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JUDGEMENT IS COMING WEEKEND PAGE 19
JUDGEMENT
IS COMING
WEEKEND PAGE 19

SSNNIIPPIINNGG FFRROOMMWWIITTHHIINN

REPUBLICANS ADDING TO MITT ROMNEY’S TROUBLES

NATION PAGE 8

REPUBLICANS ADDING TO MITT ROMNEY’S TROUBLES NATION PAGE 8 Panthers beat Cap SPORTS PAGE 11 Weekend
REPUBLICANS ADDING TO MITT ROMNEY’S TROUBLES NATION PAGE 8 Panthers beat Cap SPORTS PAGE 11 Weekend

Panthers

beat Cap

SPORTS PAGE 11

TROUBLES NATION PAGE 8 Panthers beat Cap SPORTS PAGE 11 Weekend • Sept. 22-23, 2012 •

Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 31

www.smdailyjournal.com

22-23, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 31 www.smdailyjournal.com HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL Stephen Breyer,associate

HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL

Stephen Breyer,associate justice of the U.S.Supreme Court,shakes the hand of a resident of the Magnolia of Millbrae Friday morning.Breyer spoke to residents during a trip to visit his aunt,Shirley Breyer Black,left.

Supreme Court justice pays visit

‘Shirley’s nephew’stops by Magnolia of Millbrae

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Stephen Breyer, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, didn’t start his talk Friday morning by dis- cussing his accomplishments. Instead, he focused on a title he earned at birth. “Hi. I’m Shirley’s nephew,” he said to a packed room at the Magnolia of Millbrae Friday morning. Breyer, who grew up in San Francisco, was stopping in at the full-service senior assisted living community to visit his aunt, Shirley

Breyer Black. Before taking time with his family, Breyer spoke with the residents and answered a hand-

ful of questions that had been previ- ously submitted. First, Breyer took the time to explain the basics of his job which consist of two things: Deciding which cases to hear, then ruling on those cases. While millions of cases are heard

in courts throughout the nation, only

a small percentage makes it to

Breyer and the other justices. Essentially, he explained, the court looks at cases dealing with federal

law. More specifically, he looks for cases about which judges have pre- viously disagreed. It’s with those types of cases, he said, that the Supreme Court is truly valuable. Democracy is an interesting approach to solving problems. People argue all the time. Many resolve the arguments prior to need- ing a courtroom, he said. Even though not everyone agrees with

decisions made, Breyer is happy to

live in a place where issues are worked out through the court rather than with violence in the streets, he said.

Longboard riders seeking thrill

Menlo Park Skate Jam attracting speedsters

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Around 150 people will take turns this weekend intentionally pro- pelling themselves down from the top of Valparaiso Avenue near Menlo Park’s Sharon Heights Park at speeds of close to 30 mph on longboards with the only means of slowing being ripping the board per- pendicular to the direction of the street itself. It’s part of the third annual Menlo Park Skate Jam — a longboard

See SKATE, Page 23

Menlo Park Skate Jam — a longboard See SKATE , Page 23 MICHAEL ADAMS the third

MICHAEL ADAMS

the third annual Menlo Park Skate Jam takes place Sunday from 9 a.m.to 4 p.m. on Valparaiso Avenue near Menlo Park’s Sharon Heights Park.

Report calls newjailplan unjustified

Released from county contract, nonprofit issues study anyway

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A nonprofit consulting group once

hired by San Mateo County to eval- uate its jail re-entry program claims a planned new facility is “not justi- fied” by the demand for public safe- ty and will only cement major flaws already hampering the local justice system. Alan Kalmanoff, executive direc- tor of the Berkeley-based Institute for Law and Policy Planning, specu- lated the county terminated its $25,000 contract with the organiza- tion after it asked questions about “serious system flaws” in the courts, probation and jail. On Friday, Kalmanoff said the group is still giving the Board of Supervisors the draft report for its Tuesday budget hearing as originally requested because it would be professionally remiss not to follow through.

County spokesman Marshall Wilson confirmed the county’s agreement with ILPP but said it was

terminated because the group failed to uphold the contract requirement to focus its evaluation on the re- entry program Achieve 180 and instead pursued matters outside the scope. “Once it became clear to the county, in its opinion, that the insti- tute was not performing the work agreed upon in the contract and was instead pursuing a separate agenda, the county decided to terminate the contract,” Wilson said. Achieve 180 is a federally-funded program offering support services like counseling and employment referrals to inmates considered at high to moderate risk of reoffend- ing. The goal is preventing recidi- vism once they are free from cus-

See JAIL, Page 24

Policy dispute arises in school assignment case

Federal investigation into student discrimination at SMUHSD ongoing

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

While a discrimination investiga- tion against the San Mateo Union High School District continues, one civil rights attorney is calling for changes in the local policy for enrollment. However, district offi-

cials say it is already doing what is being asked.

In February, the U.S. Department

of Education’s Office of Civil Rights began investigating a claim that the district discriminated

against certain students when it came to school assignments. As of Friday, a representative for the department said the case was still being investigated. This week, Jenny Huang of Justice First, a civil rights attorney advocating for students in the case, sent a letter to Superintendent Scott Laurence requesting the district make changes to policies and proce-

dures to ensure equality in school placement for all students. Kirk

See DISPUTE, Page 24

to policies and proce- dures to ensure equality in school placement for all students. Kirk See
to policies and proce- dures to ensure equality in school placement for all students. Kirk See
to policies and proce- dures to ensure equality in school placement for all students. Kirk See
to policies and proce- dures to ensure equality in school placement for all students. Kirk See

2 Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day “I cannot endure to waste anything as precious as autumn sunshine
Thought for the Day
“I cannot endure to waste
anything as precious as autumn sunshine
by staying in the house.So I spend almost
all the daylight hours in the open air.”
— Nathaniel Hawthorne,American author (1804-1864)
This Day in History
1862
President Abraham Lincoln issued the
preliminary Emancipation
Proclamation, declaring all slaves in
rebel states should be free as of Jan. 1,
1863.
In 1761, Britain’s King George III and his wife, Charlotte,
were crowned in Westminster Abbey.
In 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21,
was hanged as a spy by the British in New York.
In 1862, King Wilhelm I of Prussia met with Otto von
Bismarck, whom he decided to appoint minister president, or
premier.
In 1911, pitcher Cy Young, 44, gained his 511th and final
career victory as he hurled a 1-0 shutout for the Boston
Rustlers against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field.
In 1922, Congress passed, and President Warren Harding
signed, the Cable Act, which allowed an American woman to
keep her U.S. citizenship following marriage to a foreigner,
provided the husband was considered eligible for American cit-
izenship.
In 1927, Gene Tunney successfully defended his heavyweight
boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous “long-count”
fight in Chicago.
In 1938, the musical comedy revue “Hellzapoppin’,” starring
Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson, began a three-year run on
Broadway.
In 1961, the Interstate Commerce Commission issued rules
prohibiting racial discrimination on interstate buses. Actress
Marion Davies died in Los Angeles at age 64.
In 1964, the musical “Fiddler on the Roof” opened on
Broadway, beginning a run of 3,242 performances.
In 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald
R. Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed. (Moore
served 32 years in prison before being paroled on Dec. 31,
REUTERS
A goat drinks a bottle of beer as visitors watch in Laoshan,Shandong province,China.
grown in America’s backyards. More than
85 percent of home gardeners plant toma-
toes.
pineapple is called a Hawaiian pizza.
***
Early European explorers thought the
pineapple looked like a pinecone with
flesh like an apple, so they named it
pineapple. ***
Johnny Appleseed was an actual person.
John Chapman (1774-1845) traveled
throughout the western United States on
foot, clearing land to plant apple orchards.
Chapman was a humanitarian, vegetarian
and Christian. ***
2007.)
The girl on the box of Sun Maid raisins
carries a basket full of grapes.
***
More than half of the grapes grown in
California are used for wine and juice.
One-third of California grapes become
raisins.
Birthdays
***
The most popular grape used to make
raisins is the Thompson Seedless grape.
William Thompson created his namesake
grape in 1872 on his farm in Yuba City,
Calif.
***
Potatoes are the most widely consumed
vegetable in the United States, next is let-
tuce, then tomatoes.
***
Iceberg lettuce used to be known as crisp-
head lettuce. In the 1920s, California
farmers began shipping the lettuce under
mounds of ice to keep it cool and crisp,
thus the name change to iceberg.
***
Do you know where most of nation’s let-
tuce is grown? See answer at end.
***
One-quarter of the lettuce grown in the
United States gets bagged. Fresh Express,
based in Salinas, Calif., invented the
salad-in-a-bag technology, and is the
leader in the RTE (ready to eat) market.
***
R.J. Grunts restaurant in Chicago is cred-
ited with having the first salad bar in the
nation in 1971. ***
If an apple is less than two inches in diam-
eter it is classified as a crabapple.
***
An Alaskan King Crab is so large that one
crab can yield more than six pounds of
meat.
Baseball Hall of
Famer Tommy
Lasorda is 85.
Singer Nick Cave is
Actor Scott Baio is
55.
52.
***
It takes four pounds of fresh grapes to
make one pound of raisins.
***
It takes 20 pounds of fresh tomatoes to
make one pound of sun-dried tomatoes.
***
When refrigerated, a jar of sun-dried
tomatoes in oil is good for up to one year.
The oil congeals from the cold, but returns
to liquid in room temperature.
***
In 1893, the Supreme Court ruled that the
tomato is a vegetable. At the time, import-
ed vegetables had a 10 percent tariff,
while imported fruits were imported duty-
free, so it was necessary to classify toma-
toes as one or the other.
***
Tomatoes are the most popular food
Chicago is the original home of the deep-
dish style pizza. Created by Ike Sewell in
1943 at his restaurant Pizzeria Uno, the
pizza was so popular that the owner
opened a second restaurant around the
corner, called Pizzeria Due. The restau-
rants are still in business.
***
Domino’s Pizza started in 1960 with one
restaurant in Michigan, originally called
DomiNick’s. By 1978 they had expanded
***
Baked Alaska is ice cream on top of
sponge cake, covered with meringue.
Right before the dessert is served, it is put
in an oven or a cooking blowtorch is used
to brown the meringue.
***
Delmonico’s Restaurant in New York City
created the name “baked Alaska” in 1876,
naming the dessert in honor of the newly
acquired territory of Alaska.
***
Meringue is egg whites and sugar
whipped together until the mixture gets
stiff.
NBA Commissioner David Stern is 70. Musician King Sunny
Ade is 66. Actor Paul Le Mat is 66. Capt. Mark Phillips is 64.
Rock singer David Coverdale (Deep Purple, Whitesnake) is 61.
Actress Shari Belafonte is 58. Singer Debby Boone is 56.
Country singer June Forester (The Forester Sisters) is 56. Rock
singer Johnette Napolitano is 55. Classical crossover singer
Andrea Bocelli is 54. Singer-musician Joan Jett is 54. Actress
Catherine Oxenberg is 51. Actor Rob Stone is 50. Rock musician
Matt Sharp is 43. Rock musician Dave Hernandez is 42. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Big Rube (Society of Soul) is 41. Actress
Mireille Enos is 37. Actor Michael Graziadei is 33.
***
Answer: California’s Salinas Valley sup-
plies 80 percent of the nation’s lettuce,
to 200 restaurants. Today, there are 7,500
Domino’s pizza locations around the
world.
earning the valley the nickname “the
salad bowl of America.”
***
Pepperoni is America’s favorite pizza top-
ping.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
***
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
A pizza topped with Canadian bacon and
5200 ext. 114.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
Lotto
Local Weather Forecast
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SSeepptt 2211 MMeeggaa MMiilllliioonnss
DDaaiillyy FFoouurr
3
13
14 46
55 34
7
3
4
6
SADIY
Mega number
SSeepptt 1199 SSuuppeerr LLoottttoo PPlluuss
DDaaiillyy tthhrreeee mmiiddddaayy
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the 60s to lower 70s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
5
11 28
34 39
15
2
2
0
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows around 50.
West winds 5 to 15 mph in the
Mega number
DDaaiillyy tthhrreeee eevveenniinngg
SWONH
evening
Becoming
light.
FFaannttaassyy FFiivvee
2
4
0
Sunday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming mostly
2
6
15
24
35
cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 60s. Light
winds
Becoming
southwest around 5 mph in the afternoon.
SLIEIM
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 06 Whirl
Win in first place; No. 01 Gold Rush in second
place;and No.05 California Classic in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:48.95.
Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight.
Lows in the upper 40s. West winds around 5 mph in the
evening
Becoming
light.
Monday: Mostly cloudy in the morning.
BEMMUL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
To
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jon@smdailyjournal.com
Events:
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
News:
Answer:
smdailyjournal.com
scribd.com/smdailyjournal
Delivery:
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Career:
(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
ads@smdailyjournal.com
calendar@smdailyjournal.com
news@smdailyjournal.com
circulation@smdailyjournal.com
info@smdailyjournal.com
Jumbles:
Yesterday’s
Answer:
(Answers Monday)
WOUND NOVEL DOOMED SUNKEN
What snobby birds with big egos do —
LOOK DOWN ON US
As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

