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Community

Development Futures Task Force Neighborhood Revitalization Strategic Framework


February 2010

The Community D evelopment Advocates of Detroit (CDAD) Futures Task Force was formed out o f a conviction that Detroit requires a bold new vision for its neighborhoods -- one that acknowledges that we will not reverse the loss of population for the foreseeable future, a nd that c urrent conditions in Detroits neighborhoods are socially, economically a nd environmentally no longer sustainable. D etroit m ust truly reinvent itself from the core downtown to the c ity limits. A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE THROUGH A BROAD-BASED, MULTI-SECTOR CONSENSUS PROCESS The Futures Task Force has brought together D etroit community development organizations (CDOs) and professionals individuals who have worked for many y ears every day in Detroits neighborhoods a nd created a consensus process with a wide array o f other public and private agencies a nd institutions that have long been contributors to neighborhood development - to create neighborhood revitalization recommendations. These recommendations suggest a framework for how we can collaboratively focus o n revitalizing Detroits neighborhoods, what strategies would be a ppropriate, and what role CDOs should play. Equally important, our framework suggests a system of support for community development organizations those frontline place-based organizations dedicated to neighborhoods - to play a n a ppropriate role in that effort. NEIGHBORHOOD CLASSIFICATIONS, FUTURE DIRECTIONS AND MATCHING STRATEGIES Like many stakeholder groups now looking at this issue, CDAD believes that using indicators of c hange is a valid way of determining how to invest in neighborhoods. CDADs approach also suggests classifications for areas of the c ity, based o n this data, building on earlier work that was started a few y ears ago. CDAD takes that work much further a nd suggests c lassifications for low and no density areas of the City (residential, commercial a nd industrial) that according to indicators should be totally reinvented for different purposes. However CDADs work will a dd significant value because we look not j ust at current conditions and classifications, but a t a n appropriate, sustainable and realistic direction for any given type of area in the city, then we suggest potential matching strategies to realize that direction. By looking a t right direction for any given neighborhood using a data approach, everyone - local residents a nd businesses, their representative CDOs, funders, developers, a nd local/state/federal government can make collaborative c hoices around investments in any given neighborhood, a nd around a role for a ny given community development organization. CDAD believes that realistically, every area o f the City m ust be a ddressed at the right time through the right intervention in some way even when the right intervention is the c learance of buildings a nd population. Equally important, CDOs are uniquely positioned to play the appropriate role along with the right partners in every neighborhood. We imagine that a CDO would have a role in every neighborhood, a nd that every neighborhood would include multiple classifications within it, depending o n c urrent conditions. We finally suggest that community organizing, education a nd engagement are the fundamentally important roles that every CDO should play, geared toward a purpose that aligns with the realistic direction a neighborhood is taking. REFORMING THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRY Furthermore, CDAD recognizes that while we must continue to advocate for the importance of o ur traditional work in neighborhoods candidly calling out for c hanges, for c larity of roles a nd to be properly resourced to do o ur work we k now we must also hold up a mirror to ourselves. As organizations we must be structured and resourced in a rational way, that flows from a city wide, realistic a nd collaborative strategy for revitalization. We m ust be willing to restructure, realign a nd even m erge when necessary to be more efficient and effective. Our organizations m ust be solid a nd dynamic, nimble in responding to c hanging conditions, a nd held to o bvious, published standards for o peration, and measures for success in the communities we serve. THE TRIPLE B OTTOM LINE. PRESERVING AND SUSTAINING DETROIT This concept describes a balanced standard for community a nd urban life. We a dhere to the triple bottom line, when we focus on social equity, treating each other a s we would want to be treated; environmental integrity where we respect the natural environment for future generations; a nd economic prosperity where we foster strong business and gainful employment at a living wage. When we focus on sustainability, we are focusing on the triple bottom line by fostering the use of environmentally sound a nd socially equitable practices a nd technologies in our economic production, construction a nd business practices. CDAD believes that we can a nd m ust reinvent D etroit a nd account for the triple bottom line, and the strategies suggested here a dhere to that belief. CDAD also calls for us to respect and preserve, where possible, o ur historically significant structures so future generations can understand and a ppreciate our past. CDAD strongly believes that D etroits most stunning natural asset its riverfront m ust be preserved, o pen for public enjoyment, and where used for commerce, done so sustainably.

