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JEemorial

Ctiittoii

GREEK LEXICON
OF

THE ROMAN AND BYZANTINE PERIODS


(From B.
C. 146

to A. D. 1100)

By

E. a.

SOPHOCLES

e7r8i7 Kal Tou otvov rj^iovs

irlveiv,

^vvcKirori' icrrl croi kol Tr\v rpvya

NEW YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS
1900

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1870, by


E.

A.

SOPHOCLES,
Court of the District of Massachusetts.

in the Clerk's Oifice of the District

Janibersfts Press: John Wilson and Son, Cambridge.

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NOTE.
A
and

NUMBER

of

words compounded with Kara,

irepl,

trpo, n-p6<;,

aw,
to

virep,

uTTo,

are left undefined.

The proper

directions with regard to

them

are

given under gach of these prepositions.

The same remark appHes


The reader
part.
is of

words

whose

first

component part

is

4>CKo-, yfrevSo-.

course sup-

posed to
is

know the meaning

of the second

component

This retrenchment

to be attributed to absolute necessity, the alternative being to give

up the

intention of publishing the book.


E. A.

SOPHOCLES.

At

a meeting of the

President and Fellows of Harvard College, in


it

Boston, January 11, 1887,

was

Voted
of a

To

authorize the publication by Messrs. Charles Scribner's Sons


of

Memorial Edition

Professor Sophocles's " Greek Lexicon of the

Roman and
fessor

Byzantine Periods," and to intrust the whole matter to Pro-

Joseph Hbnkt Thayer.

The present

edition differs

from the second impression

of

1870 by the

correction of nearly two hundred evident inadvertencies.

In a few instances
;

additions have been introduced, enclosed in square brackets


tions will be readily distinguished,

but such addi-

by their qualifying or correcting character,

from the matter similarly enclosed by the author.


of these

For the greater number

emendations the thanks of students are due to Professor Henry

Drisler, LL.D., of

New

York.
J.

H. T.

Cambridge, Massachusetts,
April, 1887.

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INSCRIBED
H. H. Hunneweli,

Charles

F.

Adams

Boston.
"

William Amort,
Thomas- G. Appleton,

...

"
" "

Edward

Adstin,

JosiAH Bardwell,

John P. Batlet,
James H. Beal,
James M. Beebe,
GrBORGE T. BiGELOW,

" "
"

....

"

William H. Bordman,
J.

..."
...
"

Ingersoll Bowditoh,

Martin Brimmer,
Peter
C.

"
"

Brooks,

Sidney Brooks,
Benj. p. Burgess,

Newport.
Boston.
"
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PiRMiN CousiNERT,

....

New York.
Boston.
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T.

Dana,

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Eugene Dutilh,
Charles

New

York.

W.

Eliot,

.... ....
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Cambridge.
Philadelphia.

John

W.

Pield,

DwiGHT Poster,
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Boston.

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Co.,

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N. B.

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*Thomas a. Gtoddard,
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AUTHORS REFERRED
The names
of the earlier authors are not given in this
list,

TO.

because Greek scholars are supposed to be

familiar with them.

Authors of the Third Epoch of the Byzantine Period upon those of the preceding Epochs.

are referred to only

when they throw any

light

Theodorus Ahucara (A. D. XCVII. Acac. B. Acacius of Berrhoea (A. D. 437). LXXVII. Tat. Tatius (second century PaDldot's Erotici 1856. Isagoge ad Arati PhaenoAbuc.
770).

Patrologia Graeca,

Ibid.

Achill.

Achilles

? ?).

Scriptores.

risiis.

mena. Patrologia Graeca, XIX. Achmet, an assiimed name (A. D. 950).


Regalt.

Acrop. Georgius Acropolita (A. D. 1282). Bonnae. 1836. Adam. Adamantius (A. D. 850). Patrologia Graeca, XL Adam. S. Adamantius, sophista (A. D. 415). Franz. Altenburgi. 1780. Ael. Claudius Aelianus (A. D. 222). Her-

Lutetiae.

1613.

Aelianus, (A. D. 117). Kdchly. 1858. Aen. Gaz. Aeneas of Gaza (A. D. 490). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXV. Aeneas, Aen. Lip1818. Aesop. Aesopieae Fabulae. Coraes. Pa1810. Aet. Aetius (A. a. 500). Venetiis. 1534. Julius Africanus (A. D. PatroGraeca, X. Epistola ad Origenem, XI. Cesti Thevenot's Veteres Mathematici. 1693. Agap. Agapetus (A. D. 565). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXVI, Agath. Agathias (A. D. 582). Bonnae. 1828. Agatkar. Agatharchides (B. C. 113). DiAel.

cher.

Parisiis.

855.

Tad.

tacticus

Lipsiae.

Tact.

tacticus.

Orellius.

siae.

Alex. Hier. Alexander of Jerusalem (A. D. 251). Patrologia Graeca, X. Alex. Lye. Alexander of Lycopolis (A. D. 304). xvm. Alexander of Alex. (A. D. Hepi 490). Andermacus. Amman. Ammonius, grammaticus (A.D. 400). Valokenaer. Lipsiae. 1822. Amman. Presb. Ammonius Presbyter (A. D. 558). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXV. AmphU. AmphUochius (A. D. 395). XXXIX. Anast. Ant. Anastasius of Antioch (A. D. 599 LXXXIX. Anastasius of Caesarea (A. D. Anast. CXXVII. 1095). Anastasius Sinaita (A. D. 609 Anast. LXXXIX. Anatal. Anatalius (A. D. 279). X
Alex. Aphr.
200).
Ibid.
Trail.

Alexander of Aphrodisias (A. D. Problemata. Ideler, I. By pages. Alex. Comn. Alexius Comnenus (A. D. 1118). Lingenthal's Jus Graecoromanum.

Tralles

Basiliae.

iKfilvdav.

Ideler, vol. I.

Ibid.

?).

Ibid.

Caes.

Ibid.

Sin.

?).

Ibid.

Anc.

Ibid.

'

Concilium
I.

Ancyranum (A. D.

314).

risiis.

Coleti,

Andr, C.

Andrea^s
Ibid.

of Crete (A. D. 675).

Afric.

222).

Patrologia Graeca,
vestigandi Cycli

logia

(interpolated).

Andr.

Caes.

Andreas

XCVII. Methodus Solaris, XIX.

in-

of Caesarea (tenth

Parisiis.

century).

Anon.

CVI. Anonymus, De Kussorum ad Pidem

1.

Christianam Conversione. In the third volume of Porphyrogenitus. Anonymus, De Barbarismo et Annn. Barb. Soloecismo. In the same volume with Am-

dot's

Geographi Graeci Minores.

Parisiis.

monius.

Agathemerus (A. D. 200). Hoffmann. Lipsiae. 1842. Alciphr. Alciphron (fourth century??). Lipsiae. 1856. Alex. Concilium Alexandrinum (A. D. 372). 11 Alex. A. Alexander of Alexandria (A. D.
Agathem,.
Seller.

1855.

Anon. Byz.

Anonymus,
CXXII.

De

Antiquitatibus

Constantinopolitanis (A. D. 1110).


trologia Graeca,

Pa-

Coleti,

326).

Patrologia Graeca,

XVIIL

Ananymi, in Ideler's Physici Anon. Ideler. et Medici Graeci minores, I. Anonymus Medicus. Emerin's Anon. Med. Anecdota Medica Graeca. Anonymus Mathematicus. In Anon. Math. the same volume with Hultsch's Heron.

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by Microsoft


AUTHOKS REFERRED
Valent.

VIU
Anon.
Ant.

TO.
Barker.

Anonymtts

Valentinianus.

Arcad.~Arcadius (A. D. 180).


1820. Lipsiae. Archel. Archelaus (A. D. 278).

ConcUium Antiochenum (A. D. 341). Aniec. Theophilus Antecessor (A. D. 537). Reitz. 1751. LipJacobs. Anthol. Anihologia Graeca. 1794-1814. Anthol. Palat. Anthologia Palatina. Lipsiae. 1829. Bekker's Anecdota Graeca. Antip. B. Aniipater of Berrhoea (A. D. 460). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXV. A Anthologia Graeca, HI. A Aniipater of Sidon (B. C. 103). Antip. n. Thessalonica Antip. Thess. Antipater of D. Ant. Mon. Antiochus Monachus (A. D. 614). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXIX. Anton. Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (A. D. 1840. Dtibner. 180). Aphthon. Aphthonius, rhetor (A. D. 310). Rhetores Graeci, Apoc. Apocalypsis. Tischendorf. Apocalypsis Mosis. TischenApoc. 1866. Lipsiae. Apoc. Paul. Apocalypsis Pauli. Tischen1866. Lipsiae. Acta ApoApocr. Apocrypha Euangelia stolorum. Tischendorf Lipsiae. 1851. 1853. Apollin. H. Apollinaris of Hierapolis (A. D. 160). Patrologia Graeca, V. Apollin. L. Apollinaris of Laodicea (A. D. XXXm. 382). 128). Bekker. ApoUod. Apollndorus (B. Lipsiae. 1854. Apollod. Arch. Apollodorus, (A. D.
Coleti, II.
siae.

Patrologia Graeca, VII.

^ Patrologia
,
.

Aret.

Aretaeus (A. D. 180

1735.

?).

Boerhaave.

Lugduni Batavorum.
Areth.

Antiatt.

Antiatticista.

Arethas of Caesarea in Gappadocia Patrologia Graeca, CVL (A. D. 910). Aristaenetus (fourth century??). Aristaen. 1822. Boissonade. Lutetiae. Aristeas. Hody. Oxonii. 1705.

Aristid.

Aristid.

ntiphil.

ntiphilus.

S.

Ibid.

{Pf..

38).

Ibid. II.

Parisiis.

I.

Mfis.

dorf.

Aelius Aristides (A. D. 189). Lipsiae. 1829. Aristides Quintiliamis (second century??). De Musioa. Meibomius. Amstelodami. 1652. Ars Rhetorica. Rhetores Graeci, IX. Anabasis. Arr. Arrianus (A. D. 160). Kruger. Berolini. 1835 - 1848. De Venatione. At the end of Schneider's Xenophon, VI. Lipsiae. 1815. Periplus Ponti Euxini. Hoffmann. Lipsiae. 1842. By pages. Indica. Didot. Periplus Maris Erythraei (spurious). Didot. 1855. Tactica (spurious). Kochly. Lipsiae. 1855. Arsen. CP. Arsenius of Constantinople. Pa^ trologia Graeca, CXL. Artem. Artemidorus (A. D. 180).
Guil.

Dindorf.

Q.

vol.

Parisiis.

1855.^

Parisiis.

Reiff.

dorf.

Lipsiae.

et

Asclep.
Aster.

Lipsiae.

D. 430). Patrologia Graeca, XL. Aster. Urb. Asterius Urbanus (A. D. 210).

Asclepiodorus. Tactica. 1855. Asterius of Amasea (A.

X.

1805.

By

pages.

Kochly.

Ibid.

Ibid.

C.

Athan. Athanasius (A.D. 373). Ibid. XXV. Athan. Cor. Athanasius of Corinth (tenth.

architectus

century).

120).
Parisiis.

Thevenot's Veteres Mathematici.


1693.

Athen.

Athenaeus

Ibid.

CVL
(A. D. 228).

Schweig-

Apollon.

D.

160).
tatis.

De

Berolini.

Apollonius Dyscolus (A. D. Pronomine. Museum Antigui1808. De Conjunctione.

haeuser.

Alhenag.

Athenagoras

1801-1807.
(A. D. 180).

Pa-

trologia Graeca, VI.

Athen. Mech.

De

Adverbio. Bekker's Anecdota Graeca. De Syntaxi. Bekker. Berolini. 1817. Historia Mirabilium. Ideler, I. Quoted

200).
Attal.

Athenaeus, mechanicus (B. C. Thevenot's Veteres Mathematici. Michael Attaliates or Attalidtes (A. D.

1073).

by pages.
Apollon. Eph.
212).

Apollonius of Ephesus (A. D.


1833.

Babr.

Babrius

Bonnae.
(A.
1845.

1853.

D.

?).

Meineke.

Berolini.

Patrologia Graeca, V.
Berolinij

Apollon. S.

Apollonius Sophista (A. D. 1).


Patrum
(A.

Bacch.

Bekker. Apophth.

Apophthegmata
1

D.

500). Patrologia Graeca, Appianus (A. D. 161). App.

Lipsiae. Apsin. Apsines


ser.

LXV.
SchweighaeuRhetores
Patrologia

Bacchius, senior (A. D. 300 ?). Meibomius. Amstelodami. 1652. Balsam. Theodorus Balsamon (A. D. 1204). Beveregius's Pandectae. Oxonii. 1672. Epistola de Jejuniis. Epistola de Rasophoris.

785.

(A. D. 310).

Cotelerius, II, 492. 111,473. Barn. Barnabas. Patrologia Graeca, Barsan. Barsanuphius (A. D. 550)

11.

Ibid

Graeci, IX.
AquU..

LXXXVI,
Barthol.
Ibid.

Aquila (second century).


XV.

Bartholomaeus

1.

(A.

D.

1300)

Graeca,

CIV.

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by Microsoft

AUTHOES EEFERRED
BasU.

TO.

IX

Basilic.

Basilid.

Basil.

Basil. Sel.

of Caesarea (A. D. 379). XXIX. Basilicae. Heimbach. Lipsiae. 1833-1850. Basilides (A. D. 134). Patrologia Grieca, VII. Porph. Basilius Porphyrogenitus (A. D. 1025). Lingentbal's Jus Graecoromanum. Basilius of (A. D. 458). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXV. Bekker. Bekker's Anecdota Graeca, Berolini.
Basiliiis

Clem. A.

Ibid.

Seleitcia

1814.
Biton.

Thevenot's Veteres Mathematici. Blastar. Matthaeus Blastaris (A. B. 1335). Oxonii. 1672. Beveregius's Pandectae, n. Boissonade's Anecdota Graeca. Parisiis. Boiss.

1829-1833. Bryenn. Nicephorus Bryennius (A.D. 1137).


Bonnae.
1836.
Also, Patrologia Graeca,

Clemens of Alexandria (A. D. 217). VUL Clemeniin. Clementina (A. D. 200). Clem. R. Clemens of Rome (A. D. 100). Cleomed. Cleomedes (A. D. 1 Schmidt. 1832. By pages. Lipsiae. dim. Joannes, the author of the Climax (A.D. 600). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXVIII. Clinag. Clinagoras (A. D. 1). Anthologia Graeca, Codin. Georgius Codinus (A. D. 1400).
Patrologia Graeca,
II.

Ibid.

Ibid.

I.

?).

II.

Bonnae. 1843. Comn. Anna Comnena (A. D. 1137). Books 1839. Bonnae. Books X-XV. I -IX.

Parisiis.

Conon (B.
graphi.

C.

40).

Westermann's Mytho1843.

Brusvigae.

GXXVn.
Caesar.

Concilium Caesariense in Palaeslina


(A. D. 210).

(A. D. 335). Coleti, II. Caesarius (A. D. 380). Patrologia Graeca,

Conquest of Romania and of the Morea. Buchon. 1845, Paris. Constitutiones Apostolorum. Const. Apost.

Patrologia Graeca,
Const.
I.

XXXVIII. Caius of Rome


Callist.

Concilium ConstanUnopolitanum
II.

I.

I.,

Nicephorus
CXLV.

Ibid.

X.

called also the Second Oecumenical Council

Callisius

(A. D. 1327).

Ibid.
Callistr.

Const,

(A. D. 381). Coleti, Concilium n.


(A. D. 553).

Constaniinctpolitanum

Callistraius.

In the same volume

II.,

called also the Fifth Oecumenical Council

with Philostratus. Joannes Cananus (A. D. 1422). Canan. Bonnae. 1838. Canones Aposlolorum. Coleti, I. Can. Apost. Joannes Cantacuzenus (A. D. 1375). Cant. Bonnae. 1828 - 1832. Carth. Concilium Carthaginiense (A. D. 403).

Const, ni.

Coleti, VI. Concilium Constantinopolitanum HI., called also the Sixth Oecumenical Council, OTthe Trullan Council(A. D. 680). Coleti, VII. Concilium Constantinopolitanum Const. IV. IV., called also the Eighth Oecumenical Coun-

cil

Coleti, II.

Cass.

Const. (536)
Ideler, I.

Coleti, X. (A. D. 869). Concilium Constantinopolitanum

Cassian.

Cassianus (A. D. 440). Patrologia


XLIX.
D.
1057).
Celsus,

Cassius, iatrosophista.

(A. D. 536), called also C. CPolitanum sub


Const.

Cedr,
Cels.

Georgius Cedrenus (A. Bonnae. 1838, 1839. Med. medicus (A. Daremberg. Lipsiae. 1859. Cerul. Michael Cerularius (A.
Pati'ologia Graeca,

Latina,

Mena. Coleti, V. Constantinus Ducas (A.D. 1067). Due. Lingentbal's Jus Graecoromanum. Cornut. Lucius Annaeus Cornutus (A. D.

D. 30).

70).
Cosm.

Osannus.

Gottingae.

1844.

By

D. 1059).

Cosmos
Ibid.

of Jerusalem

Chal.

Chalcedonense (the Fourth Oecumenical Council, A. D. 451 ). Coleti, IV.

Concilium

CXX.

Patrologia Graeca,
Gregorii,

XCVII.

Ad

(A. D. 742).

carmina

Chalcocond.
1463).
Charis.
vol.

Laonicus Chalcocnndyles (A. D.


1843.

Cosm. Ind.

550).
Cosm.
Vest.

Charisius (A. D. 400). Lipsiae. 1857. Choerobosc. Georgius Choeroboscus


I.

Bonnae.

Cosmas Indicopleustes (A. D. LXXXVIIL Cosmas (tenth century).


Vestitor

XXXVIH.

Keil,

800).
Oxonii.

(A. D. Cramer's Anecdota Graeca, II, 1.


1832. 407).

Chron.
Chrys.

Chronicon Paschale. Bonnae. Joannes Chrysostomus (A. D.


1839.

Ecclesiae Graecae MonuLutetiae Parisiorum. 1677-1692. Cramer. Cramer's Anecdota Graeca. Oxonii. 1835 - 1837. Anecdota Parisiana. 1841. Curop. CuropakUes (A. D. 1400). BonnaQ.
Coteler.

Ibid.

CVI.

Cotelerius's

menta.

1839.
Curt.

Parisiis.

Quoted by the pages of the


(A.

Curtius's Anecdota Delphica.

BeroUni.
Patrologia

Benedictine edition. Joannes Cinnamus Cinn. Bonnae. 1836.

1843.

D.

1118).

Cyprian.

Cyprianus (A. D. 258).

Latina, IV.

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by Microsoft

AUTHORS REFEREED

TO.
called
also

Cyrillm of Alexandria (A. D. 444). Patrologia Graeca, LXVIII. H. of Jerusalem (A. D. 386). XXXIII. of ScythopoUs (A. D. 557). Vita Sabae. Damage. Joannes of Damascus (A. D.
CyrUl.

A.

Concilium Ephesinum, Ephes. (A. D- 431). the Third Oecumenical Council


Coleti,

CyriLl.

Cyrillus

Ibid.

Ephr.

Ephraem of Syria (A. D. 379).


Komae.
2.

m.

Trans-

Cyrill. Scytk.

Cyrillus

lated from the Syriac.

1732.

Cotelerius, III.

Ephr. Ant.

Ephraem of Antioch (A. D. 546).

750).

Patrologia Graeca,

Patrologia Graeca,

XCIV.
Kopp.
Franco&rti

Ephr. Chers.
Ibid. II.

Ephraem of Cherson (A. D.


1799.

LXXXVI,

?).

Demetrius Phalereus (paeudonymus). Ehetores Graeci, IX. Bonnae. Dexipp. Dexippus (A. D. 269). 1829. Did. A. Didymus of Alexandria (A. D. 392). Patrologia Graeca, XXXIX. Mensura Didym. Didymus, grammaticus.
Demetr.

Damascius (A. D. 533). ad Moenum. 1826.

Epict.
ser.

Epictetus (A. D. 118).

Lipsiae.

Schweighaeu-

Epiph. Epiphanius (A. D. 402). Patrologia Graeca, XLI. Epiphanius of Constantinople Epiph. CP.

(A. D. 535). Ibid. LXXXVI, 1. Epiphanius Monachus (A. D. Epiph. Mon.

1015). Erotian.
Esai.

Marmorum

ac

Lignorum

(supposititious).

Erotianus
1

Ibid.

CXX.
(A. D.
68).

Franz.

In the same volume with Hultscb's Heron. Dind. Guil. Dindorf's Grammatici Graeci.
Lipsiae.
Dioclel.

1823. Diocletiani
Mommsen.
1828.

Fragments found
stus.

in Geronthrae

Ediclum (A. D. 301). and Cary1851.

Esaias (A. D. 372). Patrologia XL. Et. Gud. Etymologicum Gudianum.


Graeca,
Sturzius.

Lipsiae.

780.

Lipsiae.

Lipsiae.

Et.M.

Died.
Diog.

Diodorus

Etymologicum Magnum (A. D. 970).


Oxonii.
1848.
3.

1818.

(B. C. 43).

Lud. Dindorf

Diogenes Laertius (A. D. 220). Lipsiae. 1828-1833. Diognet. Epistola ad Diognetum. Patrologia Graeca, Diomed. Diomedes (A. D. 400-)-). Keil's Grammatici Latini, Lipsiae. 18B7. Dion. Dionysius Areopagites (pseudonymus).
Huebnerus.
11.
I.

Lipsiae.

Eucgrius Scholasticus (A. D. 593). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXVI, Euagrius ofScitis (A. D. 400). Euagr. Ibid. XL. Euchait. Joannes of Euchaita (A. D. 1050).
Euagr.
Scit.

Gaisford.

Ibid.

CXX.
M.

Euchol.

Euchologion,
Eudocia
Villoison's

the

Greek

prayer-

book.
1071-)-).

Apparently an imitator of Proelus (close of Eudoc.


the
fifth

century).

Dion. Alex.
265).

Patrologia Graeca, III. Dionysius of Alexandria (A. D.

Eugen. Diac.
Eulog.

Eugenius Diaconus.
3.

Macrembolitissa (A. D. Anecdota Graeca.


Patrolo-

Dion

C.

Ibid.

X. Dion Cassius (A. D. 222).

Bekker.

Lipsiae.

Dion Chrys.
Reiske.

Dion
Lipsiae.

1849.

Chrysostomus (A. D. 99).


1798.
74
7).

Dion. H.

Dionysius of Halicarnassus (B. C.


Lipsiae.
17

Dionysius Periegetes (B. C. 6). Bernhardy. Lipsiae. 1828. Dion. Thr. Dionysius of Thrace (B. C. 107). Bekker's Anecdota Graeca. Diophantus. Fermat. Tolosae. 1670. Diosc. Dioscorides (A. D. 60). Kuhn. Lipsiae. 1829. Saracen. 1598. Doctrina Doctr. Patrologia
Dion. P.
Diopli. Orient.
Orientolis.

Reiske.

7 7 7.

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Procopius (A. D. Bonnae. Proc. Diac. Procopius Diaconus (A. D. 815). Patrologia Graeca, Proc. Gaz. Procopius of Gaza (A. D. 520). LXXXV. Prod. Proclus, philosophus (A. D. 485). In Scheider. VratislaPlatonis Timaeum. 1847. In Platonis Parmenidem. Stallbaum. Lipsiae. 1848. Hymni. Anthologia Graeca, HI. Protosp. TheophUus Protospaiharius (A. D. De Corporis humani Fabrica. 650). Greenhill. Oxonii. 1842. De Pulsibus. Emmerin's Aneedota Medica. Lugduni Batavorum. 1840. De Urinis.
54'3).

1833-1838.

C.

Scymnus (B. C. MUller. Pa1855. Secund. Secundus, sophista (A. D. 170). Gale's Opuscula Mythologica. Septuaginta Tischendorf
Scymn.
risiis.

Sept.

Ibid.

Scrap.

Serapion of Antioch (A. D. 190). Patrologia Graeca, V.

Interpreles.

Scrap. Aeg.
Ibid.

Serapion of Egypt (A. D. 350).


Bekker. Berolini.
Friedlieb. Lipsiae.

viae.

Sext.

Sextus (A. D. 205).


Oracula Sibyllina.

XL.

1842.
Sibyll.

Simoc.

Ideler,

I.

Psell.

Michael Psettus (A. D. 1050).


Graeca,

Theophylactus Simocates (A. D. 628). 1834. Simplic. Simplicius (A. D. 490). Comentar.
Bonnae.
in Epict. Enchir.

1852.

Patro-

Schweighaeuser. Lipsiae.
scholasticus

logia

CXXU.

ndvij/Lta

'larpiKov.

1800.
Socr.

Lexicon latricon.
Graeca, I. Pseudo-Synod. (A. D. 879).

Boissonade's Aneedota

Socrates,

(A.

D. 439).

Pseudo - VT.
1723.

Pseudo-Synodus Photiana XI. Codex PseudepigrapJius Veteris


Coleti,

Sophrns.

Testamenti.

Fabricius.

Hamburgi.

1722.

Ptoch.

Theodorus PtocJioprodromus (A. D. 1150). Coray's Atacta, vol. I. Parisiis.


1828.

Testamentum Solomonis. CXXII. Sophronius (A. D. 638). LXXXVH Soran. Soranus.


Solom.
Ibid.

Patrologia Graeca,

LXVII.

Ibid.

Ideler,

I.

Soil.

Sotion.

Ibid.

Ptol.

Ptolemaeus (A. D. 161). Geograpbia. Petrus Bertius Beverus. Lugduni Batavorum. 1618. Tetrabiblus. Ba^ siliae. 1653. Inerrantium Stellarum Significationes. Patrologia Graeca, XIX. Ptol. Gn. Ptolemaeus, Gnosticus (A. D-

Claudius

Stephanus of Byzantium (A. D. Meineke. Berolini. 1849. Steph. Diac. Stephanus Diaconus (A. D.
Steph. B.

400
808).

?)

Stob.

Strab.

Concilium Quinisextum (A. D. 692). Vn. Bonnell. Lipsiae. 1854. Rang. Alexander Rizos Rangahes. Antiquites Hell^niques. Athenis. Rhetor. Rhetores Graeci. Walz. Rhodon (A. D. 196). Patrologia Graeca, V. Roman. Concilium Romanum (A. D. 873). n. Roman. Imper. Romanus, imperator (A. D.
Quin.
Coleti,
Quintil.

160).

Ibid.

VIL

Quintilianus.

Stobaeus (A. D. 450 Gaisford. 1850. Strabo (A. D. Kramer. 1844. Straton (A. D. 150). Anthologia Graeca, Stud. Theodorus (A. D. 827). Patrologia Graeca, XCIX. Bernhardy. Suid. Suidas (A. D. 974).
?).

Patrologia Graeca, C.

Oxonii.

18).

Berolini.

Strat.

III.

Studiles

Halis.

Symm.
Synax.

SymmOchus

1843 - 1853. (second century).

Pa-

Coleti,

963).

Lingentbal's Jus Graecoromanum.

Roman. Jun.
Ibid.

Romanus, junior

(A. D. 963).

Roman,
Ruf.
Sal.

et Porph.

Romanus
Ibid.

et Porphyroge-

nitus (A.

Salomon (pseudonymus). Fabricius's Codex Pseudepigraphus V. T. Sard. Concilium Sardicense (A. D. 347).
Coleti,

Rufus, rhetor.
n.

D. 947).

Btetores Graeci,

III.

Synaxarion. Georgius Syncellus (A. D. 806). Bonnae. 1829. Patrologia Synes. Synesius (A. D. 430). Graeca, LXVI. XCVIIL Taras. Tarasius (A. D. 806). VI. Tatian. Tatianus (A. D. 170). Gaisford. Terent. M. Terentianus Maurus. Oxonii. 1855. Tertullianus (A. D. 218). Patrologia Latina, Thalass. Thalassius (A. D. 648). Patrologia
Syncell.
Ibid.
Ibid.
Tertull.
I.

trologia Graeca,

XV.

Schol.
Schol. ker.
Scyl.

Scholiastae of ancient authors.


H.
Berolini.

Graeca, XCI. Themist. Themiitius (A. D. 390).

Guil. Din-

Scholia in Homeri Hiadem.


1825.

Bek-

Joannes Scylitzes (A. D. 1081). At the end of Cedrenus.

dorf Lipsiae. 1832. Theodoretus (A. D. 457). Patrologia Theod. Graeca, LXXX. Theodotus Ancyranus (A. D, Theod. Anc.

440).

Ibid.

LXXVII.

Digitized

by Microsoft

XVI
Theod. Her.
355).
'

AUTHORS REFERRED

TO.

Theodotus of Heraclea (A. D.

Tim
Til.

Presb.

Timotheus Presbyter of ConstanLXXXVI,


D. 370).
1.

Theodorus of Iconium (A. D. 1004). CXX. Theodorus Lector (A. D. 525). Theod. LXXXVI, Theod. Mops. Theodorus ofMopsuestia (A. D. 429). LXVI. Theodos. Theodosius, grammaticus (A. D. 350 Bekker's Anecdota Graeca. Theodos. Diac. Theodosius Diaconus (A. D. 963). Bonnae. 1828. Theodosius of Scythopolis Theod. (A. D. 553). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXVI, Theodtn. Theodotion (second century). XV. Daniel Tischendorf. Theognost. Theognostus (A. D. 810). Cramer's Anecdota Graeca, Mon. Theognostus Monachus Theognost. (A. D. 890). Patrologia Graeca, CV. Theologumena Arithmeticae. Theol.
Theod. Icon.
Ibid.

Ibid.

XVIII.

Ibid. tinople (A. D. 535). Titus ofBostra (A. B.

Ibid.

xvin.
Triad.

Lector.

Triodion.

Ibid.

1.

Xryph.

Tryphon,
III.

grammaticus (A. D. 1).


vol.
I.

Ibid.

?)

Scyth.

1.

Ibid.

De Tropis. Boissonade's Anecdota Graeca, (A. D. Typic. Typicum Irenae imperatricis Patrologia Graeca, CXX VII. 1118). Tyr. Concilium Tyrium (A. D. 335). Joannes Tzetzes (A. D. 1150). Chi
1826
Coleti,
II.

Museum

Criticum,

Cantabrigiae.

Tzetz.

liades.

Kiessling.

Lipsiae.
Christ.

1826.

Scholia

ad
Tzym.

Lycophr.
Toannes

M.

Goth.

Miiller.

Lipsiae.

1811.

II, 1.

Tzymisches

(A. D.

976).

Lingenthal's Jus Graecoromanum. Valent. Valentinus, Gnosticus (A. D. 155).


Patrologia Graeca, VII.
Yillois.

Arith.

Ast.

Lipsiae.

1847.

By

pages.
I.

Villoison's

Anecdota Graeca.
AmphUochii.

Vene-

Theophanes (A. D. 817). Bonnae. Theoph. B. Theophanes of Byzantium (A. D. In the same volume with Dexippus. 571). Theoph. Cont. Theophanes Continuatus. BonTheoph.
1839.

Theon, rhetor (A. D. 525). Ehetores Graeci,

tiis.

1781.

Vit.

AmphU.

Vita

Patrologia

Graeca, XXXIX. Ibid. XIX. Vit. Aral. Vita Arati. Prefixed Vila BasUii (fabulous). Vit. Basil. 1644. Parisiis. to Amphilochius.
Vit.

Theophilus of Antioch (A. D. 181). Patrologia Graeca, Vl. Alex. Theophilus of Alexandria LXV. (A. D. 410). Theophilus of Caesarea (A. D. V. Theoph. Noun. Theophanes Nonnus (A. D. 1794. Bernard. Gothae. Theophyl. B. Theophylactu, of Bulgaria (A. D. 1107?). Patrologia Graeca, CXXIII. Thorn. Thomas. Euangelium, Tischendorf.
Theophil.
Theophil.
Ibid.

nae.

1838.

Clim. Vita

Joannis Climacos.

Patrolo-

Epiphanii Vit Euthym. Vita


Vit.

gia Graeca,

LXXXVUI-

Epiph.

Vit.

(fabulous).

Ibid.

XLI.

Theophil. C.

Vit. Jos.

Hymog.

Vila

Eutliymii.

Cotelerius, IV. Joseph Hymnographi.

190).

Ibid.

959).

Thorn.

M. Thomas

Magister (A. D. 1310).

Ritschl.
Tiber.

1832.

Tiberius, imperator (A.

D. 582). Lin-

Timotheus Aelurus (A. D. 535). LXXXVI, Tim. Alex. Timotheus of Alexandria (A. D. XXXII. Tim. Ant. Timotheus of Antioch. LXXXVI, Tim. Hier. Timotheus of Jerusalem (A. D.
Tim. Ael.
Patrologia Graeca,
385).
Ibid.
1.

genthal's Jus

Graecoromanum.

Vita Nicolai CV. Ml. Jun. Vita Nili Junioris (A. D, 1005). CXX. XXVIIL Syncl. Vita Xenocr. Xenocrates (A. D. 50). Zach. Zacharias of M>'tilene (A. D. 540). Patrologia Graeca, LXXXV. Zigah. Euthymius Zigabenus (A. D. 1122). cxxvm. Zonar. Joannes Zonaras (A. D. 1118).
Vit.

Patrologia Graeca,
Nicol. S.

CV.

Studitae.

Ibid.

Vit.

Ibid.

Vit.

Syncleticae.

Ibid.

Ideler,

I.

Ibid,

Ibid.

1.

1841-1844. From XIII to quoted by the pages of the Paris edition. Lexicon. Titmann. Lipsiae. 1808. Zos. Zosimus {A. D. 425). Bonnae. 1837. Zosimas, abbas (A. D. 490). Patrologia
Bonnae.
inclusive,

XVm

535).

Ibid.

LXXXVI,

1.

Graeca,

LXXVH.

** The greater part of the author's


Vol. VII.

" Glossary of Later

and Byzantine Greek, forming

(New

Series) of the

Memoirs of the American Academy," has been incorporated

into the present work.

Digitized

by Microsoft

INTRODUCTION.
THE IONIC DIALECT.
The
earlier

avvivei yap oiKcia to

'EXXi)i>ik6i>

wcpejSoXXovro

lonians

first

appeared in Attica, the


is,

KOt vofiots rots KaOetrrrjKotnv l\a\urra rjirtlOmv.j

name

of which was Ionia, that

Solon
language.

calls his native

dialect the Attic

the country of the lonians.


pal city was Athens.

Their princiAttica they

Dionysius of Halicamassus and


early

From

Strabo

apply to the

language of

spread over Megaris and the northern parts

Athens the name of old


it

Attic,

and regard

of Peloponnesus.
Cyclades.

They occupied

also the

as essentially the

same with the las;

Finally they colonized a por-

a term used by the later authors to designate the language of the Asiatic lonians.
[See 'ArrtKos,
'las,

tion of Asia Minor, to


ferred the original

which they transof the mother

name
is

and compare

Aristid.

I,

country, and which

the Ionia of hisAsiatic lonians,

296 (317) El
(froi^cretBy),

8f Sei Kai TTJs 'Ofiripov iivrjaBrjvai


Kai TavTrjs T^r (^iKoriplas
Trfs diroiKov
fj

tory and geography.

The

p.mxei

with the weU-known sensitiveness of colonists,

7t6\is,

ov povov dta
(jtavr) (Ta<j)as

noXeas, aXX

on
2.]

were great sticklers for the appellait


;

Km

17

evSevbe.

Diomed. 335,

tion lonians, even after


solete in

had become obclaiming at the

The

earlier representatives of the dialect

European Greece

of the lonians are

Homer and

Hesiod.
lan-

same time that they themselves were the


pure lonians.
According to Herodotus,
the Cynurians also were of Ionic descent.
[E'er.
8,

But we are not to assume that the


language of Athens

guage of these authors was the ordinary


;

for,

as poets, they

73.

Compare Pans.
KareXBelv
els

2,

37,

had the

privilege

of

employing,

within

Uplv
VTjirov

Sf
TTiv

'HpaKKeiSas

TlcKoirop-

certain limits, forms


liar to

and expressions pecu-

avrfiv ritfiieaav 'hBrjvaiois oi

Apyeloi
also

the other dialects of Greece.

The

^oH/^w.J

The name Ionia was given


it

later representatives are Herodotus, Hip-

to Achaia while lonians.

was occupied by the

pocrates,

and several

inscriptions.

Greek Prose.
intellectual

Greek prose began

The lonians were the most


of
all

to be cultivated about the beginning of the

the Greek tribes, and their dialect,

sixth century before Christ.

The

earliest

in all its stages,

was the leading


1,

dialect
I,

prose writers (logographers) employed the


Ionic dialect.

of Greece.

[Her.

60.

Anthol.

102
the

According to Strabo their


[Dion.
2, 2. 3.

Uarpls

8'

'EXXaSor 'EXXas

'Afl^rai,

Athens

prose was poetry divested of metre.

Greece of Greece.
rS>v ''EKKijvav
oirtp

Philon

II,

467, 18 Oj

H. VI, 863, 12
Strab.
1, 2, 6.]

seq.

Diog.

1, 79.

o|u8epKfOTaTot hiavoiav 'Adrjvaloi

yap

iv 6<f>6a\na Koprj, ^ iv ^I'X.^ Xoyto-juor,

TovT

ev 'EXXaSi 'A^^vai.

Jos. Apion.

1,

THE ATTIC DIALECT.


Athens was the centre of
political
fifth

'Adrjvaiovs avTox^ovas \eyovin Kai jraiSeias


fie\eis.

em-

power

Paiis.
iirX

4,
air

35,

'Adripalot de

npo^-

during the greater part of the


It

century.

xBrjo-av

piya

avTtjs (t^s dripoKpaTias)

was

also the great

emporium

of Greece.

Digitized

by Microsoft

INTRODUCTION.
All the dialects

met

there,

and the Atheof

Ionia

'{

2117. 2118. 2119 (B.C.


Strah. 14, 1, 41.

348-308)
Athen. 14,

nians

culled

from

each

them such

Phanagoria.

forms and expressions as were calculated


to

13 -O

add strength and elegance to their own


This confluence of dialects
Attic dialect,
1, 6.

TOVTOV ^aviKh Ka\oiiJiPa


Ti ToO

Sa)7-<lSou Kal rh npi8c 'IcovLKb, \6yo! rh noirifiara 'A'Xe^apSpov

Ionic idiom.

AiVwXoC

KM

nifjrjTOS ToC Mi\r]<riov


jrocr]TS,p

Kal

produced
called.
Isocr.

the

technically so

'AXf'lou

Km

Sn.a>v TOiovrav

npocjjepeTau

\Xmi. Vect.

Eep. Ath.
seq.

2, 8.

Huid. 2coTa8vs,
iap^oypd(i>os.

Saip.ovtade\s Kpiyr, Mapcoviirris,

Pan. 48 D.
I,

49

Compare

"Eypa^e ^XiciKas

iJTOi.

Kivaibovs

Aristid.
I,

159.

Xanth. apud Dion. H.

8aXT9
19

'l<^viKf,.

Heraclid. apud Athen. 14,

73, 12.]

In point of development and

'li,va>v

& rh ItoKv TrX^flos rjWoicoTm, 8ia t6

in richness of literature this dialect stood

avrols <niiimpi(t)ipeceai toIs del SwacrTevoviTiu


tS>v fiap^apav.
ijej]

at the

head of all the Greek

dialects.

The

14,

20 Ta

fie

tS>i>

m>v 'liivav^
'la-

natural consequence of this pre-eminence

Tpv(j)(pa,Tpa.

Polyb. 32, 20, 9 T^k

was that Greeks from aU the


to

tribes repaired

Kr]v

Koi rex""?""^*' aaariav.

Compare Arut.
Inscriptions

Athens to obtain a finished education.


not necessary to our purpose to men-

Thesm. 169.

Eccl. 914. 953.]

It is

in the Attic dialect appeared in Ionia in

tion here

Ephorus of

any other names than those of the latter part of the third century before Christ ; which shows that the Ionic dialect iEolis, Aristotle of Stagira,
of Chios,

Theopompus
of Lesbos.

and Theophrastus
41.
Isocr.

was not

in

common

use at that time.


the

[Thuc.

2,

Pan.

When
Ionia

therefore

Artemidorus

geog-

50 E.]

rapher says that the Ionic was spoken in


persons from

Now

whatever part

of

when he

wrote,

we

are to understand

Greece educated at Athens would by preference use the dialect of Athens.


is

that lonisma were heard

among ths

im-

And

it

educated of that countfy as late as the


second century before Christ.
[For Attic-

not

difficult

to understand that their

example would naturally be followed by


their kinsmen, pupils, friends,
ents.

inscriptions found in Ionia, see Inscr. 3137.

and depend-

2852.

3045.

3067. 2855. 3069.


1,

Artem.
airb

apud Porph. Them.


to force its pecudialects.
rrjs

17, p.

42 Kal

/V

The Attic now began


liarities

MiX^TOu

fif'xP' ''^^ 'E^Eo-iui'

TroKeas Koi ai-

upon the other Greek


was the

TTJs ^fivpvrjs

Koi

KoXo^^vo?

lon/cai/ etrri KaTOiKiOy.

Naturally enough, the dialect of the Asiatic lonians


first to feel

ol Tives

Tfi

TUiV ^\aiva)V hiakiKTta ;^p(Si/Tat.]


it

As

the influStill

to the lonians of the Cyclades,

cannot

ence of the idiom of the metropolis.


inscriptions

be shown that they ever spoke a dialect


materially different from that of Attica.

show that

it

continued to be

spoken and written, in a modified form, as


late as the close of the fourth

Be

this as it

may,

all

the inscriptions bein

century be-

longing to this
Attic.

group of islands are

fore Christ.