3

Mental fitness of alleged bed burner in question

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A pair of court-appointed doctors disagree

whether an 18-year-old Redwood City woman accused of slipping into an ex-boyfriend’s home and torching his bed while he slept is mentally fit to stand trial for attempted murder and arson. On Friday, a judge accepted the doctor’s reports and appointed a third tie-breaker to decide of Jacqueline Alexandra Rivera should face hospitalization or incarceration. The new report is due back Nov. 2. Competency is a person’s mental ability for trial while sanity is his or her condition at the time of an alleged crime. If Rivara is found incompetent, she will be placed in a state mental facility and treated until, if ever, she is

a state mental facility and treated until, if ever, she is Jacqueline Rivera declared competent and

Jacqueline

Rivera

declared competent and able to aid in her own defense. When her defense attor- ney questioned her compe- tency, Rivera had already pleaded not guilty to the incident that left her 21- year-old former boyfriend with minor burns on his arms and hands that

required hospital treat- ment. She is also charged with residential bur- glary and, if ever tried, faces between 10 and 15 years in prison if convicted. According to authorities, around 3 a.m. April 26, Rivera knocked on the first-floor bedroom window of the San Mateo home where he lived with his parents and sister. She

reportedly asked to talk about their relation- ship, was denied and returned with the same request an hour later. After she left the second time, the man went to bed but told authorities he awoke around 5:45 a.m. to find his mattress on fire. He screamed for his father who put out the flames with a garden hose. The victim later told authorities he did not immediately alert police or firefighters because he believed Rivera was responsible but didn’t think he could prove it. Two weeks later, the man said he received a text message from a woman, later identified as Rivera’s friend, who told him the defendant was responsible for the fire and had made sev- eral comments about plans to hurt him. At that point, the man contacted authorities and Rivera was arrested May 7. She is in custody in lieu of $500,000 bail.

Convicted sex offender pleads not guilty to assaulting,killing teen

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A Placerville sex offender linked by DNA to

the 1986 rape and fatal beating of a 17-year-old Ben Lomond girl whose body was discovered down a San Mateo County embankment plead- ed not guilty Friday to potentially capital mur- der charges. John William Kelley, 49, returns to court Oct. 26 to set a preliminary hearing date in the death of Annette Thur and meanwhile remains in cus- tody without bail. He is charged with murder during the course of either kidnapping or sexu- al assault which could leave him facing the death penalty or life in prison without the chance of parole.

Prosecutors could not charge him with rape

chance of parole. Prosecutors could not charge him with rape John Kelley or kidnapping because the

John Kelley

or kidnapping because the statute of limitations has expired. Kelley was previously convicted of rape which led to his genetic profile’s pres- ence in the DNA databank that linked him to Thur’s killing. Thur was last seen early

Dec. 6, 1986 leaving a party in Boulder Creek with the intention of hitchhiking. Later that day, a tourist stopping to check out the view from Skyline Boulevard just north of Alpine Road spotted her body eight feet down the embankment with a denim jacket over her head and torso. Investigators determined Thur had

been sexually assaulted, beaten and possibly strangled but were never able to pinpoint a viable suspect. Earlier this year, the county crime lab ran DNA from the scene again and hit on Kelley, a registered sex offender who has lived in Oregon and California. Kelley lived in Ben Lomond at the time of Thur’s death and, nearly a decade later, in 1995, was convicted of rape in Humboldt County. Kelley has a duty to register as a sex offend- er but is not listed on the Megan’s Law data- base website.

Michelle Durand can be reached by email:

michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102.

Police reports

Two balls and a strike

A man physically assaulted the umpire at his son’s baseball game over the calls made on the 400 block of Third Avenue in San Bruno before 6:51 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19.

SAN BRUNO

Burglary. Approximately $55,000 worth of goods were stolen from the 4300 block of Susan Drive before 2:12 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19. Among the items stolen were 15 fans and 15 portable power distribution boxes. Burglary. A vehicle parked in a garage was burglarized on the 700 block of Glenview Drive before 9:38 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19. On the look-out. A suspect was seen driving a blue Nissan Sentra and armed with a black handgun on the 300 block of Merimont Circle before 10: 34 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18. Burglary. A storage unit was broken into and miscellaneous electronic equipment was stolen on the 600 block of El Camino Real before 7:09 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18. Burglary. Three juveniles took approximately $1,400 worth of merchandise from a business on the 1100 block of El Camino Real before 6:38 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18.

HALF MOON BAY

Theft. Tools valued at approximately $750 were stolen from an unlocked vehicle on the 300 block of Grove sometime between Sept. 14 and Tuesday, Sept. 18. Beach bummer. Two vehicles parked at Cowell State beach had their windows broken and were burglarized. One vehicle was stolen and recovered the next day, and a credit card was used at a gas station before 5:20 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8.

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4 Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Obituary

Rosalie G. Coyne

Rosalie G. Coyne died Sept. 20, 2012 at the age of 94. She was born in Ethan, S.D. and was a res- ident of Millbrae before moving to San Carlos in 1986. Rosalie was preceded in death by her loving husband George and her daughter Beverly Mills. She is survived by her son James and his wife Susan; son-in-law James Mills; grandsons Robert and John (Karen) Mills and numerous nephews. A visitation will be held Monday, Sept. 24 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. with a 7 p.m. vigil serv- ice at Crippen & Flynn Carlmont Chapel, 1111 Alameda de las Pulgas in Belmont. A funeral mass will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 25, 10 a.m. at St. Charles Church, 880 Tamarack Ave. in San Carlos. Interment will be at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Friends may sign the guestbook at www.crippenflynn.com As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the fami- ly’s choosing.

Three arrested for residential burglaries

A trio from San Francisco was arrested in Thursday morning in Belmont in connection with a number of local home burglaries com- mitted this week, according to police. On Thursday morning, Belmont police were alerted to three suspicious people who were stopped near Chesterton and Mountain View avenues. San Mateo police also responded to the call where it appeared the three had been “casing” the area, according to a press release from the San Mateo Police Department. During the stop, 27-year-old Nyzeina Shameka Eberhart and two teenage boys, 15 and 16, were arrested based on evidence found that connected them to residential bur- glaries that had happened in San Mateo and unincorporated San Mateo earlier this week. Belmont police, San Mateo police and the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office worked together to match the suspects up to a number of recent residential burglaries in this area. Among the crimes to which they were linked are a burglary in Belmont, two in San Mateo and three in unincorporated San Mateo, according to the press release. Detectives are

Local briefs

continuing to match property seized in this investigation to additional crimes in these and other jurisdictions. All three suspects have been booked on charges of residential burglaries, possession of stolen property and conspiracy. The juve- niles are at Youth Services Center and Eberhart to the San Mateo County Jail.