THE RIGHT DIRECTION FOR DETROIT: A B EGINNING FRAMEWORK What CDAD describes below is not a Master Plan. But it is a suggested framework that describes a v ision for every type of area in the City, moving from high-density residential to low density residential; from low density business/industrial to high density business a nd commercial. This framework is a starting point for important next steps: the collaborative development of indicators for each classification, the testing of those indicators, finalization of appropriate strategies with corresponding success measures then testing those strategies as part of an overall collaborative vision We recognize that the c hange we call for will be a long term process of c hange. But we a re convinced that the levels of abandonment in Detroit can make some o f this c hange possible in the shorter term, without undue relocation. We a lso believe that residents of Detroit along with the businesses and institutions that serve them, will be willing to renew their commitment to c hange if they can a uthentically participate in this difficult process, then come a way with a c lear understanding o f the right direction(s) for the neighborhood in which they live, work, invest a nd serve. We do not expect o ur recommendations to be the final word on the subject; although they are a clear statement from the community development industry perspective a s to what direction is right for Detroit. Rather, we ask that o ur recommendations be taken a s a starting point - a set of building blocks if you will - for a series of important next steps, a nd a collaborative process with C ity, State and Federal o fficials, foundations a nd intermediaries, corporations, non-profit organizations a nd especially residents, to build o n the framework that we present. FACILITATING THE CHANGE PROCESS BY WORKING WITH PEOPLE AND CREATING A CITYWIDE VISION CDAD a lso advocates for a change facilitation process that is humane and fair, and involves residents and local businesses through providing information openly, genuinely listening for feedback a nd ideas, a nd collaboratively planning o ur future even when it is difficult, confrontive a nd time consuming. Community Development Organizations have a unique a nd important role in this process because of o ur connection to a given community, o ur experience with involving people in planning, a nd our conviction that change is o nly possible when everyone helps plan for it. However we recognize that strong leadership is required for a process this daunting. We believe that only D etroits Mayor - with strong involvement of D etroits C ity Council - can lead that c hange, mobilizing c ity government to align with necessary change. But the plans we must make a nd the process by which they are carried o ut cannot be dictated by any one entity neither c ity government nor the private sector - or created in a vacuum. Furthermore, the strategies that are created cannot be done in a piecemeal fashion by looking only a t a few neighborhoods. A c itywide vision and strategic framework m ust be created before any one or two neighborhoods are highlighted. Once we collectively understand what o ur overall direction is, what the right strategies are for every neighborhood, implementation plans can be developed more rationally, with more support a nd involvement, a nd with more patience a nd tolerance for the difficulties that lie a head. A NEW DETROIT: SPACIOUS, GRACIOUS, GREEN AND I NDUSTRIOUS CDAD imagines a new Detroit that is the first City in the U nited States to respond to its a bundance of vacant land in such a comprehensive a nd positive way, by offering a unique array of choices in residential living from rural to main street, from traditional to suburban, from single family to high rise, with energy efficient homes and apartments both old and new. We a re committed to a D etroit where residents are employed within the city, where local entrepreneurial residents o wn local businesses. We see a Detroit that is a hub for sustainable green industry from farms to fisheries, but a lso boasts a n a bundance of natural green space especially a long o ur riverfront which is preserved for public use. We envision a c ity whose streets accommodate cars, but a lso light rail, bikes and walkers. We want a c ity that welcomes and recruits immigrants, whose people remain the friendliest a nd most resilient in the U nited States.

NEIGHBORHOOD VISION, CLASSIFICATIONS, FUTURE DIRECTIONS AND MATCHING STRATEGIES This document o utlines a v ision for all areas of the C ity divided into eleven proposed future directions a s o utlined below. The document then goes o n to describe c urrent conditions in each neighborhood classification, its potential future direction a nd strategies for how to move from the current state to the future direction. Finally the role CDOs could play in implementing the right strategies to each area of the c ity are outlined.

Proposed Future Directions


1 2 3

Traditional Spacious Residential Urban Homestead Residential Sectors Transition Zones Sectors

4 Naturescapes

5 Green Venture Zones

6 Green Thoroughfares

7 Industry Zones

8 Village Hubs

9 Shopping Hubs

10 City Hubs

11 Downtown

#1: TRADITIONAL RESIDENTIAL SECTORS


Vision: Older, single-family homes a nd quiet, friendly densely-populated streets shelter residents from the hustle a nd bustle o f
shopping hubs, city hubs a nd job zones. Families push strollers down the sidewalks as neighbors mow their front, side a nd back lawns around homes that feature driveways, backyards a nd garages. Block clubs c lose streets a nd hold block parties. While some of these neighborhoods are c lose enough to walk to the bus or light rail train stop, many of the residents will drive from their home to the main street neighborhood store several blocks a way, or to the shopping hubs. The denser of these neighborhoods has a community c enter - or uses a n existing public facility like a library for community gathering - where young people a nd seniors can use their free time productively for learning and recreation, a nd families can take classes a nd hold community m eetings.

