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University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

Introduction to Computer Networking


ASSESSMENT PROJECT - Network Design and Documentation

1. AIM
To foster the necessary skills to work in a small group to produce a network design, implement this design using a suitable network simulation tool and produce appropriate documentation.

2. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On completion of the project, the student should: Have a knowledge of the basic hardware components and physical layout of a communications network infrastructure; Be familiar with the basic configuration of routers; Have the ability to design security measures for a network; Have the skills to carry out network addressing; Have developed expertise in use of a suitable network simulation package.

3. THE PROJECT

Your company has several people responsible for designing and maintaining various sections of the internetwork infrastructure. Many technicians have done an excellent job with the small portion for which they are responsible. One of the younger network associates who was responsible for a larger portion of the infrastructure suddenly left the company. This left redesign and implementation on this portion of the internetwork unfinished. A technician is given the task to complete the design and implementation of the unfinished network.

Mark Clements

Page 1

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

After taking home the documentation to study over the weekend, it became apparent to the technician why the network associate left suddenly. The few documents that existed were poorly written. Therefore, during the weekend the technician reconstructed the diagram above from an existing diagram that was found. It represents the new internetwork design. It shows the planned routers, switches, circuits, and the servers/workstations at each site. The server at the London site is a web server accessed only by workstations on this internetwork. The workstation at the London site is used to manage all routers on the internetwork and has therefore been deemed to be the Management Network. After returning to work on Monday morning, the technician presented the new diagram to the Network Infrastructure Team Leader that assigned the project. After discussion, it was determined that new documentation must be developed by a group for the project. The Team Leader will be a member of your group. Use the following information to implement the network on Packet Tracer 5 (or later versions). Network address pool for LANs: Required number of subnets: Network address pool for serial links: IP Addressing Now that the basic plan is in place, the team leader assigns the technician to develop a prototype for the new internetwork. Use the network address assigned along with the subnetting requirements, to subnet the network. From the IP addressing scheme, assign IP addresses to the appropriate interfaces on all routers and computers in the internetwork. Use the lowest address in each subnetwork for the routers FastEthernet interface. Assign two of the subnets that you have created to the Athens and Paris LANs. Use /30 subnets for all serial links. Use the diagram overleaf as a guide to the IP addressing for your network. Obtain approval of this phase of development from your group Team Leader before proceeding to the next phase. Use static addressing on all PCs and servers in the network. Routing You will use RIP version 2 for all routing throughout the network. This will allow for classless addressing in the internetwork. 192.168.100.0 /24 4 equally sized 192.168.200.0 /24

Mark Clements

Page 2

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

Mark Clements

Page 3

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

Creating Configurations After the team leader inspects the prototype cabling, the technician is assigned to create a basic configuration on the router and workstations. Use the diagram and planning sheets to create a basic configuration for the router. The checklist below will help keep track of the configuration process. Basic Configuration Athens
Hostname Console Password Secret Password VTY Password Serial 0/0 IP address Serial 0/1 IP address Fa 0/1 IP address Fa 0/0 IP address *Serial 0/1 Clock Rate *Serial 0/0 Clock Rate Enable the interfaces Add Routing Protocol Add Network Statements * Host Table contains all routers and servers Message of the Day Serial 0/0 description Serial 0/1 description Fa 0/0 description Fa 0/1 description

London

Paris

Note *: As needed

Mark Clements

Page 4

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

Access Control Lists While testing the network, the Team Leader discovers that security has not been planned for the network. If the network configuration were installed as designed, any network user would be able to access all network devices and workstations. The Team Leader asks the technician to add access control lists (ACLs) to the routers. The Team Leader has some suggestions for developing the security. Before the ACLs are added, backup the current router configuration. Also, make sure there is complete connectivity throughout the network before any of the ACLs are applied. The following conditions must be taken into consideration when creating the ACLs: Workstation 2 and the Webserver are on the management network. Any device on the Management Network can access any other device on the entire network. Workstations on Paris and Athens LANs are not permitted outside of their subnet except to access the Webserver. Each router can TELNET to the other routers and access any device on the network.

The team leader asks the technician to write down a short summary of the purpose of each ACL, the interfaces upon which they will be applied, and the direction of the traffic. He then needs to list the exact commands that will be used to create and apply the ACLs to the router interfaces. Before the ACLs are configured on the routers, review each of the following test conditions and make sure that the ACLs will perform as expected: TELNET from Athens to Paris SUCCESSFUL TELNET from Workstation 4 to Paris BLOCKED TELNET from Workstation 5 to Athens BLOCKED TELNET from Workstation 2 to Athens SUCCESSFUL TELNET from Workstation 2 to Paris SUCCESSFUL Ping from Workstation 5 to Webserver SUCCESSFUL Ping from Workstation 3 to Webserver SUCCESSFUL Ping from Workstation 3 to Workstation 4 SUCCESSFUL Ping from Workstation 5 to Workstation 6 SUCCESSFUL Ping from Workstation 3 to Workstation 5 BLOCKED Ping from Workstation 2 to Workstation 5 SUCCESSFUL Ping from Workstation 2 to Workstation 3 SUCCESSFUL Ping from Router Paris to Workstation 3 SUCCESSFUL Ping from Router Athens to Workstation 5 SUCCESSFUL

Mark Clements

Page 5

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

Documenting the Network


In order to support the network properly, documentation is required. Create documentation that is logically organized to make troubleshooting simpler.