Court elects new top judges

Judge Robert D. Foiles was named presid- ing judge and Judge Joseph C. Scott named assistant presiding judge by the San Mateo County Superior Court judges, the court announced Friday. The terms are for the years 2013 and 2014. Foiles was appointed to the bench in February 1997 and served as presiding judge in 2007 and 2008. He currently serves as the assistant presiding judge and supervises fami- ly law, the commissioners and pro tem judges. “Judge Foiles returns to the post of presid- ing judge at an important time in the court’s history. The court and community will benefit from his previous experience as a presiding judge as the court continues to manage the

severe and unprecedented budget cuts,” Presiding Judge Beth Freeman said in a pre- pared statement. Scott was appointed to the bench in May

2003. He serves as the domestic violence pro- bation review judge, pretrial conference and trial judge. He also serves on the San Mateo County Law Library Board of Trustees and was the civil grand jury judge for 2007 to

2008.

Active tuberculosis case causes women’s jail lockdown

Two female inmates were moved to the Maguire Jail medical section and a portion of the women’s jail in Redwood City was locked down this week after officials discovered an active case of tuberculosis Tuesday, according to sheriff’s officials. Officials said the lockdown was necessary while other potentially exposed inmates were tested. The facility, built in 1980, was designed to hold 84 healthy women. The facil- ity is comprised of four housing units holding various population counts. Currently, each of the units house an average of 37 more inmates than the facility is rated to house, according to sheriff’s officials.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

5

Hutchinson walk promotes active living

By Ashley Hansen

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

If you have ever ridden a bicycle, run a mile or taken a physical edu- cation class, chances are you know the benefits of exercise. And if physically exerting yourself isn’t your strong suit, Dr. James L. Hutchinson hopes you’re willing to try something else. This weekend, Hutchinson, in association with the Pilgrim Organization and the San Mateo Senior Center, will walk one-half and two-mile courses at Beresford Park in San Mateo to promote the benefits of walking every day. Hutchinson, a longtime physician in San Mateo, discovered the bene- fits of walking in 1982. “I stopped smoking in 1982 and I knew that if I didn’t start exercis- ing, I would gain weight or proba- bly find other habits that would not be good for me,” Hutchinson said.

habits that would not be good for me,” Hutchinson said. James Hutchinson “So my wife, who

James

Hutchinson

“So my wife, who had begun

walking after

stopped

smoking, encouraged me to do the same. And the rest is history.” Hutchinson began walking

around his office in the mornings before work, for about an hour every day. He believes in walking alone and stick- ing to the same route. To him, it’s like visiting old friends. “I have grown to know the foliage, the other walkers, the pas- sengers who hail me evening and morning and even the homeless,”

Hutchinson said of his route. The community began calling the Hutchinson the “walking doctor” because of his daily ritu- al and belief in the benefits

she

walking has on a person. The Dr. James L. Hutchinson Walk began under the leadership of former San Mateo mayor Claire Mack. “This was her idea,” Hutchinson said. “And it just grew from that. She was the one who first got the idea of organizing a walk with my leading it.” The Pilgrim Association, a non- profit arm of Pilgrim Baptist Church in the North Central neigh- borhood of the city, also partnered with Hutchinson because it too advocates for healthy living. “People think it takes a lot to be in good health and just walking 30 minutes a day has been proven to have such great rewards on people’s health, so we’re just advocates on promoting good health.” Wesselyne McKinney, executive director of the Pilgrim Organization, said of its partnership with Hutchinson. “There will be a health fair after-

wards,” Hutchinson said. “It will introduce people to walking, some who’ve never walked and others who love walking and friends and patients of mine who join in the walk.” The Health Fair afterwards will be put on by the San Mateo Parks and Recreation Department. The Peninsula Stroke Association, the Center for Independence and Kikkoman will have booths. Registration for the walk will take place at 8:30 a.m. at the north end of the Beresford parking lot. The Health and Wellness Fair will begin at 10 a.m. at the San Mateo Senior Center and is free to the public. “I’d be happy to see some more seniors out there walking with chil- dren,” McKinney said. “It’s a fami- ly thing because we’re all connect- ed. So I would hope to see more people and more extended family walking together.”

Around the state

Brown signs bill allowing sale of home-cooked food

SACRAMENTO — Clandestine cooks who have been selling home- made food at local stores and farmer’s markets will no longer have to fear legal consequences under a bill Gov. Jerry Brown signed Friday. AB1616, known as the Homemade Food Act, will lift restrictions on the sale of home- cooked treats and impose sanitation and labeling requirements on the burgeoning cottage food industry. The bill excludes products that con- tain meat and cream and could quickly spoil.

Law will boost California’s space travel industry

SACRAMENTO — With the space shuttle Endeavour’s final flight capturing the attention of Californians, Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space travel industry.

Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space
Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space
Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space
Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space
Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space
Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space
Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space
Gov. Jerry Brown announced he had signed legislation intended to boost the fledgling pri- vate space

6 Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Revamping transportation’s impact

History museum transforms exhibit focusing on county’s growth

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Transportation was revolutionary for San Mateo County by bringing people, development and even com- munication to the land between San Francisco and San Jose. Ten years after the opening of the San Mateo County History Museum’s exhibit “Journey to Work: Pioneering Patterns of Growth,” it will be refurbished and reopened Oct. 7. It will still tell the story of how transportation trans- formed San Mateo County from frontier to suburb. New details, reworked exhibits and more chances to interact with the information will all be available with the renovation. “San Mateo County today is a suburban community of San Francisco. How did it get that way? Transportation,” explained Mitchell Postel, San Mateo County Historical Association president. Since March 2002, visitors to the Redwood City museum showcased the impact of that transportation. Visitors who came in June, however, may have noticed there was space in the gallery that could be filled. That won’t be the case once it’s reopened, Postel said. From horses to automobiles, transportation changes brought new ways to communicate, said Deputy Director Carmen Blair. That’s a theme that will also be explored throughout the revamped exhibit. For example, in the time of stage coaches, people would post notes nearby the stations. Visitors can write such a note to place on a tree in that portion of the exhibit, she explained. The railroad not only created a faster mode of transportation but also the ability for wealthier fami- lies to call Peninsula home, said Postel. Within that section, a few new pieces will be on display. Curator Dana Neitzel got a call from some- one who happened to have the actu- al railroad switch from the Redwood City station, which will now be part of the new exhibit. Throughout the exhibit, visitors will have the chance to hear stories of people who would use such

the chance to hear stories of people who would use such HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL Curator Dana

HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL

Curator Dana Neitzel works on updating a gallery within the San Mateo County History Museum that tells the story of how transportation influenced the area.

modes of transportation or listen to memories from locals who lived it. In the street car, a television will be added inside so as “conductors” move the lever to increase the speed, the video of the tracks will corre- spond, said Blair. It was the development of paved roads that furthered transportation freedom. The opening will coincide with the 100th year since the devel- opment of El Camino Real. Highway 82 allowed people to easi- ly go from town to town providing freedom from the Southern Pacific train. It also brought with it changes in business. Among the changes will be a new name, “The Joseph W. Welch Jr. Gallery: The Journey to Work.” The dedication of the gallery to the Welch family recognizes the com- mitment to supporting the museum. Specifically, the family committed $500,000 to the museum’s $1 mil- lion investment plan. The commit- ment came after the death of Joe Welch Jr. on Aug. 17. Welch started the San Bruno Investment Company in 1958. His success in real estate development allowed him to be involved in a variety of interests including collecting of historic

machines — one of which will be displayed as part of the new exhibit. The contribution will be used to install a new climate control system within the museum’s 1910 Old Courthouse Building. Currently, a 60-year-old boiler provides heat for much of the museum and most of the space does not have air condi- tioning. The new system will not only improve the comfort of visitors and staff but will also enhance the ability to conserve the museum’s historical items.

The San Mateo County History Museum, 2200 Broadway in Redwood City, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.

Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for seniors and students, free for mem- bers and children 5 and under. The museum will be admission free Oct. 7 for the re-opening ceremony at 2 p.m. The Oct. 7 celebration will include a “talk” from Burton Towne, California Highway Commission chairman, when ground was broken for the original paving of El Camino Real on Aug. 7, 1912. For more information visit www.historysmc.org or call 299-

0104.

ENDEAVOUR FLY OVER

ENDEAVOUR FLY OVER ANDREW SCHEINER ABOVE, NICK ROSE LEFT/DAILY JOURNAL Rather than roaring to space on
ENDEAVOUR FLY OVER ANDREW SCHEINER ABOVE, NICK ROSE LEFT/DAILY JOURNAL Rather than roaring to space on

ANDREW SCHEINER ABOVE, NICK ROSE LEFT/DAILY JOURNAL

Rather than roaring to space on an elevator of flame, the shuttle Endeavour’s final flight Friday was a leisurely, low-altitude journey past the iconic Golden Gate Bridge and Hollywood sign as well as other California landmarks. An estimated crowd of more than 10,000 people gathered at NASA Ames on Friday to see the Endeavour make its last flight with the help of a 747 shuttle carrier. Its final home is the California Science Center in Southern California.

R obert Reich, chancellor’s professor of public policy at the University of

California at Berkeley and former secretary of labor in the Clinton administration, will speak at Cañada College Wednesday, Oct. 17. The title of Reich’s talk is “The 2012 Election, the Lousy Economy, Jobs and Everything Else You want to Know About the Future.” All proceeds from the event will ben-

efit the new social sciences student scholarship fund at Cañada. Reich’s talk will be held from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Main Theater on the Cañada campus, 4200 Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City. General admission tickets are $20 or $10 for students (student ID will be checked at the door). Parking is free. A special reception with Reich will be held at Cañada Vista from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. It includes wine, hors

d’oeuvres and an opportunity to meet

includes wine, hors d’oeuvres and an opportunity to meet Reich. The price to attend both the

Reich. The price to attend both the reception and the talk is $40. Tickets can be purchased online at Brown Paper Tickets (http://canada- collegerobertreich.bpt.me/)

Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can con- tact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.