And

it

may

be added here

that (in the early part of the third century


before Christ) Sotades, Alexander of
lia,

^toit

From a Bceotic inscription, name 'AXflavSpem occurs, it is

in

which the

inferred that

Pyres, Alexus,

and

others,

made

the

the Boeotic dialect was spoken and written


at least as late as the time of Alexander

vehicle of their impure thoughts, probably

because

it

abounded
;

in indelicate

words

the Great.

As to KapxaSowor, found
it

in

and expressions

the Asiatic lonians being


\Inscr.

another Boeotic inscription,

only proves

noted for dissoluteness of morals.


2691.
c.

that that inscription could not have been

d. e (B. C.

367) Mylasa.

2008

(B.

written long after the destruction of Car-

C. 352) Amphipolis.

2919

(B. C.

350 )

thage by the Romans.

[Inscr. IbQi. 1565.],

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE ATTIC DIALECT.


In the
tians
first

century before Christ the Boeodialect, as in-

sent as Macedonian.

[See S^ayva, dfiapi,

had adopted the Attic

djSpoCre:, atuTKOv, dxpea, ydpxav, yoSa, yordv,

scriptions clearly show.

[Inscr. 1570.]

ydtims, iXe^, koios, KwpvKos, weXiyoiv,

and comAdyos,

The

Asiatic

-iEolic,

and some of the

pare 'AXe^avSpoS)

'AfjUKTas,

Kdpavos,

branches of the Doric, continued to resist


the encroachments of the Attic as late as
the second century of the Christian era.

NiKavtap, Ilappeviav, TlepSiKKas, IlToXepalos, BiXiTTTTos,

that

is $iXi7rn'os.

Apollonius (Synt.
in-jroVa,

214, 6) refers
eueo-xa, to

such nominatives as

And

according to Pausanias, the MessestiU

the Macedonian dialect.]

It ap-

nians of his time (second century)


retained their Doric idiom.

pears further fi-om Polybius that a native


of Macedonia could not converse with an

[Inscr. jEolic,

2176.

2181.

2187.

2189.

2190.

3524.

lUyrian without an interpreter.

But

it is

Doric, 2060. 1346. 1317. 1124.

Compare
PwuS.

nowhere stated that the Greek language

Tatian. 26 Ei yap dxTiKtfeir ovk


Xeye
/iot

i)V 'AOrivaios,

was unintelligible to the Macedonians. The


passage in Quintus Curtius, the romancer,

Tov

iifj

Sapi^eiv

ttjv alriav.

4,

27, 5
aia

tlieaaijvioi,

8e ixrot JieKoiTovvqaov TptaKOeicri

sometimes quoted to prove that there was


a radical difference between the two languages, merely shows,
if it

erri

p,aKurTa tjKoivto, iv ois oiJte iBav


ti

8^Xoi trapakva'avTes

twv oUodev, otVe r^K

shows anything,

diaXtKTOv r^f Aa)pida fierediSd^Otjcrav, oKKa koi


it

that a promiscuous assembly of Hellenes

fjpas

fTi

TO aKpi^es air^i UeXnnomriaiaiv

addressed in the Macedonian dialect was

p.d\i(rTa f<jii\a<rcrov.

The

following passages
Strab. 8,
1,

not likely to understand every word said

refer to the first century.


S;^e8di/

by the speaker

which might be affirmed


\Polyh. 28, 8, 9.
9,

S en

ical

vvv Kara nSKcis

aWoi

nXXoas

of any other dialect.


Q. Curt. 6, 9, 34.

SiaKcyovrai, Sokoviti Se bapl^eiv airatires Sia Tfjv


avfi^aa-av iiriKpareiav
:

Compare Pazw.
vixtjcrai
ttj

22, 3

said of the Pelopon-

^auKTai 8e

p.oi

(Corinna)

T^ BidXcKTOv

nesians.

Suet. Tiber.

56 Zenonem quendam

Tf flvcKa, OTi jSev ov t^ ipavfi

AcopiBt,

aavep a

exquisitius
set

sermocinantem cum interrogasilia

nivSapos,

dWd

onoia (rvvrjaeai f/neXXov AioXeij.J

"

Quaenam

tarn molesta dialectos

Alexander, the son of Philip, was placed

esset," et Ule respondisset, " Doridem,'' re-

under the immediate tuition of

Aristotle.

legavit Cinariam, existimans


sibi

exprobratum

And
lect

as this philosopher used no other dia-

veterem successum, quod Dorice Rholoquantur.]

than the Attic, his pupjl became acits literature

dii

quainted with that dialect and


at

Of the language of Macedonia only a few


isolated specimens

an early

age.

Now

the language of

have been preserved by


is

Alexander must have been also the lan-

ancient authors, and there


that
it

no evidence

guage of his personal attendants and


cers in general.
coturse

offi-

was ever reduced to writing by the

The common

soldiers of
;

natives.

But as the leading

families of

spoke their native dialect

and

it is

that country were of Hellenic extraction,


it is

natural to suppose that the military terms

toTDe presumed that they spoke a

and expressions used


592

in the

army

of Alexan-

genuine Greek dialect, not unlike that of

der were of Macedonian origin.


Plut.
Tjj

[Compare

Northern Greece, properly so


presumption
that
its
is

called.

This

I,

'EiBvs d(Tnaadft.voi MaKeSoKitrxi


'Avairqbj]a-as

strengthened by the fact

<j)avj.

694 C

(Alexander)

case-endings

and personal endings


be assumed

dve^oa MaKedopL(TTt KaXau Tovs

viraaTTiCTTds.j

are identical with those of the acknowl-

In

tlfe last

half of the second century

edged Greek dialects

unless

it

after Christ, the Attic

had superseded

all thejru-

unwarrantably that the grammarians took


liberties

other dialects.

\_Aristid. I,

295 Oi ras

with the words which they repre-

Tpiovs <p(ovds eKXeXotTracri,

k. t. X.J

Digitized

by Microsoft

INTRODUCTION.
In Egypt and in the greater part of Western Asia the Greek was no native tongue.
vcj)'

'EXKrjvav

eiroiKOVfievriv.

scriptions found in Syria,

For Greek inAssyria, and MeP-

Ptolemy the son of Lagus, one of Alexander's

sopotamia, see Inscr. Vol. Ill,

211

seq.]

generals,

and afterwards the

first

The

Common

Dialect.

The
remote

Macedonian ruler of Egypt, introduced


the Attic dialect into that country.

And

more or less was not in every particular from Athens


Attic used in countries
city. the same as the Attic of that speakers and writers the contrary,

although the native population spoke the language of their forefathers, the Greek
residents followed the example of the king

On

bom

and

his officers

and

flatterers.

Hence the

Greek inscriptions found in Egypt are The other dialects were written in Attic.

and educated in such countries were apt to mix with it words and phrases derived At the same from their native idioms.
time, they would naturally avoid whatever

now

so little heard in Alexandria,

that,

was

likely to perplex

a hearer or reader

whenever
there, they

they

made

their

appearance

unacquainted with the refinements of the


Attic dialect.

would naturally attract notice. some of the Ptolemys would not And
tolerate even the
\Theocr. 15,
KarlXKourai.

The grammarians, from the


call

second century before Christ downward,


this phase of the Attic the

dialect

of Macedonia.
Bvcrravoi,

common

dialect,

87

Ilauo-ao-^',

&

dvawra

and sometimes

the

Greek language, in con-

Tpvyoves
:

iKKvaurevvri

TrXareia-

tradistinction to the Attic dialect,

by which

aboiaai

mravra

to

which the Syracusan


IlfXoiroi/i/ao-iCTTl

expression they designate the language of

women
AaXe)/itr
eo-a-iv,

indignantly reply,
Aapio-Sev
8'

the Athenian authors of the Attic period.

e^etrn, 8ok<5,

toU Ampif-

When

they apply the term

koivt)

to the

we speak
;

the

language of Pelopon-

dialect of Pindar,
this poet

they simply mean that


dialect.

nesus

the Dorians,

trow, have

a right

employs a mixed

But
said

to speak Doric.
jr\aTftao-8o),

In respect to the word


broaden,
it

this

might with equal propriety be


language of

to

refers

to

the

of the

Homer and

Hesiod.

prevalence of long

in the Doric dialect

\Athefn. 3,

94

^aK^hovi^ovrds T otSa 7roXXot>(


TTjv

which sound requires the mouth to be

Twv Attikwv Sia


init.

impi^iav.

Greg. Corinth.
tj

opened as much as
Hermog. Rhet. 224,
IloXKmv 8e XeyfTai
eKjxaQeiv ykwTTas,
rijv
(x)

possible.
15.

Compare
I,
(tai

Koivfj

Se,

jravres ;(po)fiffla, Kai


i)

ixP'l'

Plut.

927 F
SKKatv

o-aTo nivbapos,
a-Totaa.

^youv

ck

rav Teaadpwv uvvethe lankoivos,

KXfOTraTpa)

Pansanias

(9, 22, 3) calls

rav

irpo avTrjs ^atriKeau ovde


TTf piXa^eiv

guage of Pindar Doric.


Kotvm;, 'ATTt/cc5s,
"ArrtictBS.J

See

Koivi).

AlyvrrTiav avexl'^'"'"'

Bca\eKTOV,

'EXXtjkikcoe,

'Ardi's,

'Attiko's,

ivltav 8e Kai to paKednvi^eLV eKXiirovrov.

For
see

Greek inscriptions found in Egypt,


Inscr. Vol. III.]

Alexandria under the Ptolemys was the


g^-eat

seat

of learning.

The genius
and a

of

Seleiious

and

his successors introduced


;

poetry was
science,

now

leaving the Greeks, and


erudition,
taste
its

the Attic into Syria


his

and Eumenes and


interior

criticism,

successors,

into the

of Asia

for fantastic versification


place.

were taking

Minor.

The two great

centres of these

The language of the


It

early poets

parts of the Macedonian empire were


tioch

An-

was obsolescent, and


solete.

in part entirely ob-

and Pergamus.

[Compare Joseph.
Ka\

was natural, therefore, that

Ant. 17, 11, 4 Td^a yap


'EXX?;W8er EiVt ttoXms.

TdSapa

Kai "imros
2,

Bell.
3,

Jud.
1

14, 4

some of the best scholars of the age should devote their time and learning to the explanation of such words and passages as

Ot

KaitrapiiDP '^EWrjves.

9,

Kaia-apfiau
TrXt'ox

jieyiiTTrjii

rys re 'lovBaias ffdXtK, Kai to

were no longer understood by ordinary

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE ATTIC DIALECT.


readers.

But we are not


of the term

to suppose that in

themselves.

The Greek

rhetoricians,

on

thesS

critics

were grammarians,
;

the
first

the other hand, with their usual superficialness, asserted

usual sense

for the

that Greece had never

attempt at systematic grammar was made

been in a more prosperous condition than

by Dionysius of Thrace, who died in the


early
Christ.

when Vespasian deprived


dependence.
'E\evdepias
drjiiois
fie

it

of

its

in-

part

of

the

first

century

before

[Plut.

II,

568 A.

824 C
ro'is

They were annotators rather than


and their
scholia

oaov

oi

KpaTovvres viixovai
io'cds

grammarians,

may

be

jtiTe<rTt,

Koi to n\foi>

ovk apiftvov

compared to the expkmaUyry

notes of

mod-

for the Greeks.

Paus.
p,(v

7,
rfju

17, 2.

Dion

C.

em
of

commentators.

It

must be added
and
others

63,
Tijo-e,

11,

ndtrav

'EXXaSa

eXfijXci-

here, that, while Zenodotus, Aristophanes

Kai wp ikev6ipav
3, 2,

d(j>is.

Philostr. 224.
irdBos 'EXXij-

Byzantium,

Aristarchus,

Herodn.

14 'Apxaiov toCto

were industriously commenting upon the


productions of the golden age of Greek
literature, Aratus,

vav, oi iTphs dXX^Xoui- oratridfoi/Tes del Kai Toiis

imepe^fiv BoKovvras KaSaipeiv 6e\ovTs erpi-j^a(Tav TrjV

CaHunachus, ApoUonius

'EXXdSa .... To Se tto^os toCto tov

of Rhodes,

and Nicander were endeavoring


is,

^ijKov

Ka\ (j>36vov pcTrjKBev (is ras Kaff rjnas

to revive the old Ionic, that


of

the dialect

dKna^ov(ras n'dXeis.j

Homer and

Hesiod, but of course with-

This
tion, of

is

the period of empty declama-

out success.

These

versifiers

may

be said

grammatical works, of fanaticism,

to afford the earliest

example of learned

theosophism, the\u-gy, mysticism, religious


persecution, religious imposture,

men making
[See
aov.
jSu/ios,

use of an obsolete language.


6p6vos, ttcXckvs, wrcpv^, atfiaipa,

and

phillit-

osophical charlatanry.

The

principal

Homer's poems were enjoyed by the


people of Athens as late as the

erary

centres

were Alexandria, Athens,

common
3,

and Antioch.

time of Xenophon.
5 'O
Trarrip

Compare Xen. Conv.


to

The common
less

dialect

was now more or

6 impLcKovfievos orras avijp ayoBos


fie

spoken and written in regions widely

ycvolp,rjV

rjvayKoae

irdvra

'Ofif/pmi

cTrr)

remote from each other, in Spain, in Mesopotamia, and from .^Ethiopia to Sarmatia.
It

jioBfiv.

Kai vvv
djro

8vvaip,r]v

&v 'iXidda dX);K koi


emeiv.
'Ekcivo
o'l

'08i(r<rciav
e(f)ri

ord/uaToy

8*,

was a

sort of universal language,

and

6 ^ hVTurOevrfs, \e\riSt

trt

on

xal

pa^atoi

consequently a

medium

of communication.

iravTts iiTifTTavTai
0?;,

ravra Ta

eirrj ;

Kai nSts &v,

Every weU-educated person was supposed


to be acquainted with
it
;

\e\Tj0oi ciKpo&p.ev6v ye
;J

avTav 'oXlyov dv

and,

if

Epicteladies

eKdarrfV ijfupav

tus

is

to be believed, the

Roman

In the year one hundred and forty-six


before Christ, the fall of Corinth reduced

were particularly fond of Plato's Republic.


[Cic.

Arch. 23

Nam,

siquis

minorem

glo-

Greece to a

Roman

province.

In the last

riae
cipi,

fruotum putat ex Graecis versibus per-

half of the first century of the Christian


era,

quam

ex Latinis, vehementer errat

the emperor Nero declared

it

free.

propterea quod Graeca leguntiu in omnifere regionibus,

The Greeks, however, were incapable of bus


making a wise use of
this boon.

Latina suis finibus,


Senec.

Envy

exiguis sane continentur.

Consol.

and hatred suddenly revived and produced


their usual effects.

ad Helv.

6,

Quid

sibi

volunt in mediis

Vespasian therefore

barbarormn

regionibus

Graecae

urbes

brought them back under the


declaring at the

Roman yoke,

Quis inter Indos Persasque Maoedonicus

same time that they had

sermo?

Juven.

6,

184.

15,

110 Nunc

unlearned liberty ; words which imply that

totus Graias nostrasque habet orbis Athe1, 1,

they had lost the faculty of governing

12.

jSueton.

Claud. 42.

Digitized

by Microsoft

INTRODUCTION.
Anstid.
1,

294, 10 "hnaam yap

at ttSKck koi
rfiv

annihilate

every word and

phrase

that

TravTa Ta tS>v avBpanrav yevr)

npos vpas Koi

vperepav Slatrav xal


TavTr]v piav
(jjavfiv
t.

(juovfiv

dmKKivf ....

Kal

under the had not the good fortune to be Thucydides or a special protection of a
Plato.

Koivf/v

airavres

tov yeVovs

"You must

not use this word,"


it is

ivopurav,

(c.

X.

Luc. 23, 38.

Act. 21, 37.


Epict.
p^fipay

they would say, " because


in any ancient author.
is

not found
is

Joann. 19, 20.


Frag.
exovai

Jos. B. J. 5, 5, 2.
PA/ij;

This

a good

53 'Ev
rfjv

aJ

yuwalfccf

/jera

liKdrmvoi TroXiTeiav, otl KOivds d^ioi

word, because it that the limits of the Greek language had

old."

They assumed

elvm rds yvvaixas.


I,

Plut.

I,

564 E.

Lucian.

been forever fixed during the Attic period.


In short, they overlooked the simple fact that a spoken language never remains stationary, but imperceptibly passes

695.]

Meanwhile the population of Greece was


rapidly diminishing
;

so that in the

time

from one

of Plutarch that country could not pro-

stage to another.

Sometimes they would


at-

duce more than three thousand hoplitae.


This

carry their presumption so far as to

may

explain the fact that piost of

tempt

to correct authors of the first order.


dhp.i\

the writers of this period were not natives


of Greece proper
;

Thus, Phrynichus finds fault with

in

and some of them were


\Cic. Pis.

Xenophon,
pia-pos in

irpaiTas in Aristotle,

and

iprtv-

not even of Greek descent.

40

Hyperides.

But we must not


critics

Achaia exhausta, Thessalia vexata, laceratae

suppose that this class of

had any

Athenae,

etc.

Philon

II,

302, 12

influence with their contemporaries.

On

'H

TrXfioTi)

pdipa tov ''EXKijvikov iravTos i^eKeval ^yap


ai

the contrary,

as

they were remarkable

c^ddprj

iravaiXedpla*

irporepov
ratv
ttjs

neither for sense nor for real learning,

eiavSpovaai TToXets oiKjjTopcov pmjpeia

they were contemned by men of judgment,

'EAXaSos (Tvp<J3op&v
Tois
opSiinv.

i7re^f\ei(p6r]crav, aTV^fls

Sea

and ridiculed by epigrammatists.

" If

Tacit.

Ann.

2,

55.

Plut. II,

there were no physicians, nothing would

413 F.

Pans.

7, 17, 1.]

be more foohsh than grammarians," said


In the second

The Atticists.

one of the wits of this period.


1.

[Tatian.
Athe7i.

century of our era the language had deviated perceptibly jfrom the ancient standard.

26.

Lucian.
15, 2

II, 23.

Ill, 171.
^(rav,

3,

94.

E(^^ laTpoi

oiScv &v ^v

Old words and expressions had

dis-

tSsv

ypappariKav p.apoTepov.
642, 27.

Philostr. 553.

appeared, and

new

ones succeeded them.

Sext. 620, 28.

650, 24.

Hw.
apud

In addition to

this,

put upon old words.


over, ther,

new meanings were The syntax, moreFur-

Poet. 58

70.

Anthol. Ill, 38.

See also

KeiTou(cTos,

and

compare

Hellad.

was undergoing some changes.

Phot.

IV, 317 A.]


latter,

Latinisms and other foreign idioms

The
sites,

namely, the literary exqui-

were continually creeping into the lan-

technically called Atticists (who

may

guage of common

life.

The

purists of the

be regarded as the predecessors of the

day made an

effort to

check this tendency,

modern

logiotati),

conceived the prepos-

but they were steadily opposed by usage,

terous idea of restoring the classical Attic


in all its splendor.
all

and

not

unfrequently

by good

sense.

They imagined
first class

that

Those self-constituted guardians


honor of the ancient Attic
into

of the

that was necessary to constitute

an

may

be divided
(as

Attic author of the

was the use and expreswords

two

classes

the grammarians

of rare and obsolete words


sions.

Phrynichus and Moeris), on the one hand,

The mania,

therefore, for such

and the

literary exquisites,
it

on the other.
to
]

The former took

upon themselves
Digitized

and expressions was now very great the supply, however, was at least equal to the

by Microsoft

THE ATTIC DIALECT.


demand.
literature

Every obscure corner of Greek

and De Syria Dea, and Arrian


dica,
teeus,

in his In-

was zealously ransacked

for these

attempt to imitate Herodotus.

Areaf-

hidden treasures.
pression

And

if

a word or ex-

a physician, employed this dialect

was objected

to,

nothing

was

ter the
II, 25.

example of Hippocrates.
26.

[lyiician.

easier for the word-hunters than to pro-

Philostr.

314

'ATroXXooi/iof

8e

duce excellent authority for

it.

Some-

Tar

fxiv hia6r]<as

ras iavrov tov 'lavwv

epixrjitrropi.-

times they would use words of their


coinage.

own

vcvei rpoTTOv.
(COS

Suid. Kodparos Pafialos

One
tells us,

of this

class

of writers,

wrote in Ionic]

Luoian

fancied himself so thor-

The Asiatic Style.


style,
is

The

Asiatic

oughly Attic that he translated into Greek

that

is,

the style in which

little else

ven Latin proper names.

Thus, he con-

required than high-sounding words and


periods,

verted Saturninus into Kpdwos, because Sa-

sonorous

made
in

its

appearance
century

turnus corresponds to
of ipovTwv

Kpdi/os

and instead

among the Greeks


before Christ.

the

first

he wrote ^powns, because he

It is represented

by the

took for granted that Fronto was derived

declamations of Dion Chrysostomus, Aristides,

from

cjipoiiTis.

Had he been

better ac-

Himerius, Themistius, and Libanius

quainted with Latin, he would have trans-

productions which conclusively show that


it is

formed him most probably into Menomas.


It is

possible

to

use

language skilfully
ideas.

hardly necessary to observe here that

without conveying any important

the style of the Atticists was essentially


macaronic.
33.
29.
30. \Plut.
I,

But

it

must not be forgotten that these


in their day.

523 E.
344.

Lucian.
348.

II,

oration-makers enjoyed a high reputation


for

172.
18.

342.

349.

eloquence

Thus, the

385.

Ill,

17.

Galen. VI, 344 E.

admirers of Polemon and of Aristides had

348 A.
fie

361 E.

363 D.

VIII, 40

'ETrel

no
ity

difficidty in

putting them on an equal[Lucian.


II,

ovx

'EXXiji'iic^i'

StdXcKTOv elKiKpivas

oiiSefiiav,

with Demosthenes.

348.

oiSe fidp^apov inXas,


<rS>v,

aXKd

riva

/itKTi)i

i^ djra-

III, 168.

Aristid. Ill, 737, 9.

742.

743.

OLOV KapvKTjVj

riva TroLKiKcorepav Koi a\k, t. \.

Philostr. 539.

542.
II,

See also

'Ao-tai/dy,

and
nvos

i^oKOTipav KapvKr)s <TvvTi6ea<Ti,v,

Phryn.

compare Plut.
iyxapia
Kvujuevoi,
feal

44

E "Oirov
vrj

yap

ip.eTov

Prooem.

Aihm.

3,

53.

Anthol. Ill, 47, 55.

irvperov Kai
\.]

Ai'a )(yTpas

imSei-

See

also

arrc/ei^o), arTtKitr/idr, dTTtKto"Tijff.]

K. T.

This tendency, however, to imitate the


Attic authors began to manifest itself at
least a centiu"y before the age of the Atticists.

Hellenistic Greek.
language of the
gentiles

The Jews

after the dispersion generally adopted the

among whom
native lan-

Thus, Strabo, in speaking of his

they resided.

Jew whose

friend Diodorus, says, that his style


"sufficiently antique."
Jos. B. J. Prooem.
5,'

was

guage was the Greek was called a Hellenist.

\Strah. 13, 4, 9.

The Jews
dialect

of Alexandria used the


is,

about the

logiotati

common
Attic
as

of that city, that

the

of his time.]
It

modified by the Macedonians.

has already been remarked that some

But

as they impressed

upon

it

the peculi-

of the Alexandrian poets used the old


Ionic, that
is,

arities of the

Jewish mind, we are not to

the language of

Homer and

suppose that their dialect was identical


in every respect

Hesiod.

We now
even

add, that, in the aboveit

with that of their Greek

mentioned century,

was not an uncomgood


scholars,

neighbors.

[See 'EXXiywo-r^r,
2,
8.].

and compare

mon
lect.

thing,

for

to

Luc. Act.

write in the then obsolete new Ionic dia-

Now

the language of the

Hebrew

Scrip-

Thus, Lucian, in his

De

Astrologia

tures was no longer understood

by the

Digitized

by Microsoft

INTRODUCTION.
Alexandrian Jews.
It

became therefore

{Eus.
eKTTiv

II,

553 C
i^b6iiriv

Ovfiovov

jrifinrrjv,

dWa

leui

necessary to translate them into Greek.

Kai

(Origenes) jrapaBeXi ipfiv

According to Aristeas, or rather PseudAristeas, a

vdav.

Epiph.

Ill,

380 A.]

The Jews,

in

Greek Jew, the Pentateuch was

wisdom their eagerness to prove that the


of the Greeks proceeded from their sacred

translated
(six

by seventy-two learned Jews The


translation

from each tribe) in the reign of PtolPhiladelphus.


of

books, invented the improbable story that

emy
these
is

portions of the Pentateuch

had been renthe

seventy-two

mythical

interpreters

dered into Greek long


of Alexander.
[Aristob.
II,

before

time
I,

called the Septuagint {seventy) version

apud Clem. A.

seventy being adopted

on account of

its

781 A. 893 A. B.
Ill,

145 A, et apud Eus.


PBeud-Aristeas
5.
1,

being a round number.

[See also Aristob.


Ill,

637 A. 1097 A.

35.

apud Clem. A.
1097 A.
Prooem.
4, p.
3.

I,

893 A, et apud Ens.


II,

Josephus (Ant. 12,

2,

14.

Apion.

22)

Phihn

138, 39.

Jos. Ant.

repeats these absurdities.

See also Just.

Ibid. 12, 2, 1 seq.

Apion.

2,

Apol.

1,

44.
II,

Clem,.

A.

I,

176 B.
I,

408 A.
B.]

472.

Just. Apol. 1, 31.

Tryph.

'iS.

820 A.

136 A.

T^tull.

515

Cohort. 13.
you
K. T.

Iren.

947
I,

XhoKijimoi 6 aoC.

The

writers of the

New

Testament, and

X.

Clem. A.

889

Tertull

I,

of the Apocrypha, strictly so called, were


Hellenists.
lect as
tion.

378
IIi;

seq.

Anatol. Laod.

213 A.

Epiph.

They used the Common Diaas

241 C.

373

seq.]

The other Hebrew

spoken by Jews of limited educa-

books must have been translated after the


reign of Ptolemy Philadelphus, but before

And

there

was a great gulf

between the doctrines propagated by the


Apostles and the religion of the Greeks,
these writers were sometimes obliged to
give

the beginning of the


Christ.

first

century before

The addition
Ptolemy

to the last chapter

of Esther mentions Ptolemy


If this
is

and Cleopatra.

new meanings

to old words

and
is,

ex-

the same as Ptolemy

pressions.

Further, their diction

in

Philometor,
sage
B. C.

who

died B. C. 145, the pas-

manner, based upon that of the Septuagint.


It, is

must have been written between 181 and 145. If his predecessor is

not surprising, therefore, that

the style of the sacred books of the Christians should

meant, then

its date is B. C. 204-181. The Wisdom of Sirach was translated

have been regarded as concritips.

temptible by mere verbal


A.
I,

{Clem.

about the thirty-eighth year of the reign


of Ptolemy Euergetes,
B. C. 131.

693 C.

Orig.
C.
II,

I,

356 A.
C.
Ill,

1289

B. C.

corresponding to

1297 A.
1072
C.

1505
Eus.

1508
264 B.
6,

584
I,

Basil.

68 B.

The

translations of Aquila,
in

Symmaohus,
the

121 A.
Isid.

Lactant. Instit.

21.

Nil.

264

C.

and Theodotion appeared


century after Christ.

second

1080 D.

Theod. IV, 784.

792
fjiiXv

seq.

Aquila valued ety;

Compare
ovK

Jos. Ant. 20, 11, 2


ajTofiejfoi/rai
leai

Uap

yap

mology more -than good usage


quently his version was so
frequently unintelligible.

conse-

(Kfivovs

tovs

ttoXXuv

iSvav

literal as to

be

ma\fKTOvs cKfiaBovTas
yov
p.r\

yXa<|)vpdn)rj tov Xd7,

[Grig.

I,

52 B.

iiTiKoii^jfeiovras.

Diog.

22 Zeno eXeye
o.irQy.vr]p.ovei(iv,

Hieron.

I,

577 (316) Aquila enim prosely-

Tas (jxavas koX ras Xc'|eti


irepX
Trjv

tus et contentiosus, qui

non solum verba,

akXa

dtddcortv

r^s

XP"'S

'"O"

"o*'"

sed etymologias verborum transferre conatus est, jure projicitur a nobis.] Three

dtrxoXfio-flai.]

Ecclesiastical Greek.

Many

other translations were discovered in the


early part of the third centiu-y, designated

of the early Christians believed that phi-

by

the

numerals Fifth,

Sixth,

Seventh.

losophy proceeded from the devil, and as a matter of course they discouraged the

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE ATTIC DIALECT.


study
of

9-

Greek authors.

They would

with which they were acquainted.


signification passed into the

This

sometunes ask disapprovingly,


fect,

"What

de-

works of the
TpaiKoSf

pray,

dost thou find in the law of

Christian

authors.

The name

God, that thou shouldst have recourse to


those heathenish fables?"

The more

in-

from Polybius downward, represents the Latin Graecus, a Greek But Greek
speaking people always regarded
exotic.
it

telligent of the Fathers, however, recom-

as an

mend
cipline
Ti yap

these authors for the mental dis-

The

later Byzantines,

when they

they
croi

afford.

[Const.

Apost.

1,

6
iv
I,

speak of the inhabitants of Greece, usually


designate

koI XciVei eu

T^

v6fiif
;

Tov Beov

them by the term

'EXXaSixot.

fV

(Kfiva TO lOvofivda opurjojis

Clem. A.
II,

Constantine was the


peror

708 B. 717 C. 740 B. 796 A.


301 A.

288 B.
Oriff. I,

309

C.

313 A.

388 B.
132 A.

the

Roman emwho publicly declared in favor of new religion. But although Chrisfirst
is,

1309 B.
II,

Basil. IV,

824 A.
Nil.
I,

Greg. Naz.
Socr.

tianity, that
ity,

the externals of Christian-

508 B.

509 A.

enjoyed the protection of the court,

420 B.
Po)/xa(Ot

Compare
TO

Pint.

350

'AjroXoCo-t
''EX\t)vikS)v

the ancient religion continued to struggle


for existence as late as the ninth century.

npayfiara

ypafifidrav

avaTf\ria-6eiiTes,

said Cato the elder.]

The
less

[Porph.
ors

Adm.

224.]

Many
now

of the emper-

ecclesiastical

writers

were more or

were fond of religious controversy, and


converted into a

under the influence of the Septuagint and


of the

Constantinople was

New

Testament, but they wrote in


dialect

vast theological seminary, in which every-

the

common
is

of their

respective
exceptions,

body fancied himself a doctor of


" If

divinity.

times and places.


their style

With some

you ask a person," says Gregorius of


" about coins, he delivers a
dis-

less elaborate

than that of

Nyssa,

the majority of their seciilar contemporaries.

course about yevvtjTov and ayimriTov.


inquire concerning the price of bread
;

You
the
sub-

The

ecclesiastical

vocabulary con-

tinued to receive accessions until a late


date,

baker informs you that the Son


ordinate to the Father.
If
is

is

but by

far the greater

number

of

you wish to
good
order,

theological

terms was introduced before


fifth

know whether
the answer
is.

the bath

in

the close of the

century.

The Son was created out of


Greg.
Boer.

Byzantine Greek.
stantine

When
the

Conseat
it

nothing."

[Greg. Naz. II, 13 A.

the
to

Great

removed
he

Nyss. Ill, 557 B.

188 B.]
the
its

of empire

Byzantium,

called

The
changes
original

language,
it

notwithstanding

New

Rome, and also Constantinople.

The

had undergone, retained


as
it

Greeks began
consciousness.

now

to lose their national


called JSomans,
dis-

character
;

late

as

the

sixth

They were

century
in

that

is,

was ancient Greek

and sometimes Eastern Romans, to


tinguish

the strictest sense of the expression.

that

is,

them from the Western Romans, The spoken language formed the basis of With re- the written, but at the same time it conthe genuine Romans.

gard to the
cient Greeks

name

Hellenes,

which the anit

tained

many words and


style,

phrases which

gave themselves,

is

to be

good scholars generally avoided.


Chrysostom's

Thus,

observed here that, during the preceding


periods,

although superior to
level

the Jews

of Alexandria

and of that of an uneducated person, was


it

other places out of Palestine often used

to the comprehension of the

common

peo-

in the sense of pagans, heathens, gentiles,


idolaters,

ple of Constantinople, with

whom
20

he was
yhp 6

apparently because the Greeks

a great

favorite.

[Zos. 278,

'Hi/

were the most

prominent gentile people

avBpamos (Joannes) oKoyov Sx^ov vwayayeaOat

Digitized

by Microsoft

10
Shv6s.]
first

INTEODUCTION.
The ordinary language of the
is

guage
stood

that

is,

it

was no longer underThose, however,

part of the Byzantine period

to

by the masses.

be sought, not in the elaborate productions of rhetoricians, but in the

who made any


afi'ected

pretensions to education

works of

to write according to the gram;

Pachomius, PaUadius, Cyril of Soythopolis,


Euagrius, Dorotheus, Zosimas, and Joannes

matical rules of classical Greek

the spo-

ken

dialect being, in their

judgment, unfit

Moschus,

in

the

Great Limonariiim,

in

for elaborate composition.

But they did

most of the Apocrypha of the

New

Testa-

not aim at anything higher than an imitation of the earUer imitators.

ment, and in the Acts of Councils.

They were

From

the beginning of the seventh cen-

enraptured with the turgid style of the


rhetoricians of the first five or six centuries

tury to the close of the eleventh, learning

was at a very low ebb, and a good scholar was so rare a phenomenon, that his
erary attainments were
likely to
lit-

of our era,

and with the verses of


Joseph Ehacen-

such poets as Oppian.

be

re-

dytes, a writer of the thirteenth century,

garded as the
magic.

result
it

of

proficiency

in

reconunends the following authors as models of

Thus,

was believed by the


Photius had received
a Jewish

eloquence

Gregorius of Nazianzus,
Gregorius of Nyssa,
Plutarch,

superstitious

that

Basilius of Caesarea,
Psellus,

lessons in the black art from


sorcerer.

Synesius,

Themistius,

[Theoph. Cont. 670.]

The

lan-

Chrysostom, Symeon Metaphrastes, Libanius, Aphthonius, Procopius of Gaza,


ricius,

guage

lost

much

of

its

original character

Cho-

by the prevalence of ignorance and the


intermixture
of foreign
inflections

Philostratus,

Demosthenes,

Xeno-

elements.

The

phon, Procopius of Csesarea, Lycophron,


Josephus, Isocrates, Georgius Pisides, Callicles,

grammatical

were for the most

part Attic, but hosts of

new words and


to

Ptochoprodromus,

and Sophocles.

phrases were daily coming into use,


say nothing of

According to Nicephorus Gregoras, Georgius of Cyprus resuscitated the

ancient words.

new meanings given to The syntax also under-

ancient

language

which can only mean that he


316

went important changes.

With very few

wrote what was then called good Attic.


[Ptoch.
1,

exceptions, the learned of this age were

seq.

Rhetor. Ill, 621.

Nic.

incapable of appreciating the merits of the


best models of antiquity.

Greg.

I,

163.]
dialect of the" twelfth cen-

They confined

The popular
maic or

themselves chiefly to the study and imitation of Basilius, Gregorius of Nazianzus,

tury was essentially the same as the Ro-

modem
Greek.

Greek of the present day,


tlie

and Joannes Chrysostomus, of whom. they


were great .admirers.
In their writings

and may with propriety be called

early

modem
name
lect,

The learned gave


the

it

the
dia-

they endeavored to avoid as


sible

much

as pos-

of the vulgar dialect, the

common
owes

whatever belonged to the language


life,

the

common language of

Romans.
its ori-

of

common

which

may

be regarded as

The

last of these expressions

the connecting

hnk between ancient Greek


\Joann. Sic. pp. 57.

gin to the fact that, during the Byzantine period, the

and modern Greek.


67.

Greeks called themselves

75.]

Romnns, as has already been remarked.


Imbecility, pedself-conceit

Modern Greek.
antry,
childishness,

\Comn.
138.]

I,

98.

Conquest.

2805.

Ducas

and

are

the characteristics of the last epoch of the Byzantine period.

In the latter part of the eighteenth


century, Ilgen, of the University of Jena,
in

In the twelfth century

the ancient language was an obsolete lan-

his

preface

to

the Homeric

Hymns,

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE PERIODS OP THE GEEEK LANGUAGE.


maintained that the popular

11
axrvep
oi'

modem Greek
/-

Pm/xaTor

p^v

rjv,

jjttIki^c

Se

iv

rfj

was the same as the language of the


tics

peo-oytia 'ABrfvaioi.^

of ancient Greece,

and

fortified

his
8S>,

It

must always be borne

in

mind that

position

by instancing such forms


Kapj],
TJK
;

as

from the twelfth century downward the


Greeks had, in a manner, two languages;
namely, the traditional language of the
Greek),

Kpi, ak<f>i, Tp6(j)i,

just as

if

these

words belonged to the Romaic.


sios Christopulos,

Athana-

modem

Greek poet of many (Modem


it

and the written


{Scholastic
Greek).

considerable merit, confounding,

would
II-

language

of

scholars

seem, the .<Eolians and Dorians with


gen's
rustics,

The
was

latter

was supposed by the ignorant


Attic,

asserted that

the

modern
^olic

to be

excellent

but in reality

it

language was neither more nor less than

little else

than a

lifeless

mass of

far-

slight modification of the ancient

fetched words and expressions.

Theodo-

and Doric.

And

in the early part of the

rus

Ptochoprodromus,

one of the most

present century he pubUshed a

grammar learned men


rjroi

of the twelfth century, wrote

entitled TpajijuniKTi t^s Alokobapuais,


ofiCKovpivrfS

T^r

in

both these languages.

His popular

Tapivijs

rav

'EXXi^voji'

yXmo-frat.

verses, addressed to the

emperor Manuel
earliest

Coray

modified

the

German

professor's

Comnenus, are regarded as the

assertion

by asserting that the popular


of the

specimen of modern Greek, properly so


called.

dialect of the first four centuries

Christian era

was

essentially the

same as

that of the

twelfth century, which was


[Coraj/s Atacta, Vol. II,

THE PERIODS OF THE GREEK


LANGUAGE.
Changes in a language are not instantaneous, but
tions,

modern Greek.
iff

seq.]

These are mere assiunptions.


is,

The
the

fact

that,

during the best days of

Greece, the great teacher of Greek was

come on by
it is

insensible gi'ada-

common

people.

The language of the amused the masses,


but
in

and therefore

impossible to

fix

orator
tively

and of the comedian, who respecadvised and

the precise time of transition from one


stage
to

another.

Thus,

although the

differed

from that of the majority of their


not
in

period of the highest development of the

hearers,

kind,

quality.

language of Athens coincides


Persian,
troubles,

with

the

[PM.

Ale. 1, p.
ou;^

110

SQK. EiVa TO piv

Peloponnesian, and

Macedonian
it

<j>av\6Tpa

otot

re 8i8d(TKeLV, ra de (tttqvOtp,ai

we

are not to infer that


after the

began

taioTcpa

AAK.
napa

tyaye

....

oiov Koi

on the day

burning of Sardes

TO

eXKrjvi^civ

rovTCDV

eyoye tpa6ov, koi

and ended with the death of Alexander.

ouK hv (xoipi cmeiv ipavrov Si8d(7Ka\ov, aXK' els


Tovs avTovs dva(j)epo>,
ttvai, SiSacr/caXou:.

The history of the Greek language may,


for practical purposes, be divided into six

oiis

trii

^s

ov (rrrovdaiovs

SQK.

'AXX',

&

yevvdie, Tov-

periods,
I.

namely

Tou pv dyadcii SiSdtrKoKoi ol jroXXoi.J

As
,

to

The mythical period. The Ionic period, from Homer to the


C. 500).

Ilgen's
that,

rustics,

Philostratus

informs

us

II.

in

his time,

that

is,

in the third
interior

beginning of the Persian war (B.


III.

century, the inhabitants of the

The Attic period, from the begin(B. C. 500), to the

of Attica spoke purer p^reek than those

ning of the Persian war

who
Vit.

resided

in

the
7 'H

capital.

[Philostr.

accession of Ptolemy Philadelphus (B. C.


283).

Soph.

2, 1,

pea-dyeta, e^t), Tijs 'At-

tires

dyaObv
is.

bibaa-KoKelov
7. X.

dvbpX

^ovhopivm
AlXiavos 8c

IV.

The Alexandrian period, from the

ha\eyea-6m,

Ibid. 2, 31

accession of Ptolemy Philadelphus (B. C.

Digitized

by Microsoft

12
283), to the

INTRODUCTION.
conquest of Greece by the
the Ionic and Attic periods.
ars use the

Some

schol-

Romans
V.

(B. C. 146).

term

later

even with reference

The Roman period, from the conof

to the
ers

Roman

period.

The

principal writ-

quest

Greece by the

Romans

(B. C.

are Euclides,

Bion,

Theocritus, Ara-

146), to the removal of the seat of gov-

tus, Callimachus,

Lyoophron, Archimedes,

ernment

from

Rome

to

Constantinople

ApoUonius of Perga, ApoUonius of Rhodes,


Moschus, Nicander.
[Quintil. 10,
1,

(A. D. 330).

54.]

VI.

The Byzantine period, from

the

Authors of the Roman period.


