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Self reaches career milestone After enduring an 18-game losing streak early in his career, Self

Self reaches career milestone

After enduring an 18-game losing streak early in his career, Self has persevered and picked up his 300th win on Saturday at Missouri.

1B

an 18-game losing streak early in his career, Self has persevered and picked up his 300th

The student vOice since 1904

tuesday, february 13, 2007

www.kansan.com Vol. 117 Issue 95

tuesday, february 13, 2007 www.kansan.com Vol. 117 Issue 95 PAGE 1A pell grant     President

PAGE 1A

pell grant
pell grant

pell grant

pell grant
   

President Bush’s budget proposal has called for a $550 increase to the maximum Federal Pell Grant.

 

3A

 
women’sbasketball
women’sbasketball
women’sbasketball

women’sbasketball

women’sbasketball
   
Senior guard Shaquina Mosley has made two of three buzzer-beater shots in the past few

Senior guard Shaquina Mosley has made two of three buzzer-beater shots in the past few weeks to secure two close victo- ries for the Jayhawks.

 
1B

1B

 
valentine’s day  
valentine’s day

valentine’s day

valentine’s day
valentine’s day
 
     
 

Let food get you in the lovin’spirit with edible aphrodisiacs such as chocolate, oysters, coffee, honey and wine.

 
10A
10A

big 12

big 12
 

Today, freshmen play a more important role in Big 12 con- ference basketball than they even have before.

 
 

1B

 

weather

 
today 24 8 AM Snow Showers — weather.com wednesday thursday 17 1 23 12 Cloudy
today
24 8
AM Snow Showers
— weather.com
wednesday
thursday
17 1
23 12
Cloudy
Sunny

index

 

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All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2007The University Daily Kansan

» bOardWaLK triaL

© 2007The University Daily Kansan » bOardWaLK triaL KaNSaN FILE PHoto Jason allen Rose, right, and

KaNSaN FILE PHoto

Jason allen Rose, right, and his defense attorney Ron Evans, right, have an additional two and a half months to prepare for the reschduled trial. The defense was granted a mistrial after the prosecu- tion attempted to introduce a surprise witness. The new trial is expected to begin April 30.

Judge declares mistrial

By Erick r. Schmidt

A surprise witness who came for-

ward at the end of last week has led the trial of Jason Allen Rose to be declared a mistrial. After four days, seventeen wit- nesses, and hours of testimony, the decision of Rose’s future will have to wait at least two and a half months more. Rose’s attorney, Ron Evans, asked for and was granted a mistrial when Assistant District Attorney Amy McGowan attempted to present the surprise witness. District Attorney

Charles Branson said the witness came to the state’s attention after the

close of business

Friday. Branson

said the police d e p a r t m e n t investigated the new witness dur- ing the weekend, and the prosecu- tion decided to attempt to admit the witness Monday. Evans contended that

had

his

and

that he would not have enough time

to investigate the new information properly. Judge

Jack A. Murphy agreed. Branson said the decision had been handled correctly. “Any time you have late wit- nesses, people bringing new information, it

puts the defense at a disadvantage,” Branson said.

it puts the defense at a disadvantage,” Branson said. “The jury is supposed to be presented
it puts the defense at a disadvantage,” Branson said. “The jury is supposed to be presented

“The jury is supposed to be presented all the information on an even playing field. Anything less is likely to be overturned.”

charles Branson

District attorney

been

stated

defense

“The jury is supposed to be present- ed all the information on an even playing field. Anything less, and it’s likely to be overturned.” The identity of the witness is expected to be known once the new trial begins. Rose had been charged with set- ting the October 7 fire in his 76- unit apartment complex that injured 18 residents and killed three more, including former KU senior Nicole Bingham. Rose faced three counts of first-degree murder, one count

SEE ROSE oN PagE 3a

» LegisLatiOn

Bill could give free tuition to some vets

By joE huNt

Veterans may be getting free col- lege tuition in Kansas, but only if they served in the right countries. The House Committee on

Veterans, Military and Homeland Security is reviewing a bill that would only give free tuition to veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan at least 90 days after Sept. 11, 2001. The bill is one of three that the committee has received that attempts to get veterans tuition breaks for higher education. By Tuesday, the three bills need to be consolidated into one bill that will be sent to the House for proposal. Don Myers (R-Derby), chair of the committee, said that all the bills would be considered and that the final bill would not necessarily exclude veterans who served in other countries.

“I think probably what the authors

were trying to do was award those who are serving in dangerous war zones,” Myers said. One of the other bills under con- sideration was drafted by the Student Legislative Awareness Board. That

bill would make any veteran dis- charged after Jan. 1, 2000, eligible for paid college tuition and fees in the state of Kansas. The bill was called the Returning Heroes’ Education Act. Myers described the third bill being examined as being “vague” in its language, and he said that to be useful, it needed to be more clearly defined. Myers said that the bill would likely grant eligible veterans paid tuition for up to 10 semesters, which is the same length of time the Returning Heroes’ Education Act would allow. Having the state pay for tuition for servicemen and women is nothing new. Ian Staples, direc- tor of the Student Legislative Awareness Board, said that the Returning Heroes’ Education Act would give veterans benefits sim-

ilar to what those serving in the National Guard receive.

kansan staff writer joe hunt

jhunt@

kansan.com. — Edited by Joe Caponio

can

be

contacted

at

a slice of civil liberties

Joe Caponio can be contacted at a slice of civil liberties Lisa Lipovac/KANSAN Queers and allies

Lisa Lipovac/KANSAN

Queers and allies event chairman, david ta, Wichita senior, cuts a slice of wedding cake

in the Kansas Union on Monday morning. Q&A gave away cake to raise awareness and collect

signatures on a petition about House Bill 2299, which would prevent any city in Kansas from creating

a domestic partnership registry.

» sOciOLOgy

Dept. was one of first

KU, Chicago vie for claim to title of oldest program

By NAthAN Gill

The department of sociol- ogy at the University of Kansas, which began in 1890 and has a strong gender studies focus, is arguably the oldest in the nation. The University of Chicago also claims to have founded the first sociology department in America. Bill Staples, sociology depart- ment chair, said the dispute con- cerned the date each department became official. “We can certainly claim to have taught the first class,” he said. Staples said the confusion centered around when each department became official. The University of Chicago claimed its department began in 1892. Whatever the date, one thing is certain: the sociology depart- ment here has had a profound affect on the University. The cur- rent departments of economics, anthropology and social work have their roots intertwined with the sociology department’s. Staples said the department was also known for its strength in gender studies. The sociology department first offered “Status of Women in the U.S.” in 1891, a course Staples said could be considered one of the first women’s studies courses in the United States. The class was offered exclusively to women. The female-inclusive tradi- tion of the department continues today. Eleven of the department’s 20 professors are women and Staples said the majority of stu- dents majoring in sociology were women. Tracey LaPierre, assistant professor of sociology, is one of three new professors the depart- ment hired this academic year. Three of the four professors were women. LaPierre said many of the department’s younger professors are women. She said she was interested in how these new pro- fessors would change the depart- ment in the future, but hoped sociology would not be seen as a female-oriented area of study. “The contributions of sociol- ogy transcend gender boundar- ies,” LaPierre said. Staples said the department’s focus, which began in a time of rapid social change, was chang- ing to address current sociologi- cal issues. In the early 20th cen- tury, sociologists were concerned with such issues as urbaniza- tion, industrial capitalism and the nation’s trend of economic booms and busts. Now the department is look- ing global. KU sociologists are studying topics that include global health systems, global economics and the migrations of peoples. “The U.S. is not just this island someplace,” Staples said. “It’s nearly impossible to study things social in isolation.”

kansan staff writer Nathan Gill can be contacted at ngill@kan- san.com.

— Edited by Darla Slipke

2A NEWS tuesday, february 13, 2007 quote of the day “You must stay drunk on

2A

NEWS

tuesday, february 13, 2007

quote of the day

“You must stay drunk on writing so that reality cannot destroy you.”

 

— Ray Bradbury

fact of the day

On this day in 1542, Cath- erine Howard, the fifth wife of King Henry VIII of England, was executed for adultery.

 

Source: wikipedia.org

most e-mailed

Want to know what people are talking about? Here is a list of the top five most e-mailed stories from Kansan.com.

1.

Med Center, international

company to work together on detecting cancer earlier

2.

Election to be held con-

cerning KU on Wheels

3.

Fraternity brothers remem-

ber friend

4.

Schneider: Jayhawks ready

for mad March

5.

Donation made for base-

ball clubhouse

for mad March 5. Donation made for base- ball clubhouse   daily KU info Saturday’s 18
 

daily KU info

Saturday’s 18 point margin of victory for KU is more than the combined margins of victory for our last five games at MU. KU won three of the five. Check the Athletics basketball page for an online media guide, which gives KU-MU scores back to the

1900s.

 

— Source: kuinfo.ku.edu

et cetera

The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of the Kansan are 25 cents. Subscriptions can be pur- chased at the Kansan business office, 119 Stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045.

The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4962) is published daily during the school year except Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams. Weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Periodical postage is paid in Lawrence, KS 66044. Annual subscriptions by mail are $120 plus tax. Student subscriptions of are paid through the student activity fee. Postmaster: Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 119 Stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045

By AmANdA EmEry

j a y h a w k

nooks&crannies:

Located at 6th E. Ninth St., The Bourgeois Pig opened its doors for business 12 years ago as a bar/café

combining the three marvels that are liquor, coffee, and an unique atmo-

sphere. While it does serve alcohol, the establishment appears to be very friendly to any age.

“There is no age limit to walk in the door,” said co-owner Rob Pope. They offer a variety of beverages with coffee prices ranging from $1.25 to $4. Employee favorites include the new “Chocolate Patrone Tequila Shot,” or, for a non-alcoholic bever- age, any kind of tea. All of their teas are loose-leaf teas. It is an establishment with enough room for you and all of your friends, with an beautiful dark wooden bar. They also offer a heated smoking porch and the perfect location for “people watching” with their front patio. On any given weekend you can see The Bourgeois Pig filled with peo-

ple visiting and enjoying the unique atmosphere. There is always art on the walls at The Bourgeois Pig, and openings to exhibit the art nearly every month. Currently they are exhibiting “Trash

Masters: A Group Print Show” until Feb. 25. This show, curated

by Michael Krueger and Kendra Herring, features screen prints, intaglio, litho- graphs, and mixed media. The Bourgeois Pig also offers a variety of events that take place all year long. On many evenings you will find The Bourgeois Pig hosting a theme-party. Some of the up-coming events are Fat Tuesday, a viewing of the Oscars party, and the one most of the staff is excited about is the Chinese New Year celebration. This is the year of the pig and they will be having drink specials and free food,

while the food lasts.

bourgeois Pig
bourgeois Pig

details

The Bourgeois Pig 6th E. Ninth St.

785-843-1001

— Edited by Sharla Shivers

What do youthink?

By richEllE BuSEr

What do you think of public displays of affection (pda)?

What do you think of public displays of affection (pda)? ben geller lakewood, Colo., freshman “It’s

ben geller lakewood, Colo., freshman “It’s OK as long as it’s not obnoxious.”

freshman “It’s OK as long as it’s not obnoxious.” bryant Williams atlanta, ga., freshman “People that

bryant Williams atlanta, ga., freshman “People that complain a lot are probably just jealous that they aren’t getting any [PDA]”.”

just jealous that they aren’t getting any [PDA]”.” todd manetH great bend freshman “As long as

todd manetH great bend freshman “As long as I’m getting play then who cares?”

“As long as I’m getting play then who cares?” sCottt Campbell Hugoton freshman “The more the

sCottt Campbell Hugoton freshman “The more the better.”

decorating sweets for a sweetheart

more the better.” decorating sweets for a sweetheart Lisa Lipovac/KANSAN Kara Roelofs, Lawrence senior, decorates

Lisa Lipovac/KANSAN

Kara Roelofs, Lawrence senior, decorates a cookie in the fourth floor lobby at the kansas student union. student union activities set up a table for students to decorate cookies and create Valentine’s day cards.

on campus

 

The Brownbag Discussion “Income Distribution and Re- distribution in Ukraine” will be presented by Nazar Kholod and Ivan Franko at noon at Room 318 in Bailey Hall.

The 2007 University Career Fair will be held at 12:30 p.m. in the Kansas Union.

Jane Staiger will present the lecture “Cosmogenic nuclide- derived boundary conditions for numerical ice sheet model- ing applications” at 4 p.m. at Room 317 in Nichols Hall.

The film “The Gleaners,” with commentary provided by Caro- line Jewers, will be shown at 7 p.m. at Room 3140 in Wescoe Hall.

The lecture “Blog to the Chief: The Impact of Political Blogs on the 2008 Election” will be presented by five political bloggers at 7:30 p.m. in the Dole Institute of Politics.

clarification

 

An article in Monday’s University Daily Kansan needs clarification. The article “Rose trial continues” should have said Ashlee Kieler contributed to the story.

 

TrANSPorTATioN

Elections for busing referendums this week

Special elections will be held Wednesday and Thursday for two transportation referen- dums. One referendum would allow for KU on Wheels to purchase new buses. The other referendum would implement

a fare-free bus system. If both referendums pass, student transportation fees will increase

$35.

Students can vote online at

www.ku.edu/computing/elec-

tion from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Wednesday and 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday. Polling sites will be open from 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday at Mrs. E’s and Wescoe Beach under the overhang.

—Ashlee Kieler

media partners

 
For more news, turn to KUJH-

For more

news,

turn to

KUJH-

TV on Sunflower Cablevision Channel 31 in Lawrence. The student-produced news airs at 5:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. every Monday through Friday. Also, check out KUJH online at tv.ku.edu.

KJHK is the student voice in radio. Each day there is news, music, sports, talk

KJHK is the student voice in radio. Each day there is news, music, sports, talk shows and other content made for students, by stu- dents. Whether it’s rock n’ roll or reggae, sports or spe- cial events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.

contact us

 

Tell us your news Contact Gabriella Souza, Nicole Kelley, Patrick Ross, Darla Slipke or Nate McGinnis at 864-4810 or editor@kansan.com.