Configuration Management Documentation


Athens show cdp neighbors show ip route show ip protocol show ip interface brief show version show hosts show startup config London Paris

Security Management Documentation


Athens show ip interface show ip access-lists London Paris

Mark Clements

Page 6

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

Deliverables
The key outcome of this assignment is the importance of thorough and clear documentation. Your grade will depend on the clarity and accuracy of the information, not just its presence. There should be two types of documentation completed. General Documentation: A complete narrative of the project should be typed using word processing software. Since the scenarios break up the entire task into pieces, take care to address each scenario task so that any layperson could understand that particular task. Microsoft Excel or another spreadsheet program could be used to simply list the equipment and serial numbers or you may add this as an appendix to the wordprocessed document. Microsoft Visio or any paint program may be used to draw the network. You may alternatively draw this by hand if you wish. Provide documentation that specifies how the security was tested.

Technical Documentation: The technical documentation should include details of the network topology. Use Visio, or any paint program to draw the network or alternatively a NEAT analogue diagram on A3 sized paper will be sufficient. Use the tables in the working copy of the assignment as a reference, and enter all table information into a spreadsheet program such as Microsoft Excel. The spreadsheet should include the following details: IP addressing of all interfaces, DCE/DTE information, Router passwords, Interface descriptions, IP addressing and gateway assignments for all PCs.

The actual access control lists, or router commands sequence, should be included in this documentation using a word processing program. Be sure to include the router interface that the access control list is applied to and the direction that it is intended to operate. Document the use of a routing protocol. Router output from the following commands should be captured and placed into this documentation: show show show show show cdp neighbors ip route ip protocol ip interface ip access-list show version show hosts show startup-config

Mark Clements

Page 7

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

4. METHOD OF WORK
ITCN Coursework header sheet: 164277 You will work in groups of THREE OR LESS to produce the necessary documentation for this project. It is necessary to elect a spokesperson or Team Leader to arrange meetings of your group. You are expected to arrange and attend meetings and communicate with your group without the intervention of your tutor. Members of groups who do not attend meetings or produce work on time may be sacked. Any sacked member must join another group or alternatively produce the documentation on their own. See Group Policy below. Each team member will be responsible for the documentation of ONE of the routers. The rest of the networking tasks may be divided up as the group sees fit. To complete this assignment, you must provide the deliverables as described above plus a diary showing ALL of your meetings and the work scheduled for each group member. You will submit a suitably bound copy of your work to the Student Centre. This will be hard copy of your entire documentation, a network diagram, preferably on A3 sized paper, and your diary of meetings. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A wordprocessed document containing the network documentation. A spreadsheet containing the information described in the deliverables above. Your Packet Tracer file (.pkt). Your network diagram. A diary showing ALL of your meetings and the work scheduled for each group member (if you have kept this in digital format). This will assist in the allocation of grades.

You must complete this assignment as a group and submit the analogue parts (to the Student Centre) on Tuesday 20th April 2010 (before 4 p.m.). If you experience any difficulties you should notify your tutor as soon as possible. Extensions will NOT be granted less than one week before the deadline. Note: Late submission, unless subject to an extension of time (in writing, granted prior to the extension deadline by your tutor) MAY NOT BE MARKED.

5. FORMAT OF SUBMISSIONS
Hardcopy of your work submitted must be in A4 format, typed and bound.

6. ASSESSMENT
This assignment contributes 25% of the total marks for this course.

Mark Clements

Page 8

11/09/2012

University of Greenwich

School of Engineering

7. ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
General Documentation Technical Documentation Physical topology diagram IP addressing scheme Neatness and readability Diary of meetings and work distribution Total 20% 20% 10% 10% 30% 10% 100%

Groups and Group Policy


It is your responsibility to form or join a group. Do NOT expect your lecturer to arrange groups. When you have formed a group, it would be worthwhile to get together for a meeting to work out individual members strengths and weaknesses. There are many parts to this project and it is necessary to delegate separate sections to different group members. You may decide to have a group/ team leader. Elect him/ her at the earliest opportunity. You may wish for a flat management structure. In either case, decide this early in your meetings. Examine the deliverables for the project. They are set out above. It may help to produce a Gantt chart during your first meeting to help plan out who will work on which section(s) of the project. Some parts of the project can run in parallel, others must wait for an earlier phase to complete before commencing. Sometimes there may be personality clashes or communication difficulties with team work. Make sure that you record and distribute contact details of every member of the group at the initial meeting. If you do experience personnel problems, make sure that you inform all members as soon as possible and attempt to deal with the problem in an impartial manner. If a group member is not pulling their weight, a written warning (email, text message, hardcopy, snailmail) must be issued to that member. If the problem persists, you may sack that member from your group. He or she will then have to join another group or complete the project on their own. I will have little sympathy for ex-group members who have been sacked for indolence. Remember, in industry, sacking is the fate reserved for people who constantly fail to meet deadlines. I am happy to give you general help with group politics, but will not intervene personally to resolve group problems.

Mark Clements

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11/09/2012