(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.   R EVERSE MORTGAGE CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.   R EVERSE MORTGAGE CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.   R EVERSE MORTGAGE CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE
 

R EVERSE

MORTGAGE

CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE

 

Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on property taxes and insurance

 

 

 
 

 
 

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

7

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THE DAILY JOURNAL Weekend • Sept. 22-23, 2012 7 Tuesday, September 25 th , FOSTER CITY
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8 Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

LOCAL/STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

COUNTY GOVERNMENT • San Mateo County is holding a surplus property sale to unload items

COUNTY GOVERNMENT

San Mateo County is holding a surplus property sale to unload items like furniture, computer equipment and vari- ous office and medical equip- ment. The terms are cash or check with valid California driver’s license. All items are sold “as is, where is” with no warranty. The next sale is Sept. 27 but other sales will be held Oct. 11 and 25, Nov. 8 and Dec. 13. The sale is 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27 at the County of San Mateo Surplus Property Store, 961 Bing St., San Carlos. The store is next-door to Air Gas building and parking is in the rear parking lot. Signs will be posted day of sales.

CITY GOVERNMENT

• The San Carlos City Council will consider a salary adjustment for its firefighters, including a 2 percent increase in base wages and the addition of a holiday in lieu benefit totaling $146,500. The increase will not affect the adopted budget because assumptions about funding were already included. The funds will be taken from the prior year’s fund balance. The holiday in lieu pay brings the unit in line with the holidays received by all other city employees. The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24 at City Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos. • The Redwood City Council will consider establish- ing an assistant city manager position with a recom- mended salary range between $14,581 and $17,271 per month. The new position would oversee human resources, information technology and public informa- tion as well as supervise the administrative staff of the city manager’s office and facilitate strategic planning initiatives for the City Council and city departments. The city will also eliminate the human resources director position and reclassify the vacant economic development manager position so the change will result in a net cost of $10,722. The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24 at City Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.

GOP adds to Romney’s struggles

By David Espo

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Mitt Romney struggled to steady his presidential campaign on Friday, buffeted by an outbreak of sniping among frustrated Republicans, fresh evidence of a slide in battleground state polls and President Barack Obama’s accusation that he was writing off “half the coun- try” in pursuit of the White House. Republican running mate Paul Ryan drew boos at an AARP convention in New Orleans when he said Romney would repeal Obama’s health care law, which closed a gap in coverage for seniors’ prescription drugs. The

a gap in coverage for seniors’ prescription drugs. The Mitt Romney Wisconsin gressman con- accused the

Mitt Romney

Wisconsin

gressman

con-

accused

the

administration

of

weakening

Medicare

and

flinching

from

tough

measures

needed

to

stabilize

Social

Security’s

finances,

adding

that the president has “put his own job security over your retirement security.” Obama rebutted Ryan’s charges point by point in a video appearance to the same audience. He said the Republican prescription for Medicare would mean “billions in new profits

for insurance companies” and replac- ing guaranteed benefits with a voucher that would bring higher out of pocket costs for seniors. Romney campaigned in Nevada as aides released a 2011 federal income tax return showing he and his wife, Ann, paid $1.94 million in federal taxes last year on income of $13.7 mil- lion. Their effective tax rate was 14.1 per cent, lower than many families pay because most of the couple’s earnings come from investments. The campaign also released a letter from Romney’s doctor saying the 65- year-old former Massachusetts gover- nor is healthy and physically up to the demands of the presidency.

California unemployment rate dips to 10.6 percent

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — California’s unemployment rate dipped slightly in August to 10.6 percent, down from 10.7 percent the previous month, the state reported Friday. The numbers from the Employment Development Department are an improvement over California’s 11.9 per- cent unemployment rate a year ago and show the state’s economy is continuing its slow recovery. The state added 12,000 nonfarm payroll jobs in August. The state has added nearly 300,000 new jobs over the past year, with job growth in 12 of

the past 13 months. Half a dozen sectors grew in August, including construction, manufacturing, financial activities, and hospitality. The biggest gains were seen in the education- al and health services sector, which added 8,900 jobs. Five industries shed jobs, including mining and logging, and transportation. The biggest losses were in the govern- ment sector, which shrunk by 7,400 jobs. The number of people unemployed in California fell by 27,000 in August to a little more than 1.9 million. But that was in part due to people giving up on active job searches. The total labor force shrunk by about 66,000 people.

Around the state

More than 17 million Californians registered to vote

SACRAMENTO — The secretary of state’s office reports that more than 17 million Californians are registered to vote ahead of the November presidential election, or nearly 73 percent of those who are eligible to cast a ballot. The report issued Friday by Secretary of State Debra Bowen shows the number of unaffiliated voters continues to grow. More than one in five, or 3.7 million vot- ers, have chosen no party preference. Bowen’s office says Republican regis- tration continues to decline and is just barely over 30 percent. About 7.5 mil- lion voters are registered Democrats, or 43.3 percent, compared with nearly 44 percent in the November 2008 presiden- tial election.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

9

Letters to the editor

There is a war on women

Editor, In his letter, “Earth to women, are you out there?” in the Sept. 12 edition of the Daily Journal, decrying the plaints of many women speakers at the Democratic National Convention, Christopher Conway is either totally disingenuous and naive or deliberately deceitful. In regard to his federal taxes paying for abortions, that issue has long been decided. The Hyde amend- ment passed many years ago definitive- ly precludes that. The present Republican abortion policy is not at all about money. It is about political rheto- ric and trying to control the choices available to women in regard to their reproductive rights. Bills mandating needless, invasive and expensive ultra- sounds are just one of many thinly veiled efforts to shame and embarrass women — i.e. warring on them in a most egregious and un-American way. More importantly, in a pluralistic society, one group’s moral values does not have precedence over the values of any other group or over the consensus of the populace at large. My taxes pay for wars which I consider immoral. Jehovah’s Witnesses’ taxes pay for blood transfusions, Christian Scientists’ taxes pay for penicillin, etc. In a civilized society you advocate, demonstrate, proselytize, vote; you win some and lose some, accept the verdict of a duly constituted legislative process, move on and try again next time. One really gets exasperated by the sanctimonious whining of self- righteous men who feel just so abused by women — and other men — fight- ing back.

Jonathan Feinberg

San Mateo

Foreign policy

Editor, On Sept. 11, 2012, the anniversary of 9/11, Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three others were brutally tortured and murdered. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton apologized to the perpetrators. We are told that this hap- pened because of a video? The press would have us believe that somehow Romney is to blame. President Obama is concentrating on fundraising and has no time to talk to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The president is not sure if Egypt is an ally or not. If they are not our ally then why are we giving them money? Am I the only one who’s confused by our foreign policy?

Keith C. De Filippis San Jose

Focus on ‘important issues,’ not birth certificates

Editor,

With presidential elections around the corner, I am sad to see as a voter that our Grand Old Party is still talking about our president’s Hawaiian birth certificate. First Arizona and now Kansas. We need to move forward, people. There are really serious and very important issues facing our nation, and we just do not have time to waste on this “silliness.” It’s times like these when I vaguely start thinking about changing my regis- tration. The big and difficult question to answer is always “to what?”

Oscar Lopez-Guerra

San Mateo

Israel and the United States must unite against common enemies

Editor,

I agree with Steve Lipman in his let-

ter, “Support for Israel,” in the Sept. 12 edition of the Daily Journal. Support for Israel is one of the few issues that both major parties agree on. I was in Washington the evening that Sen. Bob Dole, the Republican Presidential candi- date announced he was introducing a bill to move the American Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. Neither George Bush or Bill Clinton took action and few will question their support for Israel.

I am concerned with some radical

members of both parties who do not support our only true ally in the Middle East. The followers of Ron Paul support an isolationist position which is unreal- istic in today’s world, while left-wing radicals in the Democratic Party haven’t come to grips with the reality that the Palestinians and their allies in the Isamic world are unwilling to accept the exis- tence of a Jewish state in their region, no matter what concessions Israel makes. After the events of Sept. 11, most of us understand that Israel and the United States have mutual enemies that must be stopped, whether it be Al-Qaida or the Islamic Republic of Iran. The recent attacks on our embassies in Libya and Egypt are an unfortunate reminder of who our enemies are and what they want.

Gil Stein

Aptos

Our right to bear arms

Editor,

Our Bill of Rights, the first 10

amendments, are being violated by our new secularist, humanist and atheistic government, controlled by the corpo- rate elite. One by one they are being violated. The latest is the Second Amendment, the right to bear arms that is being targeted for oblivion. They feel that the time is now ripe to disarm the public of their right to bear arms. The reason why I use this term, ripe time, is that it took the corporate elite many years to corrupt our country by using the U.S. Supreme Court to first kick God out of the classrooms. Then the high court can continue with the other ungodly rulings that followed. By doing this, the corporate elite was able to transform our once Christian society, which it was based on, and transform it into a ruthless ungodly sec- ular society. Secularism is based on rel- ativism and subjectivism, a society that is alienated from God, a society that makes its own rules, and a society that has no moral restraints. In other words, if it feels good, do it by all means which has caused a society that has no respect for human life. It has caused an

uncontrolled society of violence of hideous crimes that has engulfed our once peaceful Christian society. Lastly, the corporate elite have now accomplished their goal by causing the violence that we are experiencing now for giving them the excuse to disarm the innocent people of our country. They certainly will have harsh laws and jail terms that violate the gun control law. The criminals will have no prob- lem arming themselves because there

will be a profitable market to supply the them with firearms.