Kansan newsroom 111 Stauffer-Flint Hall 1435 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045 (785) 864-4810

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tuesday, february 13, 2007 news 3A » Financial aid Increase in Pell Grants proposed By

tuesday, february 13, 2007

news

3A

» Financial aid

Increase in Pell Grants proposed

By Brian lewis-jones

Students from low-income fami-

tuition at the University. Students receive the grant based on information from their Free

Application for Federal Student Aid information, a required financial aid application, which formulates the amount a fam-

ily is expected to contribute to their stu- dent’s education. FAFSA takes into account the age of the parents, the number peo- ple of the fam- ily and numerous

other factors, Covington said. If the family can’t contribute anything, the student can receive a maximum grant. “It truly goes to our neediest stu- dents,” she said. The grant doesn’t have to be repaid. Covington said February was an important time for students to think about financial aid, as it was declared Financial Aid Awareness Month by Governor Kathleen Sebelius. March 1 is the application deadline for several other types of financial aid, including the KU Tuition Grant and the Kansas Comprehensive Grant, Covington said. Rebecca Black, communications director for Dennis Moore, said the House Budget Committee would consider the proposal in the next few weeks. Covington said a full Pell Grant didn’t cover 12 credit hours, but that every increase in federal aid makes school more accessible for students.

lies could more easily afford escalat- ing tuition prices under President Bush’s budget proposal for 2008, unveiled at the

beginning of

February. S t e p h a n i e

C o v i n g t o n ,

associate direc- tor of the Office

of

Financial Aid,

said the pro-

posal called for

a

to

Federal Pell Grant. She said the grant, which is offered to students from low-income families, would be increased to $4,600 in 2008 — the largest increase in 30 years. “It opens the doors for students who don’t have the funding to attend college,” she said. Last year, 3,280 University of Kansas students qualified for the Pell Grant, Covington said. All of the grants averaged to $2,510 per stu- dent. The proposal would also raise the maximum Pell Grant allowance to $5,400 by 2012, the largest 5- year increase ever, according to the Department of Education’s Web site. Covington said the Pell Grant maxi- mum has been stuck at $4,050 since the 2003-2004 school year. In-state tuition and fees in 2004- 2005 cost $4,737 for 15 hours accord- ing to a table of tuition and fees for two semesters from the Office of Institutional Research and Planning. The Pell Grant was $700 less than tuition that year, Covington said. Ten years ago, tuition and fees for in-state students were $2,310, while the maximum Pell Grant amounted to $2,470, exceeding the price of

Pell Grant amounted to $2,470, exceeding the price of “it opens the door for students who

“it opens the door for students who don’t have the funding to attend college.”

StephaNie coViNgtoN

associate Director of the office of Student Financial aid

Student

$550 increase

the maximum

Kansan staff writer Brian lewis- jones can be contacted at bljones@kansan.com.

— Edited by Joe Caponio

» academics

 

Student uses job search class to land television internship

By elizaBeth Cattell

Lo said the class also taught her interviewing skills, which proved

it, not the store but where they make designs. I’ve gotten to see things that are behind all the glamour so it really helps me learn what the indus- try is really about and what I need to know,” Lo said. Ann Hartley, associate director of the University Career Center, taught Lo’s job search class. The class, Job Search Strategies for Liberal Arts and Sciences Students, focuses on lifelong job search skills. Hartley said Lo is one of many students who has secured a competi- tive internship after taking the class. “I had one student e-mail me to tell me they got their dream job. She had pursued an internship with Liz Claiborne and now she has a full-

time job for the company design- ing leather goods,” Hartley said. “It’s important to know opportunities exist and it’s very possible for a lot of students to find success.” Lo said that even though her internship has just begun, she has already gained unique experiences that will help her in the future. She even met Letterman himself. “I was walking to the copy machine with a huge stack of files and I saw him coming around the corner,” Lo said. “He smiled and said ‘Hello’ and I just said ‘Hi’ all quiet and walked away. He was really friendly and I was just awkward.”

— Edited by Joe Caponio

 

A

class on job search strategies

paid off for senior Teresa Lo. The history major is interning at the Late Show with David Letterman this semester. Lo learned about the intern- ship through her class mailing list the day before applications were due. She said the skills she learned helped her compile her application on short notice. “The stuff on my resume was good, but the class helped me polish it and it taught us how to write cover letters,” Lo said. “If I didn’t take that class I don’t really think I’d be here in New York.”

helpful when she was invited to an interview in New York during fall break. She was one of 11 students chosen for the internship. Lo began her internship Jan. 2 and is earning credits through inde- pendent study while in New York. She researches Letterman’s guests in the CBS Library to gain informa- tion on them for each show. She also picks up items associated with each guest, such as CDs or DVDs. Lo said her hands-on experience lets her see show business from a new perspective. “I had to go to Marc Jacobs to pick up a T-shirt with Julianne Moore on

 

ROSE (continued from 1A)

 

» crime

of aggravated arson, and seven counts of aggravated battery. Bingham’s mother, Nancy

Bingham, had attended the first week of trial and said she under- stood Monday’s development.

the trial, eight Boardwalk resi- dents had taken the stand, along with witnesses from adjacent buildings and several officials who responded to or investi- gated the fire.

Jury chosen for child-murder trial

By terry Kinney

they would not notice her hobbled walk. Her husband, David Carroll Jr., also is charged with murder and is to be tried separately next month. They are each being held in lieu of $10.1 million bail. Liz Carroll’s attorney, Gregory Cohen, has asked that the trial be moved from southwest Ohio. Ringland has not ruled on that motion but could at any time if a jury cannot be seated. Ringland cautioned prospective jurors to stop reading newspapers, listening to news reports or research- ing the case on the Internet until the trial ends. He said the trial was likely to take two weeks. Liz Carroll and David Carroll Jr., 29, have pleaded not guilty to murder and other charges including kidnap- ping and child endangerment. David Carroll, who is accused of burning the boy’s body and dumping the remains in the Ohio River, also is charged with gross abuse of a corpse. Liz Carroll acknowledged in grand jury testimony days after the child was reported missing that he had been left in the closet and died, but she said she had no intention of hurting him.

assoCiated press

BATAVIA, Ohio — A woman charged with murder in the death of her developmentally disabled foster son sat quietly at the defense table Monday as potential jurors were asked what they knew and thought about the accusations against her. Prosecutors say Liz Carroll and her husband wrapped 3-year-old Marcus Fiesel in a blanket, bound him with packing tape and left him in a closet last August while they went to a fam- ily reunion in Kentucky for the week- end, returning to find the boy dead. She later reported that Marcus went missing from a suburban Cincinnati park. Ten of the first 30 prospective jurors who were questioned were excused, but only three because they told Judge Robert Ringland they had strong opinions about the couple’s guilt. Jury selection was set to resume Tuesday afternoon. Carroll, 30, wore a black pantsuit that covered the leg restraints she was ordered to wear. She was brought into the Clermont County courtroom before prospective jurors entered so

 

“I

want what’s right,” Nancy

said. “They had new develop-

Evans had built his defense on questions about where in the

ments, it’s only right the defense has time to prepare.”

building the fire had started, as

 

N

a n c

y

well as the interrogation itself. He had said

said

she

 

Rose was not

 

wanted

to

“i want what’s right. they had

capable

 

of

see

the

trial

new developments, it’s only right the defense has time to prepare.”

providing

a

a n d l e d thoroughly

h

valid confes-

sion

due

 

to

and correctly. She also said she

appre-

his

mental

conditionand

 

a

childhood

ciated

compassion she has seen

the

NaNcy biNgham

Victim’s mother

of

abuse.

alleged

 

J

u

d

g

e

 

Murphy

set

from every- one, including some of Nicole’s friends who came from Colorado for the trial. The prosecution had focused its case on the victims and wit- nesses involved in the blaze, as

April 30 as the starting date for the new trial.

Kansan staff writer erick r. schmidt can be contacted at eschmidt@kansan.com.

well as the taped interrogation of Rose, who eventually confessed

 

to

setting the fire on tape. During

— Edited by Sharla Shivers

of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
of Rose, who eventually confessed   to setting the fire on tape. During — Edited by
4A NEWS tuesday, february 13, 2007 » artists Professional musicians work with students BY CHRIS

4A

NEWS

tuesday, february 13, 2007

» artists

Professional musicians work with students

BY CHRIS HORN

Kennedy Center, said the program had mutual benefits. “We have a wonderful orchestra,” Steele said. “The musicians really enjoy the residency program.” Even though the residency’s week-long program in Kansas ends March 30, KU students and faculty still have a chance to work with the National Symphony Orchestra. The Kennedy Center and National Symphony Orchestra offer a summer

institute for young musicians, ages 14 to 21. As part of the residency pro- gram, up to six Kansas students have the opportunity to receive scholar- ships to the institute. The Kennedy Center will also select a Kansas music teacher to travel to Washington, D.C. to take part in a program that will develop the teacher’s professional and musical skills. The chamber music work of a Kansas compos-

er will premiere at the Kennedy Center later in the year. Bryan Kip Haaheim, assistant pro- fessor of music theory and com- position, said the residency

program and the Kansas compo- sition selection offered someone the perfect oppor- tunity to showcase his or her talents. “I think it’s a fabulous thing,” he

said.

Music students will work one-on- one with members of the National Symphony Orchestra when it stops in Lawrence for a residency program next month. Each year, the National Symphony Orchestra spends at least a week in a different state for its residency pro- gram. The annual program, founded in 1992, consists of educational and

professional activities throughout the chosen state. Symphony members and directors will spend three days in Lawrence, working with elementary and secondary school students, and with students and faculty from the University’s School of Fine Arts. Margaret Marco, assistant profes- sor of Oboe, was excited that her students will get the opportunity to work with oboists in the

will get the opportunity to work with oboists in the “We have a wonderful orchestra. The

“We have a wonderful orchestra. The musicians really enjoy the residency program.”

Cynthia PiCkett steele

Orchestra manager at the kennedy Center

national orches-

tra.

“It’s good for them to hear dif- ferent styles and

players,”

Marco

said.

D

u

r

i

n

g

the 2007

resi-

dency

 

pro-

gram, National S y m p h o n y Orchestra members will perform chamber music concerts, provide and administer master classes, work with area youth orchestras and schools and do a variety of other activities. At the University, symphony mem- bers will participate in workshops for teachers and faculty, coaching ses- sions and master classes and music appreciation classes. Cynthia Pickett Steele, orchestra manager at the

Kansan writer Chris Horn can be contacted at editor@kansan.com.

—Edited by Darla Slipke

CUT IT OUT! Campus  coupons coming soon to a Kansan near you
CUT IT OUT!
Campus  coupons
coming soon to a Kansan near you
Campus  coupons coming soon to a Kansan near you » dining services Students could shape menus BY
Campus  coupons coming soon to a Kansan near you » dining services Students could shape menus BY

» dining services

Students could shape menus

BY MARK DENT

After dining for more than a semester on campus, Courtney Rellihan has learned an impor- tant lesson: Stay away on Sundays. “They have days,” the Prairie Village freshman said, “when I just don’t want to eat there.” Rellihan and other University of Kansas students could be eat- ing tastier food soon, even on Sundays. KU Dining Services may let students share recipes from home with the dining halls. Nona Golledge, KU Dining Services director, said it is one of the services’ “goals” and will like- ly be finalized later this semester

or in the summer. When the program is finished,

students would go to the KU Dining Services Web site to submit a recipe.

A menu committee would look at

the submissions and decide if it could make the meal. If a student’s dish is chosen, it would be named after him or her. “The idea gives a bit more engagement and enjoyment for our customers, which is what we want

to do,” Golledge said.

The GSP-Corbin Hall dining hall already asked students to share recipes during a homemade cookie contest earlier this year. Golledge said KU Dining Services has also collected cooking ideas off and on

in the past.

When the dining halls start incor- porating students’ recipes into their

meal lineup, they will be following the example of other college caf- eterias. According to an Associated Press article, universities such as

Georgia, Harvard and Connecticut are using the dishes to cure home- sickness and create more variety. KU Dining Services’ motive for col- lecting recipes is to give students more freedom to choose their food. “Everyone wants to participate and have more input into their

meals,” Golledge said. “It gives them more of a connection.” One possible problem with the plan is that it might not comple- ment health food programs at the University such as “Better Bites.” Ann Chapman, Coordinator of

Nutritional Health at the Wellness Resource Center, said home-cooked meals likely would not be as nutri-

tious as the healthy alternatives the dining halls serve now. “Some people cook healthy at home; some people don’t,” she said. “The better options in the eating halls are already there.” The home-cooked meals could lack the nutritional value of other available foods, but the program could succeed as long as students such as Rellihan enjoy the new dishes. “If they’re good recipes,” she said, “then it would be great.”

Kansan staff writer Mark Dent can be contacted at mdent@kansan. com.

— Edited by Sharla Shivers

Little rolls of health

com. — Edited by Sharla Shivers Little rolls of health Anna Faltermeier/KANSAN Myint Lwin prepares sushi

Anna Faltermeier/KANSAN

Myint Lwin prepares sushi at The Market in the Kansas Union. Lwin has worked at The Market for three and a half years.

INTERNATIONAl

Celebs speak out against Chinese rule over Tibet

BeRlin — Richard Gere on Monday urged Germany, which holds the european Union and G-8 presidencies, to press China about its human rights record and tibet. Gere, a longtime advocate of the tibetan cause, argued at a news conference that the twin

presidency marks “a historic moment for Germany to step forward.” “this is a moment of great

not just punishing

but encouraging China to become part of the modern world,” he said. “tibet should be ever-present in any discussion with China.” China has exercised an often harsh, intrusive rule over tibet since communist troops marched into the region in 1950.

possibility for

German Chancellor angela Merkel has publicly raised the broader issue of human rights with Chinese leaders, saying dur- ing a visit to Beijing last May that they are “an important issue of bilateral dialogue.” Gere, 57, was in the German capital for the annual Cinema for Peace gala. it gathers celebrities to raise money for humanitarian organizations such as the U.n. Children’s Fund.

also attending was rocker and anti-poverty campaigner Bob Geldof, who echoed Gere’s call for action on China. “it is probably the job of Germany this year, the privilege of Germany this year to embrace China into the international norms that are expected of be- havior,” Geldof said.

—Associated Press

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tuesday, February 13, 2007 state 5 a » agriculture Bill may hurt, help farmers SAM

tuesday, February 13, 2007

state

5

a

» agriculture

Bill may hurt, help farmers

SAM HANANEL

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bill may hurt, help farmers SAM HANANEL ASSOCIATED PRESS Larry W. Smith/Associated Press Joe Kejr looks

Larry W. Smith/Associated Press

Joe Kejr looks over his John Deere 4720 sprayer, used to apply fertilizer as a top dressing, on his farm near Brookville, Kan., Monday. Lawmakers and farm groups have questions about President Bush’s plan to reduce agriculture spending overall, cut subsidies to producers earning more than $200,000 in adjusted gross income and make it more expensive to buy crop insurance.

drought, believe they were treated unfairly under the 2002 farm bill because they could not qualify for certain subsidy programs that are based on yield. “We were in a situation where the cost of production went up and we just left that money on the table,”

said Joe Kejr, a Brookville farmer and president of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers. “We’re trying to get those ineq- uities fixed in

the farm bill.” While the Bush plan offers a 7 per- cent increase in direct payments for wheat grow- ers, Kejr said that alone does not cover rising

production costs due to higher fuel and fertilizer prices. Kansas Farm Bureau President Steve Baccus says he wants federal lawmakers to “change the way they think about federal farm programs”

and preserve an economic safety net for producers through smart poli- cies, not just “a government check.” Representatives of 21 Kansas farm organizations will travel to

Washington next month to lobby

lawmakers and administration offi- cials on the farm bill. One of Roberts’ biggest concerns

is that the plan would raise premi-

ums for crop insurance, increas- ing costs for a large number of Kansas producers. At the same time, the Bush administration has con- sistently opposed separate disaster assistance legislation because crop insurance is available. “How does taking additional money out of this risk management program help producers?” Roberts said. “I don’t understand that.” On the positive side, the adminis- tration proposes to boost conserva-

tion spending by about $780 million

a year. Part of that money would

help cattle producers and livestock feeders comply with environmental standards for runoff, water pollu- tion and air quality. That will make a difference for the state’s $5 billion a year beef industry and be felt in Moran’s west- ern Kansas district, which has more cattle than any other in the nation. Moran also is excited about the plan to make $1.6 billion in low interest loans available for small, critical care hospitals to buy new equipment and upgrade aging facili- ties.

