Heritage Museum, Inc. Atlanta, GA Bill Peterson Deadwood History, Inc. Deadwood, SD
Utah State Historical Society

Trina Nelson Thomas Indiana Historical Society Indianapolis, IN Mark Thompson Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum Saint Leonard, MD Craig Tuminaro Historic New England North Hampton, NH

Tobi Voigt Detroit Historical Society Detroit, MI Robert Voyles Utah Museums Association Salt Lake City, UT Gary Walrath Rocky Mount Historical Association Piney Flats, TN

UTAH HOST COMMITTEE


Robert Voyles, Host Chair, Utah Museums Association* Alan Barnett, Utah State Archives* Gary L. Boatright, Jr,, LDS Church History Library* Lynette Hiskey, Utah Division of Arts and Museums* Kirk Huffaker, Utah Heritage Foundation* Linda Hunt, Foothill Cultural District* Kaia Landon, Brigham City Museum, Brigham City Sandra Morrison, Park City Historical Society, Park City Heidi Orchard, Utah Division of State History* Dr. Justina Parsons-Berstein, Utah State Parks and Recreation* Patricia Lyn Scott, Independent Historian* Maria Torres, Utah Humanities Council* Keri Wilde, Fort Douglas Military Museum* *Salt Lake City

BIN GH AM CA NY ON

Alexandra Rasic Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum City of Industry, CA Julie Rose West Baton Rouge Museum Port Allen, LA

Pre-Sort Standard US Postage

PAID
Nashville, TN Permit No. 1592

The two additions below did not appear in the original brochure, but were added and posted to the AASLH website.

SESSION ADDED! Educators and Interpreters Showcase -- Thursday, October 4 from 1:30-2:45 pm This session enables participants to join themed discussions on various relevant topics, set up as six mini-roundtables. Each table will be manned by a facilitator with experience on topics including the changing museum eld trip, education outreach strategies, new trends in interpretation, starting an education department from scratch, working with volunteer docents and educators, and more. Participants are encouraged to bring their issues and solutions and participate in discussions. Chair: Tobi Voigt, Director of Education and Interpretation, Detroit Historical Society, Detroit, MI TOUR ADDED! Capitol Hill: From Homes for People to the Peoples House -- Friday, October 5, 1:30-5:30 pm -- Cost: $30 Its been said that no other Salt Lake City neighborhood is more diverse in landscape or architecture, or more rich in history than the Capitol Hill neighborhood.From the earliest settlers building of adobe residences to the capstone construction of the Utah State Capitol in 1916 on the former Arsenal Hill, Capitol Hill is impressive through its distinctiveness. The tour will take a closer look at the McCune Mansion, site of Wednesdays evening event, as well as the Woodruff-Riter Mansion and others.Exploring this neighborhood wouldnt be complete without seeing the buildings within the capitol complex including the Utah State Capitol which reopened in 2003 after a $300 million restoration.

A A S L H A N N UA L M

Salt Lake City


OCTOBER 36, 2 0 12

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