Ross Foti

Belmont

Obama condemns attack

Editor, President Obama said, “I strongly condemn the outrageous attack on our diplomatic facility in Benghazi, which took the lives of four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.” Mr. President, I’m sure the people of Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, Yemen and Somalia all strongly condemn the outrageous attacks on their citizens and country by the United States and its stooges in NATO. Or as Hillary Clinton has said after our illegal war in Libya, “We came, we saw, he died.” It looks like the chickens have come home to roost.

Frank Scafani

San Bruno

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Guest perspective

An opportunity missed

By Steve Okamoto

A t a recent Foster City Council meeting, the sub- ject of the land sale to the North Peninsula Jewish campus was discussed. The final docu-

ments were studied very diligently by

Councilman Charlie Bronitsky and he felt confident that the paperwork was satisfactory enough to proceed with the sale. Thus, the council, in a 4-1 vote, approved the sale. The final details of the sale called for the city to carry back a $19 million note with a $1 million down payment. The terms are that the NPJC would pay the city monthly installations for 25 years totaling around $1.1 million per year with an annual inter- est rate of 3.25 percent. One of the concerns raised by members in the community was the loss of the discount for Foster City residents. We were pleased to hear at the council meeting from Scott Maltz of the NPJC’s Board of Directors that their board heard your pleas and have decid- ed to voluntarily continue the discount to Foster City resi- dents. Whether you agree with the final terms, the deal was struck. Sometimes, that is the way negotiations are done, each gives and takes a little. But I digress. The reason I write about this agenda item is because there were additional discussions on what the city should do with the $1.1 million in total annual payments. Since it is a fully amortized loan, the annual payment consists of both interest and principal. In the first year, the interest portion would be $459,000 and the balance of the payment goes toward the principal reduction. The Sept. 10 discussion was about a resolution that would require that the mortgage payment be placed in a new account called the “Capital Asset Preservation Fund.” The fund will capture all payments, including interest, and use the money sometime in the future for acquisition of real property or to fund a new or significant capital improvement project. The final definition for the use of the money is still to be determined. There were discussions as to how much, if any, of the interest portion could be used for general fund purposes, rather than reserving it for capital assets. The general fund is the operating account the city uses to provide services to the community. The first option was that none of the inter- est should be used for general fund purposes. This would result in the availability of a maximum amount of money at the end of the 25 years. Another option was to use the equivalent of the lost lease payments from the sale of the property, or about $128,000 for the remainder of this fiscal year and $178,000 starting in fiscal year 2013-14. The city currently uses lease income from the site as operating rev- enue in its general fund. Lease revenue will cease once the sale is final. A third option, which is a bit more complicat- ed, would be to use the equivalent of lost lease revenue plus the equivalent of lost in-kind revenue (membership discounts, etc.) or more than $246,000 for the rest of the fiscal year and more than $338,000 annually thereafter. The final option, which I favored, was to use the entire interest portion for general fund purposes. That amount in the first year would be $459,000, but that amount would decrease annually as the interest payments go down. One of my goals was to use my financial experience to explore and locate additional sources of revenue so that the structural deficit gap could be cured. Each year that gap is getting smaller and smaller and, I am confident, that in a few years with an already increasing property and sales tax revenue stream, that gap could be closed. I felt there was an opportunity to significantly close the budget gap by voting to use the entire interest portion, at least for a couple of years. This would have allowed us time to see the benefits of our forthcoming plans for eco- nomic development and other potential revenue sources or other expenditure reductions such that the general fund would no longer require that revenue. I was the lone dis- senter of the resolution which called for a modest $205,000 to be transferred to the general fund from the interest portion of the mortgage payment. Additionally, that transfer was for only three years. The final vote for this resolution will be held at the Sept. 24 City Council meeting. The meeting will start at 6:30 p.m. so if you have any strong feelings one way or anoth- er, please make an attempt to attend so your voice will be heard. In the meantime, if you would like to discuss your thoughts with me prior to the meeting, please call me at 286-3501 or email me at sokamoto@fostercity.org.

please call me at 286-3501 or email me at sokamoto@fostercity.org. Steve Okamoto is a member of

Steve Okamoto is a member of the Foster City Council.

10 Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Sept. 22-23, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL D D o o w w 13,579.47

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13,579.47

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NNaassddaaqq 3,179.96

+0.13%

OOiill (per barrel) 91.949997

SS&&PP 550000 1,460.15 -0.01%

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1,778.00

Stocks slip in late trading

By Christina Rexrode

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The market took a recess Friday from the Fed rally. Stocks have been pushing higher for weeks, not because investors think the economy is healed but because of expec- tations, then confirmation, that the Federal Reserve would step in and try to fix it. Most of Friday seemed like another day in the Fed rally, which began in earnest early this month, until stocks slipped in the late afternoon. The Dow Jones industrial average rose as much as 50 points before falling into the red in the last half-hour of trading. It’s just the fourth day in September that the Dow hasn’t managed a gain. Still, the declines were small. The Dow lost 17.46 points, or 0.1 percent, to 13,579.47. The Standard & Poor’s 500 fell in the final minutes of trading, clos- ing down a minuscule 0.11 point, or 0.01 percent, to 1,460.15. The other main index, the Nasdaq composite, rose four points, or 0.1 per- cent, to 3,179.96. Despite the Friday blip, stocks are still much higher than might be expected for such a morose economy. This month, the Dow and the S&P started trading at lev-

Wall Street

els not seen since December 2007, nine months before the fall of Lehman Brothers investment bank. Since the start of June, the Dow has popped nearly 1,200 points. But the stock market’s party mode doesn’t mean the underlying economy is healed — far from it. The summer rally is mostly the result of vows by the Federal Reserve and other central banks, like the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank, to do more to try to help. But the promises are also an unsettling reminder: The central banks think the economy is so bad that it can’t bounce back on its own. “It’s just a big illusion,” said Bob Phillips, managing partner at Spectrum Management Group in Indianapolis. The economy, he said, is still a “no man’s land” plagued by high unemployment and slow growth. The signs were obvious Friday: The Labor Department reported that the unemployment rate rose in 26 states last month. The World Trade Organization cut its estimates for growth in global trade for this year and next. In Europe, Spain was reportedly close to asking for a bailout from Europe.

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded

heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE

KB Home,up $2.15 at $15.26 The Los Angeles-based homebuilder said that its net orders and the number of homes delivered rose during its third quarter. Darden Restaurants Inc.,up $2.49 at $57.21 The operator of the Olive Garden and Red

Lobster restaurant chains said that its fiscal first- quarter net income rose 4 percent. Mastercard Inc.,up $5.34 at $459.52

A Citi analyst raised his rating and price target

for the payments processor, saying that consumer spending is stabilizing.

Nasdaq

Research In Motion Ltd.,down 45 cents at $6.46 The BlackBerry maker said that its service

crashed in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

It fixed the issue after a few hours.

Apple Inc.,up $1.39 at $700.09 Shares of the technology company hit an all- time high during the day as consumers lined up outside stores to get their hands on the iPhone 5. Microvision Inc.,down 33 cents at $2.23 The developer of energy-efficient, high-

resolution drivers for miniature video displays, said its chief financial officer resigned. Wet Seal Inc.,up 4 cents at $3.15

A Roth Capital Research analyst gave the teen

retailer’s stock a “Buy” rating saying that the company is on track for a turnaround. TIBCO Software Inc.,up 47 cents at $30.33 The business software provider said that its net income rose 11 percent in the fiscal third quarter because of higher sales.

IPhone 5 launch draws Apple fans worldwide

of higher sales. IPhone 5 launch draws Apple fans worldwide By Kelvin Chan THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
of higher sales. IPhone 5 launch draws Apple fans worldwide By Kelvin Chan THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By Kelvin Chan

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

In a now familiar global ritual, Apple fans jammed shops across the globe to pick up the tech juggernaut’s latest iPhone. Eager buyers formed long lines Friday at Apple Inc. stores in Asia, Europe and North America to be the first to get their hands on the latest version of the smart- phone. In New York, several hundred people lined up outside Apple’s 5th Avenue store. Jimmy Peralta, a 30-year-old busi- ness management student, waited three hours before getting the chance to buy his new gadget. Was it worth the wait? “Definitely,” he said, noting that the

new phone’s larger screen and lighter weight compelled him to upgrade from the iPhone 4. “A little treat for me on a Friday morning, why not. Why not be part of something fantastic? It’s just such a smart phone it does all the think- ing for you, you can’t get any easier than that.” Catheryne Caveed, 23, was in line at a Verizon store in the Queens borough of New York. An iPhone 4 user, she had no regrets about skipping last year’s model, the iPhone 4S. The only real upgrade in the 4S, she said, was Siri, the voice-con- trolled “personal assistant.” “The 4S looked the same as the 4,” Caveed said. With the 5, “everything is different — even the headphones.” Apple’s stock closed up $1.39, or 0.2

percent, at $700.09. The stock surpassed the $700 level for the first time earlier this week, as excitement for the launch mounted. For Apple, the iPhone introduction is the biggest revenue driver of the year. Analysts expect the company to sell mil- lions of phones in the first few days. This spring, iPhone sales slowed down from their historical growth rates, apparently because potential buyers were holding off for the arrival of the “5.” Apple now needs to sell tens of mil- lions of phones before the end of the year to justify its position as the world’s most valuable public company. Although Samsung Electronics Inc. of Korea sells more smartphones, Apple’s iPhone prof- its are far greater.

Tesla to open 10 new stores over next few months

PALO ALTO — Electric car company Tesla Motors Inc. said Friday that it plans to open 10 new stores across North America over the next few months. The first of the new stores was set to open Friday in Garden City, N.Y. The location is expected to include interac- tive displays and design studios where customers can design their own Tesla Model S sedan on a large touchscreen and then view it on an 85-inch video wall. Tesla said it plans to open its first loca- tion in the Boston area a week later and follow that with the opening of a second

Business briefs

store in the Chicago area. The company also plans to open stores in New Jersey, California, Florida and Virginia in October and November. Tesla’s first Canadian store is expected to open in November in Toronto. Once those stores are open, Tesla will have 24 locations in North America and 34 worldwide.