WASHINGTON — When Congress passed the last farm bill five years ago, Sen. Pat Roberts was firmly in the “no” column. The latest version of farm legisla- tion offered by the Bush administra- tion last month hasn’t put to rest Roberts’ concerns, or those of other Kansas officials worried about its impact on the state’s farmers and ranchers. “We want to do a lot more homework and run the numbers to determine what we really think

the practical effect will be and then we’ll go from there,” said Roberts, a Republican. Lawmakers and farm groups have questions about Bush’s plan to reduce agriculture spending overall, cut subsidies for producers earning more than $200,000 in adjusted gross income and make it more expensive for farmers to buy crop insurance. Yet the state also stands to benefit from other aspects of the proposal. The White House’s blueprint would boost conservation funding, promote renewable fuels and pro- vide money to upgrade the quality of rural hospitals — all key for Kansas farmers. “There are

some things that make a lot of sense to me and some things that are detrimental to the agricul- tural economy in Kansas,” said Republican Rep. Jerry Moran, who

represents all of western Kansas. C o n g r e s s enacts new farm legislation about every five years in response to

changes in the agriculture industry. With the current farm bill expiring in September, Bush’s plan is viewed

as a starting point for discussion. Kansas farmers received over $9

billion in subsidies from 1995-2005, ranking the state 6th in the nation according to a database compiled by the Environmental Working Group,

a public interest group that tracks

payments. Texas ranked first in sub- sidy payments, with farmers there pulling in $14.8 billion over the same

time. Many wheat farmers, whose crop production suffered because of the

wheat farmers, whose crop production suffered because of the “There are some things that make a

“There are some things that make a lot of sense to me and some things that are detrimen- tal to the agricultural economy in Kansas.”

rep. jerry moran

r — Kansas

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» development

Local residents resist proposed $13 M highway interchange

ASSOCIATED PRESS

But opponents said the inter- change would cost too much and affect their rural lifestyle.

“It’s like the difference between living on Walden Pond and living near a strip mall,” said resident

Maryam Hjersted, whose land has several acres of forests and native prairie grasses that she doesn’t want to see spoiled by the inter- change. “Development impacts not only the envi- ronment, but

the community

impacts not only the envi- ronment, but the community Turnpike Authority has prom- ised $2 million.

Turnpike Authority has prom- ised $2 million. The source of the remaining $1.96 million has not yet been identified, but Leavenworth County Commissioners hope to secure federal money for the proj- ect. Residents at the Sunday meet- ing also said the project could end up costing more than the pro- jected $12.96 million. They said the county would have to pay for

overruns, plus whatever is not pro- vided by the federal government.

“It’s like the difference between living on Walden Pond and liv- ing near a strip mall.”

as

well.”

The money from the county and

The

opposi-

Tonganoxie would come from a

tion

meeting

voter-approved 1 cent sales tax

at

the

county

that runs through 2016.

f a i r g r o u n d

Jan Bernhardt stands to lose

 

came

three

a

portion of her 320 acres to the

maryam hjersted

days

after

the

project.

Leavenworth resident

L e ave nwor t h C

y

C o m m i s s i o n approved a resolution reaffirming its support for the project, at an expense of about $8 million. Tonganoxie is expected to pro- vide $1 million, and the Kansas

o

u

n

t

“My concern is the access road

to the toll booth will go right by my house,” Bernhardt said. “Even beyond that, all the development that will follow this interchange is scary. We have a right to have

a voice in this process, and we haven’t had a voice.”

TONGANOXIE — Plans for

a proposed $13 million highway

interchange at the intersection of Leavenworth County Road 1 and the Kansas Turnpike are facing strong opposition from residents living near the area. About 80 people turned out Sunday to protest plans for the

p r

o

j

e

c

t

,

which

aims

to

improve

County

Road

1

from

U.S.

Highway

 

24

to

Kansas

Highway

 

32

to

support

traffic.

i n c r e a s e s

in

Leavenworth

County offi-

cials argue that the proposal has been in the works since the 1990s and will provide better access to the county, which will allow for growth and development.

» crime

Ex-Westar chief finishes prison time

ASSOCIATED PRESS

LEAVENWORTH — David Wittig, the former top executive of Westar Energy Inc., was released from prison Monday after serving nearly 13 months in prison. Wittig was released from the federal detention center in Leavenworth about 2 p.m. and was greeted by his wife, Beth, and Jeff Morris, one of his attorneys. Wittig, the former chairman, president and chief executive of Westar, was convicted in July 2003 of engaging in a loan transaction with a Topeka banker and helping

to conceal the loan from banking regulators. Wittig had been incarcerated in a minimum security prison in Sandstone, Minn., until last month, when he was transported to Topeka for his third sentenc- ing in the bank fraud case. U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson sen- tenced him to two years. On Thursday, Robinson granted Wittig’s request to be released on bond pending his appeal of that sentence. Although Robinson granted Wittig bond last week, he could not be released until the 10th

U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver ruled on his request for bond in another case, in which Wittig was convicted in September 2005 of looting Westar. Robinson sentenced him to 18 years in pris- on in that case. On Friday, the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver grant- ed that motion. Wittig’s release may be only tem- porary if the appeals court affirms the two-year sentence in the bank case, or prosecutors decide to put Wittig on trial again for some of the crimes in the Westar case.

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6 a Nat io N tuesday, february 13, 2007 » courts » BusINEss Boeing shows

6

a

Nat io N

tuesday, february 13, 2007

» courts

» BusINEss

Boeing shows tanker design to Air Force

BY donna Borak

associated press

WASHINGTON — Boeing Co. on Monday announced a newly designed KC-767 as its proposed aircraft for a $40 billion Air Force contract competition to replace 179 refueling planes. The Chicago-based company said at a press conference that it

tweaked the design of its long-range 767 freighter plane to improve fuel efficiency and allow it to take off and land on shorter runways, giv- ing it greater flexibility in combat situations. Boeing is competing against Northrop Grumman Corp., which is expected to offer its KC-30, a modi- fied Airbus A330, at a discounted price. “They can afford to make improve- ment to the aircraft — by putting in

a couple of bells and whistles — and

still be well below the price competi- tion,” said Paul Nisbet, analyst for JSA Research Inc. At stake for both competitors is

a multiyear contract to replace a portion of the military’s older fleet

of KC-135 aircraft, a medium-sized

refueling plane made by Boeing. The $40 billion contract is the first install- ment of an expected three-phase deal that calls for more than 500 planes and could be worth an estimated $100 billion. The Boeing-led team includes Smiths Aerospace, a unit of Smiths

Group, Rockwell Collins Inc., Vought Aircraft Industries Inc., Honeywell Inc. and Spirit AeroSystems Inc. Boeing said it would primarily

build the refueling tankers at facilities

in Everett, Wash., but that additional

work — and flight tests — would take place in Wichita, Kan. Boeing esti- mateed that if the Air Force selected the KC-767, the contract would sup- port more than 44,000 American jobs and 300 suppliers. The tanker program has been on hold for three years, after Boeing lost the contract amid an ethics scandal that resulted in prison terms for a former company executive and a for- mer high-ranking Air Force official. Boeing’s 767 is, on paper at least, more affordable than Northrop’s air- craft, with a listed retail price of roughly $120 million. But industry insiders expect Northrop Grumman, which is partnering with European Aeronautic Defense and Space Co., the parent company of Boeing’s arch rival, Airbus, to heavily discount its KC-30 to increase its competitive- ness. The current retail listing of the A330 is roughly $160 million. Both aerospace manufacturers typically sell planes to prime custom- ers at a discount. Last week, after much specula- tion that Northrop would bow out

of the competition, the Los Angeles-

based defense firm said it would bid

on the contract. Northrop officials said changes made by the Air Force addressed concerns it had that the

contract specifications would unfair-

ly favor Boeing.

The Los Angeles-based company has been viewed as the underdog in the competition with a heavier, less fuel-efficient aircraft. The Airbus tanker would have a maximum fuel capacity of 200,000 pounds.

Journalists testify in perjury trial

BY MicHaeL J. sniFFen

associated press

in perjury trial BY MicHaeL J. sniFFen associated press Dana Verkouteren/ASSOCIATED PRESS This artist rendering

Dana Verkouteren/ASSOCIATED PRESS

This artist rendering shows Washington Post reporter Walter Pincus, left, questioned by I. Lewis‘Scooter’Libby’s attorney William H. Jeffress Jr., right, standing, as District Judge Reggie Walton, seated, center, and Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald, seated, right, look on during Libby perjury trial at federal court in Washington Monday.

direct hit the defense made on the

prosecution’s evidence that Libby lied to FBI agents

and a grand jury about his talks with reporters about Plame and obstructed an investigation into how her name leaked.

Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, is not charged with the actual leak.

The defense did show Libby had numerous opportunities to leak

Plame’s identity to reporters and did not. But none of Monday’s tes- timony went directly to the precise charges that he lied about his con- versations with three other reporters about her. The day’s highlight was the tape of Woodward’s June 13, 2003, inter- view with Armitage about how Bush decided to go to war. Armitage’s name was never supposed to be connected publicly to what he said, but the scandal prompted him to release Woodward from his pledge of confidentiality. Armitage has said he revealed the name accidentally

off-the-cuff and didn’t realize that Plame’s employment was classified information. With Armitage’s frequent pro- fanities deleted, the jurors heard him tell Woodward no less than four times where she worked. Woodward asked about Wilson’s 2002 fact-finding mission to Africa for the CIA that the ex-ambassa- dor says helped him debunk prewar intelligence on Iraq. “Why would they send him?” Woodward asked. “Because his wife’s a (expletive) analyst at the agency,” Armitage

replied. “It’s still weird,” Woodward said. “It’s perfect. That’s what she does. She is a WMD analyst,” Armitage said. Later Woodward asked if she was the WMD chief at CIA. Armitage said she wasn’t but was in a position there to suggest that her husband had contacts in Africa. Finally, Armitage said: “His wife is at the agency and is a WMD analyst. How about that (expletive).”

WASHINGTON — Three promi- nent journalists testified Monday that Bush administration officials volunteered leaks about a CIA oper-

ative, as I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby’s attorneys sought to suggest he was not responsible for exposing her. The jury in Libby’s perjury trial heard a 66-second snippet of one of the deep background interviews given to Washington Post editor Bob Woodward for use in one of his books. They also saw a parade of Pulitzer-prize winning journalists discuss who did and did not leak the information that set off a scan- dal and ultimately brought Libby to trial. Woodward, who never wrote about Plame, and columnist Robert Novak, who first identified her in print, testified that then-Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage first told them in the summer of 2003 that the wife of prominent Iraq war critic Joseph Wilson, Valerie Plame, worked at the CIA. Another Post reporter, Walter Pincus, testified that then-White House press secretary Ari Fleischer “suddenly swerved off ” topic dur- ing an interview to tell him of her employment. This contradicted a point in Fleischer’s testimony last week. A major government witness, Fleischer testified Libby told him about Plame _ earlier than

Libby has told investigators he thought he first learned about her from NBC reporter Tim Russert. On

e x a m i n a t i o n , Fleischer also testified that he did not recall telling Pincus about Plame. The reporter’s testimony Monday was the most

about Plame. The reporter’s testimony Monday was the most The defense did show Libby had numerous
about Plame. The reporter’s testimony Monday was the most The defense did show Libby had numerous

The defense did show Libby had numerous opportunities to leak Plame’s identity to reporters and did not.

cross-

to leak Plame’s identity to reporters and did not. cross- nation Bush honors present-day contributors, sacrifices

nation

Bush honors present-day contributors, sacrifices

WASHINGTON — To honor black history, President Bush on Monday didn’t spend much time looking

back. He focused instead on people contributing today — those who are seizing opportunities gained at great price, the president said. “Their stories,” Bush said, “speak

a lot louder and a lot clearer than I could.” Like the breakthrough by Lovie Smith and Tony Dungy, who this month became the first black coaches to take their teams to the Super Bowl. Or the work of astro- nauts Robert Curbeam and Joan Higgenbotham, whose helped rewire the International Space Station. And then there’s Tyrone Flow- ers, a once aspiring basketball star who was shot and paralyzed. Instead of seeking sympathy or revenge, Flowers became a lawyer and teamed with his wife to form

a leadership program for at-risk children. “That’s what we’re honoring

today: ordinary citizens who do unbelievably fine things,” Bush said in an East Room ceremony honoring Black History Month. “Our call and our need is to continue to remember the promise belongs to everybody,” Bush said. “And our call for this country is never to rest until equality is real, opportunity is universal and every citizen can realize his or her dreams.” The nation has honored

Black History Month since 1926. Bush seemed to delight in recognizing some of the star personalities around him. Reprising a memorable scene from his State of the Union speech at the Capitol last month, he honored Wesley Autrey of New York, a construc- tion worker who jumped onto the tracks in a subway station to save a man who had fallen from a seizure. Autrey pointed with pride to the president and blew kisses to the audience. “We’re proud you’re here again,” Bush said. “We thank you for your

courage.”

—Associated Press

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tuesday, february 13, 2007 world 7 A

tuesday, february 13, 2007

world

7A

» iraq

Three car bombs shatter Baghdad’s oldest market

by KIM GAMEL

AssoCIAtEd prEss

Monday, according to police reports. About 30 minutes before the attack on the market, a suicide bomber det- onated an explosives vest in a crowd near a popular falafel restaurant in the nearby Bab al-Sharqi area. Nine people were killed and 19 wounded. A 15-minute period of com- memoration in the capital marking the February 2006 attack on the al- Askariya shrine had just ended when attack on the market took place. The sound of two of the blasts was caught on tape as Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki was delivering a speech live on television from the Cabinet building in the heavily for- tified Green Zone at the end of the commemoration. The Shiite prime minister didn’t

flinch — though his bodyguards did

— as he called for unity and said he

was optimistic about the U.S.-Iraqi

security sweep that officials said will gain momentum this week.

“We have great faith in our secu- rity services, army and police who have proved that they are a real protective force for this country, and we have faith that Iraqis have real- ized that there

will be no future for this country unless terrorism

is curbed,” he

BAGHDAD, Iraq — Thunderous car bombs shattered a crowded mar- ketplace in the heart of Baghdad on Monday, triggering secondary

explosions, engulfing an eight-story building in flames and killing at least 78 people in the latest in a series of similar attacks aimed at the country’s Shiite majority. The blasts in three parked cars obliterated shops and stalls and left bodies scattered among mannequins and other debris in pools of blood. Dense smoke blackened the area and rose hundreds of feet from the market district on the east bank of the Tigris River. Small fires, fueled

by

clothing and other goods, burned

for

hours in the rubble-strewn street

firefighters battled blazes in two buildings. “Where is the government? Where

as

is

the security plan?” survivors

screamed. “We have had enough.