Polybius
B. C. 129

removal of the seat of government from

Rome
the

to

Constantinople (A. D. 330), to


of

Cameades
Apollodorus

129

conquest

Constantinople by the

128 127
127 117
116

Turks (A. D. 1453).

Hipparchus

The mythical period.


a few lines attributed to

Of the

Inscriptio
Inscriptio

4893 4896

poets of this period, with the exception of

Pamphos and

to

Ptolemaeus Euergetes
Agatharchides
Clitomachus, philosophus

Orpheus, nothing remains.


4, 35.

\Her. 2, 81.
Aristot. Poet.

US'
111

PlM.

Crat.
2,

402 B.
1,

4, 9.

An. Gen.
1,

32. 21,
9.

Mund.
7,

7,

4.

Dionysius of Thrace

107
103

Pans.

18,

5.

7,

29,

8.

Artemidorus of Ephesus
Antipater of Sidon

Philostr.

693.]

103
95

The Ionic period.


known representatives Homer and Hesiod.

The best

Meleager
Alexander Polyhistor

of this period are

93
90

ApoUonius Molon

The Attic period.


Pindarus,
cles,

The

princi-

Scymnus
Inscriptio

pal authors of this period are Aeschylus,

4678

82

Antiphon,

Herodotus,

Sopho-

Geminius
Metrodorus of Scepsis
Parthenius
Tyrannio, grammaticus
Castor, chronographus

Euripides,

Thucydides,
Isaeus,

Andocides,

70
63

Aristophanes,
Hippocrates,
Aristoteles,

Lysias,
Plato,

Xenophon,
Lycurgus,

Isocrates,

58 56

Demosthenes, Aeschines, Di-

narchus, Theophrastus.

Inscriptiones 4898. 4897, b.

4899
51

The Alexandrian period.


period takes the

This

Aenesidemus
Posidonius

name Alexandrian from

the circumstance that Alexandria, under the Ptolemies, was the great seat of learning.

Demetrius Magnes

49
49

Theophanes of Lesbos

It begins, strictly speaking, with the

Juba

('Ic5/3ar)

46
46

reign of Ptolemy Philadelphus.

For, al-

Didymus, grammaticus
Antipater of Tyre

though the new capital of Egypt was founded in the year three hundred and
thirty-three

44 43

Diodorus of Sicily
Conon, mythographus
Tyrannio, junior
Nicolaiis of

before our era,


literary celebrity

the founda-

tion of

its

may

be said

32
16

to have been laid

by that monarch.

Damascus

The authors of the Alexandrian period


are

Inscriptio 3902, b.

H
7

commonly

called
later

later

authors,

and

Dionysius of Halicarnassus

their language

Greek,

in contradis-

Theodorus of Gadara

tinction to the authors

and language of Dionysius Periegetes


Digitized

by Microsoft

THE PERIODS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


From
secular

13

the

first

century of the Christian era downward the writers are divided into

and

ecclesiastical.
;

The former

are the legitimate successors of those preceding


oi* disturbing forces.

this century

the latter

may

be regarded as intruders

Secular authors.

Ecclesiastical authors.

14

THE PERIODS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


Herodianus, grammaticus

16

16

INTRODUCTION.

Diogenes Laertius

Athenaeus
Inscriptio

228

4705
238
Alexander of Jerusalem
Origenes
251

Herodianus, historicus
Philostratus

253 265

Dionysius of Alexandria

Dexippus
Plotinus

269
270
Gregorius Thaumaturgus

270 272

Manichaeus
Macarius Magnes

Longinus

273
Archelaiis of

Mesopotamia

278
279

Anatolius of Laodicea
Pierius of Alexandria

283

Malchio

Theognostus of Alexandria
Phileas

285

300
300

Theonas
Petrus of Alexandria
Porphyrius

304

305

Aphthonius
Hierocles (Xdyos
(j)iKa\Ti6tjs)
?

Palaephatus

Apsines

Menander, rhetor

Pamphilus
HeUadius

307

308 Methodius
Concilium Ancyranum
Concilium Neocaesariense 312

314 314
325

Concilium Nicaenum Concilium Gagrense

Alexander of Alexandria
lamblichus

326

329

The Byzantine period.


stages,

The language

of this period passed through several


it

and therefore

it

will be convenient to divide

into a

number

of subordinate

periods or epochs.

We

propose the following

First epoch, from A. D. 330 to 622 (the first year of the Hegira).

Second epoch, from A. D. 622 to 1099 (the year of the capture of Jerusalem by the
Crusaders).

Third

epoch,

from A. D. 1099 to 1453 (the year of the conquest of Constantinople

by the

Turks).

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE PERIODS OF THE GREEK LANUUAUE. Authors


TJlpianus

17

of the first

epoch

of the

Byzantine period.
Ecclesiastical authors.

Secular authors.

Theodosius, grammaticus

Harpocratio

Alypius

Julianus
Oribasins

363

Himerius

386

Themistius
Libanius

390
391

Ammonius, grammaticus
Pappus

18

INTRODUCTION.

Chariton of Aphrodisias

THE PEEIODS OF THE GEEEK LANGUAGE.


Stobaeus

19

Andreas of Samosata

Priscus Panites

471

Proclus, philosophus

485

Marinus (Procli)

Candidus of Isauria
Coluthus

491
1

Tryphiodorus

Malchus
Simplicius
Aetius,

medicus

Alexander of Tralles
Nicolaus, sophista

Theon, rhetor

525

Joannes Lydus

527 533

DamasciuB

Theophilus Antecessor

537

Procopius

543

Paulns Silentiarius

550

20

INTEODUCTION.

Julianus of Egypt

THE PERIODS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


Joannes of Damascus

21

756

Theodorus Abucara
Elias of Crete

Epiphanius of Catana
Concilium Nicaenum II

Josephus (Christianus)
Geoponica
Tarasius
Georgiiis

SynceUus

HesycMus (Lexicon)
Stephanus Diaconus
Procopius Diaconus
Gregorius Dacapolites

Georgius Choeroboscus

Theognostus, grammaticus

Theopbanes (Isaacius)
Theodorus Studites
Joseph Studites

Nicephorus of Constantinople
Nicephorus of Alexandria

Methodius Confessor
Georgius of Nicomedia

Joannes of Sicily
Concilium Constantinopolitanum

IV

Synodicum Vetus
XI)

(in Fabricius, vol.

Pseudo-Synodus Pbotiana

Metrophanes of Smyrna
Basilius (imperator)

Petrus of Sicily
Nioetas of Paphlagonia

Theognostus Monachus
Photius

Mcetas of Byzantium
Joseph Hymnographus
Joannes of Jerusalem

Nicephorus Philosophus
Joannes Cameniates

Leo Patricius
Arethas of Caesarea

Leo Philosophus (imperator)


Georgius Hamartolus
Nicolalis of Corinth

Basilius of

Neae Patrae

Basilius

Minimus

22

INTKODUCTION.

The authors of of the Byzantine period. The former Scholastic Greek. this period must be separated into Modern Greek and the artificial Attic of the latter, in wrote in the language spoken by the masses

The third Epoch

the schools.

Modern

Greek.

modem

Greek writer
definite acco
I).

have any

Atacta, voL

Pachomius Monachus

THE PERIODS OP THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


Mazaris diroSrmia

23

B(/3X(0i'

Tijs

KovyKearas

Trjs

Pmfiavtas

Kat roS Moipatffif,

a translation

from the French

1350

Joannes Cananus

14:22

24

INTEODUCTION.
The
of the

THE FOREIGN ELEMENTS OF THE GEEEK LANGUAGE. The Persian element.


express things peculiar to

following table contains the

names
Greek

Hebrew

letters written

characters.

The

Persian words occurring in ancient Greek

In power it corresponds to N, 'AXe<^. the Greek smooth breathing; as, 'Ahdp,


'E(j)paip.

the Persians.

Such
8i)r,

are ayyapos, ava^vpiSes, apra^r],


Ki'Sapis,

dardv

3,
J,

Br; 6

B, B^ra.

yafa,

Kvp^acrla, 7rapaa-dyyr]s, aav-

Tipe\, Tip\

vaKpa,

o-apdfiapa,

traTpdims,

axoii'OS,

riapa.

^,

AaXe6,

In Byzantine Greek
Kiov,

we have

("^dap, farpi-

n,

Ae\6

r,

Tdppa.

A, AcXro.
it

E, El.

In power

corresponds

Ka^dbiv, T^ovKavttTTripiov.
dp)(^aiots

[Athen. 3,
irotrjTdls

94
1,

to the Greek rough breathing.

Kat yap irapd Tols

Kat

avy-

Ovav

F, Fav,

BaS, Vau, OX Aiyappa.


it is

ypa(j>evcri Tois cr(j)dSpa eWrjvi^ovcrLV 'danv evpeiv

After A, E, Q,

changed into

its

Ka\

HepcnKa ovSpara
avvTjOeiav,
a)s

Keifieva

did rrfv t^s XPh~

corresponding vowel

as 'Ho-aO, hi-

(7eft)S

tovs jrapairdyyas koX tovs


rj

vdv, Afvt, Nti/fuij, 'lavdv.


f,

diTTavSas Kal rois dyydpovs Koi ttjv axoivov

Zaiv,

Zai

Z,

ZiJTa

as

Zaxapias,

Tov rrxoivov.
tprjo-iv

11,

98 Sai/vaKpa .... eKncopd


KoKovpepov

Zopo/Sd/SeX.
is

The proper
dialect.

name

'Efpas

ivai OVT03S

eart Se Tlepcn-

written also "Eo-Spaj, after the anal-

KOlf.j

ogy of the ^olic

The Hebrew element.


Hebraisms and
occurring
in

The

n,

H 5 H,
X,

''Hto.

It is represented

by

the

Septuagint

and

sometimes
;

by the

smooth

Greek,

New Testament, and in may be divided into four


Hebrew words
in
;

Byzantine
classes.

breathing
pa>v,
to,

as ILappdv, Xd/i, Pax^^, 'Aep'A/3w/),

Xa^ap Or
e,
eiJT-a.

Teav.

First.

Greek
as
1v,

letters

Trjd

Regularly represented

without any further change


^rdaxC) pa^^i,
<l)a<TfK.

Kop^dv,
*,

by T
,

as 'Apapar.

Second.
ings

Hebrew words with Greek end;

3j
7,

and accents

as

dfifids,

dfipa,

dppas,

lad Icod I, "ifflra j as 'IovSqs, 'laKa^. X a(f) K, X, KaTTTra, X. Aa^eS, AajSS A, Aap^Sa, Ad/38a.

^dros, ^va-a-os, yfnopas, xd/Sos, Kop^avds, ndpos,


papcovds.

0,
J,

i;

Third.

Hebrew words

slightly modified

D)
J^,

as KL^OUpiOVf cIkKoS'

N uv N, NO. ^apcX' ^"^/"'X Acv O, Ou. It

^ M, MB.

'^j

Siypa.

is

represented- by the

Fom-th.

Hebrew idioms

as

llotijo-fo a-e

smooth breathing, and sometimes by r;


as 'Appav, rdfa, Tdpoppa, Tat/SaX.
fi,

fis Wvos piya.


6
'IrfiTois

Kal iyevfTO
Toiis

ore ereXeaev

ndvTas

\dyovs tovtovs, fiWf roiy

ij

n,

*, nr, *!.

paBrjTois avTOV.

V, To-qSt), 2a8ij
to

2j

as

Mf Xxio-cS,
sound T2

2t^
is

With regard
declinable

Hebrew proper names,


Nme.

d)v,

Sa/3ao)9.

Its Semitic

in the Septuagint they are generally in;

inadmissible in Greek.

as 'ASdp,, Kdiv, "A^fX,

2175,

p,

Ka)(j>

Q, QoTTira or Kdmra.

It is rep-

In the

New

Testament,
;

they are com"1'


JJ*,

resented

by K

as 'laKm/S,

icd/Sor.

monly declined

as 'Idxa^os, BapOdKopdios, Xoufay.


;

'ladvvris, 'hjirovs, Krj^as,

In Josephus
as 'ASapos,

Xo-ei/,

they are regularly declined


Kdtr, "A^cXoj, Sqflor, Nmfor.
6, 1

P, Pc5. ^VX'j PVs Stv s, Sav. It is represented by iiypa as 2a,iou^X, ianfav,


;

\Jos.

Ant.

1,

'icr/iaijX.

Its Semitic

sound

SH

cannot

Ta yap ovdpara

bid t6 rrjs ypaffirjs finpe-

be expressed in Greek
ri,

TTCf ^XXiji/KTTat Trpds r}bovTiv tS}P

evTev^opevwv.l

Tav, Sav

letters.

T, 6, TaC, S^ra.

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE FOREIGN ELEMENTS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


The Arabic element.
upon the Greek.
and

25 was
liable

The

lan-

he might be
to

in other respects,

guage of the Arabs made no impression

be cashiered, and even disfranchised.


II,

The few Arabic words


(See
durjpas,

\_Plut.

1010

D
n
2,

XlepX Vatpaiav Xe'yeiK,

i>v

found in Byzantine writers express objects


titles

piv Xdyo> vvv opov


Valer.

irdvres avBpanroi ^paihai.

peculiar to the Arabs.


dfiepaiJ.i'ovv^s,
dfirjpoKi^s.,

Max.

2,

2 Illud quoque

magna

dj38ioK,

Sfiep,

cum

perseverantia custodiebant (magistra-

KaSrjs, Katrris,

Kap^aviov, KapT^i/ias, Kovpav, p,a(j)apiov,

tus prisci), ne Graecis unquam, nisi Latine,

aylhiov,

<papai,

;yaXt(^af.

See also

responsa darent.
volubilitate,

Quinetiam ipsa

linguiie

dyyovptov, <raj/8u^, xdvSa^.)

qua plurimiun

valent, excussa,
in

The Keltic element.


(TdKaTai)

The

Kelts

per interpretem loqui cogebant, non

under Brennus made an irrup-

m-be tantum nostra, sed etiam in Graecia


et Asia
:

tion into Greece in the year

two hundred

quo

scilicet

Latinae vocis honos


difiundeSeret

seventy-nine before Christ.

portion of
finally

per omnes
retur.

gentes

venerabilior

them crossed the Bosporus and


settled in

Sueton. Claud. 16.

Tiber. 71

a part of Phrygia, which from

mone
Dion

Graeco,

quamquam alias promptus


60, 17, 4.

that circumstance received the appellation


of Galatia.

facilis,

,non tamen usquequaque usus

est.

And

because they were interalso

C. 60, 8, 3.

57, 15, 3 Ti-

mixed with Greeks, they were called


GaUograeci.

berius iKOTovTapxov 'EXhr/viOTi iv T& crvveSpim


papTvpfjirai

The leading language


its

of this

idehrja-avros, ovk ^ceorp^eTo


rjj

Kai irip

coimtry was the Greek, but

Keltic in-

iroWas pev 8Uas iv

SiaKeKTm ravTrj Koi i<fi


irepci}Ta>v.

habitants retained their original language,


at least as late as the time of Saint Je-

\eyopevas aKOVOiV^ TroXXa Se Kai avTov

hyd. 177
8o6itrras

'Exeli/or

yap

(6

^mxr^ios)' crrixovs
iroTe

rome,

who
5. 9,

states that it

was

essentially

nvas

Srjdeu

PapvXio

iraTplms

the same as that of the Treviri.


1,

\Polyh.

pripaaiv

ai/ac^epet

rovs dva<^avbov irpoXeyovTAs orav avToi


Nd/ioy

6,

35, 4.

Pans. 10, 19, 4 seq.

T&re Papaiovs
rrjs

tt]V rv^rjv aflroXeii/^etv,

Hiermi. VII, 357 A.]

TTarpiov </)<Bi^r (irCKadavrai.


fiv

261

The few Keltic words which occur


later

in
re-

dpxaloi

TtavTa pkv

to.

onaaovv npaTTopei/a
Ka\ rais aXXais
prjpaa-iv

and Byzantine authors must be

irapa. rois eirdp^ois,

Ta\a 8e

rav
o5
Trji

garded as having been introduced chiefly

dpx^v, Tois 'ItoXSk


Ttapa^aSevTOS,

eK<j>tt)vrj<T6ai

through the medium of the Latin, inas-

o)S e'prjrai

{ov yap nXXws), to

much
its

as the stay of the Kelts in Greece

eXaTTOxreas itpov^aive.
Ka0v
01

220 Hdvres pen


rav dp\av

dvefforj-

was too short to exert any influence upon


language.
(See
/Spaxnt,

irapa

ttj

ttote TTparrj

ymaos or yaiaa,
oviprpayos,

6ovvTes Tois Tpe\ov(n (Txpiviois


waiSeias, ttepX 8e t^v Piopalav

....
(jjcavriv

ef\apirov

KaffaKXrjs,

KaproKapos,

Kaprapepa,

to jrXeov

eX^iv ianouba^ov

;(/}eta)8i;j

yap

riv

avTois Kara

The Latin element.


was the
empire.
Latin,
official

The Latin

TdvayKolov.

Compare Arr.

Per. Eux. 43. 52.

language of the

Roman
in

Philostr. 221.]
It

The judge must be addressed


Rome, but

may

be remarked here that the exfj

and judgment must be pronounced


also in all
it

pression both languages {Uaripa

yXao-aa,

in Latin, not only in

utraque

lingua),

without

any adjuncts,

the conquered countries.

Greece, after

was used by Romans and Greeks in the


sense of Greek
5.

was reduced to a

Roman

province, formed

and

Latin.

[Hor. Od.
I,

3, 8,

no exception to this rule.


address a

Greek could

Sueton. Aug. S9.


Tertull. II,

Pto.
158 B.

491 E.

Gell.

Roman

magistrate only through

17, 5.
3,
1.

Dion
589 T^v

C.

69,

an interpreter.

public

officer

unac-

Compare

Philostr.

iripav

quainted with Latin, however well qualified

yXmcirav, referring to the Latin.]

Digitized

by Microsoft

; ;

11 r

26

INTKODUCTION.
Constantine's yemaoular language was

masters.

the Latin.

The language of his attendofficers,

tine periods, a

During the Roman and Byzannumber of Latin words and

ants and military

and

also of the

idioms crept into the language of Greece

Ebman

noble families

who

followed

him

to

Byzantium, was the Latin.

In short, the

Latin was the court language, which privilege it

must be remembered that the educated always regarded them as barbarisms. As to the Greeks of Sicily and Italy, they
but
it

continued to enjoy some time after


It

began to use the Latin tongue in the


part of the

early

the death of that emperor.

was now

Roman

period.

\Liv. 40, 42

taught pubUcly

in the

new

capital,

and

it

Cumanis eo anno petentibus permissum ut


publice Latine loquerentur, et praeconibus

would seem that a Greek


tion

of liberal educa-

was expected
it.

to be

more or
Si/nes.

less ac-

Latine vendendi jus esset.


8e
irepi
ttjv

Lyd. 262 Ta
nairra
t^ii

quainted with
Soz.

[Zos. 97.

1428

C.

'Eiipanrqv

irpaTTOfJieva
e'f

937 A.

TheopLU.
Athan.
I,

Codin. 20.

Greg.

dpxaioTTiTa 8ie(f)v\a^ei>
airrjs otKijTopat, nai

dvayKrjs 8ia to

tow

Th. 1065 B.

784 C.

Macar.

wep "EXXi/koj ck tov wXci(jideyyetrBai


(poiv^,

04

C.

Socr.

649

C.
6.]

ApopUli. 89 A.

ovos ovTas^
Kai

Tji

Tav 'iTaAwi/

Just. Imper.

Novell.

fiAXicTTa Toiis Sr/pocriivovTas.

Here Ev -

In the reign of Justinian the Latin be-

panri means
It

Sicily

and

Italy.]
it

gan to disappear from the East, and cons.equently


it

may

be stated in this place that

was found necessary to trans-

late the laws of the empire into Greek.

uncommon assume Roman names


was not an
Srjs,

thing for Greeks tu


;

as AiXios 'Apun-fi-

After the

close

of the sixth centiu-y

it

Aelias Aristides

iXa^tos ^iXotrrparos.

retreated from Greek ground.

Even the
set-

[Philostr. 407.

Sueton. Claud. 25.]


in the

descendants of the

Romans who had

The Latinisms

Greek language
First,

tled within the Byzantine

emperor's do-

may

be divided into fpur classes.

main adopted the Greek.


of
it

The knowledge
scholars.

Latin words with Greek terminations and


accents
;

was now confined to a few

as, dSiovrap,

dbinav, aKneirrov,

fiap-

In the tenth century the only remnants of


the language of

^dros, ^^\ov, /SouXXa, ypaSos, SiKTarap, Bo/ie(TTtKOSt 6oV^, ^blKTOV, IvdlKTlOtV,

Eome were

certain sen;

KcXKo, KeVTVpttiJV

tences chanted on stated occasions

and

or KevTovpiav, Krjvaos, Kov^iKovXApios, Kov(rrmSi'a,

when Petrus was bishop

of Antioch (in the

oo'ttItiov,

TrpatTapiov, wpalipeKTos.

eleventh century) no person could be found


in that city capable of translating Latin
into

Second, Latin words slightly modified


as ay(TTa or dyiara or
dvTiKrjva-ap
&K(Ta-a,
aKKivn^o-ios,

Greek.

[Antec. 3,

7, 3.

Justinian.

or

dvTtKrjva-ayp,

/Sepya,

Kep^iKcipiov,

Novell. 13, Prooem. 146,


fin.

1.

Blastar. Praef.
Cer. 369, badly
Const.
If,

XevTiov, <Tr]piKivdiov.

Porph. Them. 13.


Luitprand.
Petr. Ant.

Third, Latin formative endings append-

written.

365.

Ill,

ed to Greek roots
Kapios,

as dvayXvcfmptos,

dirodtjj3a:

1017 A. D.
fore,

813 C]
is

therefor

dTroaratridpLos,

dpxie^bopahapios,

a word of Latin origin

found

o-Toyapios, Sivrepaptos, Sox^idpios, ivToXiKapios

the

first

time in a Greek author

who

wi-ote

aWayaToip

dp^ovroirovKos, avdfvronovXos, Vako/itjtojtovXoe


: :

during or after the second epoch of the

/3pt);Xo7rouXos,

^orjdovpa,

kXei-

Byzantine period, we
that
it

may

safely

assume

o-oCpa

TTfTpovXa, iroprovXa
:

d/jLVySaXdros, ye-

was introduced before the comof that epoch, unless the con-

pdros. povoTOKaTos

KcipdXrjnaiv.
;

mencement
trary
is

Fourth, Latin idioms


iSelv,

as To

Uamv

Xa-

satisfactorily shown.

satis accipere.

To Uavov

noif/trat, satis

The language
usually more

of a conquered people

is

facere, or satinfacere.

or less affected

by that of their
Digitized

With regard

to the

manner

in

which

by Microsoft

THE FOKEIGN ELEMENTS OF THE GEEEK LANGUAGE.


the

27
428.

Eomans wrote Greek words, we must


to both these languages (as iym, eg o
Trarrip,

pos, EpicArtts.

[Terent.

M.

429.

distinguish between words originally com-

Priscian.

mon
TV,

YI

YI
the
I

1,

36.]

"ApjTumi,

Harpyiae.

fu,

pater,
ovis
, ,

iidnip,

mater,

mFov,
,

AI (long A) and HI were introduced

when

ovum,
a
h
,

Sfjs,

Foivos,

vinum

ano,

had ceased

to be

sounded; con-

imo,

sub

imip,

super), and such

as

sequently they were represented by

were adopted from the Greek during the

long and

long respectively

QpaiKes,

Roman period
sumed a
(as Skottov,
npoBviiia,

that

is,

after they

had

as-

Thraces, epi/i^, Threx, epfjura-a, Thressa.

definite

form on Greek ground


ayyeXos,

OI becomes

OE

in comoedus, comoedia, tra-

acopum,

ang elus

goedus, tragoedia, from KapmSSs, KapmSia,


rpaymidot,
rpayaiSia,

prothymia).

which shows that

A E

is

E short H E long O short


I

represented by
;

'AvaKpeav, Anacreon.

these words were introduced

when the

imdrjKr), epitheca.

was

audible.

It

becomes

long in ode,

Srrja-ixopos, Stesichorus.

odeum, from

diS^, mbelov.

'iKiov, Ilion.
;

The smooth
Orchomerms.

breathing has no appro-

'Opxop.ev6s,

priate sign in Latin.

[Donatus
is

1, 5,

3.]

Y was

originally represented
'Ap.(f>iTpia>v,

by the vowel
Kipj),

The rough breathing

represented by
"YXas, Hylas.

Amphitruo,

Cumae,
B

H
is

as 'Oprjpos,

Homerus,

Kufuvov,

cuminum, ^piyes, Bruges, Hippos,

represented by
;

Burrus.

The educated Romans,


its

affect-

VG
cus.

BaKx"^- Bacchus.

Vrjpvovris,

Geryones, VXaunos, Olau-

ing to be charmed with

pretty sound,

adopted

it,

in
;

Greek words, about the


as
EipvSUr],

T nasal

N.

It occurs only before the

age of Cicero

Eurydice,

palatals r, K, X,
(Tvyypa<\>T),

(that

is,

X2

or K2)

Kvpos, Cynis, inopvtjpa,

hypomnewa ; the
Orator

syngrapha,

cyKavcrTos, encaustus,

Latin
of

being one of the ancient forms

'Ayxi(Tr)s,

Anchises, S(^iy|, Sphinx.

the

Greek

Y.

[Cic.

48.

AD

ArjpoaSevTjs,
first

Demosthenes.

Quintil. 12, 10, 27.

Velius

Longus 2215.
1, 8.

Z was at

represented by SS, after

Agnaeus Comutus 2286.


9.

Priscian.

the analogy of the Tarentine dialect


as
KporaXi'fo),

49.]

crotalisso,

paKaKi^o),

mala-

Oeta.

long

Kavos, cdnus.

cisso,

nvTiCa, pytisso.
it

Afterwards the
in

AI and 01 are represented by


respectively
;

AE

and

OE
re-

Romans adopted
[Quintil. 1 2, 1 0, 2 7.

Greek words.

AiVxu^os, Aeschylus,

Oi'nj,

Velius

Longus 2216.
Diomed. 422,

Sometimes these diphthongs

Agnaeus Comutus 2286.


32.

tain their
in

Greek form before a vowel,


I
;

Priscian.
;

1,

49.]

which case the

has the power of


as Aias, Aiax, Maia,
[Friscian. 53.]

a double consonant

e K

TH C
;

QovKvb'ihrjs,

Thucydides.

KdoToip, Castor, kSivos, conus, Kr]-

Maia,

Tpoia, Troia.

<l>ia(r6s,

Cephissus,

Kipxr],

Circe,

dihKvav,

AY and EY

AU

and

EU

respectively

halcyon.

AiTop.eSwv,
parras,

Automedon,

'Ayavri,

Agaue, Ei-

Eurotas, EuuvSpos, Euander.

EI

priv,

I long,

and sometimes

long

2ei-

Siren, M^Sem, Medea.

Compare the
and the
[Friscian.

later Bceotic ai-cXra for dreXeia,

later Doric N^Xos for NeiXor.


1,

L MM NN SX nP p R
A

AvKovpyos, Lycurgus.
;

MripiovT]!,

Meriones.

Na|os, Naxos.
Sfvo(j}Siv,
UiiXtoi',

Xenophon.

Pelion.

ll/jmreur,

Proteus.

At the begin;

32.

OY U

9, 6.]

ning of a word, by
;

RH

prjnap, rhetor.

long

Oipavia,

Urania,

'EttIkov-

In the middle of a word, PP are rep-

Digitized

by Microsoft

28
resented

INTKODUCTION.
by

RRH

a-Kippos,

scirrhus,

As a consonant,
the

it

is

equivalent to
is

Uvppos, Pyrrhus.

According to Varro,

Greek av
called

or

digamma, and
Dionysius

at the beginning of a

word should be
[Agnaeus

sometimes

vau.

of

written without the H, the aspiration

Halicamassus regards OY as the


representative of
Valerius,

later
;

being

left to

pronunciation.

the digamma
Fulvius,
Servilius,

(F)

as

Cornutus 2286.

Priscian. 1, 24.]

OvdKepios,
^epovios,

*oi;Xouoy>

T * PH X CH
T
;

2(BKpdT)/s, Socrates.

Servius,

SepoviKios,

TpiVmc, Triton.
;

Verus,

Ovrjpos,

which in

earlier

Greek

*ius, Phineus.
Xi'os,

would be
FiXtos,

FaXepior, *ouXFios, SepWios, 2ep-

Chios.

Fijpos.
1,

[Varro et Didpm. apud


Dion. H.
It is
I,

at the beginning of a word,


p.a,6r),

by PS

"ira-

Prise.

20.

52,

9,

Quintil.

Psamathe.

In the middle of a

12, 10, 29.]

represented also by

word, by PS, and sometimes by


a^is, apsis or ahsis.

BS

as Livius, Ai^ws, Livia, Ai^ia, Varro,

Bdppav, Verus, B^pos, Valerius, BaXepios.

Latin words in Greek letters


iirst

made

their

The combinations AV,


resented also by
tively
;

EV
EY

are rep-

appearance about the middle of the

AY

AB,

EB, respecOctavius,

second century before Christ.

as

Octavia, 'OKravia,

A
E

is

represented by

Agrippa, 'Ayphr-

'Oktovws, Plavius, ^Xaovios, *Xauior, *Xd/3iOs,

nas.

Severus, Seovrjpos, 2cvfjpos,

Sefirjpos.

short

E
;

Decius, Aexior, acceptum, &<

The combination
OOY, OB,

OV

is

expressed by
;

KeTTTQV.

less correctly

by OY

as Novavovefx-

long

Aurelius, AupijXtoj, secretum,


SeKirjs,

tus,

NoouoTof, No^Stos, novemhris,

(rriKpriTov,

decies,

edictum,

tj&iktov.

^picov {Inscr.

1732).

In the decline of the language,

when

AE AI;
lis,

Caesar, Kala-ap.

Theophilus An-

long could not be distinguished in

tecessor writes aiSl\is, roxn-eXae, for aeditutelae.

pronunciation from
resented also by

E
;

short, it

was rep-

When

it

ceased to be

disit

as legdtus, Xeyaros,

tinguished, in pronunciation, from E,

secretum, a-eKperov, edictum, t&iKTov.


I

was represented also by


praecocia.

E, as

wpe/cdicui,

Prisons, Upla-Kos, Julius, 'louXios.


;

O long Q
short
titvus,

Commodus,

Kop.p.o&os.

AU AY

Antonius, 'Avrmwos, ConstanCUStodia,


KovorcoSla.

KavaTavTivos,

OE Cloelia, KXotXia. 01 B B Balhus, BdX/3os, harbatus,


;
;

Augustus, ACyoworos.

In the decline of the language,

when
by

|3ap/3arof.

Cicero, KiKepav, Cato, Kdraiv.

It

long could no longer be distinguished

corresponds in form and relative position (in the alphabet) to the Greek r

from Oj as

short,

it

was represented

also

religidsus, peXiylocos for pc\tyia><ros.

(anciently written also C)

but

for a

is

both a vowel and a consonant.


votoel, it
is

As

long time

it

had two sounds, namely r

represented by Y, or

OY

and

K.

The character

(a modification

Lusitania, hva-iravia, Sulla, SuXXas, Tulliics,

of C) was,

in later times,

introduced

TuXXioi, Lucius, Aovkws, ususfructus,

as the representative

of the sound r.

oia-oi(f>povKTos.

In this

case,

the Greek

C then
to C.
it

retained only the sound K, a

OY corresponds
that
is,

to the later Boeotic

OY

soimd which did not originally belong


In the names Caius and Cnaeus
r, for

it is

long or short according as


is

the Latin

long or short.

Thus,

was equivalent to

which reason
not KdVos,

pdlus, TToKovs long OY, ndtus, varovs short

the Greeks wrote


Ki-oiof.

rdVoj, ri-mos,

OY, capitiUUm., KairiTovXavp, short OY.

The new

letter

stands be-

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE FOREIGN ELEMENTS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


tween F and H, the place once occupied
wrote
chises,

29
;

for

before
aggulus.

C
1,

or

as Ag-

by
28.
11.

Z.

[Pltct II,

277 D.

Quintil. 1, 7,

agceps,

[Figid.
39.]

apud

29. 20.

Scaurus 2252.
425, 12.]

Diomed. 423,

Gell. 19, 14.

Priscian.

P
given- to

The sounds now


Italians

C by
after

the

n Q
Tos.

Pompeius,

llop.in)ios.

K.

The combination

QV
;

is

repre-

and the Germans, in the comCE, CI, appeared


the

sented by KOY, KY, or


Kov'ipivos,

KO

Quirinus,

binations

Quintius, Kvivrios, 'Quintus, KdiV-

Justinian age.

The mediaeval Greeks


TZ.

Frequently

QVI becomes KY

as

represented
Tfaio-ap.

them by

See

TfjjStra,

Quirinus, Kvptvos, Aquila, 'AxuXas.


ginally
it

Ori-

CH X D A F *
bet
it

was equivalent to
it

CV

(KW).

Chacchus, TpaKxos.
Decius, Ackios.
Felix, *^Xt|, Festus, *ijoTor.

Afterwards

was confounded with C


its

(K);
In

and in order to preserve


the weak consonant V.

an-

cient pronunciation, the

Romans appendSo that

form and relative position in the alphacorresponds to the Greek


in power.

ed to

it

FaC

or

QV represents the
denoted by
Velius

sound which once was


[Quiiitil. 1, 4, 9.

Digamma, but not


to Quintilian
tal sound.
it

According

alone.

had a disagreeable den*, says

Longus 2218.

2231.

Terent.

As compared with
it is

M.

719.
1,

Diomed. 422, 19.


14.
15.]

425, 18.

Terentianus Maurus,
bes.

knis atque heit is

Priscian.

Priscian remarks that


to
*,

equivis

RP
S

alent

except that the latter


lips.

uttered with compressed


12, 10,

\Qv,intil.

2 T

Roma,

Vaiirj.

Sergiv^, Sepywc.
Titus,
Tiros.

The combination
Byzantine TZI.

29

(1, 4, 14).

Terent.

M. 8441,

TI before a vowel,
was pronounced
See BoKePT^ia,

in the sixth century,

847.
14.J

Diomed. 424, 17.

Priscian.

like the

Bever^ia,

Aopcvr^ia, Aofiev-

G r Granianv^, Tpaviavos. H the rough breathing Hwatius,


;

Tf/oXos.

\Isid.
Seactus,

Hisp.
Se'lror.

1,

26, 28.]

'Opd-

XS
sents

is

one of the

TtOS.

earlier
;

forms of S.
or GS.

In Latin

K.

repre-

Kalendae, KoKavbaL

It

was not

OS

[Maxim.
Priscian.
it

Victorin. 18.
1,

much used by
employed at
all,

the
it

Romans.

When

Diomed. 422, 30.

14. 15.]

was followed by

A
its

With

regard to accent,

should be obis

thus, Eaeso, Kalendae, Karthago, Kato,


karissime, kalwnnia, Icanna, kaput, kave,
kareo, hxptus, khao, kassus, klaudus, kalleo,

served that,

when a Latin word

Grecized,

accentuation usually foUows the analogy


;

of the Greek

as Trajdnus, Tpaiavos,

Au-

kausatus, klam.

\Quintil. 1, 7, 10.

gustus, AvyovoTos, Cicero, Kixepcov, secrUum,


trrjKprjTov,

Scaurus 2252.
2218.
Gell.
1,

2253.
18,
3.

Velius

Longus

like SupStanrfi, i^aKovaros, 'Ax^pov,

9.

Termt. M. 797.

appriTov.

But when
it

it

is

merely given as
its

Bmmtus
1,

2,

Max.

Victorin.

18.

a Latin word,
accent
cies,
;

should retain

Latin
de-

Arusianus Messius
14.
)

(ed. Lind.).

Priscian.

as, carere, Kapfjpe, ferire,

<pep~ipe,

47.]
I/wcviiS, AovKios.

8K)r,

aedilis,

atfiiXt;,

tutila, tout^Xo,
Koi/Seoi.

A MM NN
L

c6hors, Koops, coMheo, Kot^eo or

Fur-

Marius, Mdpios.
Nero, 'Hipav,

ther,
Novfias.
it

when OY stands
to

for the consonant V,

Numa,

should be regarded as a consonant in


accentuation.
Livius,

nasal

or

Cincius, Kiyxjos, IniiiavKmiiTlcDv.

respect
T^epovas

Thus,
Aiovios

Nerva,
(aI^ws),

gauni, 'lyyavvoi, emancipatio,

(Np/3ar),

According to Varro, the early Romans

Servitis, Sepovios (Sep^ios).

If the

Digamma

Digitized

by Microsoft

30

INTRODUCTION.
in use during the

had been

Roman

period,
Nt'/j-

yovva, bpovyyos, 'uraKO, 'utko, KOvpKOvpov, KovKovpov, pMvvTos, iiovvtCo OT pLOV^a, vdKKo, novyyiv, povxov, <TKov<pm, r^ayyiov, <f>ap&vs.)

these words would have been written


Fas, AtFiof, SfpFiOS.

We

subjoin here a specimen of the Greek

The Hunnic element.


longed to the same family.

The

mode of writing Latin words during the

Hunns, Avars, Turks, and Bulgarians be-

Roman

period

The

first

three

Ovfidva)

KWirm

xepoviKfii iriKTOp iKOvlva/i


7rXoi!/ias,

of these appellations are sometimes con-

'lovyyepe at oveXiT, eV ovapias ivSovKcpe


OilvSiKove

foimded by the Byzantines.

The Sunns

KoKKdns fiXfi^pK, our rovpiriTep


it'uTKefi,

h-povji,

appeared in Europe in the latter part of


the fourth century.
fifth,

Arja-ivar Iv

p.au\ip ^opjiaxra a-ovnfpvri,

In the middle of the

^TreKTaTovp, dS/oiiWi pla-ovp.


KpiyStTe, Ui(T0)vrjs,
I'ffTi

reveans

ap,iKi

they overran Thrace.

About a hunas.

rd^ovXai (pope Xlfipovp.


irop-via,

dred years later they proceeded as far


Greece.

HeptrijuXep, koviovs, oucXout a'iypi

ovavai

In the early part of the seventh

^lyykvTovp (meKtr]!, out kck

irrjs,

veK KanovT oiVj

century we find them before the walls of


Constantinople, in

PeSBarovp

(popjuii.

conjunction with the


Prise.

The Teutonic element.


tribes of the

The Avars.
141.

[Eunap. 75 (A. D. 374).


Simoc. 38 seq.

Goths, Vandals, and Gepidse were different

Porph. Adm. 123.

same

race.

The Goths made


In the latter

Theoph. 186 (A. D. 466).


Affath. 301 (A. D. 558).]

485 (A. D.

617).

their

first

appearance in Greece in the

middle of the third century.

According to Theophylactus Simocates,


the

part of the fourth, they overran Thrace,

name "A/Sapot was given


C.

also to the in-

Macedonia, and Thessaly


ric

and under Ala-

habitants of Pannonia.

[Simoc. 283. 284.

they devastated Megaris and Pelopon-

Mc.

P. Hist. 38, 19.]

Porphyrogenitus

nesus.
find

In the latter half of the


in lUyria-

fifth,

we
of

speaks of certain Slavic tribes that were

them

The Vandals under


greater

caUed 'A^apoi.

[Porph.

Adm.

126.

141.]

Genseric plundered the

part

The Turks
tury.

sent ambassadors to Constan-

Greece in the
are

fifth

century.

The Gepidce
with
the

tinople in the latter half of the sixth cen-

mentioned in

connection

In the time of Porphyrogenitus, the


called
it

Avars,

who made an attempt upon Con- country now


[Froc.
I,

Hungary was

called

stantinople in the early part of the sev-

Turkey, because [Men. P. 295.

was inhabited by Turks.


Porph.

enth century.

312.

335 (A. D.
252.

Theoph. 378 (485).

429 - 477).
253

Zos.

28 (A. D. 253).

(A. D. 396).

Eunap. 51

(A. D. 376).

Adm. 81. 141. 168. 177. Zonar. 16, 12.] The Bulgarians first became known to the
Byzantines in the latter part of the
century.
fifth

77 (A. D. 378).

79 (A. D. 380).

Prise.

160

(A. D. 467).

Theoph. 485 (A. D. 617).]

Conjointly with the Avars they

The Goths, Vandals, and Gepidae made


no permanent settlement in Greece, and
therefore their language

attacked Constantinople in the reign of


Heraclius.
later

And

one or two generations

had no

effect

upon
of

they crossed the Danube and invaded

the Greek.

As

to the small

number

Thrace.

In the eighth century they were

words of Teutonic origin occurring in Byzantine


writers,
it

converted to Christianity.

The Bulgarians

may

be

a question

of the present day speak a Slavic dialect^

whether they were not taken directly from


the Latin.

which circumstance

is

the origin of the

Those found in modern Greek

current opinion that they are of Sclavonic


descent.
3.

most probably came from the German.


(See dpaSa, ^dvSov, jSepfSor or
/So'pdo)!-

[Theoph. 222.

544.

Zonar. 14,

/SepatSos, ^oiixKa,
\

Genes. 85, 22.

Pisid. B. A. 197. 409.

or ^ovpSav, ^ovTTis, yepdveos, yov\a,

Porph. Them. 46.