In a digital age, paper stocks hang on

Bob Kerstein loves his paper stock certificates.

At a time when stock trading is domi- nated by rapid-fire computers, he relish- es paper stocks for their palpability. Wall Street seems cryptic and far away, but certificates are something he can see and hold. They’re a pleasant throwback, a tangi- ble marker of company history, a wisp of inky artwork in a canyon of electronic solemnity. So when Facebook went pub- lic this year and decided not to print paper stock certificates, Kerstein was bummed. “A travesty,” he says. He’s used to it. For years, people have been writing the obituary for paper stocks. They’re derided as hard to track, easy to lose, out of date and out of place.

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GIANTS ON A ROLL: SAN FRANCISCO WINS FIFTH STRAIGHT WITH A 5-1 VICTORY OVER THE
GIANTS ON A ROLL: SAN FRANCISCO WINS FIFTH STRAIGHT WITH A 5-1 VICTORY OVER THE PADRES >>> PAGE 16
Weekend, Sept. 22-23, 2012
<< South City defense plays tough in loss to M-A, page 12
• Vikings can learn something from 49ers, page 13

Carlmont can’t keep up with Aragon

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

When the final whistle sounded in Aragon’s 35-14 win over host Carlmont Friday night, it was the third straight week the Dons won in convincing fashion. Yet Aragon coach Steve Sell was not happy. The score may look lop- sided, but the mistakes that were made in Week 1, which were chalked up to first-game jitters, are still plaguing the Dons in Week 3.

Turnovers, penalties and just gen- eral sloppiness had Sell all but seething after the game. “I’m concerned about our football team,” Sell said. “Maybe if we get in a competitive game they’ll play better. You still would have liked to not make so many glaring mis- takes.” The game couldn’t have started any better for Aragon (3-0 overall). Receiving the opening kickoff, J.D. Elzie grabbed a bouncing line drive off the foot of the Carlmont kicker,

made the first wave of Carlmont defenders miss and then bolted past everyone else for a 70-yard kickoff return for a touchdown. “We talked about not kick the ball deep to him,” said Carlmont coach Jason Selli. “We went with the squib, but I think [our kicker] may have been a little amped up.” The Dons then got the ball right back when Brandon Gordon inter- cepted a Carlmont pass on the Scots’ first play from scrimmage. Despite having a false start penalty,

Aragon went 26 yards on seven plays, with Patrick Pauni bulling his way into the end zone from 2 yards out. With less than four minutes gone, Aragon already led 14-0. Things would get worse for Carlmont (1-2). The Scots managed to pick up a couple of first downs on their next drive, but it stalled near midfield and they had to punt, pin- ning the Dons at the 1-yard line. Three plays later, Aragon was in the end zone again. The Dons got

out of the shadow of their own goal posts on a 26-yard completion from Nat Blood to Aldo Severson down the right sideline. Elzie then had a 23-yard run to midfield before Blood and Severson hooked up again. He caught a simple bubble screen, split two defenders and went 50 yards to the house to put Aragon up 21-0 with 2:51 to play in the opening quarter. Aragon recovered a pooch kick on the ensuing kickoff, but were forced

See DONS, Page 14

the ensuing kickoff, but were forced See DONS , Page 14 NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL Burlingame’s Cameron

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Burlingame’s Cameron Webb runs through a would-be tackle on his way to a 10-yard touchdown run during the Panthers’44-35 win.

Panthers outlast Cap

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Burlingame football coach John Philipopoulos admitted the thought of trying to contain Capuchino running back Justin Ewing resulted in some fitful sleeping this week. He had a right to be concerned as Ewing lived up to those nightmares. A week after running for nearly 500 yards, Ewing fell just shy of the 300-yard mark, finishing with 286 yards and five touchdowns on 36 carries. But even that was not enough to carry the

Mustangs over the Panthers. Burlingame forced three turnovers that it converted into touchdowns and blocked a Capuchino punt for another score as the Panthers outlasted the Mustangs 44-35. “I don’t want to say we contained him,” Philipopoulos said of Ewing. “But it was good enough to get the job done.” There was no question who was getting the ball when Capuchino had the ball. Of the Mustangs’ 51 offensive plays, Ewing carried the ball 36 times. Burlingame, on the other hand, relied on a number of running backs. Even with stalwart Joe Mahe out with an

injury, the Panthers did a good job of picking up the slack. “We were prepared for that,” said Capuchino coach Adam Hyndman. “We knew they were going to make us guess (who was going to carry the ball).” Early on, it was Cameron Webb, who had 45 yards and a touchdown on four carries on Burlingame’s first drive of the game. Webb also blocked a punt and returned it for a touchdown in the second quarter and recov- ered a Capuchino fumble in the third quarter.

See BGAME, Page 16

Cabrera won’t win batting title after all

By Ronald Blum

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Melky Cabrera has been disqualified from the National League batting

title at his own request, a person familiar with the discussions told the Associated Press. The person said Cabrera asked the players’ association to convey his desire to the commis- sioner's office and that an

agreement to make him ineligible was reached Friday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no announcement had been made. CSNBayArea.com first reported the disqualifica- tion. Major League Baseball

could not unilaterally dis- qualify Cabrera. It could only change the bat- ting title rules for this year with an agreement from the union. Serving a 50-game suspension, the San Francisco Giants slugger entered Friday with a league-leading .346 average, seven points ahead of Pittsburgh's Andrew McCutchen. Cabrera, the All-Star game MVP, was suspend- ed Aug. 15 for a positive test for testosterone

was suspend- ed Aug. 15 for a positive test for testosterone Melky Cabrera See CABRERA ,

Melky Cabrera

See CABRERA, Page 16

Knights’defense

improves in loss

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

On more than one occasion this season, the

Hilsdale High School football team has made

a fan or two cringe a bit at the sight of the

score come game’s end. In their three losses to start the year, the Knights were outscored 128 to 38. And while Friday night’s 34-14 loss to Alameda High School seems to follow that same early-sea- son trend, head coach Mike Parodi assured Hillsdale Nation that things are looking up

heading into Peninsula Athletic League action

in two weeks.

“I told the boys, our whole game plan for the preseason is to get better for league,” Parodi said. “Period. I tell them all the time, 4- 0 is great, but did we get better? — 0-4 is great, but have we gotten better? And yes we have. So we’re excited for getting ready for league.”

See KNIGHTS, Page 14

12 Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

M-A survives in win over South San Francisco

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The story of Friday’s clash between Menlo- Atherton and South San Francisco High School begins and ends with a pair of faces — Sione Taufoou’s and Frank Moro’s. On one end, you had Taufoou who, despite the Bears’ 13-7 win over the Warriors, looked like a coach who had just suffered a loss. And on the other, Moro emerged from South City’s post-game end zone meeting with a conflicted look — one that battled between satisfaction and disappointment. “We’ve wasted two good defensive efforts,” Moro said. “It took us seven quarters to get a touchdown on the board. I thought we’d be able to light the scoreboard up this year. We’re going to have to go back to the drawing board.” A week after limiting Half Moon Bay to just 90 yards of total offense, South City had another inspired defensive effort against a Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division opponent go unsupported. Their 173 yards on offense lacked any explosion and despite only surrendering a pair of field goals for most of the game against the Bears, M-A had just enough to hold on to the victory. Still, it was clear from Taufoou’s demeanor after the game that he was none too thrilled with M-A’s second win of the season.

“No, we aren’t where we want to be,” Taufoou said. “I think South City played one hell of a game. They were ready to go. I think we have a lot to work on and we’ll go to work on Monday.” The Bears marched down the field to open the game, taking the ball to the South City 10- yard line with relative ease. After stalling on 3rd-and-1, M-A lined up to go for it. But a false start set them out of fourth-down range and the Bears opted for a 32-yard Blake Olsen field goal to give themselves a 3-0 lead. Little did they know it’d be their lone points until the five-minute mark of the third quarter. While M-A did racked up 71 yards rushing (44 net following a couple of South City sacks), Taufoou said of the M-A offense: “No, we aren’t there yet.” The Bears ran 30 plays in the first half and gained a total of 85 yards, picking up only five first downs, one of which came via penalty. But the Warriors’ offense struggled even more than M-A’s. South City managed just two first downs in the first half, putting up 47 yards of total offense. Their best chance to score came after a nice punt return set them up with 1st-and-10 from the M-A 35-yard line. That drive lasted five plays before a turnover on downs. “It’s tough,” Moro said. “We’re going out there and giving good efforts, but we’re not doing the little things we need to do offen-

but we’re not doing the little things we need to do offen- GEORGIA REID/M-A JOURNALISM Menlo-Atherton’s

GEORGIA REID/M-A JOURNALISM

Menlo-Atherton’s Alan Sakalia dives into the end zone in the Bears’ 13-7 win over South City High School.

sively. We’re not getting to the spots we need to. We’re lacking a little big of patience. We are struggling so it’s difficult.” South City’s defense, even with a couple of key cogs out with injuries, is good enough to carry the team. M-A went on another long drive after South City turned the ball over on downs again to start the second half. The Bears moved the ball, but the drive stalled after a sack by Max Varela forcing Olsen to boot another field goal — the 37-yarder made it 6-0 M-A with 5:15 left in the third quarter.

M-A was gift-wrapped its lone touchdown of the afternoon on South City’s first drive of the fourth quarter. A fumble, recovered by Tom Bucka, gave M-A the football on the South City 44-yard line. Six plays later, the Bears made South City pay the ultimate price, scoring from two yards out on an Alan Sakalia touchdown.

“We had a good week of practice,” Moro said, “even offensively. I thought that would translate and it didn’t. We’re just grasping at straws and trying to figure out what works best with this group. I think defensively we’re there. We have to put the ball in the end zone offensively.”