Description of Current Conditions: a. Predominantly single family housing; Structures o n a lmost every lot; v ery little blight; some

foreclosure and some vacant homes; mostly home o wner; stable v alues high household income; high educational attainment; c lose to quality schools a nd parks; good infrastructure; active neighborhood a ssociation; good neighborhood reputation; low crime;

OR b. Predominantly single family housing; Structures o n most lots; limited blight; some litter; rapidly increasing foreclosures a nd vacant homes; mostly homeowner with some rentals; values decreasing; high to moderate household income but decreasing; high educational a ttainment; close to quality schools a nd parks; good infrastructure; active neighborhood association; good neighborhood reputation; occasional crime; a djacent to anchors

OR

c. M ix o f single family housing and vacant lots; Structures on most lots; signs of blight a nd fire damage; o bvious litter; some foreclosure
and many vacant homes; mix of home o wners a nd rentals; values decreasing rapidly; moderate household income; good educational attainment; close to decent schools and parks; deteriorating infrastructure; active block c lubs a nd strong CDO present; slipping neighborhood reputation; occasional crime a nd growing; a djacent to anchors.

Description of Future Direction:


Mid to higher density single family homes; a long with some duplexes and quadplexes. Yards can range from 30 ft. lots, to 100 ft. and properties features larger set-backs, backyard garages, a nd driveways. They serve as a connection from a Village or C ity Hub to an Urban Homestead Sector, Shopping Hub or Green Venture Zone. Less dense Traditional Residential Sectors may increase population over time, or maintain its more spacious c haracter. D epending on the density, level o f resident interest, a nd level of deterioration in one o f these sectors, the strategies may vary.

Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:


Systemic Change Strategies

Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Community-Based land use planning Community Based housing strategy

Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Green codes

Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) School Reform

development Zoning/green codes Broken Window Policing; Foreclosure prevention programs Housing preservation and home repair including residential matching faade grants Side lot acquisition a nd community park/garden programs in less dense sectors Code enforcement Community Engagement to build cohesion among residents, especially in less dense areas Home greening/energy efficiency programs Affordable and market- rate infill housing; Creation of a community center; Workforce development; Side lot acquisition planning Mixed income housing development to prevent gentrification


Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies


Role of Community Development Organization (CDO):
Community Engagement for land use planning and resident cohesion In less dense sectors, planning for distribution a nd/or banking a nd/or collective ownership of vacant lots Blight Awareness/Code Enforcement & Blight Reduction organizing Housing strategies to catalyze private market housing activity: Home Repair Purchase/Rehab/Resale of select homes Vacant Home boarding Select housing infill Foreclosure prevention Housing weatherization/greening a ssistance Senior housing If a ppropriate, community C enter Coordination/Staffing; or facilitation of the use of a n existing public facility (i.e. a library or school or c hurch) for this purpose Partner with Specialty Organizations for workforce development, Human D evelopment strategies coordinated out o f community center Partner with Specialty Organizations for community gardening, pocket park development & Maintenance in low density areas Liaison to c ity planning Monitor/organize to promote resident cohesion and prevent gentrification

#2: SPACIOUS RESIDENTIAL TRANSITION Z ONES


Vision: This unique category suggests that these neighborhoods will likely evolve over time into a NatureScape, Green Venture Zone
or Urban Homestead Sector. Covering many residential areas o f the city, these sectors include blocks that may include a few homes or low-density a partment buildings. In these Spacious Residential Sectors, homes will feature very large side lots a nd back yards. Even though the population is less dense, residents organize to prevent crime, maintain vacant lots, create community gardens a nd improve the parking lot or playground around the local school. Residents a ccess a multiplicity o f needed social services to help them gain employment, improve their basic skills, resolve family challenges, a nd gain access to better quality shopping a t the Shopping Hubs. Residents are provided information a nd support to help them make c hoices on other more dense neighborhoods to which they will move as the a rea transitions.

Description of Current Conditions:


Mix o f single family housing and vacant lots; Vacant lots become m ore noticeable; blight a nd fire damage is significant; obvious litter a nd dumping; some foreclosure a nd many vacant homes; mix of home owners and rentals; decreased values - not expected to increase soon; low household income; close to decent schools a nd parks; poor infrastructure; limited educational a ttainment; some block clubs a nd limited capacity CDO; questionable neighborhood reputation; crime problem; not a djacent to anchors; expensive delivery of basic city services a nd utilities

Description of Future Direction:


Low -density single family homes; a long with some duplexes a nd quadplexes. Yards can range from 30 ft lots to even a quarter acre. In five years, the neighborhood is reassessed to determine whether it is moving in the direction of Nature Scape, Green Venture Zone, or Urban Homestead sector. New housing a nd commercial development is restricted or prohibited. Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction: Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Mid Term I mpact (3-5 yrs) Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) Systemic Change Strategies Community planning /visioning sessions Community education sessions Zoning c hanges to accommodate larger lots a nd restrictions o n new housing a nd commercial development Community influenced reassessment o f indicators a nd re- classification Green codes for future classification Transition to possible options: Urban Homestead Sector, Green Venture Zone or NatureScape If market conditions, level of resident engagement, blight conditions warrant it, reclassify a s Traditional Residential Sector


Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Broken Window
Policing; Housing preservation including residential matching faade grants; Deconstruction of non- useable structures Code enforcement; Community garden program; Community organizing to build relationships among residents, prevent crime

Land banking

Workforce development and family support services Side lot acquisition Local school improvement projects Community Center organizing to bring needed services under one roof


Role of Community Development Organization (CDO):
Community Engagement for land use planning and planning for distribution of vacant land according to collective plan; and to promote residential cohesion Creation of a collective land ownership structure to assemble a nd conserve vacant land that is not used for side lots Coordination of side lot acquisition program Blight Awareness/Code Enforcement & Blight Reduction organizing Home Repair strategies Facilitation o f use of existing public facility (i.e. school, library, c hurch) for community gathering, planning a nd provision o f human services under o ne roof Partner with Specialty Organizations for workforce development, Human D evelopment strategies coordinated out o f community center Partner with Specialty Organizations for community gardening, pocket park development & maintenance of land in low density areas

#3 URBAN HOMESTEAD SECTORS Vision: Country living in the City! A homeowner and his/her family harvests some vegetables that they intend to sell at their local
farmers market. They enjoy their large o lder home, surrounded by a natural landscape comprising the huge lot/yard/small farm that comprises their property, a way from the high-energy, noisy activity in o ther places in the city. Many c ity services (IE public lighting) a re no longer provided, a nd homeowners enjoy lower taxes, in exchange for experimenting with a nd using alternative energy programs for heat a nd electricity, a nd where possible, well-water services. However, they are still c lose enough to the rest o f the city where they c an easily sell produce at Eastern Market, enjoy a ball game downtown, and take a dvantage of the citys c ultural amenities.

Description of Current Condition:


Vacant lots with some single family homes; Structures on less than half the lots; illegal dumping obvious; some foreclosure; mix of ownership; low values; low household income; limited educational attainment; bad infrastructure; no or limited capacity block club or CDO; risky neighborhood reputation; not a djacent to a nchors; delivery of basic city services and utilities is cost prohibitive

Description of Future Direction:


Low and extremely low density. Lots can be a s large a s an acre or more. Low-impact a gricultural activities can be a llowed in the zoning. This area is adjacent to Spacious Residential Sectors, NatureScapes and Green Job Areas. Residential development can range from one home surrounded by single/multiple acres; to clusters of homes/buildings surrounded by multiple acres, a strategy which could facilitate the use of geothermal heating/cooling systems.

Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:



Systemic Change Strategies

Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Major investment in land a ssembly/land banking/land leasing program to a ssist property o wners to assemble surrounding half to one-acre lots; Marketing initiatives; Zoning c hanges Deconstruction of selected structures; Community education/listening sessions; Community planning/visioning sessions; Community organizing to promote cohesion among residents Facilitation o f use of existing facilities (libraries, c hurches, schools), to create community gathering places Relocation a ssistance thru partnerships with other more dense neighborhood CDOs Residential matching faade grants Other housing preservation/home repair strategies

Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Marketing initiatives; Devolution of some utilities a nd city services. New property tax rates/codes Waste disposal/storm water regulations Gravel road services (dust m itigation, snow plowing, pothole repair, drainage ways, tree/weed removal, mail services, school bus access) Alternative energy program including geothermal heating/cooling systems community garden programs; workforce development focused o n farming/green jobs for placement in Green Job Zone Continuing relocation assistance

Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) New property tax/land value codes Identification of utility corridors

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Gentrification prevention strategies

Role of Community Development Organization:


Facilitate community engagement/community planning for public space reuse and to promote cohesion among residents Facilitation o f use of existing public facilities (Schools, libraries, churches) for community gathering Create a nd articulate the vision a nd marketing plan Assist/facilitate assembly of existing residential lots a nd home purchasing Community planning for use of public green spaces Implementation o f public space re-use (parks, gardens, etc) Vacant land management (cutting, litter pick up, community patrols)

#4 N ATURESCAPES Vision: These are areas that offer beautiful, low-maintenance, managed natural landscapes intended to bolster air and water quality,
and support indigenous wildlife. No o ne lives in these areas they have been reinvented to highlight and preserve special natural indigenous features a nd plant/animal species. Detroits former creeks and rivers are daylighted, offering new opportunities for recreation. Families hike a long paths that have been fully integrated a s part of Detroits greenway system. A hundred yards a way, residents hike through some natural wooded walking trails. These natural areas help to filter a ir a nd water pollutants, creating a healthier city. They are distinct from D etroits major c ity parks (which offer more active a nd built amenities including golf courses, zoos, nature c enters, tennis courts, swimming pools, boating a nd canoeing).