Theoph. Cord. 342.1

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE FOEEIGN ELEMENTS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


The Byzantine authors have preserved
a few Hunnic words (see &6xia,
/liSos,

31

vvfios

TO aKrjTTTpa

ttjs

t&v

Pat/iaiav Siflirev apxrjs.

mx)-

Q<TTC Tiva twv eK IlcXoTrovvrjaov /leya tfipovoivra

As to the Turkish words belonging to the popular Romaic, most of them were introduced after the
fall

em

Trj

avrou eiyeveia, Iva


cKe'ivov

/ir)

Xcyoi SytTyevfla,
ypap.fuiTiKoi^

'Eitfirip.iov

t6v

irepi|36?)Tov

of Constantinople.

ajToaKta'^at ets avTov tovtoi to BpvKovpevop lap.all

The Slavic element.

Of

^elov, rapaa-Soei&fis

oi|f is ifrffka^ajiivr).

'Hi/ 8c

the barbarians that overran Greece previously to the ninth century, the Slavs

ovTos

NtKijTas

KijSeucrar
v'lov

cVl

BvyarpX

^o<pia

Xpt(rTO(ji6pov

TOV

TOV KoKov Papavov koL

alone

are represented

by the Byzantine
to

dyaBov ^ao-tXeas.]

historians as having permanently settled


in Greece.

mizer of Strabo,

The anonymous epitowho must have lived af-

They began

come in con-

ter the eighth century, says,

"And now

tact with the

Greeks in the early part of the Slavic Scythians occupy nearly the

the sixth century, and for nearly two hun-

whole of Epirus, Hellas, Peloponnesus, and


Macedonia."

dred years they, conjointly with other barbarians, did little else
ria,

And
;

again,

" But

now the
in-

than devastate Hly[Proc. II,

names Pisatae and Caucones and Pylians


are not used
for

Thrace, and Greece,

397
P.

aU these regions are

(A. D. 547).

449 (A. D. 550).


Mai. 490.

Mm.

habited by Scythians";

Scythians, in the

327.

404

(A. D. 576).

Thecph.

Byzantine writers, meaning Northern Barbarians.


[Strab.

360 (A. D. 551).


(A.

532 (A. D. 656).

559

Chrestomath.

Ill, p.

507

D. 683).]

Soon

after

the

terrible

Kal

iniv

8e Ttairav 'Hrretpow (cm 'EXXa8a trx^Sov

plague (which in the middle of the eighth

Kal JleT^oirovi/Tjaov xal MaKeSovlav ^kvBol SkXq/3oi vip,ovTai.

century visited Southern Italy, Sicily, and


Greece), the Slavs established themselves
as settlers in the depopulated provinces of

519 Nuv
Kal

8e oihk ovopa itrn Hi-

(TaTotv

Kai

KavKavav

UvXiav

airavTa

yap

TovTa

'2<i6ai. vipovTai.

In the

first

of these
gloss.]

continental

and peninsular Greece.

Ac-

passages, SKkd^a

seems to be a

cording to Porphyrogenitus, aU the rural


districts of

But although they did not enter Greece

Greece were occupied by Slavs, as conquerors, they disdained to consider when Constantine Copronymus was em- themselves as subjects of the Byzantine They enjoyed their national inperor. [Theoph. 707 (A. D. 775). 651 (A. emperor.
D.

738)

Tffl

8'

aura

eret

'KoiiiaSrjs

Bavaros

dependence, and were a source of trouble


to

diro 2i,Ke\las Koi

KaKa^pias dp^afievos, oiov

the

government

at

Constantinople.

Trip iiiive fMfievov cttI Trpi Movo/Sao'tuv Kaj*'EX-

[Theoph. 663 (A. D. 750). 707 (A. D. 775).

XaSa Koi Tos TtapaKeijievas


Trjs

vritrovs r/KBev 8i

oXtjs

Porph. Cer. 634, 11.

Adm. 217

(A. D.

802

lA' IvSmnSivos-

652 'H

8e ainri Xoi^tK^

-811).

221 (A. D. 829 - 867).]

In the

voaos Tov ^ov^ati/os dvebpap.iv r^ TrevreKaideKar^


ciriveiiritrei

ninth century, the emperor Basilius, according to his son Leo the Philosopher,

iv

rfj

jSacriXidi wdXet.
oiis

N^ic.

P.

Histor. 70, 11 Kaff


fiTf(j)vcTO

ronovs to (^doponoiov

succeeded in thoroughly subjugating, Romanizing, Christianizing, and Grecizing the


Slavs in his dominion.

nados, Stnav avBpimtov ytvos iwive/ioAieaa>6r}


o)S

fxevov Sii\vi re K.a\ apSr/v i^tftavi^e.


S"

Their

soldiers, be-

av Tis 6ela ndvTios ffovKr/aei, oaris

wop-

ing trained
tactics,

after

the

Roman system
own
princes,

of

poyrara Tovrtov rav ^o>pui/ aireopai


Se TO Trjs (fiSopas /ioXicrra
irept

ETreTeivero

were of essential service to the


Their
of

to Bv^avTiov.
'Eo-flXa-

GrEeco-Romans.
cotu'se,

Porph. Them. 53 (A. D. 741


^adri 8e irao-a
f/

- 775)

had

lost their

power over them.


8e

x^P-

*''

ye7<"'

^ap^apos, ore
Trjv

[Leo Tactic.
Wiiri

18,

100 Kal to 2(cXa0a

6 XoiiiiKos BdvaTos Tratrav e^oaxero


fievriv,

oikou-

ofioSiaiTCi tc

rjaav Kai oporpoTta dXXijXojj

mrrivUa Kavtrrairrlvos 6 t^s Koirpias eira-

Kal

i\ev6pa, pTjSapSii SovXovaSai

apxeuBai

Digitized

by Microsoft

32
ireidofieva, Kal /loXtcrra orf irepau

INTRODUCTION.
tov Aavov^iov
""' ^'^"vaa

an arrogant and refractory people. have no respect


for

"

They

KoraKovv 4v
7repait>6evTa

rfj

tSia X'^P"'

"O^f

masters," says the

koI oiovei ^laaBevra

Si^aadac rqv
aX-

" Book of the Conquest of the Morea by

SovKeiav ov^ eripa

rjdeas Treldeaoai rjacKov^

the Franks."

And from
last to

Porphyrogenitus

Xa

rpoTTov

nva eavrav
rfjs

KpeiTTOv yap rfyovvro


(pvKijs <j)6eipe(r6at,

we
yot

learn that the 'EiepiTot and the MiXijy-

OTTO TOV
3)

ap^ovTOS
PiopatKois

eavrmp

were the

submit to the Con[Conquest.

Tols

SovXevciv

Kal

{moKKive(r6m
tov

stantinopolitan

government.

vofiois.

Oi hk

roil

(ranripiov /SaTrrtV/iaror

1666 "On

6 fvyos rav MeXiyymi/ evi

yap Bpoy-

((j>a>na-ii6v 1)

Karade^dficvoi axpi t&v rjiifT^pav

yos p.fyas, for the ridge of Milengi is


district.

large
rai/

Xpovav, TovTO oirov Kar aiiTois tls dpxaias XeuBepias avvr]6eiav biarqpoivrm.

3205
tov

T<3j

dpxty&v

cfifjiwirav

The text

IS

McXtyywi'

dpoyyov,

^= tov dpoyyov rwv

corrupt here.
KaTTjp

18,

102 Tavra oSv

6 fiptirepon

MeXiyymv.

386 'Ek

tov (vyov tov MeXiyymi/

Kai Vap.aia>v

avTOKparap BatriXetor rav


CTTCicrf

^\eav Td neCiKd tovs.

1671.

1713.

3279.
6px>i<as

apxaiav edvav [read iOavj


Kal

/iCTaiTTrivai,

3262
tIjs

Etr TOV Spoyyov yap toC MeXtyoC

ypaiKoxras

Kal apxovtri Kara tov


fia7rTi<riiaTi,

PapMKOP
tjjs

T^aKcovias.j

TUTTOK

vnoTa^as Kal

Ti.p.rja-as,

8e
Kal

According to an anonymous writer of


the fourteenth century, Peloponnesus was
at that time inhabited
lation,

fiouXftay rjXevBepciiae

t&v eavrav dpxovTav


Pcu^ai'oi;

orpaTevecrBai

Kara tS>v

TToXe/ioiJiTO)!'

by a mongrel popu-

idvav e^7ral8evaV ovra ncos iirtfieXms


ToiaitTa
8LaKelfifos.

itepl

Ta

the principal elements being Lace-

A(6

Kal

dfiepifivovs

Po)-

dsemonians, Italians, Peloponnesians, Slavs,


lUyrians,
Ill,
cive,
Siv

p.alovs K Tris

TToWaKis

diro SKXd^cai/ yevofievrjs

Egyptians,

and Jews.
i)S Kal

[Moiss.

dvTapo-ias enoirjae^
Kal Trokefiovs toIs

noWas

im* eKelvav dx^rjo'eis

174

'Ec IIe\o7rovvTi(T(a,

avTos otdaf,
Tra/iiroXXa,

ndXai xpdvois vno/ieivavras.^


to the Slavs of Peloponne-

oUel dvafil^ y^'^ TroXiTevofieva

With regard
sus,

TOV x^P^^P^v evpelv vvv ovre pahiov, ovre

Porphyrogenitus informs us that those


slopes

KarcTretyov.

de rais aKoais ireptTJX^lTaL, as

who occupied the

of the

Penta-

Trdai

S^Xa Kal

Kopvcl>aia,

Tvyxdvei TavTa

Aaice-

daotylus (the mediaeval

name

of the Tay-

Saifiovioi, 'ItoKoI, IIc\o7rovvri(noi,, SdXajSivot, 'IXXu/Jiot,

getus) were called 'Effpirat and MtXijyyoi.

AlyviTTWi,

Koi 'lovSaloi, ovk oXi'yot 8e

The word
p6v,

'E^cplrai

means

natives of 'Eft-

fie(rov

tovtwv Kal imo^XifuiLoi

ofiov

ra TotavTa

the mediaeval

name

of 'EXos;
lake,

i'^^po

kirapiBiioviifva
8,

Iwrd (a poor imitation of Her.

(neuter) in Slavic
this

meaning

and

in

73

Oiice'ei

8e t^v neXoirdvi/i/croi' ?0vea iirrd).

case

applying to the lake or marsh

The Md^apts

of this

unknown author seems

(fXor) in the vicinity of the ancient "eXoi.

to be an imaginary person, suggested per-

As

to MiKriyyoi,

it

is

analogous to the anis, it

haps by Plato's r.]

By

Lacedcemonians

cient

word Afomvot, that

applies both

to the place
it.

and to the people inhabiting

and Peloponnesians he must mean the MaviuTcs and McapniTes of the modems. His
Illyrlans are our 'hp^avms.
AiyuTTTtot,
<^roi,

In the " Book of the Conquest of the


this place is called

As

to his

Morea by the Franks,"

they are most probably the r-

MfXtyyoi or MeXtyoi, or in the singular MeXiyyor or MeXryov.

Gypsies, of the present day,

who

are

The same book uses


and

currently believed in the Levant to be of

also TO SKXa/SiKo, the Slavic settlements,


TcSi/

Egyptian
sies

origin,
first

perhaps because the Gyp-

2KKafiv 6 Spdyyos, the district of the

that

appeared

among

the Greeks

Slavs,
conia.

with reference to the Slavs of La-

came from Egypt.

It is possible,

howbe

The neuter

to MtKiydv occurs once

ever, that this writer's

Egyptians

may

in Phrantzes,

an author of the

fifteenth

the descendants of the Saracens and the


Africans, who, conjointly with the Slavs,

century.

These Slavs are represented as

Digitized

by Microsoft

THE FOEEIGN ELEMENTS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE.


were plundering the Greeks of Peloponnesus in the early part of the ninth century, as Porphyrogenitus informs us.

33

entered Greece, in the eighth centmy, the Greek element was suflioiently strong to

But we

are not

to suppose that the

absorb the Slavic, and to serve as a nucleus for the new race, the progenitors

Greek race was extirpated by the great


plague.

There

is sufficient

historical evi-

The proportion of the Slavs to the Greeks cannot be determined with any degree of
certainty.

of the

modern Greeks.

dence that the Greeks

(ol 'EXXaStKoi)

did

not entirely disappear during the eighth


century.

When

it is

said that the emperor Basili-

Thus,

Saint

Nicephorus

the

us Romanized, Christianized, and Grecized


his Slavic subjects, in the ninth century,

Confessor says that, as Constantinople was

aU but depopulated by the plague,

it

be-

we

are not to suppose that he interdicted

came necessary to replenish

it

with people

the Slavic tongue, and thus forced those

brought from the continental parts of the


empire and from the islands.
Hist.
72.]
[Ific. C.

whose vernacular

it

was to use the Greek.


Slavic,

P.

We

are only to
it

remember that the

And

there

is

no proof that
wfere Slavs.

when

came

in contact with the Greek,

these

new Constantinopolitans

was an unwritten language, an uncultilanguage, and, under ordinary cuincapable


its

Again, Porphyrogenitus teUs us that

when vated

the Slavs of Peloponnesus rebelled against the government, in the reign of Nicephorus,

cumstauces,

of

resisting

the

encroachments of

powerful neighbor,
its

nearly

two

generations

after

the

which, in addition to

fuU development

plague, they plundered the houses of the

and rich

literature,

had the advantage of

Greeks (rmv TpaiKov) in their vicinity.

In
in-

being the language of the emperor and of


the imperial city, of the clergy, of the provincial

another place he
habitants of
Matvri,

observes that the

a fortified town near


;

governors,

military

commanders,

TBenarum, were not Slavs


scended from the earlier

they were de;

judges, lawyers, physicians, schoolmasters,

Romans

and by

merchants, and, above


the Greek Church.

all,

of the ritual of

Romans he means
bors, because
idols

Oreehs.

In his time

The disappearance of
is

they were called "'EWrjves by their neigh-

the Slavic from Greece


singular phenomenon.
itself

by no means a
forced
in-

they continued to worship

The Latin

as late as the reign of his grand-

upon the Daoians, and upon the


;

father BasHius.
Ifrreov ort
ol

[Porph.

Adm. 217

seq.

habitants of Gaul and Iberia


tians

the Egyp-

toO Katrrpov
rtjs

ttjs

Maivrjs oIktito-

and Syrians adopted the language of would seem

pes ovK la\v dno


-S/cXa^coi',

yevcas rav TrpopprjBevTaiv


Pa>p.aici}i/

the Koran, the sacred book of their conquerors,


further,

d\X'

eK rav iraKaiOTepaii'

the
that

Saracens.

It

ot

(cat

/ie^P'

'<'''

^''

Ttop'^

''S"

ivToirlav "EXiv

the

Slavs

began to learn
Basil.

\tjves

irpotrayopevovTaif

dia ro

tols Trpona-

Greek before the time of

Thus, in

Xaiois

^povms

el8(o\o)idTpas etvai kol TTpodKvvT)'

the reig-n of Copronymus (in the eighth


century),

Tas Tav flSaSwv Kara tovs TraKawi/s 'EXKtjvas.


OtTtves eVl Ttjs ^atriXeuis roit doi8lpov 'Baq'iXeiav
.^aTTTiffdevres ILptariavol yeyovaartv-

we

find a Sclavonian

eunuch

fill-

ing the oecumenical see of Constantinople.

*0 8e to-

This dignitary, however, was not remarkable for scholarship, his forte being eat-

nas iv

olKcwtriv cariv

avvSpos Kal dirpop'oSos,


TrapapmBiav
e;)(ou(n.

e\aio(ji6pos Si

odev

/cat rrjv

ing and

drinking,

according

to

Glycas.

Afaxferat Se 6 toiovtos tottos els aKpav rov

Ma-

[Theoph. 680, 7 ^ij^^ tov ^aa-CKeas X"?"ve'iTm tiiKriTas 6

Aea (write
-jrpAs

Taivapov), rjyovv iufWfv tov 'EfepoO

dwo SkXci^cbk

ii'oC;^09

dStapas

7Tapa6aKa(r(Tiav^

TraTpidpxvs

Kava-TavTivoimSKeas.
tis
vvov-j(os

Olye. 527,

It appears, then, that

when the

Slavs

13 Kai TOTC NiK^TOs

Ta irpara

Digitized

by Microsoft

V
INTKODUCTION.

i-

34
0fpo)i'
rj

napa ra Koirpavviia
triveiv

firjSev

aK\o etSas
naTptdpxris.

eadleiv Kal

^fipoTove'irai

GRAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
First Declension.
lines in
1.

OStos noTC t6 evayyeXiov avaywaxTKiov iv ra


xeXAt'co

avTov avri Tov


'E K
'E(j)'

eiTretv

Efc

rov Kara

Mascuanalsin-

Murdalov,
i^e(^iivrja-fV.

tov koto. Marddiov

A2

(circiimflexed)

foUow the

Kai Tis tS>v irapuTTa/ifvaiv

ogy of the Doric declension in the


gular.

elm, Mfj Siaipet


iKeivos
ecjir)

tijv

AI &i(pdayyov.
^Xvapeis
p.uTe1
17

Xlpos ov

In the plural they end in AAES.

fierd

6vfi.ov,

ra yap

di-

Thus,
S.

(j)0oyya Kal

Tpi(pdoyya noXKa

^VXV

!''"'

N. i^^ds
G. a/S^a

P.

N. V. dma^fs
G.

The

full

form of the sentence preceding


if it
is

d^^dhav
{d^^dtn)
d^iSdSat

the Gospel of the day,

found in

D. a|3^a
A. V.
a/S/Sai/

D. A.

Matthew,
yeXtov TO

is

'Ek tov Kara M.aT6aiov &ylov evaySO.

dpdyua>a'[jLa,

ioTi

if

Mark,

a/SjSa

the introductory sentence


MdpKov,

is

'Ek tov kotci


8i(pdoyya

So
6ai,

dp.r]pas,

da-^iaras, drfuTrSs, /SeXoi/as, c\d-

and so

on.

The words

Kara/SXaTTar,

Kepards,

Ke^aXSs,
<TTOjj.aTds.

KO^Xias,

and
this

Tpi(j>6oyya

are used

by the author of
the patriarch's

Kpaods, KTvds, o^vyaKaTcis,

TheopJi.

story in allusion to
eKTer/tij/icKos.]

689, 13 d^^a&av.
dpjjpdhcs.

698, 21

dix.r,pdbas.

699

being

Const.

IV,

869 C

^eKovabes.

An

anecdote preserved by Porphyrogeni-

Porph.
Oont.

Cer.

674,

13 d^^dSas.

Theoph.

tus seems to imply that the Graeoo-Slavs


of Peloponnesus prided themselves
their
lineal

145,

19 KapT^ipabav.

upon

The element AA sometimes occurs even


in the singular of masculines of this class.
Inscr. 3137.

descent

from

the

ancient

Greeks,

because

they spoke

Greek and

3242

tov AtowTo or AiovvTd&os.

went to the Greek Church, although their


features sufficiently

3142, III, 9 ToO MrimSos.


\d8os.
2.

3253

TOV 'AffoX-

showed the predomelement.


p.

3392

Tea ^iXcDvdSi.

inance

of the
53.

Slavic

[Forph.

Proper names in

H2

often form the


of the
fol-

Them.

See above,

31.
it

genitive

by simply dropping the 2

The

Slavic language has left behind


(iSaXra,
/SeSouptov,

nominative.

In the other cases they

a few nouns

^odvos hr

low the common declension.


N.

^oedvos, /SotXafies or fioXiaSer, (aKavov, foujravos),

a number of names of places, and

the diminutive ending -ITZA.

The

Russiaiis,

a branch of the Slavic

family, at the instigation of the Byzantine

emperor, devastated Bulgaria in the early


part of the ninth century.

In the reign

of Basilius the Macedonian, they, together

with
ritual

other

Slavic

tribes,

adopted

the

and the alphabet of Byzantium.


emperor against the
\Cedr. II,

In the latter part of the twelfth century


they
assisted

the

Comani and
802-811).

Blachi.
Glyc.

372 (A. D.
seq.

553.

Anon. 362

Meet. 691 (A. D. 1195-1204).]

GRAMMATICAL OBSEEVATIONS.
Adm.
1

35
oyjfdptov,

70 rhv

'A-fmabij,

tov SaXjuour^ij.

Them.

Bepiyyepios,

Ka^aXKiptos,

become

62 TOV irdna
i.

Faiir/s.

Bepiyyepis, KafiaWdpis, oyjrdpiv, respectively.


is 2.

The accent of the genitive plural

In inscriptions referred to the


centuries
is

first

sometimes found on the penult.


in classical Greek,
XpfifTTtttv.

Thus,

three

of

our

era,

the

ending
Thus,

we have

d<j>viov, irqa-iiov,
I,

AI02

found shortened into AI2.

In Byzantine Greek, Athan.

A.6rjvais,

Eiprjvms, 'Eo-Tiais, for 'A^iji'aior, Elpr)-

656 285

rav TdKkimi, twv 2iraviav.

Mai. 267.
KaToo-iipTwi'.

Kav8rj\av.

Leo Grarnm. 305


267, 24
iraihitrKav.

'Eanaios. If we foUow the analogy of syncopated nouns in 102, we must accent


vaios,
'Adrjvais, Elprjvais, 'EoTiais.
3.

Porph.
5.

Adm.

Sometimes the

classical

ending AI be-

Verbal nouns in

IMON
Thus,

are often in-

comes ES (borrowed from the third declension).

flected after the analogy of neuters in

of

Pallad. Vit. Chrys. 33

yemabes

the third declension.


S.

ioi yewahai.
o-er

Mai. 170

Aii/cmSey.

331

Ilfp1.

N. A. dWa^iftov
G.
aXXa^tjUOV, dXKa^Lp.aTOs
aXXa^i/jo), aXXaJi'/xoTt

as V.

1.

Leo Gramm. 78
iTTTroVes.

'S.kidcs

as v.

Altai. 254, 15

D.
1.

Second Declension.
into 12, IN, respectively.

The
and

P.

N. A. dWa^ifia, aKKa^Lfiara
G.
dWa^ifi(ov, dXKa^ip,ara)V

endings 102, ION are sometimes shortened

The

genitive

D.

dWa^inois, dWa^lfjiain
Se^i/ioi',

vocative of ma,sculines thus syncopated are

See

also

peTacrTdirip.ov,

<T^ip.ov,

each formed by dropping the 2 of the nominative.

<TTei\rip.ov.

Thus,
Neuter.

4.

The N

of the abridged ending IN beas the tenth

Masculine.

gan to be dropped as early


century.
5.

N. Bepiyyepis
G.
BepiyycpL

'loiJXts

N. A. V.
G.

ivopfiiv

See

'ASpavovr^rj, naihi

'louXt
('lowXi)
'loiiXif

ivopp,iov
cvop/xio)

Foreign names in 0Y2 are inflected


:

D. (Bepiyyepi)
A. V.
Bcpiyyipiv
Bepiyyepi

D.

as follows

N.

'I?;o-oOj,

G.

'iriaov,

D.

'iqa-oi,

A.

'irjiTovv,

V.

'lr)(Tov,

in the

New Testament.

'louXt

So

ZaffoOs,

Koo-croCr,

Xprjarovs.
'irjo-ovs,

In
OY

the
is

See

'A/3Xa/3tr, 'AXujrtj, 'Avrmvis, 'A0poSei(ris,

Septuagint the dative of


^iTJtToi,

Joshua,

ArjiiriTpti,

Bepiyyepis, 'EXXoSie, "Evyevis, 'louXis,


Kvpis,

not

^iTJffOV.

KafiaWapis,

Mapis,

TpatKis,

xPP's^'
^atv,

6.

Feminine diminutives
as

in

are de-

Neuters

dva^oXiSiv,

dpjiApiv,

d(Tfip,iv,

clined

follows

N. Mapov,

G. Mapois,
Arjrovv,

^aXriStv, ^avidpiv, ffXarriu, yoyyvXiv, '"EXevSepiv,

A. Mapovv.
'loCv,
7.
Tixa>,

(Compare the Ionic

ivopfuv,

Se/iaTiv,

KoKoyripiT^iv,

KaiTTeXXiv,

for Aryra, 'Im.)

pmivdbiv,

o^apai,

<nra6iv,

^iKfj/idnv,

and a

The ending n
2ajr0(B,

of feminines like Xex^j


also

multitude of others.

was written
See

with the diph^iKvTwi.

When H was no
in pronunciation

longer distinguished
I,

thong

QI.

'ApTep,a)i,

Aiovvo-aii,

from

the endings

12,

[Bekker. 1204.]

IN

were written also


'Aprft/Sovpijr,

H2,

HN.

Thus,
KfWdprjs,
;

Third Declension.
in H2, 12,

1.

Nouns
inflected

App.evrjs,

Ka/3aXXapi)r,

and Y2 are sometimes

liayyavaprjs, pjiKfWdpris, Tapylrris, ^aKTiovaprjs

after the analogy of the first declension.

aU

inflect like Mawjj.

Neuters

dp.p.r]v, /3ep-

Thus,
N.
"Apr)s

y^K, ^epoviKrjv, irapawiiTju, irpoairriT^rfv, (tokk^v,

'AyadoKKrjs

for dp,niv, fiepyiv, fiepovixw, Trapavifiiv, TrpouQTirfo/, tTOKKlV.

G. 'Apr,

D.

The

accent of a

noun thus syncopated

is

A. "Aprjv
V. 'Aprj

'AyadoKKijir
'AyadoicKij

the same as that of the fidl form.

Thus,

Digitized

by Microsoft

36

INTRODUCTION.
N.

GRAMMATICAL OBSEEVATIONS.
AXON,
ATQP,
the Latin

37

ATUM

So/jieaTtKaTov,

naibia
aTildta

'

8ap,a(TKr]va7nS6iJ.r]\a

SapaiTKrjiia Kat

SpovyyapaTou, TtarpiKarov, irpaToairaBapaTov.

Kai
;

pijXa

p.rj'hoKvdatvia ^=:

prjXa

Ka\
;

G.

opos,

the Latin

ATOR

aX-

KvSavia

rroSoKicftaXa

AayaTojp, ^lykarap, o'^^iKarap.

VTTOKap.iO'o^pdKLa

=
1.

ttoScs koi

KecpdXal

viTOKapifja Ka\ ^paKia.

EA, from the


denotes the
effect

earlier

A.

It usually

Adjectives.
tive

Adjectives in o Y
if

produced by any

instru-

are sometimes inflected as

the nomina;(pu(rds.

ment

KovTapea, noB(a, cnradea.

ended in O 2

dpyvpos,

ei/Ti-Xor,

IKION, from the


TiKioi',

earlier

IK0 2

djroXu-

(Compare the ancient


if

8opu|e, hmXorepov as

KaTerravUiov, XiraviKiov, p,aTpa>viKia.


rjs,

from
2.

8i7rXo't.)

122 A, G.

an ancient ending,
;

very

The ending ta

of the neuter plural of

common

in

Byzantine Greek

equivalent

adjectives in
into
7;
:

Y2

is

sometimes contracted
rj8faj rjpiaea.

to the English
iKK\jj(ndpxi<T(Ta,
itpi.a(ra,

ESS

'AirdpLo-a-a, ^aa-iXia-aa,

^S^,

Tjp,iar]j

for

indpx^a-tTa, i7n<TTTifwvdpxi(Ta-a,

AN 02,
KripivBiavos,

the Latin

ANUS,

in adjectives
:

Kaio-apto-o-a,

KavStdaTUTaa,

KOfirjTKTira,

derived from names of persons


2(;u(Di<ta>'df,

Xpia-navos,

AaoSiKKraa.

K\eol3mv6s, Aocri5eai/ds,
^aTopvLXiavos,

OYPA,
trovpa.

the Latin

URA

^orjQovpa, k\u-

KapiTOKpanavoSi
Seovr]pi,avos.

Bafftkeidiavos,

nOYA02,
of
:

from the Latin pullus, son


rajSptTjXo-

AT0 2,
8aroff.

the Latin

ATUS

iKavaros, (povv-

apxovTmovkos, avSfvroirovXos,

irOvXoSi KO^JJTOTTOuXoff.

EIN O2

in four syllables,
:

from the

ear-

QP, G.
tiraip,

opos-,

the Latin

OR

fie/SiViap,

xpe-

lier

NO2

TTfT^eivos, (rrvmrilvos.

Se^ei'O'cap,

SiKTarap, Koipaap, Kovparmp.

Augment.
XoQj,

See

alxp^aXayri^w, dirXiKfia,

When

such words are thoroughly Grecized,


prjTap, irpaKrap
;

diTOKaBitTTrjpi, apparoajf d^opl^oi, /SaTTTtfco, /3ovX-

they are inflected like


8c/3lTOpOC, blUTCLTOpOS,

as

hiappr)ywpi, SiotKEco, eaw,

etfioTTOteo),

eXX?;-

UOt

8e/3lt<Bp09, SlKTOTOpos.

w'fto, ip.Trapoivka>, pyj/vxo<a,

evavTioopai,

eprjfiou),

AKH2,
MapTiVOLKTlS.

G.

jj,

for

AK102:
AS

GcoSoTaKjjf,

inalpas,

eirKTKcmeto,
^u/xoct>,

iirurvvdya,

emrfpifo),

fao),

^0006),

KaoreXXoti),

Karapdopat,

KTi^o}^

AKION,
tives
like

diminutive of

(as anciXa^,

pappapoa, pedoppda,

Trapaxadi^o), irepaw, noieio,

\i6a^, \a0pa^, Xelp.a^)..

Byzantine diminukiovokiov,

TToXiop/ceo), npooip.ia^a,' irpoKTc^a,


7rpo(ji7]Tevcii,

irpna-opoXoyea,
patvaj,
pco,

Kama-TpaKiov,

(ttcvokwv,

TTVpTToXeo),

paStoupyeoD,

presuppose masculines in AS.

pivoKoirea, (TaypaToaa, atdrjpuoi, avpirtTTTOi, avv-

AKI02, masculine
ITZA,
force

of the

preceding

dyco,

(j}6dvai,

(pdetpco, (pBovea, (pikoKoKea,

x^Xi-

Bao-iXoKior, 'Sravpaiuos, 2Te(j>avdKios-

voa, ^vx'i'-

G.

as,
it

the

Slavic

HT2A.

In

Active and middle.

1.

The

proper names
;

has lost

its

diminutive
Tpia-

third person plural of the indicative (and

as

FafietrrdviT^a,

^rpovfUT^a,

0Y2I.
Nom.

subjunctive) active sometimes ends in

YN

Leo Gramm. 359, 13 Kvpievow. 47


noLr^iravv.

ITZH2,
ITZIN

G.

17,

from the preceding

Bao-i-

Goteler.

307

ia-diovv, exovv.

XiVfTjf, eeo(/)iXiTf);s, 'laKa^iT^rjS, 2KuXiTfj;s.

This ending seems to be formed from the


Doric. ONTI as follows: ONTI, ON (not OYN. (Compare the Cretan cxo
exo"""'; ^X''"o''>
2.

for

ITZION, neuter

of

ITZA:

Ka\oyrjpiT^iv, npoaaTiT^iv.

Common

Pto-

used),

choprodromus.

:=
are sometimes formed
:

in Hesychius.)

Compounds
xdpva

ac-

The

third person plural of the perfect

cording to the following examples

la-xaSo-

indicative active often ends in

AN

=; A2I,
and

l(TxdSs
;

Kai

Kapva

d^ivopiym :=

Doric

ANTl.

{Sext. 647, 12.

Tzetz.

dlivai Koi opvyia

yvvaiKOTTaiSa

:^ ywalKfs

Kai

Lycophr. 252.)

Digitized

by Microsoft

38
yiyvofjiai.,

INTEODUCTION.
yeyova.

ApoC. 21, 6 ylyovav.

Cypr. 1729
tK^dXai.

B imp^aXm.

Mai. GO, 23

yiyvioa-Kui,

eyvam.

Joann. 17, 7

cyvioKav.

Theoph. 541, 3 ava^aXay.

hlbtofUy behaxa.

Joann. Mosch. 2941

yiyvofiai, kyiv6p.rfu.

Luc. 24, 22.

Apoar.
.

hibaxav.

Act. Pet. et Paul. 14.

YaewAo-Nicod.
yo-d/iKi/os.

bo^aia, SeSo^aKo.
bebo^aKav.
pbw, i'opya.

Hippol. Haer. 272, 74

I,

Porph. Adm.
ing cyeva, active.
bepKoimi, ebpaKov.

A, 15,

5.

J/aZ. 109, 19,

136, 8 yheicv, imply-

Batrach. 179 eopyav.


Jacob. 5,
1,

cpXa/iaL, e\riXv6a.
fX<, etrxi/Ka.
(O-Tij^ti,

ela-cXriKvBav.

Orph. Argon. 133

ejVe-

&'6yM.

86

e(7X')Kai'-

Spaxa. epxop/u, riKdov.

to-TTjKa.

/S'epi.

Esai. 5,

29 nape-

Sept.
?X(9a.

AmoS

4,

claTjXdare.

Inscr.
Xap.pdvm,
e'i\ri(f>a.

5922

J/att.

11, 7 i^i,\-

Inscr. 3137,

38

vapei-

Sare.

14, 15 TrpoaijXdav.

Luc.

^X^av.
olba.

Act. 21, 8

rjX6ap.ev.

Gen.

8,

35
19,

Pseudo-JixcoS. 17,

1 oiSai'.
7.

14
Paul.

E'IfXfiare.

Ex.

5,

4 awfX5a'.
15,
1

14, 16

opaa, iapaKa.

Sept. Deut. 11,

fio-eXfldT-iao-ar.

Jer.

k^ekBdratrav.
^fflra.

Col. 2, 1 eapaKav.
mfi7rprip.i,
Ttiitprjua.

Matt.
Inscr. 4712,
h,

6,

10.

10,

13

Add.

ivwi-

6 (Codex x)

fla-eXdare.

Apocr. Act.
Thecph.

TTpriKav.

Pet. et Paul. 30

eiVcXfloTe.

mvcD,

Tren-cBKa.

Apoc. 18, 3

ircTToiKav.

595, 10 dni\6aTe.
fvpl(TK.ai,

PEG,

to say, eiprjKO.

Apoc. 19, 3

elpTixav. an-c-

eSpov, elpojirjv.
SejJt.

Callim. Epigr. 49
2,

OTcXXo), earoKKa.

Luc. Act. 16, 36

evpdp,riv.

Reg.

17,

20

evpav.
evpoiev.

oraXKav.
Trjpea, TCTrjprjKa.

Inscr.

2266,

11

cvpeiav

=^

Joann. 17, 6

TCTrjpriKav.

Luc.
p.

8, 35.

23, 2 evpa/uv.

lamhl

V.

(pavepow.
(j)pi(r(r<a,

Barn. 7 ^(pavepaiKav.
Tre(j>piKa.

498

evpairdai.

Mai. 449, 20
evpas.

rjipa-

Lycophr. 252 rci^piKav.

fiev.

Leo Cframm. 252, 19


Inscr.

3.

27ic imperfect indicative active is

somefirst

ex<i

eo-xov.

2264 (Addend.)

p.f-

times inflected after the analogy of the


aorist.
nyo), 7yoi'.
X<B)

6vT]CTKa>,

Wavov.

Sept.

ToMt
2,

3,

9 dmdavav.

Sept. Reg. 2, 6, 3 riyav.

Xafi^dvai, eXa^ov.
1,

Reg.

23, 16 eXa^av.

eix""-

Pseudo-iVicod

I,

A,

5.

XetVa, eXiTroK.
6pda>, ftbov.

Esai. 1, 4 eyKarcXinaTc.

Fii!.

^^ip/l.

108

Axap.ev.

Orph. Argon. 119.


eiSa/icp.
I,

Luc.

beva, to bind, tbevov.

Apocr. Act. Andr.

Act. 4, 20
iSa.

^J90C. 17, 3 8a,

et

Matthiae 3

jrpocrebevav.

Pseudo-Ticod

A, 15,
cjrta.

1 eibafiev.

KOTTTio.

Herm.

Vis. 3, 2

(Codex x)

Kari-

n'lW, %mov.
^epo).

Mai. 234, 15

Ktmrav.
4.

Joann. Mosch. 3004

ecjxpa.

27te second aorist active

and middle

is

ffieiyio, c(j>vyov.

Mai. 66, 13

e(j>vyav.

often inflected like the 174, 10,

first aorist.

(Hust.

5.

On

the other hand, the first aorist

common

in Cilicia.)
1

sometimes appears with the endings of the


dyayai.

&ya, rjyayov.
21.

Mai. 110,

250,

second.
ypd<j)ta, ypa^jfa.

275, 20 avayayai.

476, 14, avva-

Apollon. D. Synt. 71, 12

ydyas.

Hes. Aydyas, dvrl toO ayayav.

eypa^es.
yvpcvtt),

71, 3 ypaifreno.

alpeai ei\6p,i]v.

Mai. 420, 12

dipeiXavTO.
1

fyipfvcra.

Pseudo-N^icod.

II,

211, 9 d^ei\dp.evos.

Theoph. 122,

(23) eyvpevrret.
iij/ii,

XaTO. 190, 13 (iXavTo. 73, 9


(ioKKco, ejSaXov.

d<f)eiKaTO.

(ca.

Apoc.

2,

d(l)-^Kes.
I,

J/circ.

14,

46

eneffoKav.

Itiva,

e/ieiva.

Chrys.
fielvoi

358 C
/leivai.

{mofifivoi.

Eustrat.

2329 C Ka6vwo^d\ai.

Leont.

Zos. 73, 14

Digitized

by Microsoft

GEAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
It

39
10
ima-av.

would seem further that the second


22 ankaToKKes as

edto,

f'icDV.

Jer. 41,

person of the perfect active sometimes end-

Sopv^ea, iBopvfiovv.
pv^oiitrav as v.
1.

Luc. Act. 17, 5 i6o-

ed

in ES.
2,

Sept. Ex. 5,

V.

1.

Apoc.
37, 9
6.

3 KeKowiaKes.

Apollon. D. Synt.

6vnma,

iSviiiav.

Jer. 19, 13.

39, 29 i6v-

et/jijKs.

piSxrav.

The ending O 2 A N

(= ON)
is

of the

viKaco,

ivUcav.

Inscr. 158, 4 evtxSxrav

h=

third person plural of the imperfect

and

1584.

i585 hUmv).
Ex. 33, 8
Karevoova-av.

second aorist indicative active

of frequent

i/oeM, ivdovv.

Reg.

occurrence in later Greek.


rians caU
it

The gramma1761.)
8,

2,

20, 15 ivoovcrav.
Sept. Esdr. 2, 6, 14.

Boeotic, Chalcidean, or Asiatic.

otKoSo^eo), aKoSopovv.

(M. M. 423.
aipka,
eXKov.

Eust. 1759, 30.


Sept.

Nehem.

4,

18 mKoSopoSirav.
Steph. Diac.

Josu.

29

Kadfl-

TraXifoSeo), eira\iv68ovv.

1104

Xotrav.
aipio (^pof).

D
Josu.
3,

iiraKivohovaaif.

14

rjpoaav.
f/papToiTav,

TTOiito,

inoiovv.

Sept.

Job

1,

fVoiofo-ai'.

&liapTava>, ^/lapTOV.
/SoXXo), e^aXov.
etTTow.

Deut. 32, 5
3,

8.

Sometimes AS I takes the place of


in the imperfect or aorist active.

Dan.

22

cv-efiaKotTav.

O N or A N
Clem. .
1,

EiUth. 4, 11 emo<Tat>.

44 (Codex A)
eTroiijo-atri.

i8aKa<n.
Vit.

Apocr.

epxopai, ^X6ov.
Socrav.

Gen.

8, 19.

12, 5

c^ijX-

Martyr. Barth. 2

Epiph. 68

Ex. 15, 27.


Ps. 77,

Ps. 78, 1 rj\eo(Tav.

D cm-hi>Ka<Ti,v.
Kaa-i.

Joann. Mosch. 3081


II,

A huBqTheoph.
II,

(adiai, (j)ayov.

29

icfidyotrav.

Damasc.
tTT-f]paiTi

324

^'maa-iv.

(vpitTKa, eZpov.

Ps. 114, 3 evpo(rav.

725, 8

from

liraipm.

Villois,

cX'"' ^'X""! fCX""-

Joann. 15, 24
Sept.

ei;^0(raj'.

122

eTtOeatri.
1.

Scymn. 695 Zaxoa-m.


5 KaTetrxoirav.
Kpiva,
fKpivov.

Nehem.
26

3,

Subjunctive.
stages

In the early

of the

language, the subjunctive


indicai\da-

Sept.

Ex.

18,

eiepi-

often coincided in form with the


tive
;

votrav.

as dyeipop,v,

j3ijo-o/xei/,

fpv(riTop.ev,

\ap,pdvai, e\dp.^avov, e\a^ov.

Ezeoh. 22, 12

a-eai, ipeiperai, cj)dicTai,

in

Homer.
is

i\afi^dvotTau.
Xetirci),

Deut.

1,

25

iXd^oa'av.

In the Attic dialect the subjunctive


distinct

e\nrov,

Ex. 16, 24 KaTeXmotrav.


Et.

from the indicative

except the

liav6dii<o,

cpa6ov.

M.

282, 37

ipd-

person in

a, as ypd<j>ai, ypdi^a.

But

in the

6oiTav.

less cultivated dialects the subjunctive

was

opdio,

elhov.

Sept.
1.7

Deut.

7,

19

"ihoirav.

often pronounced and written with the con-

Ps.

76,
eTTiov,

tiboa-av.
firiotrav.

necting vowels of the indicative. 1688, 40


? for 1.