South City was finally able to accomplish that by dialing up Jerick Anicete, who had his fair share of touches in the second half includ- ing a ridiculous catch on the South City side- line where he was on his back and was still able to corral the football. With No. 3’s con- tributions, South City found the end zone on a Dupra Goodman touchdown run to make it 13-7 with a little over a minute left in the game.

But the ensuing onside kick wound up in M-A’s hands where they locked up the game on four plays.

The loss drops South City to 1-3. Menlo- Atherton improved to 2-2.

Serra records wild win over Buhach Colony Thursday

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The Serra football team had it’s biggest test to date Thursday night in the Central Valley when the Padres took on an always-strong Buhach Colony team. The Padres led 21-14 at halftime and increased their lead to 28-14 in the third quar- ter before the Thunder rallied. Buhach Valley scored three unanswered touchdowns to lead

35-28 late in the fourth quarter. But the Padres went on a dramatic game- winning drive late in the fourth quarter, with Eric Redwood scoring a touchdown and 2- point conversion with mere seconds left in the game. “More important than the win are the les- sons that we learned about each other during this game,” wrote Serra coach Patrick Walsh in an e-mail. “We were, obviously, stressed to

Walsh in an e-mail. “We were, obviously, stressed to the limits and I tip my hat
Walsh in an e-mail. “We were, obviously, stressed to the limits and I tip my hat
Walsh in an e-mail. “We were, obviously, stressed to the limits and I tip my hat
Walsh in an e-mail. “We were, obviously, stressed to the limits and I tip my hat

the limits and I tip my hat to Buhach Colony. It is always great to see a group of young men rally when their backs are to the wall.” Serra (3-0 overall) had a season’s worth of drama on the final drive alone. The Thunder appeared to have sealed the game when they intercepted a pass on fourth down, only to have the play negated because of pass inter- ference. The Padres also fumbled the ball, but was recovered by the Serra center. Facing

another fourth down, quarterback Zack Kazakoff, under heavy pressure, dumped the ball in the flat to Redwood, who picked up the first down. “I have never been a part of a drive like that,” Walsh wrote. “Two fourth-down conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center

See SERRA, Page 15
See SERRA, Page 15
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See
conver- sions, a 3rd-and-12 conversion from Zack Kazakoff, we fumbled the ball and our center See

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

13

For rebuilding Vikings, mighty 49ers offer example

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MINNEAPOLIS — The Minnesota Vikings are in the early stage of their plan to return to peren- nial playoff contention with a team supporting a power running game with smart, productive passes and backs that up with a stingy, turnover-forcing defense. The template is coming to town this weekend. The blueprint is labeled "San Francisco 49ers." "That's something that we can relate to here, just seeing what they're doing on offense and defense and even their special teams," Vikings coach Leslie Frazier said. "They play well. They're a very physical group." The 49ers, kept from reaching the last Super Bowl by a few fluke mis- takes in the NFC championship

game, have stayed on last year's 13- 3 pace with commanding victories over Green Bay and Detroit to start this season. The eight-point winning margins in each matchup against those 2011 playoff qualifiers were closer than the games really were. Now the 49ers continue their September tour around the NFC North with a trip to Minnesota, where the postseason is both a painful, distant memory and a future goal.

The Vikings, who beat Jacksonville in their opener to get within one-third of last year's victo- ry total, are well aware of what the 49ers have to offer Sunday. This is a significant challenge, for one, a chance to gauge just how far their offseason improvements have gone. Then there's the example and the

hope the 49ers embody, a confident, homegrown team winning without the type of high-scoring, throw-it- 40-times-per-game offense so much of the NFL has taken to.

Of the 22 starters comprising their standard lineups on each side of the ball, the 49ers drafted 15 of them. That includes inside linebacker Patrick Willis, the heart of the hard- hitting group that has given up the fewest yards per carry in the league (3.52) since 2009.

"Anytime we're playing a top- rated defense or a stop-the-run defense, I'm even more stoked," said Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, whose longest gain over two games in his return from recon- structive left knee surgery is 19 yards. "We're looking forward to the challenge, man. I don't think they've

faced a run-type offense like we

I think that can switch

things up."

The 49ers play next at the New York Jets, so to avoid two long pregame flights they'll spend the upcoming week in Youngstown, Ohio, rather than returning to Northern California. So coach Jim Harbaugh, whose team is 7-2 on the road since he took over last year, is obviously wary of taking the rebuilding Vikings lightly. "Can't have a letdown or let up," Harbaugh said. "Got a good team. If you aspire to be a good team in this league then you've got to come back every single week and prove it again. You're not better than any- body else unless you prove it."

his players is

have, so

At

least

one of

bound to be plenty motivated to

"prove it" to the Vikings. Thirty- five-year-old Randy Moss, back from a one-year hiatus from the NFL in a complementary role to emerging wide receiver Michael Crabtree and star tight end Vernon Davis, will play his first regular-sea- son game against the team that drafted him in 1998 and watched him become one of the league's most enigmatic but entertaining players.

Moss was traded by the Vikings in 2005 and abruptly released in 2010 after his second, tumultuous stint lasted all of one month. He's never been one to forget perceived slights, so Moss -- still beloved by many in Minnesota -- is surely eager to show the Vikings what he's still got. Even if he shrugged off the significance of his return this week.

Steelers, Raiders search for running games

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

(0-2) go into Sunday's game against the Steelers (1-

(0-2) go into Sunday's game against the Steelers (1- Darren McFadden OAKLAND — The Oakland 1)

Darren

McFadden

OAKLAND — The Oakland

1)

with the

Raiders and Pittsburgh Steelers spent the offseason implementing new offenses designed to rely heav- ily on running games that could take a little pressure off their passers.

league's second worst rushing attack. "You don't let it frustrate you.

Two weeks into the season, nei-

The

saving

ther running game has gotten off the

grace is, you

ground.

know

Despite having a healthy Darren

McFadden is

McFadden for a change, the Raiders

back

there,"

Raiders quarterback Carson Palmer said. "He's one arm tackle away from breaking off a 40-, 50-yarder. He's got that potential, he's got that ability, he's done it before. We're going to stick with it. We're not frus- trated. We're disappointed in our- selves for not executing it better but we're not going to let it frustrate us, we're not going to let it deter it from our goal." The Steelers haven't had much better luck running the ball so far

this season in new coordinator Todd Haley's offense. Pittsburgh has rushed for just 141 yards the first two weeks and aver- aged a paltry 2.6 yards per carry, putting more pressure on Ben Roethlisberger and the passing game to get things going. "It's obviously been a little frus- trating because that was the empha- sis of the offseason, getting a new coordinator, is running the ball and being able to pound it,"

Roethlisberger said. "But it's not working quite this minute and things aren't going well." The Raiders have been much worse with just 68 yards rushing per game in losses to San Diego and Miami. For a team that has stressed being a run-first offense under coordinator Greg Knapp, it's not hard to figure why the offense has sputtered so much with a running game that can't get going.

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14 Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

KNIGHTS

Continued from page 11

The Knights chose the latter it seems. Friday night against the Hornets, Hillsdale gave Alameda three of their five touchdowns — two on interception returns to the end zone and another that set the Hornets up with the ball inside the Hillsdale 5-yard line. “Offensively, we’ve scored more points for the other team that we have for ourselves. We fix that, we’re going to be fine. And that’s what I’m telling them. This is was a great game. The score isn’t indicative of that because offensively we gave away too many things. But defensively, we played extremely well. Offensively, we’re shoring some stuff up.” Parodi’s boys moved the ball efficiently

against the Hornets. But time after time after time, found a way to shoot themselves in the foot. Hillsdale was down 19-0 with 10:02 left in the second quarter due to a pair of gifts. The first was a Pick-6 and the second came on an attempted fake punt pass that was intercepted and almost returned for a touchdown. Instead, a play later, it was run in from a yard out. “It’s been our Achilles Heel all preseason,” Parodi said. “I don’t even know how many (turnovers) we’ve had and I don’t want to know. We’ve had drops, interceptions, fum- bles — you name it, we’ve run the gamut of issues. But that’s all fixable. So, I think if the next two weeks we fix that, we’re going to be alright. We can do what we need to do.” Hillsdale battled back behind the running of A.J Bernal, who effectively moved the ball on the ground before an ankle injury sidelined him for the second half. The Knights finally broke through just before the half on a great

bubble screen turned touchdown courtesy of Brandon Butcher to make it 20-7. The Hillsdale defense held Alameda in check for most of the third quarter, but bad snaps on offense, a turnover on downs and another interception broke any type of offen- sive momentum the Knights would start. With Bernal on the sideline, Hillsdale ran behind Giancarlo Boscacci. No. 3 gained some tough yards in the third quarter and was finally rewarded late in the game when Hillsdale mounted their last charge. Down 13, the Knights dialed up another screen and Boscacci, sprung by a great seal block by John Paran, took the ball to the house on a 56-yard pitch and catch to make it 20-14 with 4:43 left in the game. Unfortunately for Hillsdale, they just did- n’t have the defensive stop they needed to earn another possession. Alameda took the ensuing kick-off and marched down the field 80 yards, scoring a touchdown with 51 sec-

ond left on the clock.

The Hornets then really iced the game four plays into the Knights’ final drive on yet another Pick-6 — this one from 57 yards away to make it 34-14.

“Last week (against San Lorenzo Valley) was a little of an anomaly because everything they did worked,” Parodi said of his team’s learning process . “So, it’s just one of those days. But in the two games before that, we played well defensively. We just, offensively, didn’t play well. We gave up points or the defense had to defend 20 yards. But our defense has been playing well and today they played extremely well. I was really excited about how they played.

“We’re ready to rock n’ roll,” Parodi said about Hillsdale’s PAL opener against El Camino in two weeks. “We’re excited about our future.”