Description of Current Condition:

Mostly vacant lots; illegal dumping obvious; m ix of o wnership; low values; low household income; bad infrastructure; no or limited capacity block club or CDO; risky neighborhood reputation; delivery o f c ity services and utilities is cost prohibitive; good soil quality a nd hydrology; a djacency to creeks, river or habitat

Description of Future Direction:


Recreational uses a nd passive aesthetic uses. Rezoning into parks and passive meadows that are connected to the rest of the citys transit system via bus stops. These NatureScapes are focused in areas that have extremely low density, a nd that are most ecologically important. Special consideration is given as to how ensure such transition areas remain safe. Greenways connect these areas to o ther, denser areas of the city. Special consideration is given to the ownership a nd maintenance responsibilities of these areas, possibly involving federal ownership. These areas may now be owned by a separate conservancy, or by the state o r federal government.

Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:


Systemic Change Strategies

Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Gradual Reduction in public. private utilities and roads; park/meadow development Zoning c hanges Land Banking for land assembly Creation of use of urban conservancies for long term ownership/maintenance Community Benefits Agreement

Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Gradual reduction in public/private utilities and roads; Park/meadow development Creation of land conservancy and/or land trusts Phytoremediation code and zoning changes

Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) Land use planning for daylighting streams, forestry, m eadow development, etc

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Deconstruction of buildings; Community education/listening sessions to promote acceptance a nd use of NatureScapes Relocation Assistance thru partnerships with other more dense- neighborhood CDOs a nd other stakeholders Land Banking Environmental remediation

Role of Community Development Organization (CDO):


Community Engagement to facilitate community education/information a nd to educate o n creation of land conservancy Facilitation o f Community Benefits Agreements to assure public access, local job training/employment a nd environmental equity Facilitate relocation of residents to c lear area for NatureScape development Community Policing Marketing of area Partner with special organizations or businesses for deconstruction of homes/buildings Facilitation, with a ppropriate partners, o f urban conservancy for o wnership o f NatureScape areas

#5 G REEN VENTURE Z ONES Vision: These are green and blue industrial areas that have been reinvented from vacant land and vacant industrial buildings to
economic generators. Fish hatcheries, hydroponic and a quaculture centers a nd newly rehabbed warehouses take up o nce-a bandoned factories, while local foresters harvest trees to ship across the county. Local horticulturists grow acres of nurseries for sale, a nd small market farms dot the landscape. No o ne lives in these zones, but they are well managed, safe, a nd create hundreds o f jobs for local residents in farming, warehousing a nd logistics, forestry, horticulture a nd fish production.

Description of Current Condition:

Mostly vacant lots; illegal dumping obvious; m ix of o wnership; low values; low household income; bad infrastructure; no or limited capacity block club or CDO; risky neighborhood reputation; delivery o f c ity services and utilities is cost prohibitive; soil quality and hydrology a nd natural features lend themselves to green v entures.

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Description of Future Direction:


These are manufacturing areas with minimal negative externalities (pollutants either through the air, water, or noise). Manufacturing uses developed from vacant land and buildings producing flowers, fish, food a nd wood. These Green Job Areas act a s buffers between Country L iving Areas a nd Commerce Corridors or Traditional Industrial Areas.

Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:


Systemic Change Strategies

Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Economic D evelopment planning a nd feasibility studies Zoning c hanges/Green codes BIZ Organizing Land Banking for site assembly Deconstruction to remove structures; Rehabilitation of viable structures Workforce Development/training and placement into new local jobs. Land banking Environmental remediation

Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Infrastructure/Site Preparation Storm water planning Phytoremediation/biofuel production strategies

Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs)

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Business recruitment Relocation Assistance through partnerships with other more dense neighborhood CDOs;

Role of Community Development Organization (CDO):


Partnering with city, developers to serve a s liaison between them a nd residents, to facilitation land a ssembly and site preparation to set the table for green/blue companies to come in Community engagement, outreach a nd education to facilitate economic development planning Facilitation o f relocation, including engagement of necessary partners Industrial Association organizing and management Facilitation o f employment through partnership with specialty organizations, c ity of D etroit, new businesses Facilitation o f Community Benefits Agreements in regard to employment/training and environmental equity Monitoring private sector-led development to assure environmental a nd social equity

#6: GREEN THOROUGHFARES


Vision: Green well-lit wide traveling corridors, flush with trees a nd o ther low-maintenance foliage, are interspersed throughout the City.
These corridors provide tasteful way-finding directions to nearby neighborhoods, separate incompatible uses, a nd convey a sense o f

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beauty, safety a nd spaciousness. Bus and bike lanes help form complete streets, which are fully integrated into D etroits Greenway/Bike Lane system. They are distinguished from Nature Scope areas in that they are auto a nd/or mass transit corridors, not intended for visitors or recreation.