We have lost our money and goods and our source of living.” The attack appeared timed to coincide with the first anniver-

sary — on the Muslim lunar calendar — of

the bombing of

a Shiite shrine

in the town of

Samarra north

of Baghdad, an

al-Qaida provo-

cation which

unleashed the

torrent of sectar- ian bloodletting that has gripped the capital for months. Monday’s bombings wrecked the Shorja market, Baghdad’s oldest, a day after joint U.S. and Iraqi forc-

es temporarily sealed an adjacent

neighborhood. The operation was part of the latest Baghdad security push to which President Bush has committed an additional 21,500 American troops. The U.S. military would not say if it had increased security patrols against potential vio- lence on the Samarra anniversary. Nationwide, 139 people were killed or found dead in violence on

139 people were killed or found dead in violence on “Where is the government? Where is

“Where is the government? Where is the security plan?”

survivors screamed.“We have had enough. We have lost our

money and goods and our source of living.”

said.

the

M i

n

i

Iraqiya

s

t

r

Brig. Abdul-

Karim Khalaf,

Interior

y

spokesman, told

state

television that three suspects were arrested — an Iraqi and two foreigners — in the attack on the marketplace. The car bombs exploded within

seconds of each other. One of the cars was parked near the entrance to a parking garage under one of the two targeted buildings, about 200 yards apart. Ambulances and pickup trucks rushed many of the 166 wounded to nearby al-Kindi Hospital in the largely Shiite neighborhood, which has been hit by a series of deadly bombings this year.

IntErnAtIonAL

British Attorney General decries Guantanamo Bay

MIAMI — Revised rules for the treatment and military trials of detainees at the Guantanamo Bay prison camp are “too little and too late,” Britain’s attorney general said Monday, repeating his call to close the facility. Attorney General Lord Gold- smith said Guantanamo remains a symbol of injustice because pris- oners held in the facility in Cuba cannot use American courts to protest their detention and may be convicted of crimes on the basis of coerced evidence and other means not typically allowed in civilian courts. “There remain fundamental problems with this system of detention,” Goldsmith told the American Bar Association at its meeting in Miami. Goldsmith said the fight against

terrorists must be won not only through force, but also values and ideas. “The presence of Guantanamo makes it so much more difficult to do this for all of us,” he said. Cmdr. J.D. Gordon, a Pentagon spokesman, said the detentions have allowed interrogators to learn information to avert terrorist attacks and kept so-called enemy combatants from returning to the battlefield. “The detainees at Guantanamo include some of the world’s most vicious terrorist operatives, includ- ing those who are alleged to have planned the attacks of Sept. 11, the bombing of USS Cole and the U.S. Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania,” Gordon said. “We have no desire to be the world’s jailer and do not hold detainees for any longer than necessary. We have been working to persuade other countries to accept their citizens.”

—Associated Press

countries to accept their citizens.” —Associated Press » celebrity Photos of Smith, official surface by MICHAEL

» celebrity

Photos of Smith, official surface

by MICHAEL MELIA

AssoCIAtEd prEss

NASSAU, Bahamas — Photographs of Anna Nicole Smith in bed embracing the Bahamian immigration minister who approved her application for permanent residency here revived a scandal in the islands Monday. Also Monday, the son-in- law of the American developer embroiled in an ownership dis- pute over the Nassau mansion where Smith was living said he found methadone in her bed- room refrigerator when he went to secure the estate following her death in Florida last week. A private pathologist has said methadone contributed to the death of Smith’s 20-year-old son Daniel in the Bahamas in September. Daniel Smith died while visiting his mother and newborn half-sister in a Bahamas hospital and an inquest into his death in the Bahamas is planned. Two photographs published on the front page of The Tribune of Nassau Monday showed Smith and Immigration Minister Shane Gibson, both fully clothed, embracing on a bed decorated with pink flowers and a white ribbon. In one of the photos, they look into each other’s eyes, their faces a couple of inches apart.

Gibson, an elected member of Parliament from the ruling Progressive Liberal Party, has already been accused of show- ing Smith preferential treatment

by fast-tracking her residency application last year. With general elections due this spring, many said the photographs, taken in

due this spring, many said the photographs, taken in J. Pat Carter/ASSOCIATED PRESS A small memorial

J. Pat Carter/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A small memorial to Anna Nicole Smith sits against a tree Sunday in Dania Beach, Fla. in front of the Broward County Medical Examiner’s office where her body is kept as lawsuits continue.

Smith’s bedroom, could damage the ruling party. Cassius Stuart, leader of the BahamasDemocraticMovement,said Gibson has “shamed” the Bahamas and called for him to resign. “He should do the right thing and step down,” he told reporters outside Smith’s Nassau residence. The BDM is a small opposition party with no seats in parliament. Gibson did not return calls seek- ing comment. But government

spokesman Al Dillette dismissed any suggestion of impropriety. “Minister Gibson is a friend of Anna Nicole, and that’s all a matter of public record,” he said. John Marquis, managing editor of The Tribune, declined to say who provided the photographs. He said he published them because of their potential political impact. “For the Bahamas, it’s not just a salacious story,” he said. “It’s a story with pretty far-reaching political

implications.” Ron Rale, a lawyer for Smith and representative of her most recent companion, Howard K. Stern, scram- bled Monday to keep control over items he said were stolen from the mansion over the weekend, includ- ing images from a computer taken from the house. Rale said anyone who dissemi- nates the items without his prior written consent “will be held liable to the fullest extent of the law.”

who dissemi- nates the items without his prior written consent “will be held liable to the

8

a

enterta inment

tuesday, february 13, 2007

tuesday, february 13, 2007

8 a enterta inment tuesday, february 13, 2007 » sal & ace » lizarD boy caleb

» sal & ace

inment tuesday, february 13, 2007 » sal & ace » lizarD boy caleb goellner samuel hemphill

» lizarD boy

caleb goellner

13, 2007 » sal & ace » lizarD boy caleb goellner samuel hemphill back on the

samuel hemphill

back on the world beat

boy caleb goellner samuel hemphill back on the world beat Damian Dovarganes/associaTeD press The police, from

Damian Dovarganes/associaTeD press

The police, from left, sting, stewart copeland and andy summers, rehearse from the Whisky a Go-Go in Los Angeles where they announced Monday the band’s 30th anniversary world tour.

announced Monday the band’s 30th anniversary world tour. » horoscope 10 is the easiest day, 0

» horoscope

10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

aries (March 21-april 19) Today is an 8 Tales of glory and adventure are your inspiration. Get a good crew on board and you’ll exceed your own expectations.

Taurus (april 20-May 20) Today is a 7

A startling discovery seems

to change everything, but it doesn’t. Maintain your course and you’ll achieve your original objective.

GeMini (May 21-June 21) Today is an 8 Somebody else finds the pas- sageway first. Hopefully, you’re on good terms. A concept you thought was ridiculous actually has merit. Abandon pride and forge ahead.

cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 7 You’re finding things you thought you’d lost forever. You’re building things you never had before. Hide all of it away in safe places, clearly marked, so you can find them again.

leo (July 23-aug. 22) Today is an 8 The more you focus attention on others, the better you’re going to feel. This is going to be easy, too, and a lot of fun.

VirGo (aug. 23-sept. 22) Today is a 5 The tension will dissipate as ev- eryone finds their new position. You’ll see, this recent develop- ment will work out to your advantage.

libra (sept. 23-oct. 22) Today is a 7 The truth is revealed, and that could cause a disruption to your routine. You weren’t really doing anything wrong, you were just going down the wrong path.

scorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21) Today is a 7 You’re still doing well, financially, but you’ll be better off if you don’t talk about money very much. Don’t provoke jealousies.

saGiTTarius (nov. 22-Dec.21)

Today is an 8

Your persistence is beginning to show results. Your profits are coming in. Resist the temptation to splurge, this may have to last

a while.

capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 The trick is to look at previously expendable items a different way. Instead of being icky, see them as potentially valuable.

aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 6

You’ll soon be past the idea phase and into the heavy lifting.

In other words, the fun part’s

over. It is time to get back to work.

pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 6

The assignment you’ve taken on

is certainly not easy. Although

you’re not making much money, you’re definitely paying dues.

not making much money, you’re definitely paying dues. KU Trivia When was Baby Jay born (or
not making much money, you’re definitely paying dues. KU Trivia When was Baby Jay born (or
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The University Daily Kansan emphasizes the First Amendment:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Valentine’s Day special: consumer holiday or time for real love? send us your opinions in 80 words or fewer about Valentine’s Day.

Email: opinion@kansan.com

fewer about Valentine’s Day. Email: opinion@kansan.com tuesday, February 13, 2007 www.kansan.com opinion opinion

tuesday, February 13, 2007

www.kansan.com

opinion@kansan.com tuesday, February 13, 2007 www.kansan.com opinion opinion PAGE 9A » Our View End of term

opinion

opinion

PAGE 9A

» Our View

End of term sees Bush altering policies

9A » Our View End of term sees Bush altering policies » cOmmentary Grant snider/Kansan Valentine’s

» cOmmentary

Grant snider/Kansan

Valentine’s Day deserves celebrating by singles

There is a disconnection between dating on Valentine’s Day and the other 364 days of the year. More than half of young, single adults in America are not actively searching for romantic relation-

ships, according to a study by pewinternet.org and American Life Project. In fact, 49 percent have gone on no more than one date in

ceeded with online speed or in reality TV, it’s time we take this holiday into today’s con- text. As a single woman adapting to this normative of

“dating” since hit- ting Mount Oread, it’s natural that I’ve come to rely heavily on my platonic relationships. Family ties have strengthened thanks to e-mailing. My high school girlfriends and I use AOL Instant Messenger and the ever-rel- evant “fresh ink” line of Hallmark cards. My male-roommate and I tend to frequent 24-hour favorites like Java Break and IHOP to catch

up. Nothing about today looks or feels like it did in 1840 when the first Valentines were mass-pro- duced in the United States to celebrate “romantic love,” according to his-

States to celebrate “romantic love,” according to his- By ABBy huGhEs kansan columnist opinion@kansan.com

By ABBy huGhEs

kansan columnist opinion@kansan.com

tory.com. So in line with the progression and development that our society has become known for and accus- tomed to: I’m spending time with my Valentines this year. My girls will be receiving their fresh-ink cards, my parents a special phone call and my co-workers and I will take a break to celebrate our good

working relationship. My room- mate and I will enjoy a platonic evening of baking chocolate cake and ordering pizza with toppings in the shape of a heart It’s easy for singles to be disil- lusioned into thinking that they are in the lonely minority and not real- ize that conventional dating isn’t so conventional in the 2007 context. Celebrate your relationships with the ones you care most about and stop expecting your Valentines to fall into a neat-tidy-dating category that doesn’t exist anymore. After all, who doesn’t deserve to celebrate the good people in their lives?

Hughes is a St. Louis senior in journalism.

Observers were understand- ably taken aback during President Bush’s recent goodwill visit to Wall Street, where he spoke out against the exponentially escalating salaries of America’s top corporate officers. Could this be the same Bush, the punditocracy wondered, who had long embraced the free market and whatever conditions it dictated? Was the nation’s first MBA president really calling for public checks on private wages? As it turns out, the executive pay speech was only part of a broad pas- tiche of surprising proposals advo- cated by Bush in the last few months. Bush has lately embraced and sup- ported the causes of increased healthcare coverage, explorations of renewable and alternative energy sources and higher spending for environmental protection. These, along with the obvious use of the military for nation-building and instituting global change, causes decried by Bush in 2000, make the president a starkly different politi- cal creature today than he was just a few years ago. If a voter had taken an Rip Van Winkle-esque nap after the 2000 election and had just awo- ken, he would hardly recognize the president. Bush’s many critics will quickly denounce his tactics as crass political opportunism, the product of a man who sees the mounting coverage of the 2008 race and has shifted his

focus to his own legacy. Cynics will recall the same strategy employed by President Clinton, who in his waning years embraced a number of conservative causes to burnish his own Oval Office accomplishments. But in Bush’s case, these evolu- tions of principle do not seem to be aleatory or strictly political. After all, he is not going to win any more business-sector friends by calling for salary caps. Rather, these changes reflect the developing worldview of a man confronted by new realities, and in these new ideals lie important lessons for young voters. Presidents enter office with the highest ambitions, busiest agendas, and loftiest aspirations. But the con- strictive nature of the governing pro- cess requires that presidents turn instead to the tools of practicality and trappings of bipartisanship. Our nation’s best leaders have been those who embrace cooperation over com- bat, compromise over contention, and consensus over conflict. As the focus on the 2008 election hones in on the basest and most rabid elements within each party, young voters should remember that little in American history was accomplished with the politics of division and dis- pute. A better future lies down the path of collaborative pragmatism, not rigid idealism.

— McKay Stangler for the editorial board.

FREE FOR ALL

call 864-0500

Free for All callers have 20 seconds to speak about any topic they wish. Kansan editors reserve the right to omit comments. Slanderous and obscene statements will not be printed. Phone numbers of all incoming calls are recorded.

instead of increasing our required campus fee, how about they just turn off the lights at the baseball field in the middle of the winter?

n

i don’t know what i like better, seeing ku win or seeing duke lose four in a row. i hate duke! i also hate how they get to sit court-side at all their games. come on, Lew!

n

did anybody find an iPod in the wescoe second floor bath- room?

n

to the person who tried to save their spot with the orange safety cone: thanks for the park- ing spot!

n

i’ve got my rain boots and my umbrella. i’m prepared for rain, sleet, snow, or shine. i’m so prepared, i should be a boy scout

working for the post office.

n

so i think i’m going to drop out of school and become a weather man.

i hope i just made someone’s day today, because i totally slipped outside of budig and busted my ass, and it hurt.

n

i am honestly so bored that i’m

considering letting people see

my boobs for $40.

n

to those who saw me on sat- urday night: i’m sorry i cried. it’s quite unlike me, and i don’t plan

on it happening again.

n

some people must have special umbrellas that protect

against mist.

n

since when were alexander Hamilton or ben Franklin presi- dents? and i’m pretty sure that ulysses s Grant was a pretty bad

president.

n

my French teacher just asked if we eat rabbits here in america.

n

to the lady with a small child

that saw me smoking a joint on campus today: that was a mean look!

n

to the asian kid that just tried to walk on the ice at Potter’s Lake: it’s clearly not frozen, you dumbass!

n

to the ku basketball players who just tried to play chicken with me on 15th street: i would be very upset with you and call the police, but you just beat mu, so i guess i’ll allow it.

the past three months. With the

dating scene being more casual than ever, why do singles still feel un-entitled to celebrate Valentine’s

Day? We live in a time when the prevalence of text-messaging and “hooking-up” are ever-present reminders that mating is adapt-

ing to 21st-century America. In a society in which dating has come to have significance only when pro-

» cOmmentary

professor-rating site deserves hits

deserve better. I lived in a three-credit-hour hell because of that famous freshman statement, “This sounds interest- ing.” At that time I didn’t understand

sounds interest- ing.” At that time I didn’t understand By sAm schnEidEr kansan columnist opinion@kansan.com I

By sAm schnEidEr

kansan columnist opinion@kansan.com

I find a class that

sounds interest- ing and a time that will fit my schedule, then I check the attached

professor’s rating.