Camino in two weeks. “We’re excited about our future.” NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL STAFF Aldo Severson makes
Camino in two weeks. “We’re excited about our future.” NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL STAFF Aldo Severson makes

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Aldo Severson makes a catch in Friday’s win over Carlmont.

DONS

Continued from page 11

forced to punt. The offense was almost immediately back on the field, however, as Isiah Atchan intercepted a pass to give the ball back to the Dons at the Carlmont 32. Marcell Jackson rushed for 13 yards on the first play, Jordan Crisologo added 16 and Jackson capped the drive with a 3-yard scoring run on the final play of the first quarter with Aragon leading

28-0.

And then … not a whole lot for the Dons. Aragon turned the ball over on its next three possessions and the half ended with the Dons up 28-0. The Dons couldn’t seem to find a rhythm in the third quar- ter, although they finally found the end zone again when Elzie went 63 yards for a score with 2:30 left in third quarter. But after scoring four touchdowns in the first 12 minutes, the Dons managed only one over the final 36. “That was a tale of two games,” Sell said. “I didn’t recog- nize the team from the end of the first quarter on. I was dis- gusted with the way we played in the second, third and fourth quarters.” Credit Carlmont, however, for not giving up. Against Aragon’s second-string defense, the Scots finished the game on a positive note. Following an Aragon punt, the Scots drove 55 yards on six plays with Yancy Portis scoring from a yard out. The touchdown was set up by a 34-yard pass from Diaria James to Mark Gustincic down to the 1-yard line. The Scots then recovered an onside kick and found pay dirt again, going 50-yards on five plays, culminating with a 33- yard scoring pass from James to Matt Stalun. “We got after it a little bit,” Selli said. “The guys played hard.”

yard scoring pass from James to Matt Stalun. “We got after it a little bit,” Selli

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend Sept. 22-23, 2012

15

USC focused on Cal

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Matt Barkley apparently figured one way he could help Southern California bounce back from a disheartening loss at Stanford was with an unusual blast of bravado. So the star quarterback went on Twitter on Thursday and declared: “It’s bear hunting season.” The 13th-ranked Trojans (2-1, 0-1 Pac-12) look to save their season when they face California (1-2) for the 100th time Saturday. Perhaps Barkley — the four-year starter known for his humili- ty and piety — was just making sure everybody knows the stakes. Perfection is no longer a possibility for USC. Another loss will finish the preseason No. 1 team’s national title dreams, and could end USC’s Pac-12 championship hopes as well. Barkley didn’t return to USC for his senior season to play in a second-tier bowl game after the Trojans’ two-year bowl ban ended, but that’s what USC

will be facing with even one more loss over the final two months of the season. The Trojans still have most of the ingredients for a title contender. Barkley is betting they can still put it all together. The Trojans realize they’ll have to get right back on top of their game to earn their ninth straight win over the Golden Bears, who are coming off their own seven-point road loss last week with considerably more opti- mism. Cal nearly beat Ohio State, yet realizes the Coliseum is every bit as tough as the Horseshoe — particularly when the Trojans are seriously motivat- ed. “I feel like every time we play them, they’re coming off a dramatic loss,” Cal safety Josh Hill said. “So we know we’re going to get their best effort. I know Matt Barkley. He’s not going to have another bad game like that unless we force him to, so they’re going to come out 100 percent ready to go. We just have to match their intensity.”

SERRA

Continued from page 12

recovered it. Just a lot of drama that we overcame and some serious heroics from Zack Kazakoff and Eric Redwood.” Even after Redwood’s final touch- down that pulled the Padres to with- in a point, a decision still had to be made: kick the point-after for the tie and play overtime or go for the 2- point conversion and the win? Turns out Walsh told his team before it went on the field for the final drive that if the Padres scored, he was going for two. “There was a lot that went into

[the decision],” Walsh wrote. “Being only three yards away from victory, on the road, in a chaotic environment, it seemed to be the right thing to do. Plus, I believe the collective hearts of the Serra com- munity, fans and players, couldn’t take a full overtime period.”

Redwood had his best game of the season Thursday for Serra. He rushed for 172 yards on 22 carries and scored four touchdowns.

“[Redwood’s] performance was one for the ages in Serra history,” Walsh wrote. “He ran tough and put the team on his back. The offensive line grew up [Thursday] night and it was good to see them start to devel- op the confidence on a Serra offen- sive line.”

NFL

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

EEaasstt

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

N.Y.Jets

1

1

0

.500

58

55

New England

1

1

0

.500

52

33

Miami

1

1

0

.500

45

43

Buffalo

1

1

0

.500

63

65

SSoouutthh

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Houston

2

0

0

1.000 57

17

Indianapolis

1

1

0

.500

44

61

Tennessee

0

2

0

.000

23

72

Jacksonville

0

2

0

.000

30

53

NNoorrtthh

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Baltimore

1

1

0

.500

67

37

Cincinnati

1

1

0

.500

47

71

Pittsburgh

1

1

0

.500

46

41

Cleveland

0

2

0

.000

43

51

WWeesstt

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

San Diego

2

0

0

1.000 60

24

Denver

1

1

0

.500

52

46

Kansas City

0

2

0

.000

41

75

Oakland

0

2

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27

57

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

 

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W

L

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Pct

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PA

Philadelphia

2

0

0

1.000 41

39

Dallas

1

1

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31

44

Washington

1

1

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68

63

N.Y.Giants

1

1

0

.500

58

58

SSoouutthh

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

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Atlanta

1

0

0

1.000 40

24

Tampa Bay

1

1

0

.500

50

51

Carolina

1

1

0

.500

45

43

New Orleans

0

2

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59

75

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Green Bay

1

1

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45

40

Detroit

1

1

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46

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Minnesota

1

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.500

46

46

Chicago

1

1

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.500

51

44

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Arizona

2

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34

San Francisco

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St.Louis

1

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54

55

Seattle

1

1

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43

27

SSuunnddaayyss GGaammeess Tampa Bay at Dallas,10 a.m. St.Louis at Chicago,10 a.m. San Francisco at Minnesota,10 a.m. Detroit at Tennessee,10 a.m. Kansas City at New Orleans,10 a.m. Cincinnati at Washington,10 a.m. N.Y.Jets at Miami,10 a.m. Buffalo at Cleveland,10 a.m. Jacksonville at Indianapolis,10 a.m. Philadelphia at Arizona,1:05 p.m. Atlanta at San Diego,1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Oakland,1:25 p.m. Houston at Denver,1:25 p.m. New England at Baltimore,5:20 p.m. MMoonnddaayyss GGaammee Green Bay at Seattle,5:30 p.m.

LOCAL SCOREBOARD

FFRRIIDDAAYY

GGIIRRLLSSVVOOLLLLEEYYBBAALLLL

AAccaaddeemmyy2255--1188,,2255--

1199,, 2222--2255,, 2288--2266 (highlights:CS — Kaiser 28 kills; Clay 10 kills;Gold 44 assists;Du 30 digs). Records — Crystal Springs 2-0 WBAL Foothill,9-1 overall.

CCrryyssttaall SSpprriinnggssddeeff

KKiinnggss

GGIIRRLLSSTTEENNNNIISS SSaaccrreedd HHeeaarrttPPrreepp 55,, GGuunnnn 22 SINGLES — Nordman (SHP) d. Li 6-3, 6-1; Oyer (G) d.Parsons 6-2,6-3;Ritchey (SHP) d. Russell 6-2,7-5; Lynch (SHP) d. Xu 6-2, 6-2. DOUBLES — Wester- fild-L. Ackley (SHP) d. Nord-Bhadkamkar 6-2, 6-1; Harman-Jones (SHP) d. Yoon-Herekar 6-4, 6-0; Perng-Nguyen (G) d.Reed-Pluvinage 2-6,7-5,(11- 9). Records — Sacred Heart Prep 4-3 overall.

TTHHUURRSSDDAAYY GGIIRRLLSSTTEENNNNIISS CCrryyssttaall SSpprriinnggss 44,, CCaassttiilllleejjaa 33 SINGLES — Wolak (C) d.Chui (CS) 6-3,6-2;Chien (C) d. Tsuei 6-1, 6-0; Schulz (CS) d. KcMaky 6-1, 6-1; Woloshyn (C) d. Maluth 7-6(4), 6-0. DOUBLES — Loh-Park (CS) d. Nicholls-O’Malley 6-3, 4-6, 7-6(6); Milligan-Wang (CS) d. Colford-Verwillow 2-6, 6-2, 6-1; Chu-McCrum (CS) d. Flamen-Maloney 2-6, 6-

4,6-3.Records — Crystal Springa 5-0 overall.

BBuurrlliinnggaammee 55,, HHiillllssddaallee 22 SINGLES — Iinuma (H) d.Harrigan 6-1,6-0;L.Sina- tra (B) d. Palisoc 6-2, 6-0; Ota (H) d. Somer 7-6(5), 6-4; S. Sinatra (B) d. Bodin 6-0, 6-3. DOUBLES — Murphy-Hu (B) d. Branting-Shayo 6-0, 6-3; Patel- Delehanty (B) d. Banh-Wong 6-0, 6-4; Arfania-Blukher (B) d. Mercado-Lewis 6-1, 6-0. Records — Burlingame 3-2 PAL Bay, 5-4 overall; Hillsdale 1-4.

GGIIRRLLSSVVOOLLLLEEYYBBAALLLL SSaaccrreedd HHeeaarrtt PPrreepp ddeeff

CChhrriissttiiaann--SSJJ 2255--

1177,, 2255--2233,, 1144--2255,, 2255--2222 (Highlights: SHP

Garrick 18 kills,3 aces;Abuel-Saud 15 kills,11 digs; Gannon 28 digs;Merten 27 assists).Records — Sa- cred Heart Prep 15-2 overall.

VVaalllleeyy

SSaaccrreedd HHeeaarrtt CCaatthheeddrraall ddeeff MMeennlloo SScchhooooll 2255-