Description of Current Condition:


Commercial zoning on thoroughfare streets; or residential zoning on wider residential streets; that are predominantly vacant (very low or no density)

Description of Future Direction: Sections of former 5 -10 lane c ommercial corridors which o nce provided entertainment, restaurants
and retail goods and services for a population of 2 m illion, have been reinvented as green gateways into the various other sectors of the C ity. Where appropriate, marked paths a llow for biking/walking as part of D etroits Greenway/Bike Path system. Commercial a nd Industrial development is restricted a nd steered to nearby Shopping Hubs, Green Job Zones a nd Heavy Industrial Job Zones. High-density housing development is restricted a nd steered to streets in the City Hubs, Village Hubs a nd Downtown areas. Low-density housing development is restricted a nd steered to streets in the Traditional Residential Sectors. Green Thoroughfares could eventually become integrated into a NatureScape sector.


Systemic Change Strategies Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Land Use Planning Land Assembly Program Rezoning Complete Street policy Greenway/Bike integration into Detroits overall plan Deconstruction of buildings Relocation o f commercial property owners/businesses Owner Education and Listening Sessions Streetscape planning and implementation; Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Utility planning (storm water, energy connectivity) Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) Rezoning

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Relocation o f existing viable businesses to Shopping Hubs Property/Landscape Management a nd Maintenance

Role of Community Development Organization (CDO):


Business organizing/engagement for purposes o f land use planning and market a nalysis Assistance with land a ssembly Facilitation o f/assistance with relocation of businesses to Shopping Hubs, Green Job Zones or Heavy Industry Zones Property and Landscape Management

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#7 INDUSTRY Z ONES Vision: These are heavier industrial areas, buffered by NatureScapes and Green Job Zones because of their typical disruptive
environmental factors such as noise, heavy truck traffic and various forms of pollution. Factories produce everything from cars a nd c ar parts to solar panels and wind turbines and hydrogen energy c ells which are then shipped overseas. Large-scale commercial growers raise sunflowers which are then sent to a processing plant to make bio-fuel. Inter-modal transportation c enters serve a s transfer a nd transport points for truck, rail, shipping and air freight traffic.

Description of Current Condition:


Adjacent to shipping infrastructure such as freeways, major roads, and active rail; job center

Description of Future Direction:


These industrial uses are a djacent to a nd buffered from either green job areas or NatureScapes, which act a s buffers between these zones a nd the Resident Living Sectors. These areas are then connected to a larger inter-modal transportation infrastructure.


Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:


Systemic Change Strategies Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Rezoning Buffering installations BIZ organizing Phytoremediation Industrial Association Organizing for cohesiveness a nd business recruitment/ marketing; Community Benefits Agreements Organizing for partnerships between surrounding residential/commercial areas to continuously push for environmental safety Mid Term I mpact (3-5 yrs) Environmental C lean-up Green Building Codes Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) New energy systems: water conservation, air pollution strategies Freight/transport planning

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Fencing/Buffering Business retention a nd recruitment Creation of BIZ

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Community Benefits Agreements Role of Community Development Organization (CDO):


Industrial Association Coordination Facilitation o f Community Benefits Agreements in regard to local employment/training and environmental equity Community Organizing of residents adjacent to these zones, to continuously monitor a nd push for environmental safety Liaison with City Planning/BS&E to influence decisions a nd mitigations for new industrial businesses Facilitate Community Benefits Agreements

#8 VILLAGE HUBS Vision: This all-in-one neighborhood hub offers residential living, nearby shopping, and entertainment all wrapped in an authentic
urban lifestyle. With a small main-street feel, these medium density streets include neighborhood shopping districts and gathering spots for the surrounding residents. A young couple exits their single-family house or town home to walk to the local bakery for some pastries, then go upstairs to where their accountant has his office. A retiree street-parks his car in front of his barber who a lso happens to be his next-door neighbor. A young single leaves his a partment building to ride his bike along the local greenway path. Libraries a nd schools cater to active families including the influx of new immigrant residents, catering to their unique c ultural/religious customs, and providing English a s a Second Language (ESL) a nd other immigrant services. An array o f ethnic restaurants and stores a ttract a variety of customers including a growing m ix o f new immigrant residents who enjoy the neighborhood a long with long-time residents.