If I find a negative

consensus among students, I look for

that a good pro- fessor is more important than the name of the class. I found

ratemyprofes-

sors.com later that semester. Now when a new semester comes around, I sit at my computer and open two tabs on my browser. The first contains the class lists put out by the university. The second is the Rate My Professors Web site. First

another class. Of course, not everyone loves this site (though few of these oppo- nents actually take classes). They point out that it’s quite possible for a student who has received a well- deserved F to slant the rankings negative. What you see is a slice of extremes: People who loved or hated a particular class, because no one else would have the motivation to leave a comment. They’re right that the comments tend to be a collection of praise and

Our professor gazed down at us with hooded eyes. You could feel them burning into the back of your

damnation for each professor, but they miss the point. We don’t take a class because no one cared about it. We choose a class precisely because someone raved about it or blew up in it. To make sure Rate My Professors

has actually helped me, I tested my own seven favorite professors. Sure enough, most of their overall ratings sat securely near a perfect five and only two dipped below a four. Be wise. Don’t base your decision entirely on ratings. But do use them. They may not reveal to you to the best professor in Kansas, but they do a fine job illuminating the worst. Enjoy the classes you take while in college. If you can avoid bad professors and gravitate to the many excellent ones on this campus, do it.

Schneider is a Topeka junior in English.

skull. As always, he was searching the room for a sign that someone had not read the week’s assignment.

All at once, he would notice a timid expression and swooping down

would cry out, “You there, Mr. So- and-so, tell us

the significance of this statement on page 224.”

Have you ever had one of those classes that

on page 224.” Have you ever had one of those classes that Ever had a class

Ever had a class that was unable

to raise your eyelids or your in- terest?

inspired Freddy Krueger dreams in you the night before? Ever had a class that was unable to raise either your eyelids or your interest? In a university as big as this, they’re bound to exist; accept that fact, and then avoid those classes. You

» talk tO us

Gabriella souza, editor 864-4854 or gsouza@kansan.com

nicole Kelley, managing editor 864-4854 or nkelley@kansan.com

patrick Ross, managing editor 864-4854 or pross@kansan.com

courtney Hagen, opinion editor 864-4924 or chagen@kansan.com

natalie Johnson, associate opinion editor 864-4924 or njohnson@kansan.com

lindsey shirack, business manager 864-4014 or lshirack@kansan.com

Jackie schaffer, sales manager 864-4462 or jschaffer@kansan.com

Malcolm Gibson, general manager, news adviser 864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com

Jennifer Weaver, sales and marketing adviser 864-7666 or jweaver@kansan.com

» submissiOns

The Kansan welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns submitted by students, faculty and alumni.

The Kansan reserves the right to edit, cut to length, or reject all submissions.

For any questions, call Courtney Hagen or Natalie Johnson at 864-4810 or e-mail opinion@kansan.com.

General questions should be directed to the editor at editor@kansan.com

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Maximum length: 200 words include: Author’s name, class, hometown (student) or position (faculty member/staff) and phone num- ber (will not be published)

submit Letters to

111 Stauffer-Flint Hall 1435 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

(785) 864-4810, opinion@kansan.com

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editoriaL board

Gabriella Souza, Nicole Kelley, Patrick Ross, Courtney Hagen, Natalie Johnson, Alison Kieler, Tasha Riggins and McKay Stangler

10a valentine’s day tuesday, february 13, 2007 Valentine’s Day food Guide Sexy treats can conjure

10a

valentine’s day

tuesday, february 13, 2007

10a valentine’s day tuesday, february 13, 2007 Valentine’s Day food Guide Sexy treats can conjure up

Valentine’s Day

day tuesday, february 13, 2007 Valentine’s Day food Guide Sexy treats can conjure up love For

food Guide

Sexy treats can conjure up love

For valentine’s day, or anytime, some food could put lovers in the mood

By CAiTlin THornBrUGH

This Valentine’s Day add spice to your day, literally, with some nutmeg. This is just one of many stimulating aphrodisiacs that could potentially enhance your romantic and sexual encounters. Valentine’s Day dates back to 270 A.D., but aphrodisiacs can be traced to the ancient goddess of love Aphrodite.

She believed

sparrows had

an “amorous

Top 10 Aphrodisiacs

1. chocolate

2. oysters

3. coffee

4. honey

5. wine

6. strawberries

7. bananas

8. vanilla

9. nutmeg

10. pineapple

nature.”

But

what

an

exactly

aphrodisiac?

is

to

Morse

M

a

r

t

h

According

Jocelyn

and

a H o p k i n s ,

c o - a u t h o r s of InterCourses: An Aphrodisiac Cookbook, an aphrodisiac is, “A food that taps into most, if not all, of the senses.”

Going beyond food, American Heritage Dictionary defines an aph- rodisiac as a “drug, potion, or other

agent that arouses sexual desire.” Overland Park sophomore Andy Lufkin just thinks an aphrodisiac is anything that stimulates sexual attraction. Other than his “natural charm” he admits to never having any experience with them, but is open to new ideas. “Probably the only time I would use them is if I was going after someone that was way out of my league, but I wouldn’t do anything unnatural like trying to make my johnson bigger or anything like

that.”

Hopkins says she has grown to

enjoy the “sensuality” of an oyster.

“I believe that some foods do have

a physiological effect on the body.

Oysters, for instance, are loaded

with zinc, which increases testoster-

one level.”

With resources such as aphro- disiac cookbooks available, mak- ing a Valentine’s Day dessert is a reasonable option for impressing a date or just increasing your passion. Numerous different foods can have stimulating effects. “I think it would be kind of spe- cial for a guy to use a recipe that included an aphrodisiac, but mak-

By Jennifer Torline

What do you think? what restaurant would you like a date to take you to on valentine’s day?

would you like a date to take you to on valentine’s day? PAIGE BLAIR Chicago, Ill.,

PAIGE BLAIR Chicago, Ill., junior “I would go to Zen Zero be- cause they have coconut flan that’s perfect for two people to share.”

coconut flan that’s perfect for two people to share.” TYLER HUGHES McPherson freshman “I would go

TYLER HUGHES McPherson freshman “I would go somewhere

fancy and romantic, but

haven’t had a chance to sample Lawrence’s fine cuisine yet.”

I

APRIL KELEHER Burlingame, Cali. sophomore “Pachamama’s because it’s a fun atmosphere, especially if you get a table by the window. Plus, afterwards you can walk somewhere and get ice cream.”

THE BIGGEST & BEST MARDI GRAS Party in Lawrence! Prizes for the girl with the
THE BIGGEST & BEST MARDI GRAS Party in Lawrence! Prizes for the girl with the
THE BIGGEST & BEST MARDI GRAS Party in Lawrence! Prizes for the girl with the

THE BIGGEST & BEST MARDI GRAS Party in Lawrence!

THE BIGGEST & BEST MARDI GRAS Party in Lawrence! Prizes for the girl with the most

Prizes for the girl with the most beads!

$2 Hurricanes $2 SoCo Lime Shots $1 SoCo 100 Proof Shots

18

for Beads

Tuesday

21

for Booze

February 20th

SoCo Lime Shots $1 SoCo 100 Proof Shots 18 for Beads T u e s d
Top recipes to make at home local chefs share their secrets By CArly HAlVorSon Making
Top recipes to
make at home
local chefs share their secrets
By CArly HAlVorSon
Making a special
Valentine’s Day for your
sweetheart can be difficult
ered, for 15 to 20 minutes,
or until the lentils and
squash are tender. Season it
with salt and pepper.
Anna Faltermeier/KANSAN
Crème Brulee
Jeff Frenya, waiter at Paisano’s Ristorante,
2112 W. 25th St., carries breadsticks and
salad to a table Monday evening. Paisano’s has
been in lawrence since 1995. the restaurant
serves traditional italian cuisine.
with an empty wallet. Five-
star restaurants aren’t exact-
Provided by Josh Powers,
ly in a college student’s bud-
get. Hopefully, the follow-
ing recipes can help you out
Executive Chef at Ten, 701
Massachusetts St.(at the
Eldridge Hotel)
a bit. With these simple yet
classy recipes, your special
someone will be impressed
with your skills.
Curried Pumpkin
Lentil Soup
Provided by Sam Sieber,
Operations Manager at
Pachamama’s, 800 New
Hampshire St.
This recipe is from their
October menu. Since
Pachamama’s is a fine-dining
restaurant, the difficulty level
of each dish is fairly high.
“The real dish might be a
little complex for students.
One of our menu items could
involve seven different reci-
pes,” said Sieber.
“Everyone loves crème
brulee, and it is pretty easy
to make,” said Powers.
“This is a revised recipe
that should make crème
brulee for two. Of course, it
depends on what sized dish
is being used.” However,
this recipe can be time con-
suming.
Ingredients:
4
egg yolks
2
oz. (about 2 tbsp.) sugar
2
cups heavy cream
1
tsp. vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
To make:
In a mixing bowl, whip
egg yolks and sugar togeth-
er until light. Heat the
cream and salt to a boil and
Ingredients:
4 cups red or mixed lentils
1-2
butternut
squash,
then turn off the heat. Pour
half of the cream and salt
mixture into the bowl with
peeled, seeded, and diced
the eggs and sugar (this is
4
onions, chopped
called tempering). Then
6
tbsp. vegetable oil
20 garlic cloves, minced
4” grated, peeled, fresh gin-
pour that mixture back
into the sauce pot. Place
the pot back on low heat
ger root
and stir with a spatula or
1 tbsp. ground cumin
1 tbsp.
ground coriander
spoon to avoid scorching.
Stir for three minutes. Pour
seeds
2 tbsp. green curry powder,
ing something at all is good enough
for a guy,” said Julie Heschmeyer,
Lawrence sophomore.
Lufkin agrees with her.
“I guess it would make me feel
nice or whatever. It would be kind of
cool as long as they were okay with
it first,” he said.
This Valentine’s Day, and in daily
life, feel free to take some aphrodi-
siacal advice from the goddess of
love. Spice it up with stimulating
aphrodisiacs.
the mixture back into oven-
safe soufflé dishes or soup
toasted
bowls. Bake in water bath
14 cups
chicken stock
4 cups
drained
canned
tomatoes
To make:
In a large bowl, wash the
lentils in
several changes of
cold water until the water
runs clear. Drain them in a
fine sieve. In a large, heavy
saucepan, cook the onions
in the
oil over moderate
heat, stirring, until they are
softened.
and the
cook the
for one
toasted
Add the garlic
ginger root, and
mixture, stirring,
minute. Add the
curry, cumin and
the ground coriander seeds.
Cook the mixture over
moderately low heat, stir-
ring for
one minute. Add
the lentils, squash, chicken
stock and the tomatoes.
in conventional oven sat at
350 degrees for 30 to 45
minutes. To make the water
bath, just fill an oven-safe
pan or dish with one inch of
water, then place the brulee
dishes in that pan or dish.
The water should come up
to the halfway point of the
brulee dish. Let the brulees
cool for two hours. Then,
top with sugar and place in
oven set to broiler. The heat
from the top will caramel-
ize the sugar. This should
only take a couple of min-
utes. Serve immediately.
“The final product can
be topped with whatever
you want,” said Powers.
“Berries are a classic gar-
nish.”
Anna Faltermeier/KANSAN
Spaghetti and Fettuc-
cine Alfredo are two
dishes served at Paisano’s
ristorante.
Simmer the mixture, cov-
Anna Faltermeier/KANSAN Luis and Erin Pardo, Wichita, celebrate valentine’s day early at the Mad Greek
Anna Faltermeier/KANSAN
Luis and Erin Pardo, Wichita, celebrate
valentine’s day early at the Mad Greek restau-
rant, 907 Massachusetts, Monday evening. the
Mad Greek serves Greek and italian dishes at
prices ranging from about $6 to $15.
907 Massachusetts, Monday evening. the Mad Greek serves Greek and italian dishes at prices ranging from

BASKETBALL TICKET PICKUP

The last men’s basketball ticket pickup of the season begins today. The games in the final group are against Iowa State and Texas.

ticket pickup of the season begins today. The games in the final group are against Iowa

Iowa State

ticket pickup of the season begins today. The games in the final group are against Iowa

Texas

group are against Iowa State and Texas. Iowa State Texas tuesday, february 13, 2007 www.kansan.com sports

tuesday, february 13, 2007

www.kansan.com

Iowa State Texas tuesday, february 13, 2007 www.kansan.com sports sports PAGE 1B » the rant Steady

sports

sports

PAGE 1B

» the rant

Steady play key to good seeding

Consistency is primary concern

play key to good seeding Consistency is primary concern By ryAn ColAiAnni kansan sports columnist

By ryAn ColAiAnni

kansan sports columnist rcolaianni@kansan.com

K ansas put together one of its most complete performances of the

season on Saturday, because of consistent play of Julian Wright and Brandon Rush. Those two played at the level that was expected when they were named Big 12 Preseason Players of the Year. It was understood with the talent and depth that Kansas has, neither Rush nor Wright would score 20 or more points a night. It simply would not be possible. Coach Bill Self even said that, but those two players can still be efficient and play at the level that garnered them those pre-season accolades. Rush put together his most efficient game of his career, going eight of 10 from the field, hitting all three of his three- point shots, and did not miss a free throw. Granted, Rush will not do that on a consistent basis, but it was a nice change of pace from the 3-for-13 games that he had been struggling with over the past month. He needs to continue his solid marksmanship down the stretch to keep defend- ers honest. Wright showed why he is pro- jected to be such a high selection in the NBA draft with his timely offensive rebounds, and easy putbacks, while going 14-for-21 from the floor, good for a career high 33 points. Kansas will need Wright and Rush to continue to be efficient if they are going to make a run in March. If not, the consistency this team has lacked is going to be a problem. Often times, the NCAA tour- nament does not dictate who has played the best basketball throughout the season. Instead, it proves who is able to pay the best basketball over a three week period. Look at last year. No one is going to argue that Florida was the best team in the coun- try for the majority of the year. They started the season off hot, but struggled down the stretch, before getting hot at the right time, and getting a favorable draw in the tournament. Then, they played better than anyone else and got the job done. If Kansas can find the consis- tency that it has lacked all sea- son, there is no reason to think that Kansas cannot be this year’s Florida. The talent is there. The desire is there. They have proven against Florida and Oklahoma State that when they play the way they are capable of, no team in America is better. It is just a matter of putting it all together,

see Colaianni on page 6B

men’s basketball

all together, see Colaianni on page 6B men’s basketball ILLUstratIon BY grant snIDer self hits milestone

ILLUstratIon BY grant snIDer

self hits milestone

Coach looks forward to another 300 career victories

By MiChAEl PhilliPs

In 1994, Oral Roberts coach Bill Self was not thinking about coaching milestones. He was thinking about keeping his job. “You lose 18 in a row, and you wonder if you’ll make it to the end of the season,” he said. He put those days behind him in a hurry, and on Saturday Self won his 300th game as a head coach when Kansas defeated Missouri in Columbia. His first victory came during that 1993-1994 season, when he took the reins at Oral Roberts. Despite an