Inscr.

mva,

Jer. 28, 7

2008

<irai^7;^t'f-

2350

(TxdCo, (rxa^ov.
(jjaivm, e(j)aivov.

Lyeophr. 21

c(rxd^o(rav.

(^tolian)
S<5|.

&yfi.

2448, V, 25. 26.


30.

VII, 13

Sept. Macc. 1, 4,

50

e(pai-

V, 26.

VII, 14.

25 i^ohd^u.
VI,

voaav.
(f>fpa>, f(l)epov.

VI, 31
Par.
1,

eTrip-Jlvieva-ft.

VI, 32 imlSdXKci.
jToriaei.

22, 4 i^'epoa-av.

36

7ro.

VII, 17, 20

VIII, 9 ypdfei.

7.

In the

imperfect

of
;

contract

verbs

2484

86iei.

2953

eVd/jw,

dwoKpifd.
Troi^crci.

3044
5774.

A02AN 002AN
282, 33.)

becomes

QSAN

and

EOSAN,
(Et.

(Ionic) Kard^fi,

woifitrei.
I,

3984
108

each become

OYSAN.

M.

5775,

I,

107
I,

dpruo-M.
vep,ei,

7rordy.
I,

1,111
\dfici.

Tfkidft.

128

(j>epet.

130
I,

ai/ojua>, Tfvofiavv.

Ezech. 22, 11
Sept. Gen. 6,

^vofiova-av,

I,

151

diroddvd.
wpd^ei.

I,

160

(I for ?.
O'ltrei,

161.

yeuvdo), iyevvav.

fyevvSxrav

163.
<j)fpei,

176

Hes.

iveyKti, jrpoa-

eyevvtov.

Ko/iicrei.

Phot. Lex.

Svi/oiVet,

avve-

SoKioa, fSoKiow.

Ps. 5, 10 eSoKioitrau.

ulyKei.

Digitized

by Microsoft

40
So in the
Karabix"'"passive.
Inscr.

INTRODUCTION.
2008
(Ionic)
fiXoyrjo-aicrav.

Sir.

33, 11 evpoicrav.

Inscr.
p.

2448, VII, 3G

bioiKfiTai,.

VIII,

1699.

1702 napexoiaav.

24

^v\oypa(j>r]6et.

23
Inscr.

e'Lirmdav.

Phavor.
airoT'ivoiav

172,

Inscr. 11

We
15

find

also,

5128

dyayouo-t.

original dn-oTiWira!'.
nnpexi-''

for the
13.

Cart. 5.

12.

31

TAeopA. 280, 13
fiwoDcri.
2.

riVo^ei'.

Por^jA. Car.
Trddov(Ti.

211

^^

T!ape\Oi,iTavj TrapepfoieK.
1.

^es. IleiaovTai,

Imperative.
is

In

classical Greek,

Pseudo-Future SubjuncWhen
the future
indicative
it

the personal endings of the third person


pilural

tive.

of the

imperative

are

commonly
and
;

used for the aorist subjunctive,

is

fre-

NTQN
2e

(Cretan
for

NT a)

for the active,

quently written with the connecting vowels

aN

the passive and middle


dei^avrav, Troiovvrtou
'.

as

of

the

spelling

mode of must have been introduced when


subjunctive.

This

Xcydcrwi/,
trOcov,

Sdi/Tajv,

Xeye-

hoaBav, Bei^dtrdcov, nonitrBcov.

(Com-

H
E

was confounded,
or with EI,

in pronunciation,
O.

with
7,

pare the Latin

NTO, NTOR.)

and Q with
2.

Luc.
8,

The endings TfiSAN,


less

seosAN
than in
8, 18.
1, 4,

are

nape^rj.

Joann. 17,
p.

Apoc.

Saxrr].
1.

common
Eer.

in
1,

classical

later

Just.

Tryph. 115,

744

Sojotjtc

as v.

Greek.

147.

Thuc.

Xen.
8 im-

Hus. Alex. 361 B. 321


npocrdfiiraiJ.ev.

D Scitrnf, e^o-js.

424

Equest. 12, 4
ardirBaxTav,

ecrraa-av.

Anab.

iTa><Tav.

Hier. 8, 4 Sepairevcra5,

So in the passive and middle.


Gen.
2,

Sept.

Tiocrav,

SoToycrav.

Vectig. 4, 41.
4,

ivvorj-

17

(^nyjjo-^e.

Luc. Act. 21, 24 yvw1,

<7dTa3crav.

Venat.

lxvveTCD(Tav^ irpoiTanjav.
dicuKErtoorai/,

fravTat.

Paul. Cor.

13,

KavBrjamfiai.

4,

iroteiTcoa-au.

4, 5
4,

p.eraBeiTay'

Tim.

1, 6,

8 apKeadrja-aineda.

Fetr. 1, 3, 1
I,

uav, kiravLTaxrav.

11 aykcrBaiaav.
Plat. Soph.
b,

10, 2 e^e-

Kepbr)6riaavTai.
Tat.

Dion. Chrys.

136, 7

EO-mK-

Toicrav, v<j)ei(T6a>aav.
o-ai/.

Just. Apol. 1, 7 (pavrJTai

(fiavciTat.

231

A cormiomtav,

Curt. 29, 39,

iovraxrav

Theodtn.
Aristid.

Dan.
I,

1,

12

<^a-^a>p.c6a,

niap.iOa.

718,

13

yev^o-iBiTat.

Hippol.
a<f>fdri-

2.

Peculiar forms
Ps.

of the
9,

imperative
^^17

Haer. 460, 30
(TcovTai.

aipr]aavTai.

466, 18

Sept.

145,

3.

Jer.

TreirolBme

Athen. 12, 33
Basil.
Ill,

irapaBrjo-aivTaL,

napa-

(Job 12,
ia-TjjKare.

6 mvoiBira).

(Txijo-au/Tai.

1618

ttXijo-Ai)-

Josu.

10,

19

fj.r)

Clem. A.

I,

432 B.

445

a-aiicda.

Epiph.
I,

I,

545

Trapa)iei\j/afiai.

peTwv
tive
:

ippovTav, ippermo-av.

Ip-

Perfect ac-

Chrys.

508

B
et

o-xai'SaXio-^^io-aH'Tae.

Prod.
Apocr.

Orig. Ill,

385

A npo(re\ri\v6eTa>, grant,
B
irc^avrfKiTa, elpi]Ke-

Parmen. 644 (59)


Act.

dvayKaa-6rjcra>p.f6a.

suppose that.

1401 A.

Andr.

Matthiae

cK(f)v$a>p.ai.

Taxrav, irewOLrjKeTa), TjKo\ovdriKTa>(rav.

IV, 208

Martyr. Barthol.
479, 17
eVijc^f.

7 yvma-mp.eda. 220, 10

Proc.

I,

Ej7iTc5u/x))Ta), TfBccoprjKeTa).

yevrjcravTai.
aKouo-i/o-^f.^

336,

Passive and Middle.


original ending

1.

The

13

(TuXX^\|/'T;Tai.

II, 71,

20

Agath.

2AI

of the second person

41, 3 neiaria-Se

from

Trdcrxa).

163, 11 xa^e-

singular of the indicative

and subjunctive
&>

passive and middle of verbs in

oocui-s in

Optative.
active
is

The

original ending

SAN

later
18, 9.

and Byzantine Greek.


Moer. 14.)
Clem. A.
I,

(Phryn. P. S.

of <Ae iAirc? person plural of the optative

sometimes used in later Greek.


aiVeo-aio-aK.

dcj}da.

173

en-a^paa-ai (con-

Sept.

Gen. 49, 8

Deut.

1,

44

tracted from
^ov\op.ai..

i7r-a<j)dfa-ai).

TTOtfja-aicrav.

Job. 5, 14

^rjKa<j)ri(Tai,<Tav.

18, 7

Leont. JIoii.

665

fioiXeaai.

Orjpevirmcrav,
o-af
(raw.

18, 9 cX^oicrav.
TTupa-eva-ata-av.

18, 11 oXfo-ai-

8e$wop.ai.

Greg. Naz. Ill,

272 C

Se^ioO-

20, 10

Ps. 34, 25 eiVot-

(Tai (Sf^tdEffai).

103,

35

eKKfinoiaav.

Tobit

3,

11

cVai/Tido/iai.

Ba^il.

I,

753

havriovtrm.

Digitized

by Microsoft

GRAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
iirciyo).

41

Leo. Tact. 9, 40 inelyeaai.


Vit.

3.

In later and Byzantine Greek, the

epXOf.at.

Euthym. 79

e^-ep^^ea-m.
'2.

subjunctive jMssive of verbs in


differ
4,

O Q does not
Paid. Cor.
1,

((701(0, (fiayofiai.

Sept. Ps. 127,

Luc.

from the

indicative.

17, 8 (^ayeaat.
laoiiat.

(fiv(rioi(Td.

Gal. 4, 17 fTjXoOre.
f>;/iuoO(rat.

Joann.

Basil. Sel.

473 A.

Apocr. Act.

Mosch. 3056
fltifioCtrat.

Doroth. 1624
Eip?)>/uior

Thadd. 2
Kavxdofiac.
Xa(rai.

Zfio-at (laeo-ai).

[rAeoc^os.

1037, 10

8e

Paul. Rom.

2,

17.

23

kou-

d ffepi 'Attik^s (TvvrjBfias ypayjras TiKovs


8ia ToC
TO.

(j)ri(n

tovs 'At-

11, 18 KaTa-Kav;^a(rat.

Hippol.

TpiTa Trp6(Tama
Xeyetv, fav

rtjs

rplrrii
eaj"

aufuyiar
yi;i|/'i7-ai,

788 B.
Koi/ido;iat.

;(/)i)(70)7-at,

ySi^i.

Deut. 31, 16
V.
1.

Koifxcurai

(icoi^aeo-ai)

as

Joann. Mosch.

4.

The ending 01 HN
/ii,

in contract verbs,

3068 B.
Kop.i^u,.

and in verbs in
376,
8.

is

sometimes changed
5, 9,

Pcn-ph. Cer.

377, 23

into

aiHN.
I,

Jos.

Ant.

KaK(ir]Te.

KOfil^e(Tai.

B. J. 6, 4, 3 jToXe/iacv.

6, 5,

2 jrapaKpaTdr),

leraofuu.

Sept. Sir. 6, 7 KTOoyii.

Clem. A.
araXa^iSa891;.

557

koct/iibj;.

Philostr.

43

8t-

^afi^aixa.

Porph.

Cer.

623

57

efi^t^j?.

Ori^'. Ill,
yi/aij.

1300

an-oS^iro.

Eus. IV, 81
XuTpdm. Basil. Sel.

^aa^r. 2621
fiij

TroXe.

473

A XurpoCo-aj

(Xu-

fiojij.

(Phryn. 343

ra/ioSi/

Xeye, dXXd ya'


818&J?;:.

Tpoffat).

juoit;,

(OS voovt), KJiiXoir).

345

AiS^i; Kai

^emoa.

Sept. Reg. 3, 14, 6 aTTO-^evoCaat

Oi8eis tSv 'AttikSv toutou to (Vktikov

elire

tia

(dTro-^eraecrat).

ToC O, dXXa 8ia


IIotoiT/v,

rijs

01

bi.<j)d6yyov.

2/oer.

297

odwdo/iai.
ccrai).
ffi'i/m.

Xmc. 16, 25 o5vfa(7at (dSwa-

'AttikSs

TTOio)))!',

'EXXt/wkSs. )

5.

The ending
is

OYN

of the infinitive of

Sept.

Deut. 28, 39

meo-ai.

Luc.

verbs in om

sometimes changed into


Marc.
4,

17, 8.
irXai/do).

OIN.
Herm. Vis.
1, 11. 2,

Matt. 13, 32.

32 Kara7,

jrXavatrai (-dfcrai).

(TKrjvoiv

KaTa(rKrjvovv.

Paul. Hebr.

5
II,

TheopUl.
TToXe/xeca.

Pa/M.
141

Laus. 1106 D.

dn-o8eKaTotc

airohcKaTovv.

Damasc.

Apophih.

TroXe/i^crai

320
vovv.

(rre(jinveTv,

write aTftpavotv

^=

(rreipci-

(n-oXe/ie'i/o-ai).

Joann. Mosch. 3017

C
65

{Pallad. Laus. 1073

koti/Iiois

TroXe/iEio-ai (iroXe/iceffai).
jTrof'tu.

KaTtj^iovs. )

^^ocr. Act.
write

Pet.

et

Paul.

Syntax.
7rToe'i(Tai.

TTTorjcrm,

ancua.

Vit.

Euthym. 73

n-fpi-CTrSo-at.

Plural Number.

king com-

(TTe(j)av6(i).

Chrys. X, 143
Const. (536)

(rTc^avoCCTaj.

(po^eofiai.

1056
1.

(po^elcrai..

monly uses the first person plural when he Inscr. 2743 'Ho-^^wt speaks of himself.
/xcK

Contract Verbs.
AQ
EQ.
This
is

Verbs in

em

rfi

KaTa(TTa<Tei t^j jSacriXeiay t^s ruiere-

are sometimes inflected like verbs in

pas.

Sept.

Mace.

1,

11,

31.

Athan.

I,

an lonism.

Apocr. Act.

341 A.

Thorn. 48 iiycmovv.
n\avoip.cu..

Act. Pet. et Paul. 64

An
Polyb.
15,
1.

author also
1,

may
8,

use the plwal.


Liod.

Proc. II,

101, 13.

327, 24.

41,
1.

7.

2, 37, 2, et alibi.

543, 7
KOLfiov.

eToXjuovK.

Joann. Mosch. 3017


iri/iovv.

17,

Strab.

6,

21, et alibi._

Mai. 39, 18

247, 8

c/it-

Just. Apol. 1, 43.

XcTOUV.
2.
SI

Adjective.

The

superlative of an

The ending
;

OQ

sometimes becomes

adjective

is

sometimes expressed by sim-

NQ

as

^v/idiva), o-xaXiii/o), tu^Xcbvo).

(Com-

ply repeating that adjective with an inter-

pare the ancient

x"""'i*^i C^ivwiu,

pavmiu).

vening Kai.

Inscr. 4697, 19

'Epfiijr

//.eyas

Digitized

by Microsoft

42
Koi neyas,

INTRODUCTION.
the same as
''E.pji.rjs

6 fieyiirros, the
fi6vos koI

Sas

oTpaTtdv,

nevTriKovTa

pvpiatmv

trrpa-

most great Herfnes.


fiovos, the

Euchol. "Ayioi

Tidv.)

<mly holy One.

Genitive.

1.

When the masculine of


by a genitive denothisJiop,
Tottott)-

Numerals.
a mixed nmnber
is

The fractional part of the


connected to the whole
Koi
is

article is followed

ing a city or a province, inicrKtmos,


to be supplied.
Patfirfs.

by

KOI.

Sept. Ex. 25, 10 Auo nijx^wi

Carth. 1256

fjfjiiaovs, sc. ixepovs.

Ftol. Euerg.

apud Athen.
Trrixfav.

pr/T^s Toil

Pallod. Vit. Chrys. 12

9,

17, p.

375
II,

D
680,

Auo
1.

Kui

rj/iia-ovs

Tbv 'AXf^avdpeias QeotfitKov, Theophilus, bishop


of Alexandria.
KOfivBfias.

Dion. H.

681,

13 Aa,8a

xai

Socr.

^fua-ovs fivav.

Cleomed. 22, 9 "Qpa


Kat

km

rjjxicru.

Theod. Ill,

A Eva-e^ws 6 Nt888 A "O r^r 'AXf^av153


Theoph. 30
Kcavtrravrivoxmo-

63,
98,

20 'Enra 10 Auo
ptyia-Ti)

e'Uoinv fj/tepaLS Kal

rjpicrec.

ipkav (ecclesiae) 'AKe^anSpos.


*0

xai rjiiurv p.oipas.

Strah. 2, 5, 39

Tov

Bv^avrlov.

120 'O

'H

ijpepa itrriv lapav larjpepivav Sexa-

Xeoif.

Teaa-apmv koi Tcraprov.


Kai ijpuTV XtVpas.

Diosc.

1,

62 Tpeis

The name of the


ceded by the

place,

however,

if

pre-

Plut. II,
r}pi(TV

908 A.

'Ekotoi'
II,

name

of the bishop,

may

ap-

oydorjKovra

8vo Kai

tjpepas.

jipp.

pear without the masculine of the


Athan.
T^ff

article.

315,

95

Mvpiddas

e^

Koi

rjpKnJ

raXavrav.

II,

808

Eiiaefiios TToXeeoy
TTJs

BipyiXKav

Galen. II, 54 F.

TaX\ios, AovKL<l>ep

^apdias vrjaov, AareSocr.

The conjunction
omitted.
rjpia-u.

Kai, however,

is

often

pios Tierprnv

rrjs 'Apafilac.

153

&io-

Athen. Mech. 4 Urjx^is

eiKoa-t rpeis

yvis tiixaias, Mapis XdKKrjSovos.


2.

Cleomed. 64, 17 MvpiaSav PH' rpiVou

The

article rd, followed

by the

geni-

(=

1,080,000

-J).

69, 5 'OKTi ^pla-ovs


tTTabitav.

tive of the

name

of a grandee, denotes the

(^apeovj.

Strah. 8, 6, 21 Tpiav rjptav


1,

quarter of the city of Constantinople in

Diosc.
piav

64 Airpas rpcU

rjpLav.

2, 92,

Mmv

which the palace of that grandee


Chal. 1409

stood.

rjpia'v.

Jos. B. J. 1, 21, 2 TpiSyv rjpiav

TStv UpoKoniav.

Stud. 1073

<TTa8ia>v.

Apoc. 11, 9 'Hp,epas Tpeis ^piqv.

Ta 'AyaSov.
avmi.
3.

Theoph. Cont. 835 Ta


'AvSepiov,

'Apa(rrpi-

x'lut.

I,

781

Clem. A. II, 309

A AeKa&vo ^pitrv A Urjxw em

p.vpidBas.

836 Ta

Ta

"ira/iaBiov.

fjp.icrv.

Afric.
rpi-

Adnomination

is

sometimes

used

84

'Oktukis yap ivbcKa TerapTov

Troiei

where apposition would be more


Dion.
P.

logical.
\idov.

p.r,vov

=8 X

(11

+ = 90
i)

days.

Ibid.

781

KpvtnuWov KaBapov
yXavKriv
\'i6ov.

TpiaKoaiav i^rjKovra

mvre

rerapTov

:= 365

1012 BripvWov

1121 FXau-

i-

KioaivTa \i6ov Kadapoio Torrd^ov.

A tc.

P.

Apposition.
following.
ev
Fajiri

Apposition

is

often

Histor. 52, 14 Tfjv ttoKiv Xep&Sivos, the city

used for adnomination in cases like the


Chron. 218, 16 Koyyiaptov
^vXtva
Kai
efiioxev

of Cherson.
vrj(Tovs Tijs

57, 16 T^ woXet Nticaias.

64 Tas

re Srjpas Koi Qrjpa^Ltis KoKovfififas.

da-aapia

6(rTpdKiva,

the
xal

Theoph.
rrjs

Cont.

295 Upas
312,

rriv

iavToii

x^P'"'

same

as

Koyytaptov

daa-apiav

^vXlvcav

^payKias.

18 *H

iroKts

^Apavrias.
Ts) opci
1,

oarpaKivav.
&as XaoK.

Theoph. 691, 19 AwStKa


Alio ;(iXia8fE 'Apaffes.

X'5^"-

320 To
roil

Kdcrrpov tiatmoKTOv.

463, 21

699

Porph.
fitav,

'OXvpwov.

(Compare Horn. Od.

Adm.

2o2, 19

2xo\apUia

^vyfjv

one

TpotTjs

Upov wroKlfBpov. )

pair of earnings.

233

T^i- Cvyf/v

rh o-xoXa-

So
/SoTou.

Sept.

Nehem.

10, 31 'Ev f/pipa tov a-a^-

pUia, the pair of ear^ngs.


Kevrrjvdpiov iv.

243, 8 Aoydpmv

Luc. Act.
the

2, 1

T^K

rinepav ttjs Qcvti]-

Theoph. Cont. 173, 19 MiXiaCedr.


II,

KoiTTTis,

day of Pentecost.

Apocr. Joseph.

piVm

8e

a-aKKia ivvia.
TrXiJflor

19 ^ipovs
Li/s.
p.vpid-

Narrat. 2 'Hp^pa t^s rerpoSoi, the fourth day

laKm^iras

ttoXu.

(Compare

of the week.

(Compare the English,


like.)

tJie

Epitaph. 192, 27 'Eo-xe.Xe ntvrijKooTa

month of January, and the

Digitized

by Microsoft

GRAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
So also Sept. Gen. 21, 28
itpo^arav, seven ewe lambs.
'Ettto ajivahas

43
eicKal-

Dion. H.

I,

113, 5 yeveais 8e vmepov


Strab. 8,
7,

31, 38 Kpiovs twv

Sexa p,eTa 'iXiou aXacriv.


KKv(r6r)

2 Kart-

npo^arav
eptcfmv

irov ov KaTecjjayov.

37, 31 'E(T(j>a^av

Tj

'EXi'kt;

Svalv ereat npo rmv Aevxrpi:

alyS)V.

Tobit

7,

Kpiov irpofidTav,

Kav.

See perd, npo

also bevrcpa,

Tpirr], re-

a male
Oi TOTe

sheep,

a ram.

Theod. Ill, 1056

TdpTTj, Trepjrrrj.)
7.

t5>v 'louSaiidi/ Trpoborai,

=:

oi Tore "loudpop,aiva}v.

In the following examples, the geni-

daZoi irpoboTai.

Mai. 219, 12 nXoIu

tive takes the place of the dative with re-

469, 9 Miav oSov povoiraTiov


Phot. IV, 52
KapApa.
/J6S

:^

Iv novoirdnov.
</ie

gard

to.

Sept.
rrjs

Num.

13,

22

KareaKe^jravTo

C T^

Tris

KapApas Xe|,
2,

word

rqv yrjv dno

epqpov Siv

ecos PoojS eltriropevo-

(Compare Horn. Od.


Achcean

87

Mj/ijot^-

pivav AlpdO.
5.

Cleom^d. 18, 10.

Strab. 8, 4,

'AxatSx, the

suitors.

Compare
rogue of a

13, 1, 32.

{Jos. B. J. 1, 21, 7 Tois

ph

also

such English phrases as

the

eK Xaids x^'-P^s elaTrXeovras irvpyos vaarbs dveX,

steward, that jewel of

a maid, that fool of a

on

the left liand as


1.

you

sail in.)

general^
4.

Dative.
genitive sometimes performs the

The dative sometimes


time.
t'Uoiri

The

denotes extent of space, or duration of

functions of the dative denoting to or for.

Dion. U.

I,

37, 12

Hivre

irpbs

rnls

Porph. Cer. 376 KaXi) aov


ing
vp.lv,

f/pepa,

good m,ornfipipa

(TTaSiois d(f>e(TTa>s Pedrov.

38, 3.

M.T](f>vXa 6e

to

you (compare 599, 10 KaXij

as TpidKovTa

(TTadlois

anoBev ^ovvrjs.

Strab.

SpxovTfs,

good morning

to you, sirs).

17, 1, 2 'Ynep Se ras a-vpfioXas tov 'AorajSopa


Koi
eivai
6,

5.

The genitive sometimes denotes duClementin.


1,

TOV

NeiXov

a-raSiois
ttj

enraKocrlois

Meporjv

ration of time.
Se Starpi^jfas,
3,

15

'llp.epav

noXtv opavvpov

i/fjaa.

Jos. Ant. 11,

and having stayed some

days.

Tpo(j)^ Kal TTora Kai rots fjSetnv airora^a-

58 'H

^jjrrjiTis

Tpiaiv cneKpanjirev r)pepS>v, the

pevTj

rpurlv rjpepais.

B. J.

Prooem.

7 'EXaJK
6rea"t

discussion lasted three days.


pas cKei pelvavTfs.
ripepav Se
iTnp,etvai.

12, 1 MiSs
t(j>Ji,

ripi-

Kara

Kpdros

lepoaoXvpa

Kai

Karao'xatv
6, 19.

13, 1 "A^iov,

ivravBa

Tpuri Koi prjmv e|.

Epict. 2,
3,

J lift.
1136 C

Lucian.

II,
fj

571 "Eojku
rjpcpav.

Monarch.
Irm,.
8c

6.

Theophil.

10, p.

ivravBa Siarpi^eiv rpiav

irivre

469 A.

Herodn.
erea-tv.

3, 15,

7 Bao-iXeuo-of

Philostr.

362 'Upepau

8e TCTTapaKovra Bia\eeifbiarpl-^as iroiv.

OKToiKaiSeKa
I,

Basil.

IV, 797 A.

\6e\s kv 'O'KvpTTia.

365 Avolv

Epiph.

677

C.

536 ^vyyevopeVQS avra


nrrdpav.

tJkovtl els 'lai/lav

irav

Sometimes
Polyb.
1,

this dative is preceded

by

^'j-.

Porphyr. Vit. Plot. 52, 12 "oXmi'


trvvatv

17,

18

^TpaTOTTe^eviravTes iv oKTOi

eruv bcKa StereXecrc


oiSei/.

pev

Tttrt,

'ypd<f)a)V

6e

araSiois dno T^s jroXeas. 3, 95, 6 Kadoppicrdels


8e Tcov TToXepitav eu dnoaTTjpari Trcpi Tot's 6y8orjKovra otoSiovs.
9,

60, 16 EiKO(ri Koi e^ irSiv oKav iv tj

Papi) diaTpifjfas.
6.
pijv,

2l, 2 'Ektiotoi pev yap


(rraSiois.

The
or Toi

genitive depending
is

upon

rjpepa,

diro

daXdrnjs ev OKTiofeaiSeKa

Diod.
rrjs

equivalent to ptra t6v in conPolyh.


1, 6,

20,

74 'Qf

fix

ev

Svcri
is

oraS/ots otto

y^s

structions like the following.

aTToaaXeveiv.

(This

a sort of Latinism.

T^

npoTtpov erei t^s t&v TaXarav

f(f)6Sov,

Compare, Aesculapii templum quinque millibus


ginti
like.)
2.

Matt. 28, 1 Miap tru^^drav,

SC. f/pepav, the

passuum
novem.

distans.

Vixit

annis

vi-

fir^ day after the Sabbath.


Aiav irpat Act. 20,
TJjg

Marc. 16, 2
Lwc. 24,
1.

Imperabit triennio, and the

/uas o-ajS/Sdrmv.

7.

Paul. Cor.

1, 16, 2.

App.

II,

In examples like the following, the

839, 20 'Hk SeKarr) rpcmSiv depiv&v.

(Com-

dative corresponds to the Latin ablative.


Jos. Ant. 14, 8, 5 Aeixios Kmravios Aev<lov
uiAr

pare Polyb.
rati

2, 18, 6 ILapayevop-ivav 8c iroKiv


els

KfXrmv

'AX^av orpaTevpan peydKa

KoXX

km

Hanlpios Kvpiva, of the

litra njv Tfjs jroXeas KaraKij^jftv tret TptaKOcrrm..

gens of Collina,

of the gens of Quirina.

Digitized

by Microsoft

44
14, 10,

INTRODUCTION.
10 Mewwa,
Aefitovla,

Menenia, Le-

yap (pdyovTat
Ppiav.

ol

av6pa>7TOC

apTOVS

Ttjv

peoTjpirpat,

monia.
Aemilia.

Inscr. 1104.

3524. 5361 AlfuUa,


Fahia.

Ex.

7,

15 BdSia-ov npbs ^apaa to


Dion. H.
tt/v I,

1186

*a/3ia,

1327. 2462

in the morning.

448, 15 Eir
f'jri

KupeiVa (for

Yivp'iva),

Quirina.

2007

Kvpivq.

\6yovs i\6a>v ipo\


dov a-ivoSov.

reXevTaiav
4,

aTpaTorref^Soprjv

2460
3.

Kvprjva (for Kirpira).

Joann.

52 X6(s &pav

Sometimes the

dative

vnaTois

cor-

dip^Kev avTov 6 nvpcTos,

where the accusative,


in logical apposition
'^**-

responds to the Latin ablative


conmlihus.
Jos.

absolute

strictly speaking,

is

Ant.

14,

10,

13

AevKiif

with the adverb x^"TijK 8e

^V^^-

^>

^7

AivrXa, Tata Map/ceXXm


tiilo,

virdrois,

LllClO LenInsrr.

TOV ^Xi'ou fipcpav

Koivfj irdvTes t/jv

avvtrjv

Caio ilarcello consulihis.


'En-iSi'ti),

2562 2943

eXeva-cv Trowvpeda.

Const. Apost. 7,
ypcpav,
Tr]v

30

AouKi'm
Kdo-o-o)

Tin'm 'AxuXfiVoj imaTOii.


AfiTuXa) Kai AfUKio)

avaaTacripov tov
(papev,

Kvplov

KvpiaK^v

KopvTjXi'o)

Ilcio-tBi't

(TVvipxeaBe
f)

dbioKeiiTTais.

Mai.- 405

viraTois.

5898

(A. D.

146) S/Ira 'Epovxia


2e(3ijpiM
1.

TiviTai fKel
4.

vavpaxia &pav

Tpirrfv Trjs ^fiepas.

KXdpa

B,

rw'm KXauSio)

xmr

(=

COSS.).
is

Sometimes the accusative

after

Accusative.
object.
fie\6e7v,

The accusative

comparative denotes the msasure of


or deficiency
;

excess

often used for the dative of the remote

that

is,

it

takes the place of

Mosch.
ecos

B EiVe rbv vlov pov my son to come out. Joann. 2876 B AtjXoI airbv 6 yipav, Afvpo
Apophth. 296
tell

the dative.

Theophil.

3,

21 AeUwcrdai
(TVV

irpo-

yeveaTepov eivai tov MavG'TJv Kal tovs


evveaKocriovs
rj

avT^
tov

Kal

;^tXious

iviavToiis

irpb

&Se, the old

man

requests

him

(saying).
'e8^X<bKOivavlas-

^XKiaKov noXipov.
5.

Come
<7cv

as

far as

here.

2877
Ttjs

Examples of the accusative


:

in adjura-

avrbv fieplda

7rp.yJAat

avTOv

tions
a-oL,

Epict. 2, 19, 15 At'ye ^oj, tovs Beovs


irpmTjv eXeyes,

Theopih. 604, 19.

Porph.

Adm. 74

'O ^axri-

per

deos.

3, 1,

36 M^,
ajro v6-

\vs

dr]\o7roii

v^ds dtreXOelu Kai dirobiw^ai tovs

TOVS 6covs

a-oi, veavi<TKe.

3, 20,

4 Kai
iroi.

UaT^ivaKLTas otto tov tottov avrav,


driXoitrav

201

^Avre-

a-ov ioTtv aXJjeXijdfjvat,

tov 6e6v

Eunap.

tov Kvptv Vapavov kiu

ttjv

^atrikeiav

V. S. 39 (69).

Chal. 1541

C T,),/ ^a>Tr,piavToi
!

rjpav XeyovTes ore Et roOro noLrjaopev,

aTLpla

^aaiXeas, by the emperor's safety

Gregent.

e^opev yevetrBai
*Edr}\o7roirj(7e

els

tovs yeirovas ^pmv.

209, 9

573
Tov

T^w

evxi]v

(TOI.

Joann. Mosch. 2925


^epdmSos.

tov ^acikea fjp&v tov ayiov tov

'S.kpainv,

=;

Trpos tov

2997

A A

dnofTTiiKai
aTTeKdrjS kv
iva

iturrov
Trj

avQpamov.

208,

20

"\va

Tow 6e6v, bv

o-e'/Sfis,

diroXvirov pe.

(Compare
trrjv <ra>Tr]-

TToXet Kot elnijs (sic) tov jSao'tXea

Athan.
piav,

I,

625

i/Laprvpopevos t^v

aTTOffTetXTy

Koi Trapakd^rj

to

KadTpov pov.

to the emperor.)
1.

Cer. 12, 12

'E7ridi8<oa-iv 6 drjpoKpdTrjs, rjyovv 6

Indicative Mood.
ent indicative is often

'Yhe pres-

dopSfTTtKOS^ TO

Xl^eWdpiOV TOV

deaTTOTTJV.

.520,

used

for the future,


will happen.

5 Af-yet TOV ddpiv(rovvdKwv dneXdovra eitrd^ai


TOV \oyo6eTi]v.
Toi/

to express vividly that


^ept. Gen. 6,
Kal TTiv 7^1/.

which

Leo Gramm. 352, 11


Aiav on 6 Xaos

AtjXoI

13

*l8ou iyai KaBa^Qeipto avTovs


1,

TTOTpidpxriv 6

(TKavboKi^eTai

Josu.

11

'Et-i Tpels riptpai Kai

bid Tas eLKovas2.

vpfis dia^aivfTf tov 'lopSai/ijv tovtov.

Matt.
padr)-

The accusative sometimes takes the


Jos. Ant. 11, 1, 3

l6,

18

IIpo;

o-e TTOiffi

TO

ndaxo

pcTo.

rav

place of the genitive.


OiKo8o;iij(7(ao-tv

ray pov.

Luc. Act.

1,

6 Kupif,

el kv t<b

xpo"?

avrhv

vyjros

piv i^r)KovTa nrj-

TouTO) diroKaBurrdveis t^k ^aaCKclav toC 'lirpaijX,

X^'S, Tmv 8

avriav koi tA eSpos.

Apophth.

Martyr. Polyc.

11.

Const.

Apost.

6,

15

380
Cer.
3.

Air TOV prjva, twice

a month.

Porph.

'Oral' TfXfVTa, /Sanrifo/iat,


to

when I
baptized.

am

about

472 "Exaw ^d6os <nri6apds Sio.

die,

then

I mil
2,

be

Apocr.

The accusative sometimes denotes the


Sept.

Joseph. Narrat.
Kal
I)

2 Kai 6 v6p.os eipi<rKerai,

time when.

Gen. 43, 15 Met'

s'luoi)

eopTTj

Ayla emTtXovpevri CTrtTeXeiTai

Digitized

by Microsoft

GRAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
2.

45

The present

indicative, in .certain cases,

irapaSpdpjis.

Clementin.
uttoo-xo).

349

A
3,

Trapdaxco.

corresponds to the English infinitive pre-

Philostr.
pav^^s.

322

y^ow.
15

2 dwol?;droi-

ceded by can, or cannot.


Tovro TO yeVos ovk eKiropeieTai,
fvxfi Koi vijoreia.

Matt.
cl
jirj

17,
iv

21

Cj/rt7Z.

//.

Procat.
Nil.

Seigi;,

vpoa-

X^B,

diroXaifrriTe, XdfirjTe.

461

\dfiris.
^jerz-'t-rf

(compare Marc.

9,

29 ToCto
el
firj

Infinitive Mood.
infinitive,
is

1.

The

TO ysvos iv oiibevl dwuTat. e^eXBeiv,


Trpoo-fuxs
<l>pOflV, to

ev

when not preceded by the


and
is

article,

*'

VTjiTTeiq).

Lucian.

I,

336 Oi

equivalent to on with the perfect indica-

nXouTO)!/, MsVlTTTTOV TOVTOvl TOV KVVa

tive or optative,

used after verbs


hear,

TrapotKoiivra,
3.

signifying

to
;

say,
as,

tliinh,

and their

Not unfrequently the present or future


Gen. 17, 9 Si 8e

equivalents

indicative-has the force of the imperative.


Sept.
ttjv StaOrjiofv p.ov Sia-

^aoLV k\T)Kv6evai
^aalv
2.

"Ecjiaa-av eXrfKvdhai.

OTi fXi)Xu5a<rt ^^''E<j>a<Tav

on

iXrjXvdoiev.

TTjpri(Teis-

Ex. 20, 3 Ovk taovral aoL

deal eTcpot
k. t.

The

perfect infinitive sometimes takes


infinitive.

irXfiv ip.ov.

Oi

noirjcreis

(reavr^ iiBtoKov,

X.

the place of the aorist


4, 28,

Polyh.

Jos. Ant. 11, 6, 5 El Tiva 6e\eis Tols imjKooij


evepyeirlav KaTaSetrdai, KeXevtrets npoppi^ov
\e<r6ai.
ypdyj/eis
trreiKrj
(ztto-

2 iirmeifKexBai,

neiioirfdai.

Diod. 11,
1,

TTenoiritrBai

noifja-ai.

Diog.

114

ye-

12, 2,

4 'Eav ovv

(tol

&ok^, ^aaikev,
oirojs

yovkvai.

Patric.

135, 20 'EvbfbaKivm xpl

Ta Tav

^lovdaiiav dp^^iepel

diro-

npos toCto.
TTTLtrdrji/aL.

Theoph. 25 ^e^ajTTicrdai

;3a-

Tav Trpea^VTepoiv e^ e^
'Avaipel odv

aTrda-rjs (pvXijs.

Mai. 271, 16
Hepaas
4.

eKaarros

ovs

f^ej

3.

The

infinitive

preceded by the

article
witli

ets tdiov

avTOv oikov.

TOV is often equivalent to 1m, or


its

on

The

perfect indicative is often used for


Sept. Ex. 32, 1 Kai Ibav 6 \abs
efc

appropriate mood.
pe Kvpios tov
TtoL^aat
prip.a
p.T]

Sept.
tlktciv.

Gen. 16, 2
18, 7 *ErdMj/fiapois
(rii

the aorist.

2u//KXctcre

OTi KexpdviKe i/lavarjs Kara^rjvai


(TVViarri
yocc.

ToS opovs,
1

X^v^

^0^

avro.

18, 25

6 Xaos

cm

'Aapav.
2,

Diod. 16,
5,

yk-

irotrjo'eLi

as to

tovto tov anOKTeivai biKaiov

Strab. 1, 2, 13.

35 yeyoxe =^
ireiipaKe irdura
1 1,

peTa

d{Tffiovs.

19, 21 'EttI
Tr)i>

tw

pfjpaTi

Toira tov

iyivcTO.

Matt. 13, 46 'AneKdav

prj KaTaarpeylraL

ttoKw.

19, 22 'Zirevaov ovv toC


pi)

o(Ta eiX^J "'" vydpatrcv avTov.

Paul. Hebr.
Tov
1,

TOV (Ttodrjvm dpapTftv


o-e

eKel.

20, 6
epc.

'E(j)iia-dpr]v a-ov

17 HuTTii

irpocrcvrivoxev 'A^padp,
1,

'lo-adx.

els

Josu. 19, 48.

22, 10.

Herm.
hehaKev.

Vis.

1 itiwpaKe.
I,

Plut.

687

Eeg.
odoiis

3, 16, 31.

Ps. 38, 1 Elna 0Xd|ffl tos dpapTaveiv ev


y\c6(T(jrj

App.

71, 2

ip.ireirpfjKaa-i.

Patric.
elprjKacri.

pov tov

pfj

pov.

121

de'SmKci/.

124, 12

SeStoKao-t.

125

118, 57 EtTra TOV (jyuXd^aaddi tov vopov aov.


Inscr.

128
12

wewpdxcuriv9,

Theoph. 5 KardKiXonrcv.
yeyove.

8,

4896 KipSweveiv
Matt. 13, 3
I/llC.

fjpds tov prj ex^iv to

SedojKE.

16

33, 18 ecapoKe.

34
58,

vopi^opeva.

'ihov e^ffkBev 6 aiiei-

iseiro'ai<e.

37, 7 iruvTeraKTai.

41

KeKXrjKe.

pav TOV

aireipeiv.

Act. 23, 15'ETOipoi'.


27,
2,

itiirrtoKev.

59, 17

co-x^k""''-

71, 12 xaTeiX^-

iapev TOV dveXelv avTov.


dirorrXeiv.

'EKpLdr]
els

tov tov

(fxun.

82, 6

ireirXripaicev.

83,

18

irewpax^v.

Yi&ldo-Jacob.
jreptrraT^a-ai.
''<"'

4 KaTe^rj
6,
1

87

TTfTTOI'^aO'iJ'.

napdheiaov tov

Ea-Tija-ev av-

Subjunctive Mood.
future indicative in

Sometimes

T^v

ij

prjTTfp avTJis x^po'i-

Siarretpda-ai ei icrra-

the aoris* subjunctive is equivalent to the

Tai, to see

if she could stand up.

Eus. Alex.

apparently indepenoxKriOfi.

365

OiiK

earI

tovto

apurrov

deUov tov

dent sentences.
Esai. 10,

Sept. Tobit 6, 8

KaTma-xiveiv tov nevrjTa.


\eva-as toC Sodijvai.
Toil

Mai. 440, 11 Ke-

14

dvTfinr)-

33,

24 d^f^j.

jSymm.

440, 21 'HvdyxaCov avTas

Ps. 54,

24

KaTevkyKn^.

Theodtn. Dan. 12, 10

npotaraadai.

460

AT/Kaa-as avTm tov


t5>v

pij

iiikeyexn, iKKevKavOatri, irvpaBacri, dyiaaBaiTi,


dvoiirj(T(oiri.

de^aa-dai.

463

'Hj-

ydp drjXadev ex

Tiepaav
tov

Men. Rhet.

232,

12

dpydoT],

TOO a-vvatpBrjvai noKepov.

467 Vpd^as avTa

Digitized

by Microsoft

46
dyanijo-ai <j>i\Lav.
yp-aro Se
dcKfj.

INTEODUCTION.
Theoph. 65, 19 UpocrpediToicaXv^eaiv- dv6pa>7ra>v

nvav

oTrovorjTiore Kaoi-

avTov xal >tov yeviuBai (rivoSov ev 2ap-

aravrat.

dvtTiaoTTjpia,

iravrX

Tp&ir<o

ra roiavra

Ill,

9 'E^amXiCeTo tov KareKBeiv

els

aTTodoKipaa-deiatv.