Description of Current Conditions:


a. M edium density; m id-to low-rise buildings; mixed uses, mix of local and regional serving businesses; combination of neighborhood
and main street; pedestrian-oriented; connected to transit; located a t major thoroughfare; possible historic district; a djacent to dense neighborhoods; CDO present; OR b. The adjacent residential includes single family housing; Structures on almost every lot; v ery little blight; some foreclosure and some vacant homes; mostly home o wner; stable values high household income; high educational a ttainment; c lose to quality schools a nd parks; good infrastructure; active neighborhood a ssociation; good neighborhood reputation; low crime; OR

c. The a djacent residential includes predominantly single family housing; Structures o n most lots; limited blight; some litter; rapidly

increasing foreclosures a nd vacant homes; mostly homeowner with some rentals; values decreasing; high to moderate household income but decreasing; high educational a ttainment; close to quality schools and parks; good infrastructure; active neighborhood a ssociation; good neighborhood reputation; occasional crime; a djacent to a nchors

Description of Future Direction:


Medium to high density with mid a nd low-rise buildings connected to narrower, walkable main street commercial districts occupied primarily by locally o wned businesses providing retail a nd service a menities to surrounding residents. The mixed-use development is centered o n a n intersection or possibly a single street. The mixed-use streets are pedestrian-oriented with z ero-lot lines. This is delineated slightly from the single family homes (with a small yard) that exist behind the mixed-use streets. These smaller a partment

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buildings a nd single family homes serve a s a transition to a surrounding lower-density or residential fabric. Bus stops a nd occasionally, rail stops, connect the v illage hub to the rest of the citys transportation system. Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction: Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) Systemic Change Strategies BIZ organizing Smart Grid district Integrated Mass Complete Streets energy systems Transit; policies School Reform Green Codes Suggested Matching Organizing to Small business micro Mixed income housing Intervention Strategies strengthen relationship loans a nd technical development to prevent between local business assistance gentrification owners a nd local Greening a nd residents and do main weatherization street strategic programs planning; Housing rehab/greening Commercial matching Complete street faade grants installations Housing preservation (foreclosure prevention, rehab and matching grants); Blight reduction & code enforcement; community organizing; Business organizing including BID a nd TIF districts; marketing to a ttract new residents, as well a s immigrant populations ESL classes Capital access strategies for immigrant a nd other local businesses

Role of Community Development Organization (s):


Community engagement for code enforcement, to push for school reform a nd to form cohesive bonds between local businesses a nd residents Community engagement for regular liaison to c ity planning to monitor a nd a dvise o n development projects Provide technical assistance to local businesses Facilitate a nd shape signature project by a ssembling development team, funding, stakeholders Local small business recruitment, development, lending Create local BIZ or TIF Manage Main Street commercial district Housing Preservation, greening a nd foreclosure counseling Partner with local schools/ethnic organizations to facilitate ESL programs

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#9: SHOPPING HUBS

Vision: City residents from across town as well as suburban commuters leaving their downtown offices or factories, pull into a node
shopping center o n a n existing commercial corridor, to comparison-shop o n the weekend, buy large-ticket items, or make a quick stop at the c leaners, donut shop or grocery store before or after work. Some Shopping Hubs are intermixed with tracts designated for Green Corridors.

Description of Current Condition:


Located on a major thoroughfare; a djacent to freeway; predominantly c hain businesses; ample surface parking

Description of Future Direction:


Focused a long existing major surface commercial corridors a nd inter-state thruways, these are low commercial density, low-rise shopping sectors. Mainly car-oriented, these are areas that allow big-box retail stores, comparison shopping, a nd tall sign-posts. There are minimum parking requirements and parking is o ften found in front of the store. Because of their car-orientation, they do not rely solely on surrounding residents for their c ustomer base a nd arent necessarily next to residential uses. Bus stops line the corridor.

Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:



Systemic Change Strategies

Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Land Use Planning for citing o f projects (new or existing); Zoning restrictions to restrict inappropriate uses Land Assembly strategies Neighborhood identity design codes BIZ/TIF organizing Infrastructure changes for project development; Streetscape planning and implementation;

Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Mass transit with coordination with bus stops Connectivity through paths to neighborhoods

Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs)

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Business recruitment and retention programs

Role of Community Development Organization (CDO):


Community Engagement for land use planning, streetscape planning, rezoning a nd business recruitment

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#10 CITY HUBS Vision: These areas exhibit the hustle and bustle associated with being directly adjacent to the Downtown District and may also feature
regional a ttractions for tourists (museums, concert halls), a s well a s a nchor health a nd educational institutions. City residents or v isitors get o ff a t transit stops to visit the art a nd historical museums, shop at the farmers market, or attend an annual ethnic or holiday parade. University Students grab a gyro before walking to a n art exhibit or to class. Young professionals a nd empty-nesters exit their townhomes or nearby single family homes to walk to a reading a t the main library or a local book store. Young couples a nd students soak up the cosmopolitan a tmosphere while feasting a t ethnic restaurants which create a n international a tmosphere.