18-game losing streak, he made it though the season, and three years later the team finished with a 21- 7 record and made the postseason National Invitation Tournament. The 300th victory is a milestone one, but gets overshadowed in the Big 12 Conference by senior coaches like Bob Knight at Texas Tech, who is marching toward his 900th. “I’ve coached for 14 years, so if I just coach 28 more, I can maybe get to 900,” Self said. He didn’t know that the Missouri game could be his 300th victory until a reporter asked him about it earlier in the week. He said that the record was more about how long he had

been around than anything else. “To get to 500 or 600 would mean a lot more,” he said. Self didn’t even tell his players about the accomplishment, instead letting them find out on their own. Sophomore guard Brandon Rush read about it on the Internet, and junior guard Russell Robinson heard about it from the assistant coaches. “I’m happy for him, it’s a big num- ber,” Robinson said. “But I think he’s after the big ones. Robinson added that Self has been able to hang around so long because of the way he interacts with

see self on page 6B

» Women’s basketball

Shaq makes big plays at the buzzer

By AshEr fusCo

The buzzer-beater is one of the most exhilarating and elusive plays in all of sports. While most basket- ball players are lucky to have one chance at a game-winner in their entire college career, senior guard Shaquina Mosley has had three such opportunities in the last two weeks alone. Mosley’s first chance to make a last second shot came on January 31st. Through 39 minutes of play, the feisty Jayhawks had managed to hang with the more talented and experienced Texas Tech Lady Raiders. Mosley was putting the finishing touches on an impressive 18 point, 11 assist, nine rebound performance. With eight seconds remain- ing and Kansas trailing by one point, freshman forward Danielle McCray secured a rebound and quickly passed to Mosley. The senior guard raced down the floor but settled for a jump shot instead of driving to the basket. As the ball fell just short of the cylinder, she dropped to the floor in dismay. “I thought about going to the hoop, but I pulled back,” Mosley said. “I should have gone to the rim.” Less than one week later, Mosley found redemption. With Kansas

stuck in the cellar of the confer- ence standings at 0-9, Colorado paid a visit to Allen Fieldhouse. The contest was heart-fought from the opening tip, complete with 12 lead changes, the last of which came with five seconds remaining in overtime. Mosley was the one responsible for Kansas’ final basket and its first conference victory. Having learned a valuable lesson from her experience nearly one week earlier, Mosley decided to take the ball toward the hoop. The miniscule guard knifed quickly through the lane and converted a layup to win the game. “I thought to myself, ‘do not set- tle for a jump shot’,” Mosley said. “I was trying to pull the defense and then kick it or finish at the rim.” On the heels of its first Big 12 victory, the team traveled south to take on a strong but inconsistent Texas squad. It was in Austin, Texas that Mosley’s most dramatic buzzer- beater would occur. She struggled through most of the game, and was held scoreless in the first half, but Mosley found success at the most important time. With less than one second remaining and the Jayhawks

see women’s BasketBall on page 6B

and the Jayhawks see women’s BasketBall on page 6B KANSAN FILE PHOTO senior guard shaquina Mosley

KANSAN FILE PHOTO

senior guard shaquina Mosley makes a shot against Colorado on Feb. 6. Mosley has made two game-winning shots at the buzzer in the past few weeks, against Colorado and Texas.

» big 12 basketball

Freshmen playing better, scoring more than before

By MArk DEnt

He leads the league in assists as a freshman. He sent a game into overtime twice by making late jump shots. He just scored 31 points and handed out six assists against Iowa State. “He’s one of those special guys,” Texas coach Rick Barnes said. “He’s got the mentality of the point guard where he’s trying to win and get everyone else involved. He has the identity I wish we could get across the board.” He’s D.J. Augustin, and as good

as he is, he’s not even the best rookie on his team. Anyone who hasn’t been living on Mars the last two months knows that designation belongs to Kevin Durant. Durant is the headliner for the Longhorns, but Augustin and two other freshmen also play significant minutes. Ten years ago, a team with as many young pups as Texas would have been punished by the veteran big dogs in conference play. The Longhorns would probably find themselves reeling toward an eighth place or worse finish. Welcome to 2007. Texas is tied for second place, and Durant is the best

player in the Big 12 and maybe the nation. Such is the reality in the Big 12 these days as freshmen have taken on a larger role than ever before. The Longhorns are the best example of this injection of youth. Durant and Augustin have won eight of the 15 Big 12 Newcomer of the Week Honors this season. Take into account that Durant would have won another three if he hadn’t been cho- sen Big 12 Player of the Week, and the number becomes even more absurd. In Big 12 play, Durant is averaging an insane 31 points and 13 rebounds per game. His teammate Augustin is averaging 8.5 assists per game. Two

other freshmen, Justin Mason and Damion James, are the team’s fourth and fifth leading scorers. “The thing that other people are missing out on is all their other guys,” Nebraska coach Doc Sadler said. “They are a very talented team.” In addition to Mason and James, the state of Texas also produced another outstanding freshman in Kansas’ Darrell Arthur. It was apparent that Arthur would be special after just one game. Shady told everyone what his name was in the Jayhawks’ first exhibition game by scoring 23 points. His numbers have dipped slightly in conference

play, but another Kansas freshman’s have gone up. Sherron Collins has been attacking the basket fearlessly the last month, and he recorded seven assists in both Jayhawk victo- ries last week. A month ago, he and Arthur took over for Kansas down the stretch in a close victory against Missouri. “The two freshmen scored 14 of our last 16 points,” Kansas coach Bill Self said after the 80-77 victory. “I’d say those two stepped up pretty big.” Other youngsters who have stepped up this year include Iowa

see Big 12 on page 6B

2B sports tuesday, february 13, 2007 athletics calendar   Wednesday n softball vs. florida state,

2B

sports

tuesday, february 13, 2007

athletics calendar

 

Wednesday

n

softball vs. florida state, 6:30

n

swimming and diving at big

p.m. tallahassee, fla.

12

Championships, all day, Col-

lege station, texas

Saturday

n

swimming and diving at big

n

Women’s basketball vs. Mis-

12 Championships, all day, Col- lege station, texas

souri, 7 p.m. allen fieldhouse

n

Men’s basketball vs. Colorado,

n

softball vs. Jacksonville, 11

8 p.m. boulder, Colo.

a.m. tallahassee, fla.

Thursday

n

tennis vs. utah, 11 a.m. first

n

swimming and diving at big

serve tennis Center

12

Championships, all day, Col-

lege station, texas

n

Men’s basketball vs. Nebraska,

3 p.m. allen fieldhouse

Friday

n

swimming and diving at big

n

softball vs. Memphis, 6:30

12

Championships, all day, Col-

p.m. tallahassee, fla.

lege station, texas

Sunday

n

softball vs. south Carolina, 11

n

Women’s basketball vs. Kansas

a.m. tallahassee, fla.

state, 1 p.m. allen fieldhouse

n

tennis vs. brigham young, 2

n

baseball vs. North dakota

p.m. first serve tennis Center

state, 3 p.m. Hoglund ballpark

BasEBall

Home-opening series rescheduled again

kansas and North Dakota state will test the third time’s a charm theory next week. The three-game series, origi- nally scheduled for Feb. 15-17, was moved early in the season to Feb. 14-16. On Monday, the athletics department reported the series would be moved again. The series is now scheduled to start Feb. 18 and end Feb.

20 in an effort to play in better

weather conditions.

According to weather.com , instead of opening at home on wednesday with a forecasted temperature of 17 degrees, the temperature on the resched- uled opening day should reach

49 degrees.

This is the Jayhawks’ second attempt at a home-opening series.

— Alissa Bauer

NHl

Chicago Blackhawks win games, but want panache

COLUMBUs, Ohio — The Chicago Blackhawks are no longer satisfied with just winning. They want to play well while doing it. Martin Havlat had a goal and two assists and the Blackhawks scored three times in the open- ing period of a 5-4 win over the Columbus Blue Jackets on sunday. “it’s a young team,” Chicago coach Denis savard said. “we made a few mistakes. The good thing about this is we can fix it.” Peter Bondra and Bryan smolinski each had a goal and an assist and Patrick sharp and Martin Lapointe also scored for the Black- hawks, who have won five of their last seven games. A few Blue Jackets fans chanted “we want a refund!” in the third period — before their team came back with two goals to almost force overtime.

—Associated Press

» NCAA bAsketbAll

Duke finally falls out of poll

By DOUG FEINBERG

assOcIatED pREss

their slide Wednesday against Atlantic Coast Conference leader Boston College. The Eagles (18-

6, 9-2) are finally back in the poll at No. 21 after falling out in week 3. Florida remained a unanimous No. 1 for the second straight week, garnering all 72 first place votes. Florida beat Georgia 71-61 on Wednesday and won at then-No. 20 Kentucky 64-61 on Saturday in front of a raucous record crowd of 24,465. It was the Gators’ fifth straight victory over their rivals. It had been 20 years since the Wildcats, college basketball’s winningest program, lost five straight games to an opponent. Tennessee was the last to do it from 1975-77. UCLA fell to fifth after split- ting games this past week. The Bruins beat then-No. 19 Southern California 70-65 on Wednesday,

but lost to West Virginia by the same score Saturday. The Bruins had to fly across the country and play an early

afternoon game. UCLA found itself down

early

the second

half before

game. UCLA found itself down early the second half before the Cougars chase their first league
game. UCLA found itself down early the second half before the Cougars chase their first league

the Cougars chase their first league title. Nevada was No. 11, followed by Marquette, Butler, Georgetown, Oregon, Southern Illinois, Air Force, Oklahoma State, Arizona and Kentucky. Georgetown made the big- gest jump, moving up eight spots to No. 14 after convincing wins over Louisville and then-No. 11 Marquette. The Hoyas have won seven straight. “We’re getting better, and our guys definitely have a comfort level

with how we want to skin the cat, so

to say,” said Georgetown coach John

Thompson III after Saturday’s win

over Marquette. “We’re more poised.

A lot of times early in the season

teams would make a run, and we’d stand around looking starry eyed.” Oregon fell two spots after split- ting games with Arizona State and then-No. 24 Arizona. Southern Illinois moved up five spots to No.

16.

Boston College was followed by Southern California, West Virginia, Indiana and Alabama.

Duke’s Top 25 streak is over. Saddled by its first four-game losing skid in 11 years, Duke fell out of The Associated Press poll

Monday for the first time since the end of the 1995-96 season. The Blue Devils had been in the

media poll for 200 straight weeks — the second longest streak behind UCLA. The Bruins’ run lasted 221 weeks, from the 1966-67 pre-

season poll to Jan. 8, 1980. North Carolina is third all-time with

172 straight weeks from the 1990-91 preseason poll to Jan. 17, 2000. “If you do it for a long period of time, it means you’ve been good that long,” Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said of his team’s streak that began in the 1996-97 preseason poll. “We never bring

it up. It’s a nice stat thing.” UCLA and Memphis are now

tied for the longest active streak at 34 straight weeks in the Top

25.

Duke was

8

in

two

ago

los-

the

Virginia

Florida

The

Devils

No.

weeks

before

ing

final seconds

to

and

State.

Blue

lost to then- No. 5 North

Carolina 79-73 on Wednesday and fell 72-60 at Maryland on Sunday for their first four-game losing since Jan. 3-13, 1996. “We travel a narrow road between winning and losing,” Krzyzewski said. “We were in

a position to win, you have to

make sure the kids know that. They are doing a lot of things

to put themselves in a position

to win.”

Duke received 150 points, fall- ing just eight short of No. 25 Alabama. The Blue Devils will try to end

short of No. 25 Alabama. The Blue Devils will try to end “If you do it

“If you do it for a long period of time, it means you’ve been good that long.”

Mike krzyzewski

Duke coach

by

in

19

clawing back.

“I really pleased with the way

fought

back,” UCLA

coach

H o w l a n d

we

was

Ben

said. “Obviously it’s a long way to come to get beat.” With UCLA’s loss, Ohio State moved up to No. 2 _ its highest ranking since 1991. Wisconsin and North Carolina also gained a spot, moving up to No.

3 and No. 4, respectively. Texas A&M was No. 6, followed by Pittsburgh, Kansas, Memphis and Washington State.

The Cougars (21-4, 10-3 Pac-10) moved up four spots after beating then-No. 25 Stanford and California. Washington State is only a half- game behind first-place UCLA as

Shred Your Ex
Shred Your Ex

NBa

Celtics set new team record for consecutive losses

The Boston Celtics are in a re- cord-breaking rut that has shaken their confidence and damaged the image of a once-proud franchise. “you can feel it in the locker room, each loss definitely hurts,” Paul Pierce said. “These guys are

going to keep playing hard. we just need to get it out of our head.” easier said than done, especially when you’ve lost a franchise-record

18 consecutive games. The latest

loss came sunday when ricky Davis’ jumper from the corner with 0.2 seconds remaining lifted the Minnesota Timberwolves to a 109- 107 victory.

“it is tough, the guys played so hard and deserve to win,” said Pierce, who scored 29 points. “we did everything we could. Down the stretch, they made the last play.”

The Celtics’ previous franchise low was 13 straight losses in 1993-

94 and 1996-97. They’ve blown

past that mark, and haven’t won

since beating Memphis on Jan. 5. The Utah Jazz also lost 18 straight in 1982 and seven teams have lost 19 games in a row. The Celtics still have a ways to go to get to the NBA record of 24 straight losses by the Cleveland Cavaliers, a streak that spanned the end of the 1981-82 season and start of the 1982-83 season. in other NBA games, it was: Chi- cago 116, Phoenix 103; seattle 114, sacramento 103; Cleveland 99, the Los Angeles Lakers 90; Miami 100, san Antonio 85; indiana 94, the

Los Angeles Clippers 80; Portland 94, washington 73; Dallas 106, Philadelphia 89; and Atlanta 106, Golden state 105. At Minneapolis, the Celtics led by 10 points in the first half and 107-105 with 1:17 to play after Pierce fed Al Jefferson for a dunk. But kevin Garnett tied it with two free throws, then got a steal on the defensive end to give the wolves a chance to win it with 3.6 seconds left.

—Associated Press

then got a steal on the defensive end to give the wolves a chance to win
then got a steal on the defensive end to give the wolves a chance to win
Tuesday, February 13, 2007 sports 3B for the lack of Colorado criticism in this section.