Pallad.
r/p'iv

Laus.

1178 D.
Chal.

kK&iR-qa-iv

avToii.

336

TlapaKoKaiv

airov tov
TlapidcoKev

Ephes. 1000

Tdvto

paprvpridfj.

etvai

avTov

(rvfi/iuj^ov P(B/iaioif.
roil

337

905 A"E\6a<nv
OStoj ^av
'Epayrr]6fi
Kajj,
rj

01 vordpioi Ka\ etnaaiv.

1012

'lova-nviavos

yjrdWea-dai ev toJs eKKXrjo-iats

oSros els 8vo yevTirai.

1080

TO 'O fiovoyevrjs uios koX \6yos tov 6eov.

342

iyia (Tvvohos.
fXSrj.

Apophth. 112
Leo.

A A
38

Mafluv TOV TTpeafieieLv


that he

jJKciv,

having learned

'O

deXav iXBuv,

Tact.

9,

had come as an ambassador.


AeSotra TOV
fifj

Porph.

'ATTOtrreXXrjs 5e
2.

Kai rtvas Ka^aXXaptove.

Adm. 132
yevea-dat.

nap' fip&v KarahrjKov


avrrjv iroKXa. tov

When
used.

the exhortation includes also

268, 14 HapcKoiKovv

the exhorter, the first person of the subjunctive is

rjtTVXa(Tai (cat

irapa^ap^aai avTois to irraurpM.

Pseudo-Jbs. Mace. 12.

Apocr.
rf/v 6r)-

4.
juexa,

In expressions like the following,


after,
is

Act. Paul, et Thecl. 30 Aor diraydyo}


ptopd^ov.

to be supplied before the


a-Trjvai.

Apophth. 341
let

"iSm ipas rtKva

article to.

Porph. Cer. 197 Kai to

pov Tiyamjpeva,
dren.

me

see

you,

my

dear

chil-

Toiis veovip.<j)ovs,

and after

the bride

and bride-

Theoph. 384, 9

"iSco i8<b

t^v avyovarav

groom
where

shall have stopped


/utra is

(compare 201, 12,

Pmpaioiv, let

see, let

me

see the

empress of

expressed).
1.

the

Romans.

Participle.
is

The

present participle

3.

Sometimes ihe future


Synes.

optative is used

sometimes used

for the future participle.


ovojii

in prohibitions.
BtKalov
TTore
(jiovov

1433

Mt/Sc yap

Me?i. P. 282, 8 KavSlx


a-^fvofievos.

ns

rjpiBr)

itpe-

Trpoird'^OLO.

Basil.
p.r)8e
sttI

Sd,
ttoXv

Theoph. 125, 12 Tov

avairXri-

585
rrjv

'Q>v p7}he

vvv avda^oio,
o-civ

povvTa TOV TOTTOV t6v epov dnefTTeiKa.


IIe/Ai//'a?,

249, 8

Kaff ijpwv

rmv

rpo(j)Lpo3V

v^piv avrav

&s

(l)aai, Koi

tov dvaipovvra avrov.

Kal drrovotav evraBrjvai trvyxoiprnToiS'

2.

The

perfect participle is

sometimes
Joann.
4,

Expression of
by means of the
optative,

Wish.
is

wish

used for the aorist participle.


KEKOjriaKiis.

referring to futiu-e time

expressed also

6,

13
9,

/SfjSpoHcoo-i.

6,

19

eKrjka-

aorist subjunctive, future

KOTcs.

Theoph.

10

yeyovoTor.

or future indicative.
Sept.

Commands and
1.

Prohibitions.

By

the aorist subjunctive.

Ruth

1,

In mild commands or decrees, later and

9 Awt; Kvpios vplv Kai evpijre dvdirav(rLV eKaarrj


ev otKO) dvSpos avrrjs.

Byzantine writers often use the present or


aorist subjunctive.

Dion. H.

Ill,

1445, 4

This

is

apparently a

^vveveyKTj pev ravra vplv Ka\ yevoiprjv eyo) kokos


eiKao-Tijff
'Att/t;

Latinism.
kKtjpov dyiov.
.

Hippol. 804
JEus. II,

A "Ek/SXjjt-os yivr/Tm
*E7rl

Tav etropevav.
17

Jos. B. J. 4, 3, 10

325 C
II,

tovto p6-

8e
!

rrelpa roii

Xoyav I

may it

never come

vov rpaTTCotTiv.

Athan.

701

A
B

Oi npoeiprj'O
pr)

to

pass

Ignat. Polyc; 8 'EppairOai. vpds Sid


Bern fipmv 'Iqaoii "KpiiTTa

pevoi e)(6po\ naOaipeOamv.

821

ei8i>s

navTos ev

ev^apni ev

TOV
let

Trjs

TTKTTeas \6yov pdBrj trapa 'Adavaa^iov,

Siapetvrjre ev evorqri 6eov koi eTTiiTKoirfj ! II,

Orw.
eWe Kdv

him

learn.

Basil. IV,

401

'Ejrl

Toiir

1016 A.
"i>a

Athan.

I,

740

A 'AXV
Epiph.

XaiKois dvoppKpatri.
nuriSai.
KeipTjTai.

753 C

'E^erao'Bacri

de

aKovoTji,

KOI aii TreurBfis!

I,

428 A

Pachom. 952
Epiph.
aiiTov
I,

MijSflr tijv KeCJjaKrjV

Tevtjrai hvvapis ev

rovra ra v8an.

Apophth.

421 C "E^eKBe

to SaipoII,

397

SvyxapfioT] vplv 6 6e6s !

Const. (536),
.'

VLOv

(ITT*

Koi

vyiTjs yevTjTai.

712

1148
1209

Aei^aTtotrav
TCOK

....

etTrmtrt.

Garth. 19 *Edv tis

D E

'A.va(TKa(j>!j

rd darea rmv Mawp^oioiK


ra dirrka rov narpos

A.va'jravQfi

(tov f

cTrKTKOirav KaTrjyoprJTM, irapa Tois t^s avrrpcorevovtriiV 6 Karrjyopos

Joann. Mosch. 3105

M17

itoii^rrrj

6 Beds!

rov \a)pas
irpdypa,

dvaydyjj t6

Mai. 146, 17

EitraKovcn; Kvpios d Beds <tov tovs

83

"Ocra yap 8i iwTrviav Ka\ paraimv

Xdyovi Pa\jrdKov.

Digitized

by Microsoft

GEAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
By ihefviure
lieBvoTpia,

47

optative.

Inscr.
II,

5760 Tpav

^Tjo-ois /

Ens.

891

Dactylic.
'tyiaL-

vovra ae 6 6e6s 6 iravTOKparcDp 8ia(f>v\d^oi inl

"OvTiva pev

fiaa-iXija

Kal

e^op^oK

&vhpa

Kixelrj.

iroWois

erea-iv.

Athan.
Cyrill.

I,

361

'O

fleos vp.a.i

Horn.

11.

2, 188.

hw.<pvKa^oi!
hi
v\)ja,s

H.

Procat. 17 *uTfi'o-ot
koI (rrpaTevtroi up,ds

Tdav

otJrts

opoia vorjpaTa nrjveXoTreirj.

Od.

2,

els ttjv fKKKrjcriav

121.
MevTiop, bs p
'0hv<Trj0s

eavTa.

Simoc. 327 'O

6e6s, avToxpaTaip, 6 Ka-

dpipovos ^ev halpos.

\e(ras ae fiainXeveiv imoTci^oi aoi


Xe/noSi/ra

navra to

tto-

Od.

2,

225.

ry

/SucriXeia.

J^ic. II,

744

'O 5e6s

(j>v\d^oi Tois evKafieis (Sao-iXfts fip,av.

Trochaic.

By

tlie fittiire

indicative.

Sept.

Tobit

Avopa Tioajvov OTrapdTTmv


KVKav.
Arist.

Kal

TapaTTav Kal

10, 11.
Vfiiv.

Apophth. 124
II,

A 'O

fleos (ruyxaprjo-ei

Ach. 682.
Tra)(v.

N'i'c.

700

*uXd^Et 6 dc6s

Tfjv

^a-

Tois aypoiKouTiv travoipyas &(TTe (paivetrdai

(TiKeiav

avTav ! /iaKpyvcl 6 6f6s tovs \p6iiovs avTrKeiarov 6 Oeos xapoTroirnrei avTovs /


t'is

Eq. 317.

rav

7rt

Td^eav

diraWayevTes

Kal

kokuv

(jioivLKiKav.

Theoph. 279, 18 Ei
iTOirja-t

ttotc

lanv,

roi/

popov

Pac. 303.

Tov lov8a I
jxc

^eos avrafnohiaxT^i avra

AXX

aKOV(TavTes toiovtov xaipopev KrjpvypaTos.

dSiKovvTi

dia Taxous !

Ibid. 311.
'E^<l>v(rr)a-if

TO(rovTOV TroXcfioVf axTTc

rw

KOTrva.

Rhythm.
In ancient Greek the basis of rhythm
qvMntity
larly
; is

Ibid. 611.

TavTa Tolmv, pa t6v


ovhevos.

'AttoXXo),

'ya

TreTricrprjv

that

is,

the metrical ictus regusyllable.

Ibid. 616.

faUs

upon a long

The

Trjvhe pev hiKpols ea>6ovv ttjv 6ebv Ktjpiypaxnv.

word-accent has no perceptible influence


in versification
;

Ibid. 638.

still

the laws of the lanshould be rendered


[Aristot. Elench.
'Ettci ail hia

guage require that

it

Iambic.
to
(r(o<j>povetv

perceptible to the ear.


4,

t^

Tsansor

eihes

rjhri ;

8 Uapa Be

rfiv

npoircaBiav ev pev tois avfv


Trotrjo-at

Nub. 1061.
So^fflxaTOK.

ypa^Tis biaKeKTLKois ov pahiov


he Tois yeypappevois

Xoyov, ev
olou

SotpmraTOV y eKeivov ; &

ri a'

e'lirio

(cut iroii^patri

paXKov
Toiis

Ibid. 1378.
T1S)S

Koi TOV "Oprjpov evioi htopBovvTai

npos

e\ey-

yap to pev

o'bv

(japa XPV ir\r]yav dOatov

XpvTas

las CLT&nais elpr)ic6rra


'

" to pev o5 KaTaniTrf

elvai;

Ibid. 1413.

deTai opl^pta

Xvoutrt

yap avTO
Kal

Trpoaahla

'AXX' ovhapov vopL^eTm tov iraTepa todto TratTX""Ibid. 1420.

\eyovTes to ov o^vTepov.
TOV 'Ayapepvovos,

Trepl

to evvTrviov
elirev

on

oiiK

avTos 6 Zeis

Tois evpvrrpaKTOVs yovv

tovtovi

Ibid. 1099.

" hiSopev he

oi

evxos dpeirdm," dXhd tw ew-

oth* eyatj KdKetvovl,

m'ua evereWeTO hihovai.

This shows that ov


ov

Kal TOV
Ti
hf/T

KopriTTjv

tovtovL

was readily distinguished from

(even

epels

when the

latter

was pronounced without


'

'UTTTipeff ,

&

Kivovpevoi.

the rough breathing), and the

first

perhi-

^povpovvT
vvKTcop

iyu}

Te Koi crv

KaTa irepmaTovvre

son hihopev from the


hopev.

Epic

infinitive

Vesp. 237.

Consult the passages referred to


t6vos,

T^9 dpTovaXihos \a66vT eKKei^apev tov oKpov.


MijTTCi)

under

eyicXtTWOi,

d^eia, 0apeia,

nept-

\a6aiv

riff

epirohoiv rjpds KaKov ti hpaarj.

(rTrapivrj.^

Ibid. 247.
co-

Sometimes the accentual rhythm


incides with the quantitative
;

K&v

pfj

KoXovvrav

tcws /loj^Xous p^aXmo'iv ai

as.

yvvalxes.

LyS. 310.

Digitized

by Microsoft

mTRODUCTION.
'Ei* rrj (TOpai vvvl \a-)(ov

to ypdp,}xa aov diKa^ecv.

SipPXoi/

fie

(l>aa-i.

XPW^'^''^

^'X^'"

airavTcs aOrdi/.

Plut. 277.
'Off rjhofxai,

Vesp. 241.
/ecu

KaX rkpirofiai

ISovXofxai

;i^op6i)o"at.

'Ett'

avTov as Ko\ovpevovs &v

rj^Uria-tv,

dXXo.

Ibid. 288.

Jbid. 244.
rfju

Mifiovnevos Koi
Ibid. 291.
BX7;;(a)ftEi/ot
o-e

noSolv

iiSl

TrapevadKevav.

"Aij/aiires

eir els Tr)v

dvpav KpLrj&ov epneaaipfv.

Lys. 307.
tovtovI mvanrra

KaTaXa^ovTes.

Tis |uXXd/3oiT' if
Trjyav
" AiTTOv
;

Toil

^vKov rmv

iv Sdjura oTpa-

Ibid. 297.

Ibid. 313.

povov ^rpCLTvKXibos Ta baKTvKa npoaeX'


Ibid. 365.
o'ayrrjpias*

On the
is

other hand, the accentual rhj'thm

Bmv.

sometimes the reverse of the quantita;

STfixovaaii doToI? dpT] t^s

Soph.

tive

that

is,

the word-accent coincides


foot.

Ant. 186.
edi|raf ^ifiijKe, kotti ;fp(BTi bf^iav.

with the thesis of the


following examples
:

We

give the

Ibid. 246.
Ibid.

TeXof

8'

or ovSeu

fjv

ipevvaiaiv irKiov.

268.

Quantitative Trochaics, but Accentual


Iambics.
'JJ liadv(a>va>v

Haiicrm nplv opyrjs K.apk peuTacrm \eyo>v.

Ibid.

280.virepTaTr],

avaaaa Jlfpa-iSmv

Aesch,

Pers. 157.
Mrjrep
r]

Accentual Rhythm.
yii/ai.

After the

Sip^ov yepaia, X^'P^ Aapciov

fourth century, quantity ceased to be appreciated


tual

&0v pev evvdreipa

Uepa-ai/, deov be Kal prjTTjp

by the Greeks generally, accenrhythm having taken the place of


It

Ot yepovTes
Arist.

ol

TraXatoi

pepcjjopecrda

ttj

TrdXet.

quantitative rhythm.

would seem, how-

Ach. 676.
'AacjiaXeios

ever, that scholars continued to enjoy the


iarXv
rj

Ols

llo(Tt8ai^

^ciKTrjpla.

ancient

rhythm

at least as late as the sixth

Ibid. 688.
T(B

century.
&vbpa kv(^qv rfkiKov Oovicvdldijv

Thus, Joannes Lydus recognizes


Icuiff

yap

eiKos

the distinction between

and

s/iort

Ibid. 702.

yLyd. 141 XlappiKibas 8e Vcopaloi opampais

Toif

vioicrt 8'

evpiirpwKTOs Kal )iaXos

x^

KXcipiov.

Tovs Te yoveaiv^ tovs re ttoXitoiv (poveas


KaXoiia-i,

diro-

Ibid. 712.

itapiVTJjs CKarepovs vpocrayopevovres.


eiri Trjs

Tov yepovra ra yepovri tou veov Be


Ibid. 718.
'H5tKT;/xevat

roj

vea.

Ata(popaii 8e

eiravvpias ravTrjv napexovai


ttjv
TrpdiTrjv

nva
rjfxtv p,p,<p6fxe(r6'

(riKTTeWovTes yap

(ruWa^ijV

yap

ivavriov.

Nub.

Kal ^pax^lav ivoiovvres tovs yovias, CKTeivovres

576.
Tr)V

8e Toiis iTnjKOouf (rqpaivovtriv.


els

That

is,

pa-

BpvaWid*

iavTov

evBias

^vvcXKvo'as

rentes,
short A,

the plural of

parens,

with a

Ibid. 585.

means

parents, yoveis, but

pawith

Ov ^avelv

<pacrKfv vplv,

f/v

aTpaTriyrjirri
'

KXemv.

rentes, from parens, pareo,


a long A, means
uv(TTiXKovTfs,
subjects,
in-jjKoot.

Mavddvovras ToWl^ripas
Triphal. Tois
"ifirjpas oils

Toiis

hpiiTTapxov TrdXai.

Here

slwrtening,

and

eKTeivovres,

xPiy^^s

juoi ^orfdrja-ai

Spopxo.

lengthening, refer to pronunciation.


ther, in irapevrrjs, this

Fiu--

Ibid.

author represents

the Latin case-ending jES (long H) by H2,


Quantitative Iambics, but Accentual
Trochaics.

and not by E2

which shows that he did

not regard E and


to 6epp,a \ovTpd

as isochronous.!

Kai

TO! riva yviiprjv

fxwv

^//eyels

In accentual rhythm the metrical ictus


regularly coincides with an accented syl-

Arist.

Nub. 1045.
Digitized

by Microsoft

GRAMMATICAL OBSERVATIOXS.
lable irrespectively of the quantity of that
syllable.
Evapl6firjT0i Kal jrpoSijXoi Tols irdtriv.

49

The

following are the most usual

H/ifis 8e (tovto) TTpbs Taina dvrepovfiev

accentual feet
Trochee,
syllable
;

Toif bo^d^ovaiv

SiSe, i)s

ovre Sapov,

an accented and an unaccented


Ttlve.

OvTe BavpaoTov Koi jrapdSo^ov tovto

as \iym, Xeye,

To

o-dJo-ai

Xpi&Tov

Toiis

{npo) Ttemo-TevKOTas,

Iambus, an unaccented and an accented


as
kclKos, TTurrms.

ETret KpiTris

SUaios imdpyiei povos,


ovk oXeirat.

Kal
;

Trar 6 Toirrm jruTTevo-as

Pyrrhic, two unaccented syllables


Xeyd-jxevos, Iprf-fuKOs.

as in

The am-thmy

of most of these lines ensues

from the use of the accentual iambus.


AeoTTOiKo Trdvayvs prJTep

Dactyle,

an accented and two unaccenti]

ed

as XcyofifV, avBpamos.

tok 6e6v pov TeKovcra,

Anapaest,

two unaccented and an accent-

Aia Tas Betas eiKovas

r]

fiesta
fjv

pov

eKoirr).

ed

as novTjpos, Tvpavvels-

Ovk ayvoels

Tijv aiTiav, di

ipdvij 6

Aeav.
rfjv

Tribrach, three unaccented ; as in irepiwaTOVVTCS, 8o^(t^o-fiepov,

IIp6<pdaoov TOLvvv as Td)(os Kal unral pov


Xe'tpa.

Creticus,

an accented, an unaccented, and


ffoC.

Se^ia TOV

i\|^i'(rTou

rj

dno aov

(rapKaiBeiira
(Trjs

an accented ; as 2pn

IIoAXaff TtOLel Tas dvvdpeis Sta ttjs

peaLTeias.

The following accentual dimeters


referred
to the time of
vof),

are

These accentual hexameters correspond to


the following quantitative hexameters
Kat piv
eyo) KaTeXetirov la)v ev 8ajpa<r
:

by the Byzantine chronographers


Phocas the Rebel
(6 rvpav-

who reigned

in the early part of the

epoia-tv.

seventh century.
UdKiv
els

Kal irooias 6 S
Tov kovkov

eireiTa 6eo2s ev^^etrdai dvayei.

XaodiKTfv eladyovaa, Svyarpav eldos dpitrrqv.


jiies,

HoXlv tov vovv

diriXeKes.
eVot'ijcrfi'

In the iambic Tpmrdpia of John of Daittttikov,

[Theoph. 457 'O 8e iooKar


Koi oi
fls (v.

mascus two kinds of rhythm are


ible,

discern-

UpdaiPoi v^purav avTov \eyovTes, HdXiv


eiTies,

the quantitative and the accentual.


Tpondpia
ai-e

TOV KavKov
1.

HdXiv tov vovv


I,

diriXeices

At present, however, these


sung according to the
latter

dn6Ka-(i).

Cedr.

709

TldXiv tov oivov

rhythm

alone.

rtffj

JlaKiv TOV vovv dirdtketras.


eiries, IlaXti'

Glyc.

511

We
first

subjoin the

first

two

Tpmrdpia of the

ndXii/ ets TOV Km)KOv


Xeiras.

tov vovv dndi-

ode of his Christmas canon.


*E(rcBO"e

The

first line
it,

of this distich, as

Theophanes gives
chaic dimeter,

is

an accentual

\aov Bavparovpywv

deoTTOTijs

tro-

fwiis

being pronounced as
as the second line
is

'Yypov 6aKd<Tin)S Kvpa ^epaixras TsaKm.


'E<co)1'

a dissyllable.

But

8e Te\6e\s eK Koprjs Tpl0ov ^arriv


Tjpiv.

a decided iambic dimeter acatalectic, the


first
ejTier,

IIoXou TtOiiaiv

'Oj

kot oialav

line

may

be read ndXt

'Icrov Te iraTpi Kal ^poTo'is bo^d^opev.


's

toi/

kovkov

or IlaX' els tov kovkov

Ijrter.j

'HveyKe yaarfip

fiyiaa-pevrj

XoyoK

The following accentual


ters

trochaic trime-

Sa(f)as d<j)\eKTm ^wypaf^ovpevT)


'M.iyevra pop(j}^
tji

^dra

and accentwil

dactylic hexameters are

^poTT}aia aeov

attributed
257.

to Joannes

of

Damascus

(II,

Evas rdXaivav
Avovra mKpas

vr]8vv

dpds

ttjs iraXat

Joann. Hier. 457 B).


KJyaffl

bv fipoTol bo^d^opev.

Tives yovv

tovs

irpoircii laTevKOTas,

Ot TtKES

i(rl

irarepes Kal jrpofpiJTai,

The following
catalectic

accentual iambic diTneters


(II.

KpiToi, jSairtXeif, <rvv avTois TtoTpidpxai,

are

attributed to Photius

Kai Tives SKKoi tov \aov ray 'E^paiav

578).

Digitized

by Microsoft

'

50
'An-6
;;(ciXe(Bi'

INTRODUCTION.
v/ivov
kti'otjj

Trjs iieravolas avoi^dv poi m-'Xas,

faoSdra

Upoa-cjiepai croi

t^

'Op6pi^ei yap t6
(TOV,

irvcvpa p.ov

wpos vaov tov ayidy

'Atto KapSiat /Savour

2oi So^av avamp,ita


'Bados (Tov TJjs

Naoi' (pepcou tov (raypaTos o\ov eaTriKtapevov.

<TO(j)ias,

'AXX'

i>s

olKTippav

Kadapou evoTrXdyxvm

am

Kpipdrav ras d^vircrovs


Ttf Xdyos
^Vfipr](Tei,

eX/.

In the second line


a monosyllable
is
;

vaoj' is
is,

to be read as

Afanora

To>v Anavrcou

that

AO must

be pro-

The

aSdptov of

Leo

(p.
:

309)

composed

nounced as a diphthong.

of accentual hexameters

The eleven e^airoa-TetXdpia


p.e

of the Rit-

''Apa Tts yrjBiv deipas iv (Tvarpoipri

^e(fmpov
(cot-

ual are each composed of six versus politid.

'AKapiaias
XaSa,
"iv

diroia-ei.

irpos

rriv

KKavdpmvos

They

are ascribed to the emperor Constan-

tine Porphyrogenitus.
oTrms fie Tas
vT](ja>

We

give here the

/ifvovaas Idav KoXao-ets 6pi-

first three.

Toif paBriTois (n>ve\6a>pev iv opei TaXiXaiac

Bafiai ^a/Sai

nas

Ppvxdcret yala Sixv priympevr)

Tlia-Tei

KptaTov Oedaaadai XeyovTa i^ovaiav


tS>v

Nfutrei T^s virepBcv ^ias (jipiKaSeis dnoyvjivovaa

Aa/SeiK

ava

Ka\

Kdrio,

paOapfv irm

hi-

Xapovs Tovs vvv KfKcvSpfVovs !


kKiLvr)S !

(jicv

poi T^s 6eas

hdcTKei

BaTrrifei" e's to ovopa tov n-arpos eOvrj jravra

The

later Byzantines, or rather

modern
iroXinKos,

Kai TOV

vioii xal

dyiov jrvevpaTOs Kal avveivat

Greeks, apply the

name

a-rixos

Tois pvaTats,

i>s viritrx^To, c<as Tr)s (ruiTcXeias.

popular
tetrameter

verse,

to the

accentual
Eustathius,

iambic
ToK \i6ov
Seapfjcracrai.

dnoKeKvXta-pivov

catalectic.

being
Al pvpo(j)6poi exaipov, elbov yap veaviaKov
KaBrjpevov ev

misled by the accentual


trochaic

rhythm of the
near the
Aeschylus,

rw

rd0G, Kal avTos TavTats


ciTrare iriiv

(j>r]

tetrameters
of

occurring

'iSov

XpioTos iyfjyepTai,

Ta QiTpa
'

beginning
identifies

the

Persae of
ttoKitikos

Tots padr/TaU, iv

ra

opei (^fldtrare FaXiXaias


(^iXotff.

the arlxos

with the tro'EKft Vplv 6(j>67)<TTaL, COS TTpoeiTTe Tols

chaic tetrameter catalectic.


01 drjpoTtKoi aTiXoi
TToSi^opevoi,
Xoi,
^leif

[Sustr. 11, 35

ol

to Trdkaioif p^v Tpoxo.'iKws


817-

"On

XpierTos iyfjyeprai prj tis StinrioTeircB

Kadd Kai AtaxvXos ev Tiepirms

'E(^dv7j TTJ

Mapia ydp,

tirsiTa KaOapadrf

apn

Se

TroXtrtKot ovopa^optvoi.

Msrpov
oi 6e ttoX-

Tois els dypov dmovcri, pvirrais 8e irakiv a>^6ti

yap avTois nevreKaiSeKa (rvWa^ai,


Kcri

AvaKeipevois evheKa, ots ^LiTrrl^eiv eKTrepi^as

Xol

els

iitTOKaibcKa

rj

kol nXeiovas airovs


TrXet'o-

Eir ovpavovs, odev

KarajSe'/St^Kcv,

dvcX^^di)

wore napeKTcivoviTi crvXKafids, ainvs, al


vs Srj'XaSfi tS>u TTfureiemSeKa, el
(jjavoyv

EwiKupav TO KTjpvypa

TrXTjOeat t5>v urjpeiav.

pkv pera avpappvdpot


/xdi/019

\d\ovvTat,
o)ff

yeXavrat

cas
et

koI

The third and

fifth

lines

seem

to be

(TKcoTVTOvraL

TToXvTrofier
(fxavfjeai,

6e

eKCJio-

designedly arrhythmical.

vovvrai Kadapois

XavOdvov to

ttoXuttoui/

The work De Ceremoniis, the authorship


of which
is

\nv(n
(cril

Til

Taxeu} avvK(pa)vrj(TeL Tav

(l>a>vrjevTa>v,

attributed to the same em-

crtifeTaj 6

TpoxaiKos pv6p6s.^

peror, contains the following verstis poUtid,

The following troparion


accentual
It
is

consists of four
catalectic.

and accentual trochaic and iambic dimeters


:

iambic

tetrameters
TpuiSiov,

found in the

the

greater

366

I8e TO tap TO KaXov TraXtv eTravaTeXXet


'bepov vyieiav
plav.
icai

part of which was composed in the eighth

x^pov Ka\

Trjv

evrjpe-

and ninth centuries.


Digitized

by Microsoft

GRAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
367
I8e TO eap to

51

yKvKv TrdXiv iiravareWei


^(ofjv

Ek Tav

dyajTOiuratv ce.

^ipov vyitiav Koi


'AvSpayaBiav ek
palav,

koX Trjv eirjfitpiav,

Q* yc^ dyairapev ae
A^ims ae tiixdpeSa
"iva dSidSoxos

fleoO toIs ^acrtKeicri Pco-

Kai

vtKrjv

deodaprjTov Kara rau iroXepiav.

MeivTjs dioiKoiv ijpds*

"Es

380

At'

^fias

kfifTpiaaas iv

Kav^

Trjs

TaXi-

O dmaTas

debs fjp&v,

\aias
Trjv evvofiov (Tvvd(piav
yifcBC.

*uXaT-T Tof Sjjpapxov.

as deos

e7rt(r<^pa-

Michael PseUus, the younger, who


&v6pa>TT0S

flour-

ished in the eleventh century, wrote sev'Ek prjTpiKTJs yap Tracrrddos


irpoeK\i6r]s,
ais

eral

poems

in accentual iambic tetrameters.

(Psell. Stich. 1 seq.)

Kai as rjvXoyrja'as tovs exet wpXJ>Vop-

MeXtTo)
vovs,

o'Oi

ypappaTiKrjs Kai

(defective)

Trjs 6p6oypa(jiias,

OvTas

UpaTos
Kai vvv evXayrjcov dvdda irrefpavov-

avTr]
fie

Sep^Xws Kai

^dcris paBrjiidTiov.

OvK eoTi
AXX'
KaraKocrpav fvTfKvlq koi
elprjvaia ^laxret.

povoTpoTTOs, ovSe KOivf) Kai pia,


Ktil

e;^ei

yXaxra-as

(pavas Kai jreire fiioXt-

KTOVS,

197

AloXiKfjv, 'laviKriv, 'AtBiSo, koI A(opi8a,

Ilvfvpa TO iravdyiotf^

Kai

TTjV <Tvvq6ri (cat KOivfjV Kai KaTt)pa^fvpkvr]V.


(jjiovas IBlas,

Tas avyouaTos UKiiratTOV


Kvpte, ^a7)V avTav

'ExdoTij 8e bioKeKTOs tx^i

'H
Aict Tr)V ^corjv fjpSiv.

Se

Koii/fj

K&v ni^vKe aOpoio'pa tS>v Tforcrapav

AXX' eoTt Kai povoTpoTTOs, aWij Tiapd Tas &WasBaaikev


vedvvfjiipe.,

Geof SiaKJivkd^ei
'Ei/Tt^uE ivdpcTe,

(re /

The following

tetrastich

in

accentual

iambic dimeters, relating to Alexius Comtre^

Tpias KaTaKOfrprjaet

nenus, has been preserved by


nena.

Anna Com-

Kai \hpav nape^fi aoi Qeos 6 knovpdvios


'EvXoyav Tov ydpov
trou,

To

crajS/SaToi/ Trjs Tvpivfjs

Xap^s, 'AXc|ie,

ivorjo-es

to

'Or povos VTrepdyaBos !


*Off eV Kat^a

Kai

TrjV

BfVTepav to npai,

to npoTepov

Etira, KaXras, yepaKiv pov.

Ta ydpa
To vSap

napeyeveTO^

\Gomn.

I,

98 "EvBev
Trjs

rot

Knl TO TrXrjdos

dito-

Kai iv avra fvXoyrjae


its (j}i\di/6pa>TT0S,

Se^apevov
voias, i^

oppfjs tov 'AXe^toK kuI ttjs dyxi-

avTav twh irpaypdraiv airpaTiav avT^

Kai oivov direTiXeaev


^Avdpajrois els aTToXavo'LU,

aveirke^avTO ^ ifitiriSos pev avyKcipevov yXuTTrjs,

avTijV

8e

Tr)V

ToO irpdypaTos eTrivoiav epjrapepipalvov


ttjv

O^TOs

ev\oyr](Tei
rrjs

ae

pekitrTaTa dvaKpovopfvov Kai


Te jTpoaiaSrja-LV t^s kot

Mera

irv^vyov <rou,
trot

ixeivov ent^ovXrls,

Kai

Kai Te<va

ScopqffCTat

TO

Trap'

avTov penrjxaprjfiiva.
Xe|eo-ti'

To

fie

atrpariov

Bfos

trop(j)vpoyevvriTa /

avTois

elx^v

oCrmr

To trdp^aTov

TJjf Ivpivris

evorjaes to X"Pi'' 'AXe^ie,


TTptot
770)5

Kai tijk

377

'A|i<BS a-oi

fvxdpeda

dfVTtpav

Til

ilira,

KuXSr, yepdKiv

pov.
e/ceii/o

BeKETot, jrayKocrpi.e.

Elxf

fif

^8e

ivmiLas to bi.a(pripi^6pevov

"Oti VTiep^dKXovtrav

^apdTWV,

i>s

apa,

Kara pev

to

Tvpampov adH.'

"E^fis (taXo^fXeiai/,

'AXe^ie finTov imepevye ooi T^r dyxivoias,


fie

Trjv

Kai evxas Kopi^taai

pera

ttjv KvpuxKrjV devTepav {jptpav KaBdnep

Digitized

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'

52

INTEODUOTION.
v-^mirrjs iepa^ a^iVrao-o tSiv iTifiov\evavTaiv

ns

Xaipe, eive, Trap' apiu (fn^rja-eaf airrap rf iTn


AfiTTi/ou Tra<ra-dpevos

fiap^dpiav.j

pvOrjO-eat, OTTfO

erf

XPV-

For further particulars, see rpoirapiov.

Gorgias

introduced

rhyme

into prose.
rrfs

[Biod. 12, 53 IIpaiTos yap

ixpr)(TaTO to'is
TJj

Rhyme and Assonance.

Rhyme

\e^eas a-xipoTicrpois irepiTTorepois Kai

<pi\o-

and assonance are recognized by the ancients, although they never employ them
systematically.
"EyvcoKa yap
8ij

TXvla dia<ppovaiv avTideroiS Kal ttroKwXots Kal

napidois Kal 6ixotoTe\evTOis,


pois T-otovTow.]

Kal

nam

in-

Isocrates also seems to have

cparos

rjiraTrfptevri,

Soph. Aj. 1 00

over-estimated the value of this kind of

Kal

rffs

TraKaias ;(dpiTOs CK^E/SXij/iewi;.

ornament.

Kal TOE nXevpas SapSanrova-tv, Arist,


Kai Kal
Trjv '^vx^jv K7Tivovcnv,

Nub.

Rhyme began
poems about the
century.
is

to be

employed

in long

latter part of the fifteenth

Toi/s opxfi'S i^eXxova-iv,

The

earliest production in

rhyme

Kal Tov irpuiKTOv ^lopvTTOvaiv.


Xlpara pev e^eis
)(poi,a.v

the Description of the Plague of Rhodes

wxpav.
piKpav

Ibid.

1016

(to

BavariKov

rrjs

Po'Sou), published in

''Q^povs piKpoiis, aTTJOos Xewrdi',

the j'ear

1498, by

Emmanuel
In

Georgilas,

VXSiTTav peyaXrjv, Ttvyrjv

a native of that place.

modem

Greek,
ele-

Kiokrjv peyakrjv, ^rj(j)iapa paKpov.


Toils

rhyme, although not an indispensable

eipvwpaxTovs

tovtovi

Ibid.

1099

ment

of rhythm,

is

generally employed by
it

yovv

otS' fy*^ icaKeivovi

verse-makers.

In popular poetry

occurs

Kal TOV

KoprjTrjv

tqvtovL
cn'siira

but seldom.

Sule for Rhyme.


So after the
Od.
1,
:

The accented
(if
;

vowel-

Horn.

II.

5, 59.

sounds in the clausulas, together with the

123.

sound or sounds /oZfoWre^


^epeKKov evj)paTo^ tektovos vlov

there be any),
as, koKos xaicdr
ypa(j)6piios,

Mrjpiovrjs de

should correspond exactly


TTovrjpos,

'Appoi/l8ea>, OS x^po'"'

ivicTTaTO haibdKa irdnra


A^ijw;.

Topos "KiBoTopos, \ey6peiios

Teup^eix,

e^oxayap piv e^iXoto IlaXXas

ipapdvBrjcrav (^vxpavBrjcrav,
XaKTj.

KaXd KOKa,

(arj

(j>v-

Os

Kai

'AXe^dvBpa TCKTrjuaTO

vrjas eiaas-

Specimens of the popular style of the


Palladiiis.

first

two epochs of the Byzantine


avvTiye

period.

Lausaioum. Cap. LXX.

"iSo-

6e\ovTs,
Toil

naaav t^v

aSfXc^xirijTa

koi

pev & Kal narepa Tivd tS>v fKet 'Appavtov ovopan


e^aipera xeXXta exovTa Kal avXfjv Kal tppeap Kal

pev jrXlvOovs eTTiSiSovTos, TOV Se v8a>p, en


aiieivXrfpovvro.

ipepa pia Ta KcXXia

Tois be
irpos tt)v
eKelvoi
rji-

rat XoiTTOs xP^'^f-

'E\66vtos 8e irphs avTov

peWovras

olKelv

to.

KeXXi'a

EKaXovi'

Tivos dbeK<^ov aaBjjvaL (rnevSovTos Kal Xeyoiros

iKK\r)alav els eva>xlav


(fipaivovTo,

Kal

as en

aiiTa iirivoelv

aira KcXKiov

irpos oiKriaiv, or eVl


pfj

cKaaros ck tov oIkcIov keXXiou yepiTrjV prj\u>TrjV

Toira ieX6av trapjfyyeCKev avrw


aiiTov CK
TTjdeiOi'

dvaxapeiv

aas eavTou
7]

^ ttjv ajrvpiSa apTiav,

Tav KeXKiav, axpis &v

fvprj

aira

etri-

Twv

XoiTTwi/ eTTtTrjdelmv, els

Ta vea KeWla
yevrjTai
els
7]

c?rc-

Karayayyiov.

Kal KaraXinav avTo.

irdi/ra

(pepev^

iva

prjdevX

ipavepov

eKdarov
oi /ie'X-

Baa et^E avv


piKpov Ti

avTols Tois

KeWiots eavTov
Kfi6ev

els

Knp7ro(popla.

'Epxdpevoi Se

eanepav

KeKKlov paKpdv
at

diriKKfiaev.

XoiTfs oiKeiv Ta KcXXt'a tjvpiaKov

i^al(j)vrjs

ndvra

El 6c Kal TrXeioyer rjaav

avvepxdpivoi a<o6tjvat

Ta ETTtrnSeta.

Digitized

by Microsoft

GEAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
Fseudo-N^icodemus,
^lovBaloi

53

Cap.
rit

Aeymviv

ot

Epiphanius.
o imaKOTTOs

I Air/y^a-aro 6 ayioi 'ETTi^dwos

n^Xdri^

A^iovfiev
Trapacrrijo'ai

Vfierepou fieye/S^/nari trov Kal

on

eVi toC paKapiov 'Adiwaaiov toO

dos

a)<TT

avTov

peydXov

KopStvai nepuirrdpevai rb tov

2epdmSos
Kal
itporr-

aKovaBrjuai.

Kal npo(TKa\e(Tdficvos avrois


aiiTois

iepbv eKpa^ov dnavcrTas

Kpds Kp as.

HiKaTos Xcyet

EtTTare fioi

on

irats

dvva-

ardvres eVt rbv paKdpiov 'A6avd(riov

ol ''EWrjves

jiai eyoD ijyffUBv i>v jSatrtXea e^sTcuj-ai;

Aeyovtrtv

eKpa^av
Kopavai.

KaKo'yijpe,

eme

fiptv

ri

Kpd^ovtriv at

aiiTa,

'Hfiels

ov Xeyofifv jSafrtXea airov elvai,


II/joa'KaXeo'd/ifi/os 8c

Kal dirOKpiBeis

etirev.

Ai Kopavai
r Ava-oviav
oti Avpiov

dXX' avTos iavTov \eyei.

Kpd^ova-tv

Kpds Kpds-

rb Se

Kpds

IltXaTos Tov Kovptyopa Xeyei avToi


Kcias axd^Tia 6 'Irjaovs.
Koi yva>pi(ras

Mera

iviei-

(fxav^ ail p 10 V ecrn.

Kal npoo-erWet

'Exfias de 6 RovpiTwp

byjfeade r^v 8d|aK toC 6eov.

Kal e|^s TjyyeXdrj Kal rovrov

airov

jrpotTfKvvrjirev, koI Xa/3a>K

to
''''

6 ddvaros ToC 'lovXiavov ^aaCXtas.

KardiiXapa

Tfjs

xeipos airov ^irXao-fv x"/""'

yevopevoVj avvdpapovres KareKpa^ov rov Sepdirt-

Xpyfi aira Kvpic, SSe TrepiiraTriaov Kal


OTi KaXei ere 6 rjyep.au.

('ia-f\6e,

80s Xeyovres, 'Eai/ ouk ^6eX(s airov, ri eXdpffaves

*lSdvTeff Se ot 'louSaiot
roil

rd eavrov

6 inoLqtrev 6 XtyoKT-fs

Kovpaap KareRpa^av

IltXarou

Theodorus Phermensis.
TTore eTravo)

XXXI
to
a-Kevri

'HXflo'v

AtaTi utto jrpaUcovos airov oix tKcXev-

airov rpels

Xrjtrral, Kal oi

dvo eKpdairov.

a-as elae\6flv,

dXX' un'o Roipiropos

TOUK auTOV, 6 8e
fir

els e/cou/SdXei

Li-moHarium, Magnum,.
Patruin. Antonias.
Toij/ios ori"'S,p')(erai,
iriv

Apophthegmata
'Eluev 6 d/SiSSs 'Akol avBpaiiToi

8e

i^TjveyKe

Ta ^iffXia Kol
Xe'yei avrois,
Kivrjo-as

rSnv

Xefiirava
dfjilere.

XXV
riva

^6eXe Xa/Seiv.

Tote

ToCto

xaipos

ii>a

pava-

Ot 8e ovK ^OeXov.
eppi\jre

Kal

rds

xeipctff

avrov

Kal

indv

'iSaxri

pfj p,aiv6pcvov, iirava-

rovs Svo.