Facilitation o f shopping c enter development Community Organizing for code enforcement, blight reduction Facilitation o f Streetscape Installations

Description of Current Condition:


On or a djacent to major thoroughfare; major transit links; predominantly m ixed-use with m id-a nd high-rise buildings present; predominantly z ero lot line setbacks; high occupancy; a nchor institutions; high level of college graduation rates Description of Future Direction: High density with high and mid-rise buildings. These are city-wide centers for employment, entertainment and culture. Major thoroughfare transecting the area Hub intersected by several walkable side streets that feature m ixed- use shops a nd stores. The mixed-use streets exhibit pedestrian-oriented zero-lot lines. This is delineated slightly from the single family homes (with a small yard) that exist behind the m ixed-use streets. These single family homes serve a s a transition to a surrounding lower- density or residential fabric. These City Hubs are given priority for regional mass transit, both rail a nd bus. A variety of ethnic restaurants and shops attract a growing m ix of new immigrant residents, students a nd v isitors.

Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:


Systemic Change Strategies

Short Term Impact (1-3 y rs) Light Rail System to link economic development with educational and m edical institutions Green housing codes for new infill housing BIZ/TIF organizing Complete street policy Historic Rehab Home repair and residential matching incentive grants

Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Mass Transit to integrate bus system with light rail system Green zoning/building codes

Long Term I mpact (5+ yrs) New energy sources

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Affordable and Market- rate Infill housing; Small business micro loans

Mixed income housing development a nd o ther strategies to prevent gentrification

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Workforce development matching local residents with local jobs Greenway a nd park development; Create a liaison between business organizations and local residents; Clean a nd Safe Matching business faade grants ESL classes Greening existing housing

Neighborhood marketing Grocery store recruitment

Role of Community Development Organization (s) (CDO):


Community engagement for planning of complete streets, neighborhood identification/marketing, a nd to create cohesiveness among diverse population of students, seniors, other residents Infill housing Business/institutional organizing to create a BIZ Commercial D istrict management w/ emphasis on marketing strategies Historic housing rehab/historic preservation Housing weatherization/greening Partner with city wide specialty organization to facilitate workforce development Sponsor greenway path Marketing/recruitment of residents, targeting immigrants; and businesses Sponsor Events and festivals

#11 DOWNTOWN Vision: The Center of the metropolitan region, Downtown is the regional crux for employment, entertainment, government and
culture. Business executives exit their high-rise office building to grab a power-lunch a t the restaurant next door, tourists get off a t a transit stop to attend a ball game and young professionals enjoy o utdoor concerts during the day a nd the flourishing c lub circuit a t night. Retirees and young professionals walk to the corner store to buy supplies for the week or for a n upcoming party a t their high rise apartment. High rise office buildings a nd hotels are filled with a new residential population who rent a nd purchase the converted apartments, lofts a nd condominiums.

Description of Current Condition:

On or a djacent to a major thoroughfare; hub of transit; predominantly m ixed-use with high rise buildings present; z ero lot lines setbacks; consistent street trees; first floor businesses; high occupancy; governmental and cultural c enter; job center; high level of college graduation rates.

Description of Future Direction: 18

High density with high a nd m id-rise, mixed-use buildings; pedestrian-oriented with zero-lot lines a nd no m inimum parking requirements. The c enter of the areas mass-transit system, downtown is connected to the rest o f the city a nd region.

Strategies to Move from Current Condition to Future Direction:


Systemic C hange Strategies

Short Term Impact (1-3 yrs)


Woodward Light Rail Zoning c hanges a s necessary Building code enforcement BIZ organizing Complete street policy Clean a nd Safe Organizing to strengthen-connect corporate a nd other institutional a nchors Community Benefits Agreements

Mid Term Impact (3-5 yrs) Long Term Impact (5+ yrs)
Mass Transit Fresh food/green initiatives Smart Grid district energy systems

Suggested Matching Intervention Strategies

Recruit Grocery Store

Create BIZ

Mixed income housing development a nd o ther strategies to prevent gentrification

Role of Downtown Community Development Organization:


Facilitate development o f retail, a s population increases Marketing to attract residents a nd businesses Business recruitment to a ttract a ppropriate retailers and restaurants Business organizing to facilitate Downtown BIZ including focus on tourism Organizing to encourage development of cohesion among residents; a nd to connect institutional a nchors with corporations Sponsor greenway/riverfront path(s) a nd parks Sponsor c ultural events, especially with international border Facilitate community benefits a greements

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