Tuesday, February 13, 2007

sports

3B

for the lack of Colorado criticism in this section. Stay tuned for regu- larly scheduled Buffalo bashing next week. For now, let’s turn our atten- tion to western Texas. Bobby Knight haters received not just one, but two special treats this week. First there was Nebraska. Let’s take some time to remember how mediocre the Huskers can be. Does a 14-minute scoreless stretch ring a bell? Well, last Tuesday that same team out- scored the Red Raiders by 15 in the second half and won on a last second shot that only happened because Tech’s Charlie Burgess accidently gave the ball to Nebraska’s Charles Richardson. Texas Tech followed up that loss by blowing a seven point lead in the last 1:30 of regulation against Oklahoma State. The Raiders lost in double overtime. Tech, team that upset Kansas and Texas A&M, has now lost five games in a row and is, to describe it in word: irrelevant.

you pRobably said ‘oh my gosh’ about… Kalen Grimes, Missouri Julian Wright’s dunk from last Saturday’s game was good, but it wasn’t “Grimy.” Before the Tigers fell off the face of the earth late in the first half, Mizzou fans were treated

by getting to see this jam. Grimes received the ball in the lane and threw down a scary one-hander in Sasha Kaun’s face. But poetic justice worked against Grimes. After all, he was the victim of Wright’s dunk later in the game.

kansan sportswriter mark dent can be contacted at mdent@kan- san.com.

— Edited by Sharla Shivers

FASTBREAK

12 standings, but both teams are much further back in terms of skill. The Longhorns are talented, but their players stand around too much and wait for Kevin Durant to do something. The Wildcats don’t have enough quality victories. They beat Texas only because they couldn’t miss from three-point range and haven’t defeated anyone else in the top half of the conference. streaking sooners The Sooners have won four

games in a row and should make it five at Iowa State Tuesday. Saturday, Oklahoma has a home date against Texas A&M and could alter the Big

12 race and give it a better chance for

an NCAA Tournament berth. The dora Watch For those who aren’t familiar with the Dora watch, the Big 12 Fastbreak bet Darryl Dora, Texas Tech forward,

wouldn’t score in double figures for the rest of the season after scoring

18 against Kansas. This week, Dora

once again kept pace. He came dan- gerously close by scoring nine points against Oklahoma State Saturday. But Saturday’s high scoring output was understandable since he didn’t even step on the floor last Monday against Nebraska.

keep a Close watCh on the RaCe FoR iRRelevanCe… The Big 12 Fastbreak apologizes

» ’Horn Born, ’Hawk Bred

BIG

12

Still no answers in Texas A&M ticket incident

Officials need to clear up confusion

Big 12 writer Mark Dent’s take on the men’s conference race.

12 writer Mark Dent’s take on the men’s conference race. he was in the ‘Oh My

he was in the ‘Oh My Gosh’ section for missing a wide open dunk and faking an injury. Now look at him. Wright dropped 33 points against Missouri on 14-for-21 shooting. He was able to get most of those looks because of eight offensive rebounds. Plus, he’s came full circle since that missed dunk two weeks ago. He more than made up for it by knock- ing down Missouri’s Kalen Grimes for a thunderous dunk.

staRt a ConveRsation with these topiCs… run ’em Cowboys Oklahoma State has to be getting tired of these marathon games. It defeated Texas Tech in double overtime last Saturday. That victory came about three weeks after the Cowboys defeat- ed the Longhorns in triple overtime. But it doesn’t stop there. Oklahoma State had to go extra minutes earlier this season to beat Missouri State. It’s a good thing that the Cowboys (19-5, 5-4) are good in overtime, because if they weren’t they would be 16-8 and on the outside looking in at the NCAA Tournament. Third-rate third place Kansas State and Texas are only one game behind Kansas in the Big

by maRk dent

Kansan sporTs ColuMnisT mdent@kansan.com

Raise youR glasses to… Kansas (21-4, 8-2) It’s almost impossible to ask for a better week after the disappointing loss to Texas A&M. The Jayhawks didn’t just beat their rivals; they absolutely annihilated them. Kansas defeated Kansas State 97-70 last Wednesday and bet- tered Missouri 92-74 last Saturday. Most important- ly, these victories came at a time when Kansas fans were getting restless. According to coach Bill Self, the loss to A&M created a “sky is fall- ing” feeling among the fan base. The two victories also gave confidence to the big fellas. Julian Wright, Darnell Jackson, Darrell Arthur and Sasha Kaun all played well in at least one of the two games.

send a ‘CongRatulations’ FaCebook message to… Julian Wright, Kansas Way to go Wright. Two weeks ago

Julian Wright, Kansas Way to go Wright. Two weeks ago by tRavis Robinett Kansan ColuMnisT trobinett@kansan.com

by tRavis Robinett

Kansan ColuMnisT trobinett@kansan.com

I t’s been nearly a week and

a half since the Texas A&M

student ticket incident and

the story has only gotten hazier. The more people I talk to about what happened, the more con- fused I am. At least one thing is certain:

The testimony from student eye- witnesses and Associate Athletics Director Jim Marchiony don’t cor- roborate. Marchiony claimed the game was not oversold. “We had the same number of people in Wednesday night as we

did Saturday

didn’t do was a good job of man- aging the crowd when they came

What we

People were trying to get in

through the vomitories and they couldn’t because of the number of people trying to get in at the same time. So because of that log jam we had to shut the doors,” Marchiony said. But Mission Hills senior Sam Stepp was outside when he and the other students were told the game in fact was oversold. “It took them at least 45 min- utes to address the crowd. Finally they said the reason why we couldn’t come in was because they had oversold the game by about, well they said several hun- dred tickets,” Stepp said. Many other students confirmed that this happened. If the game was not oversold, why were the students told oth- erwise? “I don’t know who made that announcement,” Marchiony said in a follow-up interview. “If it was made it was incorrect.” Stepp, who ended up inside Allen Fieldhouse after waiting in Hadl Auditorium, thought the

game was definitely oversold.

“There were no seats in that place, and considering about 200 kids had already gone home, you know that they didn’t have seats for everyone.” University Fire Marshal Bob Rombach makes the recommen- dation for when to stop letting people in, and he said it’s not an exact science. “For 10 years I’ve tried to figure out the count and I can’t do it, there’s no way to find out how many seats athletics sells,” he said. If the Fire Marshall doesn’t know Allen Fieldhouse’s limit exactly, how would Marchiony know whether they oversold that limit? It doesn’t stop there. Another of Marchiony’s statements couldn’t be confirmed. He later said to have “misspoke” about this, but at the time of the interview he said, “we gave an option of a refund or a GA ticket to another game. Between students and GA’s we gave about 140 refunds.” With all these contradictions, does anyone know anything? Really, everyone involved, includ- ing Marchiony, is confused. The students were hoarded together, cold and angry. They were at the game, but were far from in charge of the situation. They couldn’t say the reason why it all happened. “You never want this to hap- pen,” Marchiony said. “No one wants this to happen. We hope the students realize that this has not happened before and we took immediate steps to make sure this

won’t happen

student’s school. We can’t forget that. That’s why we feel so sorry about it.” After all this talk, does any- one, and I mean anyone, really know what happened that night? Apparently not.

really know what happened that night? Apparently not. » pga Tiger’s vacation gives others chance doug

» pga

Tiger’s vacation gives others chance

doug FeRguson

assoCiated pRess

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — For all the fuss over Tiger Woods taking another week off, perhaps the Nissan Open should consider this possibil- ity: It still might have the hottest player in golf at Riviera. True, one victory by Phil Mickelson still leaves him six short of the PGA Tour winning streak Woods is riding. And despite a five-shot victory at Pebble Beach, some perspective is in order. Lefty usually wins at least once before leaving his native West Coast, and this was the 11th time in 15 seasons that he won before the PGA Tour reached Florida. Plus, the only serious competition he faced Sunday came from Kevin Sutherland and rookie John Mallinger, whose world ranking last week was, respectively, No. 256 and No. 454. But there was something about Mickelson’s game that indicated he is ready to step back into the ring. In years past when his game has slipped a notch, Mickelson has devoted time to scoring shots — spe- cifically, 150 yards and in — and sharpening his putting stroke by staying on the practice green until he made 100 straight putts from 3 feet. But after the debacle at Winged Foot — not just the double bogey

on the 18th hole, but hitting only two fairway in the final round of the U.S. Open — he was consumed by becoming a better driver off the tee. Mickelson hit 81 percent of his fairways in two rounds at Pebble Beach and one each at Poppy Hills and Spyglass. PGA Tour statistics show him missing only one fairway

in his final round of 66, although he

said he also missed the fairway at No. 9 by a foot. Don’t get the idea Fred Funk, a guy who picks out stripes left by the lawn mower, has anything to fear. “I will never lead the stat in driving accuracy. Let’s not overdo

this,” Mickelson said. “But if I could improve 20 or 25 percent in my accuracy, that’s going to make a big difference in my scores.” His score at Pebble Beach was 20-under 268, tying the tournament record set by Mark O’Meara in 1997 when he won by one shot. Mickelson won by five, matching the largest margin of victory at Pebble. Sutherland is good friends with Mickelson and sees him plenty. And he was impressed. “He drove it for the most part on

a string, right down the middle of the fairway,” Sutherland said. “If he

is driving the ball like that, there’s

not a player in the world that is not

going to have a hard time beating him.” Mickelson is so confident about

the longest club in his bag than he used it on the short fourth hole, which plays uphill with Stillwater Cove on the right and bunkers on the left. That’s where he tried his lat- est shot, a low draw, and it twice set him up with the perfect angle into the green for a short wedge. This is the first time he can

remember hitting a tee shot and not being overly concerned when he looked to see where it was headed. “I’ve never had this type of feeling on the tee box,” he said. “I just feel so confident right now.” Mickelson has not played Riviera since 2001, and he hasn’t played it very well. The classic design off Sunset Boulevard has tight fairways, not necessarily of the U.S. Open variety, but tight to have an optimum angle into the green. Lefty has been there eight times, never finished in the top 10 and went home four times before the weekend.

in the top 10 and went home four times before the weekend. But he was so

But he was so excited about his game that he said after Thursday’s round of 65 at Poppy Hills that he might add the Nissan Open to his schedule, and by Friday morning at Pebble Beach, it was a done deal. Never mind that it will give him six straight tournaments. “I wanted to play a little bit more competitive golf with the way I’m playing before I start my run up for Augusta,” Mickelson said. “I’m look- ing forward to playing at Riviera. It won’t be a similar style golf at Augusta, but it’s pretty close to a U.S. Open.” Strangely enough, the U.S. Open is where it all started. Mickelson didn’t linger on Winged Foot because he had two majors still to play in 2006. But once he shut it down for the year, right after going 0-4-1 in the Ryder Cup, he allowed himself to reflect on his collapse and fix the problem.

It’s the

Robinett is an austin, texas se- nior in journalism.

— Edited by Joe Caponio

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4B sports tuesday, february 13, 2007 » big 12 basketball Oklahoma looks to rise out

4B

sports

tuesday, february 13, 2007

» big 12 basketball

Oklahoma looks to rise out of checkered recent past

AssociAted Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — After a couple weeks on the job, Oklahoma coach Jeff Capel figured he had already bottomed out. Former coach Kelvin Sampson’s messy departure amid an NCAA investigation into hundreds of ille- gal phone calls to recruits left the program on probation. The Sooners’ top three players — Taj Gray, Kevin Bookout and Terrell Everett — had finished their careers. Then three high-level recruits secured by Sampson suddenly

backed out of verbal commit- ments. “That was a tough period, I’m not going to lie,” said Capel, the for- mer Duke star who came over from Virginia Commonwealth. “It was really tough for me personally. But I’ve always felt I don’t want guys who don’t want to be with me.” The ones who stuck around are suddenly turning heads. The Sooners, picked ninth in the Big 12 preseason coaches poll, have won four in a row and are 15-8 overall. Their 6-4 mark in confer- ence play puts them fifth, not far behind NCAA bubble teams Texas

and Kansas State. Oklahoma has the Longhorns and the Wildcats left on its sched- ule, along with games against Missouri and Iowa State. Throw in home games against No. 6 Texas A&M and No. 9 Kansas on national television, and the Sooners have plenty of chances to make a state- ment during the last three weeks of the season. “We’ve won four games in a row, guys are feeling good about our- selves, but we still have to remain hungry and humble,” the 31-year- old Capel said. “That’s sort of been a mantra of mine.”

Capel’s peers in the Big 12 say Oklahoma’s turnaround came in a Jan. 6 loss to Texas Tech, when for- ward Longar Longar pulled down a rebound and threw an elbow that fractured the eye socket of Red Raider center Esmir Rizvic. The Sooners’ leading scorer began receiving hate mail and threatening letters. Texas Tech coach Bob Knight said he didn’t believe Longar should be allowed to play anymore. The Big 12 agreed, in part, by suspending him for two games. “They had some guys step up,” Baylor coach Scott Drew said. “Nate

Carter to take Longar Longar’s spot, it really added another dimension to the team.” Carter, a senior transfer from UC Riverside, has gone from aver- aging about 5 points per game in the non-conference to more than

19 per game in the Big 12. In last

week’s 67-60 bedlam upset of No.

17 Oklahoma State, he poured in 18

points and had nine rebounds. “The key is Nate Carter,” Colorado assistant Paul Graham said. “He just had a phenomenal night against Oklahoma State.” Figure in Longar’s return and the resurgence of senior guard Michael

Neal, and Capel is telling his team that an NCAA tournament berth is still possible. The Sooners have reached the postseason 25 consecutive seasons, the longest streak in Division I bas- ketball. Twenty of those trips have

been to the NCAA tournament, including 11 in the past 12 years.

“One of the deals for us now is how do we deal with success? Struggling through adversity is a great teacher, but also success,” Capel said. “There’s nothing that can help you deal with success but success itself.”

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STUDENTS NEEDED to participate in speech perception experiments. Must be

a native speaker of English. Contact the

20” MGA TV With Remote. Good condition, with remote, $30. Email at

greenday4life33@hotmail.com.

Perceptual Neuroscience Lab pnl@ku.edu

hawkchalk # 1116.

or 864-1461.

8’ pool table 1 piece slate Call for details

$5000 PAID. EGG DONORS +Expenses. N/smoking, Ages 19-29.

913-669-6539

SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0

reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com

Affordable Piano Lessons First Lesson Free! Call Ben 785-856-1140 for an Appointment

Bar quality, full size foosball table in excellent condition. $200 If interested call 785-760-4742 hawkchalk.com/1090

Biology 100 Book still in plastic covering & never been used. $50.00. call 913-370-5892 hawkchalk.com/1133

$500! Police impounds! Hondas, Chevys, Toyotas, etc from 500! For listings 800-585-3419 ext. 4565.

Fits 92-95 Honda Civic NON-VTECH SOHC Only, 1.5 or 1.6 Stage 1 clutch w/ 8lb flywheel New in box, never been installed $300 or best offer. hawkchalk # 1082

JOBS

First Christian Church youth group is hosting a Community Rummage Sale & Chili Feed on Sat. Feb 17 7AM-3PM. Proceeds benefit a local mission to

Ecuador. Donations of junk are welcomed. Bring to 1000 Kentucky on Feb 15 & Feb 16. Booth space can be purchased at $25

to sell your own junk. 843-0679.

can be purchased at $25 to sell your own junk. 843-0679. LOST & FOUND Black russian
can be purchased at $25 to sell your own junk. 843-0679. LOST & FOUND Black russian

LOST & FOUND

Black russian fur hat found on the 1st floor of the union last semester. If you can describe it, you get it back! call

785-236-9747

hawkchalk.com/1136

Solid grey cat missing! He is super nice, and from the 15th and Kasold area. Contact owner at 785-691-6117

hawkchalk.com/1101

TRAVEL

#1 SPRING Break Website! Low Prices Guaranteed. Group discounts for 6+. Book 20 people, get 3 free trips! www.SpringBreakdiscounts.com or

800-838-8202.