Kal ISovres

i(f>o^fi6r](Tav.

Kal
noirj-

arfjiTOVTai
pr)

aira \iyovrfs on 2v

paivr/

Std to

Xeyet auTots d yepav, Mrjdev deipda-rjre

eivai

opoiov airois.

XXXI

IIote 6 dfi^ds

aare avrd

els recra-apa peprj, Kal


ev.

Xd^ere rd rpia,
e7roir)aav did rb

Avraivios

ide^aro
Iva
eXBr)

Kcovtrravrlov
els

rov ^ao'iXeats
Kal

Kal d(f>ere rb

Kal auras

ypdppa
eWoTret

Ktovo'ravnvoinroXiv,
Tto

Xa^elv rb pepos udtoO rbv XejStVwi/a rbv a-vvaxriKov.

tl notriuai.

Aeyei ovv

d^^a

IlavXa)
;

TM

paOrjTrj

airov

"Q^fiXoi/ d7rf\6flv

Kal
Xfyrj

Theophilus.

Ill 'HXfldi' woTe narepes


roii

els

Xt'yei
cl
fie

airai
prj

'Edv

dmXBrjs,

'Avravios

'AXe^dvBpeiav KXrjBevres vnb Oeo(jiiXov


TTitTKOTTOV

dp^ie-

dneXdrjs,

d^^ds

Avruivios.

iva

TTOirjCTr)

evxrjv Kal KaBeXr/ to lepd.

Arsenius.
dpKerbv

XV "EXeyev

6 d/3^ar 'Apcrevios otj


tj

Kal

eo'Biovrcov

avrav per avrov, napereOrj Kpeas


rjuQiov prjdev oiaKpiuojievoi.

ra pova\ai

Iva KOipdrat piav Q>pav, edv

/ido';^eior.

Kat

Kal

dyavia-rris.

Xa^av
eIttcu

6 eiriaKOTTOs ev Konddiv edaKe

rw eyyujra

Agathon. VII
jToWaKis pcre^r]
vrjv

ndKiv

iripl

airov

on

avrov ykpovri Xeyav, *ldoi rovro KaXbv Koirddiv


earlv, (jidye, djS^d.

e^^v

rfjv

(rpiXav

eavrov p6^
Tiepl

Oi 8e diroKpiOevres

elirov,

els

TO

pavvdSiv.

XV

"EXeyov
err)

rov
excov

'Hpeis ems apri Xdxava rjo-diopev


cVti
eXs
01!

el

8e Kpeas

dj3/3d

'AydBwvos OTt rpia


els

ewoirjaev

rpiiyopev.

Kal uvKeri upoaeBero ov&e

\16qv

ro aropa airov,

etas

ov KarcapQaxre

i^ avr&v yeinraadat avrov.

rb tnanrdv.

Concilium Constantinopolitanum (A. D.

Achillas. II Ewrev 6 dff^ds Brjripris

on KneKpovaa

536).
pevqs

Coleti V, p. Kara rb

148
ev

seq. EtVdSou yei-orfi

ra^aivovros pov nore els SkiVik eSaiKdv poi Tiwes


oXi'ya prjXa Iva daxrco TOis yepovai, Kal
els

irivrjdes

dyimrdrTi
rrj

rjpav

peyaXji eKKXrjaia ev rjpipa KvpiaKjj

IE

toC

ro KeXkiov rov
ecjjr), 4>i)(rej,

d^^d

'A;ftXXa tva Swo-ta avr^.

eveararos lovXiov pTjvbs

rrjs

evdeKdrrjs ewiveprj-

'O de

d8e\cj)e,

oix ^deXov iva Kpovar/s


pl]8e
els

oews trapd rov

betrirorov

f/pav roii

dytoiTdTOu

pot apri, el
d%eK6jjS'

rjv

pdvva

aX\o KeWtov

dpxiema-KOTTOV Kal oUovpeviKOv irarpidpxov


dvvov,
a>s

la-

'Avex^prja'a ovv els ro KeXXiov pov

nvK dyvoei Kal


<tvv

fj

r/perepa deocj>tXeia, ev
/cXi^pw wep!

Kal dv^vcyxn

aird

els

r^v

e'KK\r]aiav.

ra yeveaSai avrbv

tm euayet

TOf

Digitized

by Microsoft

54
a/iPava, (jiaval yeyovaaiv

INTRODUCTION.

dm tov Xaov Xeyovaat,


!

eKKXria-Lq !

'

Ava<TKa<t>elri

to oaTea

tS)V Neo-TO-

HoKKa TO

erri

Toi iraTpidpxov
TtoXl^d

itoXKa

to.

errj

pLav(ov

.'

' hvaaKa<f)eir]

Ta darrea Tav Eirvxia-

Toi ^ao-iXcms/

rd

(Trj

T^f avyoi(TTrjS !
'

Tis

evi

'SeaTopws
Tijs

eya

ovk

oiba.

mXXd
vovpev;

TO

?Tj;

toC mTpidpxov !

A.KOivi>vr)TOi

'AvdBepa avT^ drro

rpidSos
(jiepe,

To

Xei-

Siari pevoixev;

oi 'Ejrl roa-avra- iti] Stari


x^i-P^"
<''"

Koiw

^avov MaKeboviov apn

to

ovop,a Moice-

'Eft tS>v

K-Oivavfjarac deXofiev.

Soviov dpTi Tayfj, Seopeda ras oXaj (j)a)ms ra

'E
TOI'

ai/e\ee
<Tov.

els

jov dp^ova.

'E

ire'iirov

^aa-tXet

Tov

veov

T^ovpdv e^m ^dXe,


tov Xrjpov tov
Kol

6 vios

Xaov

Am
UoWd
T^f

ttoXXSc irStv Koivavfiam


',

T^ovpas 'h-pavTis eaTi


e|ci)

TraXarioij
tt)

6e\opv.

'Opfld8o|oF
t
crri

TLva ((to^elaat

"A^te

/SdXe.

Ei^^/iioi/

'HLoKehdviov

U-

T^s rpidSos
iroXXa TO

rd

ctt)

toO 0aoriXe'<aj /
Seu^poj/

KXrjo-iq.
K. T. X.

Ta

trvvoSiKd els Va>pj]v

apn

direXBaai,

aiyoucrTTif /

tok

MwiX"''"'
toTij'.

^<^

^aXe.

'O

pr;

\a\av Mawxaios
tS)v

Theophilus Antecessor.

2,

4,

3 'Airoa^hovaoii-

'Ama-Ka(j>TJ

rd oaria

TAavixaiiov !

WTtn

he 6 ovaoi^povKTOs

ttj

xcXeurj tov

TTjv dy'iav

a-vpoSov
/

apn

Krjpv^ov.
cti;

UoKkd rd

en;

(bpovKTovaplov Ka\ rais bio KairiTis bepivuvrlain


Tfi

ToC (3a(rtXe<BS

IloXXa Ta
/ Tijs

toS irarpidpxov !
ktt]-

peydXT]

Kal rg

pea^Hy

<"

non utendo
a nva
vdv-

"A^te T^s T-piaSos

'H dyia avvobos apn


rpidSos
/

rpoira pr)Tm Ka\ apiirpkva

xpova

pvxBnra.
deoTOKOs

'Afic
fO-TiK.

'H dyia Mapia 'H dyw

To Trepiexerai biaTa^ei tov ripcTipov ^aaiXeas.

'A^ie ToO 6p6vov !


to-TtK.

'Opoias aTTOa^evvvTai d oiiiTOv^povKTOS


ov(TOV(ppovKTOvdpios

edv 6

Mapi'a ^coTOKOS

*H dyio

(Tvvohos tovto
ia-riv.

Ta
.

TrpoTrpieTapia top ovaoi-

elmv.

'O

prj

\a\S>v

UavixaUs

NtxS

ij

(jipovKTOv '77apax(i>pT)arj

e^aTiK^ yap Trapaxapav

nltrns ttjs TpidSos, wita ^ iriaris tS>v dpdo86^a>v.

ovbev TtpdrTU.

T^v dyiav (rivobov apn


j3ao-iXfUt,
^ao-iXe'cos,
j/eou

Kripv^ov.

'Opdoto^os
8,

Justinianus.

Constitutiones

Novellae.
''"''

TiVa ^o(3eicrai;

NtKO ^ n-icms ToC


t^s avyovcTTrjs.
fTi) /

2 'EkcIto pevToi biopi^opev to xPV""^


TTJs

hk?

TTto-Ttr

ToC
veas

^iKapiov

'Amoves ovTa be

kcll

dpxovTa

ttjs

KtoKOTQi'Tti/ou

woXXa to

T^y

HaKaTiavris ipvyias pjjKen pev ovrio TtpoaayopeveirBai,

'EXevTjs TToXXa

ra

cTij /

IloXXa rd
!

errj

toO naau-

dXXd tov

XoijroC Kopr/Ta ^pvyias IlaicoK.a\

rpidpxmi
youo-Tf,

*A|4e t^e rpidbos


.
. . .

'louo-rti/e

navrjs ovopd^eaSai,
(Tiov

Kopi^eaOai eK tov

btipoKa\

tu vinoas!

'/

pupripopai.
ova evi
'!<>""
Trt-

dnep Koi vvv npo^dfret dvvavav Te

El Krjpiaireis, ik^pXV6e<t>peiv, aSiK(j>6i

'n'urni

iiTTiv.
i/'ux'j-

KairiTanavaVf ^tol Ke<jiaXrjn-av(av Kal

o'VVTeXeiaiVy

xP "''<"'<"'

Mm

vnep CKQTepas dpxTjS iXdp^avev, ovbevos iXarTovpevov TOVToiv.

o-Tive

aOyovore,

tuvilicas!

Ei 0iXeis t^k
'Ee'r/

Kal

pi]

bvo Ta^eai
ttjv

xPW^^h

Tif, SeO^poK
'Ee's/

dvadepdnaov.

papripopai.

dXX' dvapiye7(Tav eKOTepuv,


TTjv

Te tov apxovTos,
KoprjTiavijV

o-upm

o-e.

'E/

rar flupas

icXeio).

'O

fiTj

Te ToO ^iKapiov,

plav yevetrBai

XaXwi' Mavixalos ianv.


Trap"
e'fie,

Maprvpopai

o-e,

obSe

avtrdv re Kal ovopa^opevrjv, tov Kivbvvov

Tav

brj-

K. T.

\.
Tijs

poaiav
cio-oSov ycvopev7)s

<^6pu)v avTco Te Kal irdatv opxtlas eirdvTos^

Ibid. p.

1135 ndXiK
Ka\

Old fiias Taverns Ka6e(TTd>aT]S, prj bijjprjpivris avTTJs

napd TOV dyiayrdrov


TTio-fcoTTOu
(cai

panaptardTOv

dpxLe^

TravTeXas.

13, prooem.

To

tS>v Xapirpo-

oiKou/ifi'iicoi)

irarpidpxov 'ladvvov,

TOTtpv Trfs dypvTTvias dpxdvrtov ovopa^ aepvov re


Kal Tois TrdXai
Pajjuaioic

fidias Spa T^ yciiea6at aiiTOV TrXtjaiov toC ap^wvoSf


<l)Q)vai

yvapipaTOTOv

hv,

ovk
(cai

Tj\dav diro Travrds tov

Xaov ovTtos'
?Ti)

"urpev OTTOJS els

dXXoiav /leTEonj rrpoariyopiav


(l>iovri

IloXXd TO
TTis

eTj)

TOV TTOTpidpxov
!

iroXXa rd

To^iv.

'H pev ydp iraTpios fipmv

prae-

miyovarris
cTTi /

tov veov KmvaTavrivov woXXa

fectos vigilum avTovs exdXeae,

Ttj

tS>v dypv-

TO

Tijs veas 'EXevrjs jroXXa

to

ctt;

.'

T6

nvovvTav Kal
TJ
J]

oiibev dvepevvrjTov KaToXipTravovrav

Xel'fjfavov

MaKcbovlov

Tfi

eKKXrfala !
!

\ovaT\ve
avyovara,
rfj

tS>v

dv6pd>ir(dv

dpxfj

tovtovs

ewtoTrjcraaa

avyovare,

tu Vincas

'Ev<f>r]pia

be ye "EXX^fmi' ipavri ovk Xtrpev odev evdpxovs 1 3,

tuvincas!

Toiis ev i^opia Std t^w wiariv

avTovs eKdXeire t&k vvktSiv.

3 IIp&Tov pev

Digitized

by Microsoft

; !

GRAMMATICAL OBSERVATIONS.
oSv BeoTri^Ofiev
rflv elprj/ievrii)

55

jui/Seva

WKriirapxov n-awreXSi int


!

Tqv fjpepav OTTO TOV TTpoKea-aov toC "E^fidpou


Trepl

dpxrjv TrapUvai irpXv


<f>povT[(rpaTos
Xa(3ot,

tj

nap
koX

rjpSiv
I

eanepav,

Kal

epxeTai

KafiaXKdpis
e^ijs

els

to

min^oXa

Toil

^TjSexi
eTrl

waXdnv
TeoTiv

t^s jroXeas.

Kal tJ

Tjpepa, tovTtj

Xoyo) ToXpav e^co ^atriKiKau <rvp^6Ka)V


(jtpovTUTiia

to
ttjv

Tjj

KvpiaKJj, TrXria-iaa-dvTav

rav trkoiav

TOVTo

)((opetv,

aW

avajiivnv

jrdXft, BoKOJo-os,
Tfi

Sans to

Trdv&eiva ev ^AvTioxeia
eiV;;-

^aiTiKfiav Kal Tqv ixeWev iv ypapp.afTi ^rj^ov.


"H/ifis

peydXri Kar emTpoTTr)v *o)Ka 8tmpa|aT0


Toil Ttjs dvaa-Kd<l>ov pvfiptjs,

yap ovhevX
el

Trp/ elprifievr)v dp)(riv

napaSal\-

yqaei Oeo(f)dvovs

Tore

iTOfuv, irkriv

pri

rav peyaKovpeneoTarav

S>8e S>v ev Tjj TToXet, peTo. to

^a\eiv avT6v nip


e(j>vyev,

Xouvrpiffiv,

^
fj

tZv 7rpi^\ewr<ov KopfiTav con-

nXtjcriov rai/

Kaiaapiov Kal diTTOx^a-ai,


els

Bistorianuif,

t&v Xapirptrrarav rpi^ovvav t&v


oi

Kal

eKBav peTa Kapd^ou

tov 'lovXiavov Xipeva

xpaLTapLavav Ka\ vorapitov,


^avovTes
KeiTcs
eiev,
r]

tqvttjv irapaXap-

Kara Ta Xeyopeva Mavpou, a-revaOels eppi^ev


eawrbv
els ttjv

aWas

dp)^as &p^avT5 Kal


(cat

^a-

ddXaaa-av, Kal \afiav peTa anaei/os

fip.lv

eTTtr^BEtoi

ttjs

irap

fipwv a|iot

Oiov wktjytjv dno

e^KovfUropos, as

rjv

els

fiaprvpias.

BoKaa-o-aV, direSavev.

Kal eKJSXrjBevTos

Toii aKt)-

Joannes Mbsch-us.
rav
Stijy^craTo
ijjuii'

XXXVII

Tts tZv yepov-

vapaTOS

aiiToii ea-iptj

Kal dirrivexBrj els tov BoCi'

dvcKdoiio'iv iv Qrj^atSi oti


Ttjs

Kal eKaidt].

yepav cKaBe^eTO e^m


iroiri<Tas

TroKeas 'Avriva, piyas,


stij

Theophanes,

p.

279 Oi Upda-ivoi..
1

"Etij

els

keXXiov auroG

nepi to

ej3So/iij-

TToXXo, 'lovo'Tiviave aSyovo'Te, tov fiUas


Koiipatj

'ASi-

Kovra.
-Trafu

Eixev 8e paBrjTas beKa

eva be ecr^ev

pave dyaBe,

oil

^ao'Ta^a

oidev 6 Beds,

dpeXovvTa eavTOv.

ovv yeptav iroWaKis

^o^oiipai dvoiidiyai,
Kivbvveveiv.

prj TrXeov evTVXtl(Trj Kal


Ti'f

peXXa
olSa.

evovBerei Kal irapeKoKei avTov Xcymv, 'A8e\(f)e,


<f)p6vTi^e T^s eavToii
ciff

MavSoTap.

eariv

oiiK

i^;(5*

e}^eis

dnoBavelv Kal

(Ol

Updaivoi,.^
tcl

*0 irXeoveKTav pe, Tpiaaii-

KoKaa-iv direXOelv.

8e ddeXcj^os irdvroTe

yoviTTe, els

T^ayydpia eupia'KeTau
dSiKei.

Mai/8d-'

napfjKovev ToC yepovTOi pi] Sexopevos

ra Xeyopeva

Tap.

Oiidels

vpds

Oi Ilpdcrivoi. Eir
prj dvaKe(j)a\L(T7j
oiiK

im

avToii,

^vve^rj ovv pera Tiva xpovov rcXcu-

Kal povos dbiKel pe.

QeoTOKe,
eo'Tiv

T^(rai Tov
-6

dSe\^6v
jySet

no\v

8e ekvnriBr)

eir

avT&

MavSaTap.
yovaTe,
tls

Tis

CKelvos

o'lSapev.

yepav

yap

OTt ev ttoXX^ ddvpla Kal ape'

01 Ilpdcivoi.

2i

Kal

povos oiSas, Tpiaav-

Xeia e^rjKBev tov Koapov tovtov.

Kat fjp^uTo 6

TrXeoveKTei
rtff

pe

a-fjpepov.

MavOt

yepav e^)(ea6ai

leal

\eyeiv, Kvpie 'li/o-oS

Xpurre
to.

SaTap,

Et

edv etTTiv

ovK

o'ldapev.

d\r]6iv6s f/pav 6e6s, drroKoKv^ov poi

nepl

Hpacrn'oi.

KaXoTToSios 6 airaBdpios

diiKe't pe,

T^s ^vx^is avTov TOV ddeXc^oO.

Kal

drj

Beapel

beoTTOTa ivdvTav,

MavdaTap.
TTOLtjaet Toii

OiiK exei irpd"Ei Tts troTe

iv eKordaei yevopevos TTOTapov irvpos Kal wKrjdos

ypa

KaXo7rd8to5.

01 Tlpatrivot.
'louSa
.'

4v avTco

Ta

.Trvpl

Kal pttrov tov dbe\(\>bv j3cj3a-

eo'TLVj

TOV popov

Beos dv-

TtTurpevov eas Tpa^ijXou.

Tote Xeyet avra 6 yeire

TanoSaaei aiiTa dSiKovvTi pe 8id rdxovs.

Mav-

pav,

Ov

Sia ravTrjv Tr/v Tipapiav irapeKoKavv

baTap.
el prj els

'Ypels ovk dvepxeaBe els to Beaptjaai,

iva (ppovTio'rjs Ttjs ISias ^jrvxijs, TeKvov; 'AneKpcdi]

to v^pi^etv Tovs apxovTas.

Of Ilpd-

i d8e\(p6s Kal

eirrev

ra
ij

yepovri,

EvxapuTTa

a-ivoi.
fjo-ei

Et

TIS StiTTOTe dbiKei pe, tov popov noi-

6e^, jTOTcp, oTi K&v

KetjjaXfj

pov

avetriv e;^ei

TOV 'lovSa!

MavSaTap.
Kal

'Ha-vxaaaTe,

Kara yap Tas evxds (tov ewdva


emo'Koirov,

Kopv(j)rjs Xarapai,

'lovSaioi,

Mavixaioi Kal SapapeiTai.


'lovSalovs

Oi Tlpd-

(Tivoi.
p.

SapapeiTas diroKoKeis

Ghronkon Paschak,
TouTO) ovs
Tffl

699 (A. D. 610)


Z

'H BeoTOKos peTO o\av.


jroTe iavToiis

Mavbdrap. "Eas
Ol Upaatvoi. Et
6 beairaxris, dvd-

eTei prjvl
r',

'

vwepBeperaia, KaTa PapaiIvSiKTiavos


IA',

KaTapdaBe

OKTafiplov

^pepa

TLS ov Xt'yei OTt

opBas marevei

avaipaivovTai itKo'ia iKava kotci to arpayyvKovv

Bepa avTa
vpiv Xcyo)

oiE

Ta

'lovSti.

MavSdTap. 'Eya
k. t. X.

KaaTeXKiv, ev ols
xXci'ov.

rjv

Kal 'HpaicXejoj o v'As 'Hpa-

els

eva ^aiTTi^eo'Bai,

Kal Tore eltrepxerai iaKas Kar avT^v

Leo PMlosophus. Tactica 18, 72 nXeioms

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fir)

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e^aa-(j>aXi^dpcvoi irpos Te tov kov poiraKan)v Kai


Toits

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ev rals

rijs

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8ta
oiJic

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airovdrjv

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iv yvp.vco

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firfre

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ai5ra Tfjv Trapdra^iv

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iroXiTcov

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ikai. eio-i bacTflai, prjre

iroKpaTa,

be KoiKakisLVOOV-

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8cs ivoxKovcriv Sia ra


pueva

vapd rav Toipxav

pMVOv Kai

Trjv

fiaaiKciav r]pa>v XeyovTes

on E?
els Toiis

yicpipp.aTa.

73 Kut ras

|3/-yXas
Trjs

8e

ex

tovto noirjaopcv, aTipia ex"!^" yeviaOai


yeiTovas
fjpaiv.

dia(7Tr}paT0s

Kara Tea-adpop fiepav

irapa-

Ta|e(os

iroirjo-eis

81 0pdyKoi Tolvvv Kai


irepl

Leo Orammaticus,
fie

p.

275 'Ek

ttj

irpoeXeia-a

Aayyo^aphoi \6yov iXevSeplas


ovvraL.

ttoWov nottjjs

Trjs

HevTrjKoarrjs tov ^aa-tXeas AeovTos direX-

*AXX'

ol p.ev

AayyojSapdoc to ttXcov

SovTos els TOV ayiov Ma>Kcov Kai eltro8evovTos,


OTe ^Xdev irXrjaiov T^s o-oXeas, e^eXScav Tis eK

TQLavTTjs dpeTrjs vvv aTTfuXetray.

llXriv koX ovtol

Kni

ipayxoi

dpaaeU

^a-ai>

Kai dKaTdnXrjKTOi ev
Kai
irpoKiTeis,
els

TOV ap^atvos 8e8(0Kev avTov Kara Ke(f)aX^s peia

TOLS

TToXepiois,

ToXprjpoi re

pd^8ov lo-xvpas Kai

iraxeias.

Kul

el pij

rj

<j)opa
6if-

oveidos e^ovTes Trjv detXiav, Kai Tr)v rrpos fiLKpov

lijs pd^Sov els iroXvKdvSrjXov epiroburBelaa

dvax^p^fTLV, Kai tuvttjv olovel (pvyfjp ^yovpevot.


"EvKoXoiS 6e 6ta tovto

Xavvd>6rjj irapevdii

av tovtov dir^XXa^ev.

davarov KaTa<ppovov(Ti

ttjv

Scriptor Incertus de Leone Bardae Fillo


(A. D.

Kara x^^P^ f^^XV^ (r<j)o8pas Kai Ka^aXXdpioL Kai


TTe^oi

1013

p.

352 Kai

Xoiirbv eas

^
ipw-

paxopevoi.

82 "OTav

ydpj

cas

etKos,

iv

deKep^piov prjva Kpvwrov tov boXov eixov

Tals Ka^aXXapiKals pAXXais <rTeva>daa-tv, e^ ivos

Tapevoi 8e eXeyov ^ev86pevoL OTt *0 ^aatXei/s


eireTpe^ev rjpds
Tl/rjXacjyrjaai

avvdrjpaTQs

diroKaTa^atvova-i

Tav

tTTTTUv

avTotv

tq

fiifiXia, oti XijSacri-

Kai Trefot irapaTdtTiTOVTai oX/yot

Taxa

Kai irpos

yovaiv avTa Ttves otl OXiyov xpdvov exeis


XeiKTat^ Kai eveKev

TrXeiovas

Ka^aXXapiovs
pdx7]S-

prj

SetXtmi^ey, y aTroXjj-

tovtov iroiovp^da

rifv ^rjTTjiriv.

yovTes
plots

T^ff

83

'OTrXtfovrat Se (TKOVTa-

Kai

irepl

tov 8eKep,^piov prjva 8r]XoL tov iraTpi-

Kai Kovraplois koX (nraOtois KovTorepoLSj

apxr}v 6 Aecav oti 6

Xabs (TKav8aXl^eTai bid rds

Kai

eiTL

Tav apatv avTap 8ia


evioTe

Xaipiatv dva^atrrd-

CLKOvas XeyovTes otl


Kai
OTL

KaKas avTas
TO.

irpoaKvvovpev^
rjpav,

^Qvaiv^

5e

Ttves

avTwv Kai dia^avvvvrat


xp^paTtov

^La TOVTO

eSvT]

Kvpievovcriv

aird

90

')Cno<j)6eipovTai dc 8td

Kai

(TvyKard^a,

(ftrjai,

tI

piKpov Kai

iroirjirov-

evKoXtus (jliXoKepSeis ovtcs, c|


'La-pev

&v

irelpa

padovTes

olKovopiav els tok Xaoi', Kai rd xaprjXd irepLeXapev.

dm

tSiv

c| 'iToKlas
eTTi

ivTavda

ttoWokis
eKcivav

Et

fie

pi) jSouXet, irtlrrov rjpds 81

o5 eveKev

Trapayevopevcov
fTTipi^ia,

Trjs

fitot/ci^tremff,

t^

TrpotrKwelTe^ Trfs ypaf^rjs pi} exovmjs prjTots iraTTOTe.

oipai,

Kui

TOVTtav

fiap^apwdivToav re

Kai

877X04

avTa 6 iraTpLupxis on 'Upeis

Kai avvedia-devToiV.

Ta KaXas e^ dpxrjs xal SvcoBev opLaBevra

mo

Te

Constantinus
p.

Porphyrogenitus.

Adm.

Twv

aiTO(TToXaiv Kai

Tav iraTepav

oCfre

TTopao'a-

200

"Oti iroXXoKi: o Kvpis Aeiop 6 /Sao-iXcir


fj

Xevoiiev oSTe nepLairiTepov Ti ev avToXs oIkovo^

Kai 6 Kvpis ap,av6s Kai avrrj

|3ao'(Xe/a ijju(5f

povpev.

Digitized

by Microsoft

. ;

LEXICON.
Note.

When

period, is referred to,

an author, or an inscription, belonging to the periods preceding the Roman an asterisk is prefixed to the word under which thS reference is made as,
;

A
A, aK<l)a, represented in

Latin by A. [Its full mouth to be opened as much as possible, and the breath to come up freely, that is, without any effort to change its direction. Short A differs from long A in degree, not in kind. Plat. Crat. 427 C.
utterance requires the
Dion.

Athan. IV, 1021 B'H a^a6p.lhayros ho^oXoyia, with reference to the equalitj* of the Three Hypostases.
a^adpos,
ov, (jSa^poj/)

without base.

Piiid. 1442

A, OTvXos.
d^cLKiov, ov, TO, (aj3a|)

abacus,

for arithmeti-

H. V,

75,

12 Autwv Be

tq>v fuiKpav ev~

cal operations, or geometrical figures.


I,

(^avorarov to A, orav eKTeiinjTOi' Xeyerat yap


dvoiyofievov tov OTOfiaros in\ TrXettrrov, Kal tov
irvevfjuiTos

793 F.

Schol. Arist.

Nub. 205.
ajSa^.
like

2. AbaSchol.

Plut.

cus of a
d^oKoeiS^s,

theatre.
ff,

See

avto

(jjepofievov

Plut.

II,

738 B.
Terent.

wpos tov ovpavov. Apollon. D. Synt. 28, 27 ToO

(EIAQ)

an

afia^.

Theocr. 4, 61.

r]

eK^atinftTLS p.eyi(TTq iarlv.


.

Hermog. Rhet.

a^aKTis or
corder.

a/3 oktis, 6, indeclinable,

the Latin

224, 17.

ilf.

Ill

A littera sic ab ore

ab act is,

register, regl<<trar, registrary, re-

sumit

Immunia riotu patulo tenere labra Linguamqne necesse est ita pendulam reduci, Ut missus in iUam valeat subire vocis. Nee
2. In the later numerical system,
it

Nil. Epist. 2, 207 GfO^iXo) d/3dicris. Lyd. 220. 262, 23. 213 "A^ oktis fiev ovopa

Ta
SffaX

(fypovTitrpaTi,

arrjfjiaivet

Se Kod epiMrjveiav tov

partibus uUis aliquos ferire dentes.]

Tols

stands
stroke

7rl

^prjpatTi Trparrofievots

e^eoTwra.

a/3dXc.

Et. 21.

1,

54.

for

els,

one, or irpSyros, first.

With a

djSdXo, dj3dXai, see d/3aXe (paroxytone).

before, ,A, it stands for

-jfJXioi,

thousand, or

XiKiooTos, thousandth

with a

diaeresis, a, or

with a dash over Heron Jun. 169,

it, d,

for jiipioi, ten thousand.

*a^aK, interj. z:^ side. Call. Frag. 455. Dion. Apollon. S. 2, 15. Anthol. II, Thr. 642, 2. 251. IV, 202 "A/SaXe p,r]Te oe Keivos Ibeiv
(like &(pe\ov').

4, et alibi.

Apollon. D. Conj. 522, 15.


1

a,

3. Figuratively, the beginning, first. Apoc. Clem. A. I, 1365 B. 1, 8. 11. 21, 6. 22, 13. diphthong, represented in Latin by A long.

Agath. Epigr. 50,


fioi!

*A)3aXe

p-rjd^

eyevovro yd-

(Compare Alcman 21
ei'Ji'.)

(12_)'

BdXt

Sfj

/SdXe KTjpuXos

See under

I.

dfidke, also d^dXa, d/3aXat, interj.

woe!

alas.'

Aapav, see epav.


'AapaniTis, i8os,
fj, (^Aapav) of Aaron. Carp. 120 A, p6&hos.

PhUon
Hes.

"A^dXf t?, Joann. Mosch. 2865 D. 2936 2973 B 'A/3dXai.' voaa KkavdvdpamoTriTi
.'

a-op.ev Koi fieTavoJi(rop.ev,

e<l>'

ois vvv

oii

peTO-

a^ayvov, ov, to, Macedonian,

i^

p68ov.

KooS/ici' '

Z>amasc.

II,

277 B.

Steph. Diac.
ttjs

A^ayva,
'A^aSSav,
sonified

p68cL.

MoKsdoves.

1156 B.

Stud. 489

'A)3dXe

avolas!

6,
;

indeclinable, pi^K,destriu:tiompeT-

=^

in Greek 'AtroWiav. Apoc. 9, 1 1 (See also ^AtrfioBaios, 6\o6pevTrjs, oXoOpevoJv, and compare the classical "Attj.)

829 C 'AjSdXe to tote yeyevrffieva Porph. wapa t5>v oTaXevTav (TTpaTrjyaiv Adra. 268 'A|3aXa Xootow t6> ttkjtcuojti Xfpwoe unto him, therefore, who trovria-iTTi ttoXitt;
a>

poi!

.'

.'

afiaSfjs, s, (jSoii'ib)

not being able

to

walk. Euthal.

trusts

citizen

of Chersonesus

Et.

M.

2,

54

629 A, ttSXos.
d^aSrjS, is, (/Sa^os)

not deep, without depth or


2, 1, 1.

thickness.

Onos.

Sext. 210, 24.

Zonar. Lex. 'A/3dXai, dvrX tov (peii. [It seems to be of Shemitic origin. Compare S^S, to mourn,
'A^aKai,
eiripprjpa

axerXiaarTiKov.

ajSofl/iidiBTor, ov,{^a6ji'i.s)

vnthout degrees. Pseud-

to grieve, to be desolate.']

Digitized

by Microsoft

u^afJba
4/3a/ia, see fiafia.

58

a^^a<i

A^avav(Tos, ov,

= ^

ov ^avaviros, decent, decorous.

2.

I,

252, 23 TO d^da-Kavov,

freedom from
1, 9,

envy.
/idp-

Truthful.

Jos. B. J.

4 'O Sc

Const. Apost.
A^avava-ios,

2, 3.

adv. liheraliter,

with propriety

or

Tvs d^do'Kavos yiverai irpos Kala'apa rSiv AvriSuid. 'Afid<TKavos, Trdrpov KaropdapaToyv,
d'^fvSrjs, dveiTi^Bovos.

decorum.
Ant.

Clem.
(he

R.

1,

44.
Jos.

a^avijB, !333X,
3, 7,

high priest's girdle.

d^dxTKovTos, ov, not to be fascinated or bewitched.

6/xia.

ai3a|, oKos, 0,

abacus,

ZaJZe^, for

geometrical

figures.

56.
tre.

2.

Sext.US,n. 719,27. lambl.Y.P.


Plural, ol afiaxes, a part of a thea-

KdKKianavov Koi rot) imibiov aiTav d^a(TKdvTa)V dbe\(j)5)v, may the gods preserve them from the evil eye ! 5119
Tov
KCLi

Inscr. 5053

"OXrjs (Tvvyeveias Trjs d^aaKavrov.

SasiZ. SZ.

537 D.

Suid. "A/3a|t, toIj

as a

charm against
Tivi.

the evil eye.

Trap* ^/xti' XeyofievoLS d^aKiOLS.

(105),

(See also ^aa-Kavtov.)

*d/3a7rTioTos, ov, (/SawTifw) oJ submerged, not

verbially, d^da-Kavra

2. Acting Diosc. 95 3. Ad3,

d^aa-Kavrcos, without

sunk, not foundered: that does not sink (neuter).

fascination or injury.
(TKavra dicunt.

Charis. 235, 16 Prae-

Pind. Pyth.
<j inrip

2,

146

'A/SajrTio-Toy

ei/ii,

0c\Xor

fascine, id est, sine fascino,

quod Graeci

d/3d-

epxos, a\iias.

Anthol, II, 82 (Ar-

Hes. 'AfidcKavra,

;(<opij ;3Xd-

chias')

'

A^aiTTitTTov re Kad*

does not sink in water.

Plut.

vdap fpeWov, that 11, 686 B Ei-

d^cuTKdvrais, adv. without fascination.

Anthol.

Kpauia aafiaros d^aiTTtaTov kol iXafppov, not soaked in wine, not drenched with liquor, not
intoxicated.

983

'AirepiTpenTov

xal

d/3a-

TV, 136 KfpKiSos oi XPfff"* o XoyjOTiKOf, oiSe Kal yap d^aa-Kavras plva Tpitnixvv pieXei crot e'xm, may the gods preserve your nose from the

nna-Tov.

Basil. Ill,
TTjv
'

248

'Op6i]v koi djSd-

evil eye !

wrtaTov

yj/vxriv

Bicuroi^a.

Theod.

Ill,

d^afTKavcos

(d^d(TKavos),
1,

adv.

without

envy.

1204 A h^aiTTiaTOV to t^s cKKXtjO'ias diacraiaavra aKd(f)os. Galen. X, 150 F 'A/3d7rrtOTa

Anton.

16.

d^dorayof,
1, 9, 11.

ov,

following. Vit. Nil. Jun. 156 B.


Epict.

TpvTTava KareaKevdaravTo

KaXovai Be ovrats

djSdoTaKTos, ov, (j3a(rTdf<o) unbearable.

avTa dta to
kukAo)

p-rj

fiairTi^eaBai

irepiBfi

yap iv

Plut.

I,

nepi,(j)epT)s

ment

for trepanning, furnished

to prevent its 'A^dimoTov, TpvTTavov eiSos larpiKov. 2. Unhaptized, not yet baptized. Ctementin. 344 D. ^(Aan. I, 233 C. Cyrill. A. 1, 7811). Joann. Mosch. 3097 C. Nic. CP. 853 B. Jejun. 1921 D, not Christian. Anast. Sin. 709 B. 769 C. Porph. Adm. 86, 12.
/3anTos, ov, (pdirrai) untempered, not tempered,

a surgical instruwith a guard piercing into the brain. Hes.


Xtvs,

tk

Suid.

'

A<l)6pr)Tov,

Did. A. 281 A. Bekker. 411, d^daraKTOv.

922 E.

23

'

AvinroioTov, d^dcraKTOv.

a^aros, ov, impassable, etc.

Substantively, to

a^arov, (a) the

358 C. 217 C.

(b)
to

name

of a pjant.

Galen. VI,

TO a^ara, privy.

Epiph.

II,

d^arom, oMra,
d^a<j)Tis, es,

make a^aros.

Sept. Jer. 29,

21 dPaTmdijvm.

(pdirra) colorless.

Plut. II, 650 B.

a/3a0o9, ov, not dyed.


dj3/3d,

Gloss." A^a(f>os, intinctus.


abib or nisan

as

an edged instrument.

Hes. "A^mrroi,

the

month ^'^X,

\S>oi.

doTo^ioiroff.

d^aprjs, is, not heavy.


cally, not

Classical.

Metaphori2, 11, 9.

Jos. Ant. 4, 4, 7.
d/3|3a,
d,

indeclinable, (Heb. Chald. Syr.)


father, applied to

burdensome.

Paul. Cor.
Avaric.

Trarljp,

God

only in the
8, 15.

Athan.
'AfiapiKos,

II,
ri,

916 C.
6v,

vocative.

Marc.

14, 36.
irarrjp,

Paul. Bom.

("A/Sapot)

Eustrat.

Gal. 4, 6 'A(3j3d 6

2312 A.
"A^apoi,
20, 3.
a>v, oi,

word
Hunnic people. Agath. Euagr. 2789 B. The name was
Avari, a

is

where the Greek explanatory of d^|3a. Clem. A. I,


TO,
little

200 C.
dfi^dSiov,
ov,

d^fids,

paltry

monk.

also given to certain Slavic tribes.

Porph.

Const. TV, 908 C, et alibi.


d^/Sar, d, 6,

Adm. 126

seq.

d^apv, TO, Macedonian,


pi, opiyavov.

:^

opiyavov.

Hes. 'A^a-

MoKeSovia.

d^apms
x6a>s,

(dfiaprjs),

Dion. 332 D.

Metaphorically,
willingly.

adv. without weight.

Pseudodveira-

ahh a, s, father, a title of respect given to elderly monks. Pallad. Laus. 1011 D. Hieron. VIT, 374 B. Apophth. 80 "O djSjSds 'AvTwvios. 336 NfBTepdf iari, kcX

=;

cheerfully,

Simplic.

Ench.

Sometimes d0(3a

biari KoKets avrbv d^^dv ; Leant. Cypr. 1 728


is

D.

used for

all

the cases.

331 (206 A).

Clim. 698 D.

d^ao-aviaras, adv. without pain, without suffering pain. Clementin. 312 C. Athenag. 944 C.

Ael.

N. A.

10, 14.
^ao-jcaj/ifto)

a^aiTKdvuTTos, ov, (as if from

from envy

or malevolence.

Plut.

II,

free 756 D.

Athan. II, 980 D 'A^jSa U.dp.p.aiv. Scrap. Aeg. 940 A. B. Pallad. Laus. 1026 D 'A|30a Up ovopji airm. 2. Abbas, abbot, the superior of a monastery. Pachom. 948 C. Nil. 244 B. Joann. Mosch. 2988 A 'O d/3j3as
Tot) SixS.

Justinian. Novell. 123, 34.

Basilic.

o^da-Kovos, ov, (fia<TKalv(p) freefrom envy. Philon

4, 1, 2.

Digitized

by Microsoft

A^yapo<s
'A^apos, see'Ay^apos.
'AjSSijptnKos,
tj,

59
o/Abdera.
Cic.

a/Bpo
free from reproach.
Basil. Ill, 956

Socr,

6v, (^A^hrjpiTqs}

617 A.
o^XauTos,
ov,

Att.

7, 7

Id est

'AjSSijptrtKoi;, stupid.

Lucian.

(pXavrrf) without slippers.


Philostr. 869.

n,

0pp.

3.

Cyn.
("A^Sripd),
I,

4,

369.

'A^8rip66ev

adv.

/rom

Ahdera.
like

d^Xerrto) :;= following.

Iren. 1237 D.

Lucian.

553.

dj36ijpo\oyoy, ov, ("A/SSi/pa,

Xeya) talking

an

d^Xem-eta (as if from &^Xeirros), not to see, to be blind; to overlook, disregard. Polyb. 30,
6,

Abderite, that

is,

foolishly, stupidly.

Tatian.

4, Ti.

Frag. Hist. 45.


mistake.

Eus.

TL,

17 Kara

toj'

koivov \6yov afiSripoKSyos icrriv

d^XeTrrqim, aTOs, Th, (d^XeTrreay)


oversight,

6 cmo tS>v 'A^driptov avBpunros,

an Abderite
Porph.

napdpafM, Polyb. Frag. Gram. 1.

896 D.

naturally talks stupidly.


afiSiov,

Suid.
Orig.

'

A^XcTrrriijuin, djUiprqpuTi.
tj,

ov,

TO,

a kind of garment.

dfiXeij/La, as,
I,

(/SXeVm)

^=

dopairla, blindness.

Cer. 470

'AjSfii'a

ffXaruXiopa Koi dfiSla puurov-

1341

B Aeo-pov d^Xeyfrias.
505 B.

Eust. Ant.

para.

[Perhaps connected with the Arabic abayeh, a woollen cloak usually striped
tjtos,
f),

652 D. s. in, 176B. Dion. 1025 A.


es,

Pseudobleating.

brown and white.]


a/Se/Saionjy,

dfiXrjxrjs,

(^Xtjxdoiwi)

without

(a^ifiaios)

unsteadiness,
6.