#1 Spring Break Website! Low prices guaranteed. Group discounts for 6+. Book 20 people, get 3 free trips! www.SpringBreakDiscounts.com or 800-838-8202.

Get ready for spring! 4 tans $15 level 1 beds only (must present coupon) expires
Get ready
for spring!
4 tans $15
level 1 beds only
(must present coupon)
expires 3-31-07
4000 w.6th
(Hyvee Shopping Center)
Call 785-mango (856-2646)
Walk-ins welcome!
sunshine
fresh air
cool water
mangos

Bulky White 15” Monitor for $25 contact jeisma@ku.edu hawkchalk.com/1075

Epson C3100 printer/scanner/copier w/ usb cable and install CD

913-486-7569.

hawkchalk #1118.

Fooseball table for sale! In great condi-

tion. great for parties! $175 or best offer.

call 785-236-9747

hawkchalk.com/1135

For Sale 2 10 inch Alpine Subwoofers, and a 600 watt amp. Also comes with Box enclosure. $200. OBO 785-218-6959

hawkchalk.com/1098

HSES 269 Foundations of Exercise Sci- ence Book. Used but in great condition. $35.00. Call 913-370-5892

hawkchalk.com/1134

Ibanez Electric Guitar, it’s Metallic Blue, looks like new and comes with a 25 watt Ibanez Amplifer and Guitar Stand 785-218-6959 hawkchalk.com/1100

Internal DVD-Rom Drive from a HP Pavil- ion but would fit other styles. Black face and in perfect condition. $25. hawkchalk #1117.

Nice XBox 360 bundle. Premium system w/ harddrive. 2 wireless controllers. 10 games. 1 mo. old. 3 mo. live subscription multiple accessories. $500 OBO

hawkchalk.com/1141

PS2 with wireless controller & network adaptor. Great condition. Games: Burnout Revenge, 4x4 Evo, NCAA Final Four 2001 & Ridgeracer. $100 OBO. Call 913-370-2627. hawkchalk.com/1144

Spanish Book Mundo 21, never been used, $100, plus CD and online book code 816/588.7892 hawkchalk.com/1089

TICKETS

3 Texas tix needed by alum & sons. 3/3. Reserve only. Appreciate the help. Rob 847-814-4149

Attention College Students! We pay up to $75 per survey. www.GetPaidToThink.com

BARTENDING. UP TO $300/DAY. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. TRAINING PROVIDED. 800-965-6520 EXT 108

Berry Plastics has several part-time jobs available in our Printing department; evening hours. Work hours either 3pm-11:30pm or 11:30pm-7:30am. Must work minimum of 3 shifts per week. Our work week is Sun-Sat. Pays $10/hr. Great opportunity to join a fun work team and earn extra cash. Part-time jobs have lead to full-time career opportunities at Berry Plastics! If interested please respond to:

christystocks@berryplastics.com. EOE

Disabled Ku student requires morning help on Tues, Thurs and Sat. Summer help will also be needed, hours may vary. Good pay. Please call 913 205-8788 for details.

hawkchalk.com/1137

Dairy Queen on 1835 Mass St. now accepting applications for P/T cooks. Flexible schedule, competitive pay, no late hrs. Located within blocks of KU Campus. Apply in person after 2 pm. No phone calls please.

KU’s free local marketplace

free [ads] for all

KU’s free local marketplace free [ads] for all
Psychological
Psychological

JOBS

2 PART-TIME LEASING AGENTS needed for Aberdeen Apartments immediately. Some afternoons & weekend shifts required. We need someone dependable that will be here past August and is not planning any extending spring break or summer vacations. Must be profession- ally dressed & have an energetic friendly personality. Bring resume to Aberdeen, 2300 Wakarusa Dr., (785) 749-1288

Accepting applications for certified personal trainers and pilate and yoga instructors at the Body Shoppe Fitness and Nutrition Center. Desoto, KS. Please Call 816-806-5300 for more information.

COOLCOLLEGEJOBS.COM Paid Survey Takers Needed in Lawrence. 100% FREE to Join! Click on Surveys.

Earn $2500+ monthly and more to type simple ads online. www.DataAdEntry.com

Enthusiastic, hardworking students wanted for part-time mngmt. at Jimmy John’s. Pay negotiable, based on experi- ence. Submit application at 601 Kasold.

JOBS

Help Wanted: 6-15 hrs/wk. No late hours. Saturday and summer availability required. Apply in person at The Mail Box

3115 W 6th St. Ste.C. 749-4304

House Cleaning: 2-4 hours every 3-4 weeks. $10 per hour. Contact

785-830-9098.

Natural Pet Food & Supply

PT to FT, Must Love Animals, excellent customer service skills, able to carry pet food for customer, above average comput- er and math skills. Pick up application @

3025 W. 6th St. No telephone calls.

Peer Educators Wanted for Fall 2007 Learning Communities Program Co-facilitate a seminar with a faculty/staff member; provide out-of-class program- ming & be a resource for LC participants. For more info, go to http://www.lc.ku. edu/educators/index.shtml. Pay begins at $8.50/hr. Required: 30+ credit hrs (60 hrs pref); Current KU student during semester, min. 2.75 GPA (3.0 GPA pref); Eligible to work for entire fall semester or academic year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu.

year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student
year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student
year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student
year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student
year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student
year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student
year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student
year.To apply, go to the KU HR website at jobs.ku.edu. JOBS Lawrence business looking for student

JOBS

Lawrence business looking for student sales representative to reach student market! Great resume builder! Very flexible schedule! Commission based. If interested respond to dadfrat@gmail.com

Secure your Summer Job. Shadow Glen the Golf Club is looking for bright and outgoing wait staff. PT, flexible schedule. Free meals and some golf privileges. No experience necessary, will train. Located 20 min. from KU. Please call

913-764-2299.

Seeking self-motivated person for PT position at Lawrence Airport fueling and parking aircraft w/ general responsibilities. Evenings 4PM-8PM &/or weekends total- ing 15-20/wk. Apply Hetrick Air Services, Lawrence Airport, Mon.-Fri. 8-4. No calls.

Air Services, Lawrence Airport, Mon.-Fri. 8-4. No calls. “ A future with no limits starts at
Air Services, Lawrence Airport, Mon.-Fri. 8-4. No calls. “ A future with no limits starts at
Air Services, Lawrence Airport, Mon.-Fri. 8-4. No calls. “ A future with no limits starts at
Air Services, Lawrence Airport, Mon.-Fri. 8-4. No calls. “ A future with no limits starts at
“ A future with no limits starts at Farmers.” ® Deciding on a major can
“ A future with
no limits
starts at
Farmers.” ®
Deciding on a major can be tough. But deciding where to start your
future is easy. At Farmers Insurance there are no limits to what you can
accomplish. If this is how you see the future, you belong at Farmers.
It all starts here.
Rewarding, growth-oriented opportunities are available in
Kansas City for:
• Office Claims Representatives
• Underwriters
• Accountants
If you are ambitious, motivated and ready to put your degree to work,
Farmers has what you’re looking for in a career. What’s in it for you?
Compensation and benefits that include competitive starting salaries,
paid training programs, tuition reimbursement, profit sharing, medical/
dental/life insurance and a lot more.
Find out why you belong at Farmers.
Apply online at www.farmers.com
or see us on campus. EOE.
www.farmers.com
Tuesday, February 13, 2007

Tuesday, February 13, 2007

Class if ieds

5B

KANSANCLASSIFIEDS

AUTO
AUTO
STUFF
STUFF
JOBS
JOBS
LOST & FOUND
LOST & FOUND
FOR RENT
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE/ SUBLEASE
ROOMMATE/
SUBLEASE
SERVICES
SERVICES
CHILD CARE
CHILD CARE
TICKETS
TICKETS
TRAVEL
TRAVEL

PHONE 785.864.4358

HAWKCHALK.COM

CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM

JOBS

SPORTS OFFICIALS Lawrence Parks and Recreation Dept. is looking for softball umpires, and kickball referees for their adult spring/summer leagues. Job offers excellent pay and flexible schedule. Applicants must be

at least 18 years of age and possess

background and experience in the sports. Training provided and required. Work available starting in April thru October.

Anyone interested must attend orientation meeting on Feb.17th, 10:00-12:00am, South Park Center, 1141 Mass. Street.

If you have any questions call the Adult Sports office at 832-7922.

The University of Kansas Medical Center

is searching for a fulltime Research

Assistant in our Department of Tele- medicine. Incumbent will assist in the

daily operations of research projects that relate to Telehealth for Kansans. Requires a Bachelor’s degree in health sciences, education, communications or related field; experience in data collection; maintaining computerized data records; and in conducting statistical analysis. Superior communication, writing, and organizational skills are essential. Prefer

a Master’s degree in health sciences, edu-

cation, communications or related field. Experience in telemedicine a plus. Apply on-line at http://jobs.kumc.edu, position # J0030308. KUMC is proud to be AA/EOE.

Wanted: Summer Employees. The C Lazy U ranch in the Colorado Rockies has positons available for individuals who can work until Aug. 19 or later. Applications available online www.clazyu.com. Questions, contact Phil at pdwyer@clazyu.com.

Winter / Spring Positions Available Earn up to 150$ per day Exp not Required. Undercover shoppers needed to Judge Retail and Dining Establishments. Call 800-722-4791

ROOMMATE/SUBLEASE

2 awesome roommates needed to share

4BR 2BA house. Avail ASAP. Mostly furnished. Big backyard. Garage. Just north of campus. $350/mo/BR Please call

816-589-2577

Female roommate. Lg BR w/ own BA. $300/mo+$35/mo utilities. Walking dist. to KU. W/D in apt. Avail now. Amanda (913)488-7238. Hawkchalk #1111

Female subleaser wanted at 9th & Emery. Own BA No pets. Walk-in closet. $300/

mo.+ 1/3 util. Call Emily (316) 990-4170

hawkchalk.com/1088

I have a 3 Bedroom/2 Bathroom condo and I am desperately looking a roomie,

the rent is very reasonable only $350! Contact me at kansbug@hotmail.com or 785-550-8299. hawkchalk # 1083

1 BR avail. in new 3 BR, 2 full bath duplex in new development, very nicely furnished & decorated, FP, bar, DW, W/D, digital cable & internet, 2 car garage, private patio, $395/mo.+ share util. Lots of privacy. Close to KU & I-70. No pets or smoking. Troy 785-550-6149.

1700 Kentucky #3, 1 room available in 4BR apt. for rent IMMEDIATELY!!!!!! $250 security dep. up front $250/mo rent. Feb- Aug. Contact 816-547-4457 or chadley@ku.edu. hawkchalk #1078.

Room in nice home Christian couple seeks 1 person; No pets, smoking or loud noise. $400/mo. Utils. paid. Can use laundry, kitchen, etc. Avail. now. 785-749-3523

Wanted: 2 BR summer sublet!

785-285-1154

hawkchalk.com/1146

Kansan Classifieds classifieds@kansan.com

Kansan Classifieds classifieds@kansan.com We Want You to help make a difference in peoples lives!
We Want You to help make a difference in peoples lives! Flexible Schedules Fun Environment
We Want You to help make a
difference in peoples lives!
Flexible Schedules
Fun Environment
Do you prefer a compressed work week?
Community Living Opportunities (CLO) is a local
non-profit organization that provides individuals with
development disabilities the opportunity to live a more
fulfilling, independent and productive life.
Looking for work?
CLO is currently hiring for Full-time, Part-time, and
Weekend Teaching Assistants.
Teaching Counselors directly support individuals with
severe to profound disabilities and will involve personal
care. Applicant must have valid driver’s license and ability
to lift 50 lbs. Weekend Asst.’s have 3-4 day work weeks.
Starting pay $6.00-8.00 an hour. Paid training.
Located at 2125 Delaware St. Lawrence KS
Please contact Mike at 785-865-5520 Ext. 313
Check out our website at clokansas.org
COMING SOON! We are hiring for: WAITSTAFF HOST LINE COOKS BARTENDERS APPLY IN PERSON AT:
COMING SOON!
We are hiring for:
WAITSTAFF
HOST
LINE COOKS
BARTENDERS
APPLY IN PERSON AT:
1501 VILLAGE WEST PKWY
KANSAS CITY, KS 66111
913-334-9995
(Only 25 Miles from the KU Campus)
Equal Opportunity Employer

ROOMMATE/SUBLEASE

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

$339/mo utilities paid@The Reserve 31st&Iowa.1 BR avail. in 4BRx4BA.Male only.W/D, furn.,elect 1/4.Lease through July.On KU bus route.Contact Mark @ 913-370-2627 hawkchalk.com/1132

1BR Apt. Right behind KU football sta- dium. March rent paid! Contact 913-439-9574. Free internet and cable.

hawkchalk.com/1131

2 BR apt. for sublease, W/D, cable, $605/ mo+ util.Tuckaway,Harper Square. Call 838-3377. M-F 9-5. ASK FOR APT D4. Or call 691-5792 or 843-6428 anytime.

2BR 2BA APT. @ the Legends 4101 W. 24th. 2nd BR not occupied. Util. incl. $569/mo. willing to negotiate. Contact Ahmed 3124801018 hawkchalk.com/1087

2BR @ Tuckaway $900/mo but very will-

ing to negotiate! Call with your best offer. move in tomorrow! 785.766.6129

hawkchalk.com/1091

3+ BR Townhome Sublease. 2 1/2 BA.

2 Living Rooms. 1 Car Garage. Near City Bus Route. Avail. June 1st. 979-2636

Looking for someone to sublease 2 BR 2 BA apartment at Campus Court on 23rd & Naismith. All electric for $595/mo. Contact Judith at 913-244-3187.

MONTH FREE! at The Reserve. Female. Fully furn. on KU bus route.$325/mo+elec. 913-206-1530 hawkchalk.com/1095

Summer sublease at Hawks Point I. $223.45 per month. Call 785-218-4683. hawkchalk #1112.

FOR RENT

1 & 2 BR apts. $400 & $500/mo. 1130 W. 11th St. Jayhawk Apartments. Water and trash paid. No pets. 785-556-0713.

2 BR 1&1/2 BA Avail. Aug 1st $695/mo.

Fenced yard. Garage. W/D hook-up. CA. Quiet. No smoking or pets. 1 yr. lease. 3707 Westland Place. 785-550-6812.

2 BR Tuckaway apt. FEB. RENT PAID!!

ONLY $800/mo. Includes 2 Bath, fireplace, w/d, and dishwasher. Call 612-875-0520 if interested. Move in asap.

hawkchalk#1115

2BR 1242 Louisiana St. AC DW W&D Hardwood Floors, Pet OK, $600/mo Water paid. Avail NOW. 785-393-6443

3 bedroom luxury apt. at Tuckaway for

rent with $150 off per month till June!!! hawkchalk #1107

3 BR 2BA. Off-street parking. Close to