Antip. S. 95.
d^XrixpaiSrjs, see j3X);;(a>8)jr.

fickleness.

Polyh. Frag. Gram.

Diod.

II,

614, 13.
affe^riXos,

Philon
ov,

I,

276, 34.

651, 29.

d^oaros,

ov,

see dj3oi)Tos.
fj,

unpro/aned, sacred. Pint. I, 144 C. n, 166 E. Synes. 1128 A. Hes. c^Eij fx^is, L. h a b e s
OtjSijXor)

d^orjBrjaia, as,
Sir. 51,

(dfiorjdrjTos) helplessness.

Sept.

10 'Ev Koip^ vnepTicjjdviov no help against them.


Ps. 87, 5.

dfiotjBrjcrias,

affeKrepcios, ov,

r=

d^cKrepos.

Herodn. Gr. (6
in

d^m)6r)Tos, ov, unhelped, unaided, helpless.

Sept.
'A/3oi}-

TfXViKos)

apud

<. 1930, 32.

Sap. 12,

6.

Mace.

2, 3,

28

o/3eXrep(or (d;3eXrepos),
taste.

adv. stupidly;

bad

drjTOv

cavra KodeiTT&Ta, unable


5, 39.
1 7,

to

help himself.
is

Plut.
3,

n, 127 E. 531 C.

Porphyr.
&^rjva.

Diod.

18, 25, kivSvvoi, in which there

Abst.

22, p. 269.

no

help.

44, drix^p^a.

20, 42, emKovpia.

d^h/a, d^eva, less correct for

d^va,

Strab. 11,
d^orfdrjTas,

2, 12,

unprotected country.
Diosc. lobol. 12
d^orjdrjTas,

'Afievrlvov, ov, to, see 'Aovcvrtvos.


dfiepTrj,
rjs,
r),

adv. helplessly.
i^atparovvTes

(doprfjp)

averta,

knapsack.

TeXevrSxTLv

bleed

Suid. 'AopTTjv, Xeyovtriv ol iroXXol

vijv d^cpTr/v.

themselves to death.
d^6rfros,
ov,

d^rjva,

MnKeboviKov hk Koi T& (TKevos Koi to Bvo/jm. ^, the Latin a vena ^= atyiXa^jr, or

/3pd/xoy.

d^rjva,

i),

habena,

Diosc. 4, 137 (139). 138 (140). thong, strap, for beating.

857 B. Doric d^daros. unlamented.


d^dXiaros, ov,
(jSoXi'foi)

(/Sodo)) -noiseless.

Nonn. Joann.
Anthol. IV, 265,

that cannot be sounded,

Leant. Cypr. 1717


blows, stripes.

'Efit'Sov

avTci d^jjvas,

whose depth cannot be ascertained,


;

in

which

Theoph. 568,

8.

Cedr.

I.

773.

Zonar. Lex. 8 'A^eva, ^ d^jjva Pto/iai'o-ri. Schol. 0pp. Hal. 1, Schol. Arist. Eq. 767. 183 SKtiroXou, d^rjvm \cy6pxvai. Eus. HI, 232 A, e|i)d^iaaros, ov, unforced.
yrjiTis.

the lead will not sink said of the sea of Mar'Pseud-Athan. IV, 684 A. 1028 A. morica.
dfioXtTLav, tavos,
rj,

the Latin abolitio. Pallad.

V. Chrys. 51 D.
the Latin abolla, a thick woollen Arr. P. E. M. 6. preceding. Arr. P. E. M. 6. a^oXos, ov, fj, "A^oXos, ov, 6, Abolus, one of the ko(tjxottoio\ ayyeXoi of the Carpocratians. Epiph. I, 369 1).
djSdXXa,
17,

ajSi/SXa/Sov,

African,

cloak.

Kpivov,

^iicpOKaXKis.

106 (116). 127 (137). [The Hebrew J37 3'3X OTdxvs XetiKos.j
Diosc.
3,

ifiiva,

incorrect for d^ijva.


without a living, poor.

'

A^opiyives,
Tdyovoi.

a>v, oi.

Aborigines,
I,

yevdpxai, irpa27, 10.


28, 2.

afiios, ov, (|8i'oy)


I,

Lucian.

Dion. H.
ov,

24, 4.

401.

Strab. 5, 3, 2.

djStpo, see ^ipd.

ojSiWos, ov, not to be lived.


TO d^larov

2.

d^oa-KrjTos,

(jSdo-KO))
opr,.

affording no pasture.
heedlessly, incon1, 5,

Substantively,
Plut.

Babr. 45, 10,

z=

K&veiov.

Diosc. 4, 79.
I,

d^ovXeiras (^ovXevopni), adv.


82

d^iwras, adv. insupportably.

A
life

siderately, rashly.
d/SouXfo), rja-a,
to

Sept.

Mace.
of.

67.

"Evioi Se Koi KvvStv davdTtf Koi inwav cutrxpas

disapprove

Dion. O. 55,

mi

d^iiyras vko Xutdjs SifTc6rja-av, their

was rendered insupportable.

960

'Soo'av

cSo^ev 6 Aiovva-ios dfiiarcos fX""' ^^ seemed to be beyond the hope of recovery.


'A/SXo/Sir for 'A^Xd^ios, ov, 6, Ablabius.

Inscr.

9, 8 OCt d^ovXr](ras to SeSoypeva. d^ovXrjTKOv, incorrect for d^oXinav. involuntarily. Plut. dfiovXriTas (diSovXijros), adv. Sext. 7, 3. II, 631 C. precedmg. Philon I, 124, 32. adv.

dfiovXi,

6447.
d^a(r(l>Tifa]Tos, ov,
(fSKaa-<j>riiieai)

*aPpa,
not defamed.

as, v,

female attendant.

Chaldee rvvm, female companion, Men. (Comicus), Apist.

Digitized

by Microsoft

A/3paafi
Sicyon.
3.

60
Sept.

ayaOoepjeco
ov,

Pseuderacl.

3.

Gen.

24, 61.
iraXoiire

aSpoxos,

(j3pexa>)

unsteeped,

not

soaked.

Ex.
r]

2, 5.

Esth.

2, 9.

Hes. "A/Spa,

goijA?;,

Judnn. Mosch. 2878 A.


d^p6x's, adv. without wetting or being wetted. Eudoc. M. 349.
ajSpvCos, see Sppv^os.

XoKij.

"Afipai, veai

SoiXm.
r]

Suid. "h^pa,
vp,opcf)OS

dtrXms OepaTraiva, ovre

Oepdnaiva

Xtyerai, dXX' oiKOTpi,^ Kopt] Kol evnp.os,


oiKoyevfis, eiVf
/iij.

nre
I.

Eust. 1854, 14 seq.


Sept. passim.

a^pvvrrjs, ov,

6,
fj,

(d^pvvco) dandy.
the being

Adam.

S. 366.

'Afipadp,, 6,

Abraham.

Orig.

diplopia, as,

a^papos.

Anast. Sin.

700

'0 5c6? 'APpadp,

used by heathen ex-

253 D.
a^piopos, ov, (Ppapos) free from offensive smell.

orcists in their incantations.

'A^paaplns,

iSos,

ri,

female descendant of AbraSept.


'

Diphil apud Athen.


Diosc.
1,

8,

51. 52, fish.

ham.
"Afipap,

Pseudo-/os. Mace. 18.


6,

15. 2, 35.

Xenocr. 9. Anast. Sin. 232 D, in1.

Ahram.

A^paap. Nicol. D. 114. Pseudo-Jos. 'A^papLotos, a, ov, Abrohamic. Mace. 9, p. 510, veavlas, descended from Abra'A^pap.r)s, ov, 6,

=
I,

Gen. 11, 26 seq.

correctly edited a/Spwi-os v.


djSpas, wTOs, 6,

a^popos.

a^pcaros, not eaten, not con-

ham.
d^papis,
1,

Athan.
I'Sof,

748 C.
little

d^papi&iov, ov, TO,


ij,

afipapts.

Xenocr.

78.

244.

a species offish. AtAen. 7, 88.


6,

0pp. Hal.

"A^papos,

ov,

=
1,

Agath. 134, 16. (^i^paxTKo) not eaten. Diosc. 1, Herm. Sim. 8, 4. 11, not cut by moths. 2. Not eating, unable to eat. Vit. Nil. Jun. 52 B, TTJs (Tvvfjdovs TpoCJ>rjs. d^vpcrevTos, ov, (jSvpa-eva)) untanned. Schol.
sumed.
a^pwTos,
ov,

'APpaap.
15, 1.
the lord

Alex. Polyhist.

Hom.

H.

2,

527, p. 83.
evira,

apud

Jos. Ant.

d^a-nvaTcuo),

'A/3pao-a|, 6,

Abrasax,

of heaven of the
is

law-term.
d^vatriKos,

Antec.

the Latin abstineo, a 2, 16 Ei d^aTivaTevoT] iav-

Basilidians; the Latin fathers write Abraxas.


Tlie numerical value of this figment

Tov, se abstinendo.
i),

365,

ov, {a^v<T<Tos)

of the deep.

Hippol.

the

number of days
I,

in the year.

Iren. 680

Haer. 188, 89.


a^va-a-os, ov,
the sea.
r),

A.
1

Hippol. Haer. 372, 43.

TertuU. 11, 62 A.

sc. p^apa,

abyssus,
Ps. 35,
7.

the deep,
Sir. 1, 3.

Epiph.
78 A.

316 B. Hieron. I, 687 (453). IT, Theod. IV, 349 C. (Compare .Tust.
Theophil.
3, 2

Sept.

Gen.

1, 2.

16, 18.

42, 18.

Esai. 44,

27.-2. Abys-

Mon.
Xr]a-sv

2 'Op(l>vs 6 irapeuToybiv tovs TpiaKoarlovs

sus,

the

e^rjKOvra Oeovs.
.
.

T/ yap

ufjie-

Sept. Job. 41, 23.

under-world ; opposed to ovpavos. Ps. 70, 21. Luc. y. 31.


7.

7j

'Op<^ea ol rpiaKocriOL e^rjKovra

TreWe deoi
ii^peKTos, ov,

;)

Paul. Rom. 10, Act. Thorn. 82


kS>v.

Apoc.

9, 1.

11.

Apocr.
ol-

Tijy d^vfrtrov

tov raprdpov

Optx)

y-nwet.
/3i'or)

Plut.
living

II,

381 C.

a^po^ios, ov, (d/3pdf,

luxuriously.

d^va-a-oTOKOs, ov,

{a^va-tros, tIkto)

born of

the
tte-

Dion. P. 968. 730 C. Poll.


afipo&LaiTa, ing.
rjs, rj,

Plut.
6, 27.

I,

889 P.

H, 353 B.

deep.

Cosm. 509

Xepa-ov d^vcrcroTOKOv

= Appa

Sov
Siaira, luxurious liv-

rp\.uis

fVfTrdXeutre noTf, referring to the

crossing of the

Ked

Sea.

Ael. V. H. 12, 2 (titul.), in the old

dyadapxla, as,
good.
Tu>v

editions.
diraXrj.

Suid. 'A^poSiaira, rpvcjxpa fm^ koi


(d/3po8iaiTos),

{dydBapxos) the fountain of Pseudo-2)(on. 680 B. 696 C T17C irdvfj,

dyaOapxiav.

[^Ayddapxos occurs as a
being the fountain of good. T^v dyaBapxiiajv ttjs

afipoSiaiTas

adv.

luxuriously.

proper name.]
dyadapxiKos,
rj,

Philun

I,

324, 3.

ov,

d^popios, ov, (Bpd/itoff) loithout Dionysus (^wine).

Pseudo-Z)ion.
dyddeia, as,

593

Antip. S. 59.
ajSpopos, ov, less correct for d^papas.
d/3po7re'StXof,

deapxias npovolav.
rj,

dyoBoTijs.

Clim. 641 B.
Osiris.

ov,

{dfipos,

mSiKov) with

delicate

aya6r)<p6pos,

ov,

(dyajBos,

^cpm) good-bringing,
Hippol.

sandals.

Mel. 21.
Anthol.

ajSpoTvovs, ovv, (novs) with delicate feet.

an Ophian word applied to Haer. 144, 44.


dyaSoboTis, idos,

IV, 227.
a^poTovivos, ov, flavored with d^poTovov.
1,

Di.osc.

A. 712 A.
dya6ob6Tas,

r), (pihiapi) giver of good. Pseudo-J3!on. 561 A.

Did.

60, eXaiov.
6,

adv.

beneficently.

Pseudo-Z)jora.

d^poTovirrjs, ov,

abrotonites,^ajjoreo!

irith

120 B.
dyaBoeibms (dyadoiSris% adv. Dion. 237 C. 393 B.
dyadoe^ia, as,
t],

d^poTovov.

Diosc. 5, 62, otvos.


r],

d^povs, ovros,
lies.

Macedonian,
6(j)pvs.

like

good.

Pseudo;

o(^pis,

brow.
Men.

'A^poCTcr,
as,
17,

MaKiSoves.
drought.
13, 2.

(e|ts)

good habit or

state

op-

*a/3poxia,

(a^poxos)
8,

posed to Kaxe^ia.

Nil. 516 B.

Ephcs. apud Jos. Ant.


ov <po^r)6r)a-eTai,
nov.

Sept. Sir.

32, 26. Jer. 14, 1. 17, 8 'Ev eviavrm d^poxias


koj.

ov

8iaXei\jfei.

iroiwv Kap-

Sibyll. 3, 540.

Sext. 433, 3.

dya6oepyns, lSos, 17, (EPrO) beneficent. PseudoDion. 393 C, dpxndyadoepyea, rjo-co, (dyadoepyos) to do good, to benefit. Paul Tim. 1, 6, 18 (Gal. 6, 10

Digitized

by Microsoft


d'yaOoep'yia
'Epya^aficBa to dyadov).
'

bJI,

ayaOvva
cal.

Clem. A.

200

Sept. Ps. 52, 2.

Prov. 11, 17.

Ayadoepyovficvoi avaKoyms ivorrira Sicdkcd^cv, being benefited. Contracted dyadovpyca.

n, 368
plied

A 'ArfXes dyadov,

Plut.

by

Luc. Act. 14, 17. A. IX, 624 C.


dyaBoepyia,
as,
ij,

imperfect good, apthe Egyptians to the new moon.


the sacred elements, the

Orig. VII, 133 B.

Cyrill.

(d) TO dyadov,
charist.
Greg.^

Eu-

Basil. IV, 673 B.


II,

724 A.

Hippol. 652 D.

doing of good works. ajrill. H. 1017 A. Conthe

796 B.

Nyss.

229 C.

ISept. Judic. 11, 25

dyadaiTcpos.
ayadoa-vvrj,

Diod. 16, 85 ayafimrai-or.]


see dyadaxrvvq.
ij,

Oenom. apud Eus. Ill, 137 B. dya6oepy6s, 6v, (EPrQ) doing good. Contracted dyaBovpyos. Plut. U, 370 E. 1015 E. Iambi. Mvst. 43, 4.
tracted dyaBovpyia.

rjs, r),

396 C.

Cyrill. .4. I,

dyadoTTjs,

t/tos,

(dyaSos)

goodness.
I,

Sept.

Sap.

1, 1.

Sir. 45, 23.

Philon

54,

45 'H

yeviKaTdrt] dperij,

Clem. A.
C.

dya6o6f\fia, as,

fj,

(fleXto)

good

will.

Theophyl.

2.
Trjv

I,

rjv nves dyaSarrjTa KoKoia-iv. 980 A. H, 332 A. Basil. IH, 261

Goodness, as a
dya66rr}Ta.

title.

Baxil. IV, 544


Ill,

B. IV, 340 C.
dyoBoTroieo), rja'a, (dyadoTroLos)

C nz dyadofpyew Sept. Num. 10, 32


;

a-fjv

Greg. Naz.

64

opposed to
13.

KaKOTTotem.

T^ vfimpa dyaOoTi^n. Greg. Nyss. Ill, 1097 A Tavrd aov rrjs dyaBorrjTos Kara o'ttovS^s KaTiKripTjo-a.

"Ocra &v dya6oTTOir](Tri Kupios

rjjids.

Sophon.
3,

1, 12.

Mace.

1, 11,

Tobit 12, 33 Ta Wvit

Ti>v 'lovSaiav

....

tKplvajxev dyadonoifl(Tai.

Marc.
Petr.
3, 11.

4.

2. To do
1, 2,

well, to

Luc. 6, 33. Act. 14, 17. conduct one's self virtuously.


1, 3, 6. 17. 2, 10.
rj,

ov, (tvitos) of goodly form. PseudoDion. 724 B. dyaQovpyem, see dyadoepyeai.

dyddoTvwos,

15. 20.

Clem. B.
fias,

Joann. Epist. Diognet. 1176 A.


following.

{dyadovpyeco) good Theophyl. B. IH, 547 C. dyadovpyla, as, f), see dyadoepyta.
dyadovpyiKcos, adv. beneficently.

aya6ovpyrip.a, aros, to,

act.

dya6cmolrj(ns,

^=

Herm.
Clem. R.

Pseudo-dVm.

Mand.
1, 2,

8.
fj,

400 A.
the

dyaBoTToila, as,

doing of good.

ayaOovpyos,

ov,

see dyaSoepyos.

et alibi.

Patriarch. 1137 C, benignity.

Ptol. Tetrab. 38.

2.

Well-doing, virtuous

dyaSovpyas, adv. Dion. 441 B.


dyadocpiXris, is,

dyadovpyiKas.
good-loving.

PseudoPseudoPtol.

conduct.

Petr. 1,4,19.

Clem. A.I, 13i8 A.


;

((f)iXea>)

dyadoiroios, 6v, (ffoie'm) doing good, beneficent

Dion. 1085 B, ipyarnaj,.


dya66(Ppci>v, ov, (ippriv)

opposed to KaKowoios. Plut. II, 368 B. 2. Doing well, virtuous. Athenag. 952 A.

well-minded.

Te-

trab. 163.
dyadofpvrjs, es,
((f)ia>)

Sept. Sir. 42, 14, yvvfj, plausible.


14.

3.

Petr.

1, 2,

born of good.
effusion

Pseudo-

Propitious, in astrology.

Hermes

Dio7i.

637 A.
as,
r),

Tr. latrom. 388, 10. Ptol. Tetrab. 19. 48. Artem. 374 Oi dyadonoiol raiv daripav. Doctr. Orient. 692 C. Iambi. Myst. 52, 18. dyadoTrpfTTtjs, es, (wpeVoa) becoming the good. Pseudo-Z)ion. 641 D.
dyadtrnpeiras,

dyadoxvcria,

(p^uo-is)

of good.
;

Theophyl. B. HI, 715 B.

dyaBow,

axrai,

(dyados)

to

do good to one

op-

posed to
Sir. 49,

KaKoco.
9.

Sept.

Reg.

1,

25, 31,

Jer. 39, 4.

51, 27, nva.

2.
905
Sept.

nvL

adv. in a

manner becoming
181 B.

the

To make good.

Numen. apud Eus.


make good
r/

Ill,

good.

PseuAo-Dion. 121 B. Paphl. 84 A.


rj,

Nicet.

C -a^Bai,
dyadvvca,

to

become good,
to

vvS>,

or glad.

dyadoTTTiKos,

good.
Synes.
dyaBos,
rj,

capable of seeing Pseudo-i)iO)i. 725 C.


6v,
(oTrrticrff)

Judic. 16, 25 'Hyadivdr/


hearts were merry

Kapbia avrav, their


19, 22 'Aya2,

(made kef).
Reg.

dyadSppvTos,

ov,

(peco)
1,

streaming with good.


I,

dvvovres Kapblav eavrcov.

13, 28

Qs

Hymn.
6v,

129, p. 1592, nayd.

good.

Dion. H.

142, 8 (6a\do-

OTjs) ivopfilcraadai dyadrjs,

affording good an-

&v dyaOvvBr) f) Kapbia 'Afivav iv ra o'lva. 3, 1, 47. 4, 9, 30 'HydBvve t^v Kf(f>a\fiv airfjs, she adorned her head. Esdr. 2, 7, 18 Ei n cm
a-e Kai rovs dbiKfpois pov dyadvvBfi iv ra KaraKolirw Tov dpyvptov, wlmtever shall seem good to thee and to thy brethren to do with the rest

Diosc. 2, 205, p. 321, npos nva, chorage. Just. Frag. 1593 C BeXndv a-oi good for. vmjpxfv Iva iifj fyevv^drjs ojrA yaa-rpos (compare Matt. 26, 24 KaX6i' ^v aira ft ovk iyevvrjBj] 6 avSpamos ck(ivos). 2. Substantively, (a) 6 dyados, sc. 6f6s, the good Ood of Marcion and Justinus. Clem. 4. I, 1113 B. n, l3B. Hippol. Haer. 222,
52.

of

the silver.

Nehem.

2,

5 ' AyaBvvBrjtreTai. 6

naXs (TOV ivwmov


sight.

(tov, shall

find favor

in

thy

Mace. 1, 1, 12 -dijvai, to seem good. Theodtn. Dan. 6, 23 'Hyadvvdrj eV avTa, he


to benefit.

228, 44.

28 seq.)

(b)

(Compare Hermes
f)

Tr.

Poem.
to

was glad for him. 2. To do good,


13, nvi.

Sept. Judic.

1 7,

dyadr), sc. 6fd, the

Bona Dea

Ruth

3,

10 'ilyd6vvas to eXtdr

o-ou

of the Romans.

Plut.

II,

268 D.

(c)

dyadov, good, abstractly considered.

Classi-

TO ecrxarov imep to irpaTov, thou hast shown more kindness in the end, than at the begin-

Digitized

by Microsoft

aiyaOwwuia
ning.
4, nvl.

62
124,
dydKpaTOTTOUKr),
13.
f/s,

%ya'irr)

Reg.

4, 10, 30.

Ps. 50, 20, nva.

fj,

preceding.

PoU.

1,

ayaBamfiia, as,

fj

(pvofui)

good name.

PseudoSept. Reg.

dyaXpoTovpyia, as,

tj,

Dion. 680 B.
aya6S>s (aya66i), adv. well, kindly. 4, 11, 18, thoroughly. 1, 20, .7.

paronoda.
Poll. 1, 13.

Max.

(dydXpaTovpyos) dyaXTyr. 91, 45. 131, 27.


sc.

Tobit

l'3,

dydKpaTovpyiK^, ^s,
TToda.

rj,

Te^vrj,

dyoKfiaro1,

10 'E^OfioXoyoO tw Kvpia dyaSas. 70 ^=. tTvfi<l>ep6vTa>s. ayadaxrivrj, rjs, i?, goodness, kindness
to KOKta.
25. 22.

Erotian.

Max.

Tyr. 131, 26.


6,

Poll.

13.

dydkpaTOvpyds, ov,
;

(SydKpa,

EPrO) =:

dyaX-

opposed
9,

paTOTToios, sculptor.
I,

Poll. 1, 12.

Clem. A.

Sept. Par. 2,

24,

16. 15, li:

Nehem.
14.

136 B.
rj(T<o,

Ps. 51, 5.
5, 9.

Pa/.
Thess.

Rom.
2, 1,

Gal. 5,

dyaXpaToCJiopea,

(ayd\paTotj)6pos} to carry
(idea')

Eph. 1080 C.

CTem. ^. H, 325 B.

Written
^<).

Patriarch.

an image

to

carry the image

of anyI, 4,

thing in one's
'AyaXpaTO(l>ope'i

own mind.
votjttjv irokiv.

Philon
16,

27

also ayajBoa-vvT].

Barn. 2 (Codex
1.

^^ocr.
cat-

4 Tou 0e(rov
tco (ra-

Act. Paul, et Thecl.


ayaKuKTos,
tle.

povTOS
vovv).

Koi

dydKpaTO(j>opovvTOs

avTov

ov, that gives

bad food for milch


Chrys.

II, 85,

11

Tiff

apa 6 evotKav ev

Galen. VI, 151 B.

paTi Kol dyaKpaTo<l)opovpevos vovs iari.

Atlie-

ayaXXta^o/xat z:= dyaXXtaJjuat, ^So/iot.

X,

nag. 997 B. 'Ev


iroirjTTiv.

eavTois

dyaKpaTo<l>ov(ri

tov

729

D *AyaXXtdferat rpavfiara
aros,
to,
6,

emcfyepaiv.

ayoKKiapa,
Sir. 1, 11.

Sept. Tobit 13, 11.


31.

(dyaXXiam) delight, joy. Judith 12, 14. Ps. 47, 3.


Esai. 16, 10.
60, 15.
'

To oSipa fj ttjv Eus. H, 860 eKKKrjo'iav dya\paTO(j)opovvTa. A. B. 872 B. Zonar. Lex. 35 AyaKparo^o'

Orig. HI, 381

15, 6.

povpevos, dyakpaTO,
(jjepav ev eavTa.

fJToi

tvttovs tS>v vorjBevrmv

Hes. 'AydSXiapa, B6^a(rpa, exultation.


dyoXXido/xat, see dyaXXido).
ayaXKla<ris,
eeor,
rj,

Ovtco ^iKwv.

Hes. *AyaX-

paTOipopelo'dat, KaKKtoTri^eirdaL.

(dyaXXtdco) a rejoicing, great

joy.

Sept. Tobit 13, 1

"Eypa'^ev ima-roKfiv
his gladness.

dyakpaTo^opos, ov, (<f>epa>) carrying an image in one's own mind. Hes. ' AyaKparoipopos, as

els dyaWiaa-iv,
6.

showing
1,

Ps. 29,

aydKpa

ev tJ ''frux^ ((j>epa>v ?)

41, 5.
lips.

44, 8.

62, 6 XfiXrj dyaXXtderetoy, 14.

ayav, adv. nimis, very much, exceedingly.

Simoc.

joyful

Luc.
6,

ayaXKiao-pos, ov,

333, 6 Atd TO is Syav epiraBas SmKoveladai,

preceding,

Macar. 632

where, is
dyavaKTeio,

is

superfluous.
to be

B.

rjo-o),

angry or indignant,

said

dyaXXidm,
2, 1, 20.

atra,

commonly
1,

dyaXXido/iai, da-opat,

(dydXXu)

to rejoice, to

be glad.

Sept.

Reg.

Par.

16, 31.

Tobit

13, 7 'AyaX-

of inanimate objects. Sept. Sap. 5, 23 'AyavoKTrjO-et KaT avToiv v8aip ddkda'injs. Diosc. 5, 84 'AyavaKTetv Se tovs oSovras, el \ldos eXrj
iv
TTJ

Xid(reTat Trjv peyaKaxrivriv, airoS, shall rejoice

dtapao'cfjo'ei.

in his greatness. Ps.

2,

11.

94, 1, nvl,

18, 16

dyavaKTiKws (dyavannKos}, adv. peevishly.


ton. 11, 13,
Siaridea-Bai.

An-

'AyaXXidcTETai

o>y

ytyar Spapctv 686v, shall re32, 1, ev nvi.

Trpos

n.

Eus. H,
Hes. 'Aya-

joice as a hero to run a race.


34, 9, eVt Tivi.

1445 D.
dydvtSa (dyavoff), adv.
viSa, drpepas.
softly, gently.

67, 4, ivimiov nvos.


3, 2,

118, 161,

eVi n.
1,

Mace.

17.

Matt.
fiov

5, 12.

Luc.

47 'HyoXXi'ao-e to TTvevpd
cayrrfpi pov.

em ra

^em

ayavov, ov, t6, (aywpi) splinter, small dry stick,


for burning.

r
8,

10, 21 *HyaXX(d(raro t5 Trveu-

Suid. "Ayavov, irpoTrapo^vTovas,


t)

ftoTi,

in his

spirit.

'Act.

2, 26.
iSj;

Joann.
t^i/

5, 35.

TO KaTeayos ^\ov,

to (f)pvyavabes.
Classical.
Sept.

56 'HyoXXtdtraro tva

eprjv,

fjpepav

Tnv
9

dyandm,
to see.

fjo-a, to love, to desire.

ISav, in that he

saw.

Petr.

1, 1,

Ps. 33, 13 'AyajToiv f/pepas IBelv dyadas, loving


Sir. 6, 33.

'AyaXXtSo-^e XP? dweicXaX^ra, with unspeakable joy.

App.

11,

403, 70 'Hydn-mi'
15, 20,

oe opios
ov, to,

AoKo^eWav

exeiv tov orpaTov 'Ajtq)2,

aydWoxov,
dyaXpanas,

Hebrew D'Snx
Diosc.
1,

or niSnx,

viov paXXov.

Herodn.

lignaloes, aloes
ov, 6,

wood.

21.

both with the


ally

infinitive.

8.

15, 8.

4,

To

love sexu-

(SydKpa) beautiful as a statue.

=:

ipS>.

Plut. n, 505 F.

Lucian. H,

Philostr. 612.

122.
6,

dycApaToyXvKJios, ov,
od. IV,

(yXu^a)
6v,

sculptor.

The-

888 C.
rj,

dyoKpaTOTroi-riTiKos,

making
II,

statues.

2.

Substantively,
following.

fi

dyaKpaTowoirjTiKri, sc. rexvrj,

3. To persuade. Sept. Par. 2, 18, 2 'Hydna avTov tov (rvvava^rfvai /irr' avTov, := eiret6ev. 4. To value Tip&pju. Diog. 7, 20 ndo-ou yap riydira to Si86peva 5. To be

Galen.

364 C.

Jul. Fras.

contented.

Classical.

Jos. B. J.

1,

10, 2

235 C.
dyoKpaTOTToUa, as,
Poll. 1, 13.
r),

Aeov dyairdv OTi Q.


(dyaX/iaTojrotds) sculpture.

dydmj,
3, 9.

r]s, f),

(dyoTrdco) love, charity.

Sept. Sap.

Abst. 192.

Rhet. 196, 16. Bekker. 335, 3.

Men.

Porphyr.

6, 19.

15, 9.

Luc. 11, 42. Joann. 13, 35. Epist. 1, 3, 1. Paul. Rom. 5, 58.

Digitized

by Microsoft

A'^aiTi}
Cor.
2,
2,

63
3,

Ay^apof
adv. amanter, affectionately.
I,

4.

Thess.

1,

12 Tg

0711717;

ir

dyaTnjTtKois,

Phi-

oXXi]Xovf Kai els iravras.

Clem. R.

dydjnji' r^r TrarpiSos, objectively.

sexual love,
Terpcofievr)

2.

1,

55

At'

lon

I,

462, 34.

Xou,
4,

Clem. A.
TTpds n.

Hermes Tr. Poem. 13 3 260 A. H, 277 A, hmrWeUav


beloved.

eptas.

Sept. Cant.

2,

noteii'

Epiph. I, 337 C nvos {KaKfp.(jidTa)s). 3. Love, beloved woman, mistress. Sept.


dydm/s, love-sick.
7171'

dyainiTos,

17,

ov,

Substantively, (a)

dyamjv

fierd

o dyamiTos,

an

intimate friend.

Apophth.

Cant.

2,

7.

4. Love, as a
nji/
(77)!'

title.

^<Aara.

I,

356

A npAs
IV,

Mosch. 3109 B IIoT-e 6/cdflto-a piKpov xpovov els rnv Xavpav To d^/3a Tepairtpov koL eaxov nvd
dyamjTov. (b) the beloved, the adoptive brother of a trweiaaKros. Basil. II, 825 C. Greg. Naz. IV, 86 A. 88 A. 91 A. 93 A.
Justinian. Novell.
6,

324

/cat

ns

airSiv dyaTnjTos.

.Toann.

dyaifrjv,

dSfXc^e dyaTnyrc.

Basil.

381 C.
a-ov.

IH, 1073 (Compare Ignat. 684


Grejf. iVi/ss.
dydirrj 'Sp.vpvaiav.)

A T^s aydjn)r
C
'Acrnd^eTai

vfias

Tj

6.

(c)

5. Charity, alms.

Apophth. 92 D. 105

dyoTn/Tiy,

'Aydiras noietv iirep f/wv, to give alms. -^ Hotrj<jov dydin\v, iroirj<TaTe dydTnjv, do me the favor, have the goodness, he kind enough to do anything. Apophth. 117 B XIotTjo-are dydirrfv, fif)

820 A. Greg. Naz. IV, 87 A. 89 A. 90 A. 93 A. Epiph. I, 1064 D /canj-yopoCo-t be Sijdev t&v iv


o-uj/eio-aKTos.

agapeta,=:

Ba^il. II,

XoXeiTe
irrjv, crii

apn fUT

ijxov.

129

(KKkqaia rds dyaTnjTas Xeyopevas a-vveia-dKTovs yvvdiKas Ke<TqpAvav. Hieron. I, 402


rji

HoItjo-ov dyd-

Koi oi d8e\(f>oi trov fKaaros Kara fiovas

Jjovxaa-fi.

Joann. Mosch. 2856

IIoit/o-oi/

Unde in eoclesia agapetarum pestis Unde sine nuptiis aliud nomen uxorum ? Immo unde novum eoncubinarum
(98)
introiit?

dydwiiv dSe\<f>

ikde tva rd

tTKeirj

tov obeK-

genus
Basil,

Theod.
iBos,

m,

(pov dneveyKcofiev els to olKovo/ieiov.

dyamyrpis,

rj,

873 A.
dyaTrr/rrj,

(rvveiiraKTOs.

6. Salutation, kiss, holy kiss. Joann. Mosch. 2944 B 'ETroi'jjcrai' dydnrpi, they saluted each
other.

n, 813 D.

"Ayap,

Porpli. Cer. 17, 10 Kal

fifrd.

tovto
o'X'l-

i^ip\ovTai TToKiv oi SeandTai iv tm avTco


jxan els
rrjv dydirrjv.

66 'EKelire SiSaxru' 6

|3a-

f), indeclinable, ^Jn, Hagar, the mother of Ishmael the progenitor of the Arabs. Sept. Gen. 16, 1 seq. Theoph. Cont. 96, 19, 121. 298 Oi Tr)s "Ayap, oi e| "Ayap, oi ex rrjs

ariKevs dydirqv

T&

re Trarpiapxil, p.riTpo7r6KiTais

Ayap, zz^
'Ayapaioi,
1, 5,

oi ^Ayaprjvol.

Te

/cat

eTntTKdTTois.

a>v, 01,

("Ayap) Hagarites.

Sept. Par.

Tt.

Amity, good understanding,


Const,

alliance,

20.
r],

between two nations.

'Iva yevrjTai dydtrq Kol elprjvq.

m, 1041 Porph. Adm.

'Ayaprjvos,

6v,

of Hagar.
6

Genes. 70,

6.

144, 11 SvpjrevScpias fierd tovs TovpKOvs Koi


dydiras e^ovTas.
eixpv dyaTnjv
TToXlTWP.
/cat

200, 13 Oi
(piKlav juera

''l^rjpes TrdvTore

t&v QeoSoo'tovin

Hagarene, Hagarite, descendant of Hagar, Arab, Saracen. Sept. Par. 1, 5, 19. Ps. 82, 7. Eus. I, 354. Epiph. I, 196 B. Cyrill. Scyth. V.
'Ayaprfvos, S. 23.

2.

Substantively,

Agape,

love-feast,

the

ancient

'Ayapia, as,
the

rj,

church.
TToielv.
1,

473

Jud. 12. Ignat. 713 B 'Aymrriv CTem. ^.I, 384 B. 1112 A. Tertull. Coenula nostra de nomine rationem
;

Agari.

("Ayapoi) Agaria, the country of Diosc. 3, 1.


to

dyapl^a, ura, ("Ayap}

be or become a

Mo-

hammedan.
/xayapt'fo).)

Nicet. Byz. 728 B.

(See also

suam ostendit

id vocatur,
1,

quod

dilectio

pe-

nes Graecos est. Orig. Laod. 27. 28. Jul. 305


avTois dydmjs
jrefSv.
(cat

652 A. Gangr. 11. T^r XeyopJvtjs trap


/cat

'AyapiKos,

rj,

6v,

of

the "Ayapoi.

Substantively,

TO

dyapiKov,

agaricon, agaricum,
3, 1.

inroSop^^j
2, 1,

StaKovias rpa-

fungus.

Diosc.

Galen.

Xm,

a 894 B.

Const. Apost.

28.

Apophth. 181 A.
Petr.
2,

895 D.
dyapuTia,
as,
fj,

(Compare Paul. Cor.


2,

11, 21 seq.

(dyapifo))

Mohammedanism.
Nicet. Byz. 736

13.)
r/s,
f].

Nicet. Byz. 712 A.

'hydinj,

Agape, the female counterpart

dyapia-pds, oi, 6,

dyapiaia.

of Mr/rpiKos, in the Valentinian theogony.


Iren.

A.
I,

(See also
tov, oi,

payapia-pios.)

449 B.
Sept.

"Ayapoi,

Agari, a Scythian people. App.


(yaa-njp) bellyless.

dydrnjo-ts, ewr, ^, (dyajniaj) love, affection.

774, 47.
f/,

Reg. 2, 1, 26. Sir. 40, 20. 769 A, et alibi.


dyaTnjnKos,
fj,

Plut.

TI,

148 B.
81 F.

dytio-rap, opos, 6,

Greg.

Naz. ni, 1532 A, fasting.


Plut.
I,

6v,

affectionate.
irepi

dyao-uXXi'f,

I'Soy,

ij,

the tree producing the dyd3,

ra reKva dKrjBivas dyaClem. A. I, 300 B. mfTiKov, affection for. Greg. Nyss. Ill, 1004 C T^x dyamymajv irpbs Basil. IV, 740 A, ypdfidXXi7Xouy (rxecrtu.
1,

Anton.

13 To

a-vWov.
dyeio-uXXoi',

Diosc.
ov,
to,

88 (98).
dpptovioKov.

Diosc.

3,

88 (98).
"Ayfiapos, less correctly 'A/Syapos, ov, 0, rus, a legendary toparch of Edessa._

AgbaEus.

paTo, letters of comity.

Digitized

by Microsoft

ayjapeta
n, 120 seq. [Apparently
great, potentate.']
tlie

64
Arabic AKBAP,
Fr.

ayje\o^
monachism. 1125 B, d^la.
rd^is.

Basil. HI,

629 D, diaycoy^. IV,


crx^/ia,

Marc. Erem. 1032 B,

ayyapsia,

as,

fj,

(ayyapeva)

angaria,
Inscr.

corree, compelled service.

4956 (A. D.

o-xwa.

Pallad. Laus. 1009, nokiTela. 1026 D, (IV, 892 C), ^ios. Theod. I, 1482

49) avyapAa. Epict. 4, 1, 79. Artem. 405^. Leo. 134, 1.^ Justinian. Novell. 128, 22. Suid. 'Ayyapeia .... dyyapeiTact. 20, 71.
av avayK.rjV aKovmov
lj,cvr]v

Parad. 444 B.

Eustrat. 2288

Toi t5>v p.o-

vaxS>v dyycXiKW x/"PdyyeXiKSf, adv. angelically.

Orig. Ill, 564 C.

Xeyo/iej/ Kal ex /3iaf

ywotj

IV, 409 A.
60 B.

Prod. Tim. 298 B.

virqpea-iav.

"kyyapos

Koi 'Ayyapeia,

ayyeXioTT/s, r^TOS, n,

dyyfXdrj;y.

Anast. Sin.
sect.

Sripocria Koi

dvayKaia 8ov\eta, service.

*ayyapfVQ),

(v(Tai,

(ayyapos)

angario,
Karrjx^ri

?o

com-

'AyyeXIrai,

av,

ol,

Angelitae,

Tim.

pel one

to

perform

service without pay.

Men.
Kpivfff

Presb. 60 B.
dyyeXimSijf, ff,
I,

(Comic.) Sicyon. 4 'O nXeav


8'

following.

Iambi, apud Stob.

ovTos iToKifuos 'Eav exV " F"^""""' dyyap^wTM. Inscr. 4956 (A. D. 49). Matt. 5,

395.
es,

dyyeXoi8^s,

(EIAQ)

angel-like.

Pseudo-

41 "Otrris

ire

ayyapevtrei ptkiov

ev.

27, 32'

Dion. 146 B. 856 D.

Tlieoph. Cont. 203, 21

ToOroj' rjyydpevo'av tva aprj tov UTavpov avTov. Marc. 15, 21 ' Ayyapsvova-t Trapdyovrd Tiva

To

CXW"

dyyeXoftfieis.
af,
II,
ij,

ayyfXofieo-i'a,

(^cVtr)

anjreZic

sfation.

Slp,ava

Kvprjvalov

ipx6p,fvov

dir

dypov, tov

Cfem. A.

413 A.

Doc(r.

Orient.

728

rrarepa 'AXf|aj/8pou Koi Foicjiov, iva aprj Toy

A.
dyyeXop-iix^Tcos (iiip.iop.ai),

aravpbv avTov. Jos. Ant. 13, Suid. "Ayyapoi tin. 325 A.

2, 3.

Clemen'Ayyapve-

adv. in imitation oj

a-dai KaXovtrtv, aa-nep fjpfh vvv,

to els

(f>oprri-

yiav Kat Toiavrrjv Tiva vTnjpetrlav ayeaoai.


dyyapihiov, ov, to, (ayyapos) a beast of burden.

Pseudo-Dion. 593 B. 625 D. dyyeXo7rX)7/><oi-of, ov, (irXr]p6(o) full of angels. Pseudo-.l^/ifw. IV, 908 D. dyyekonpcTTTis, es, (irpiiva) becoming an angel.
the angels.

Porph. Cer. 489,

4.
,

Pseudo-Z)(on. 328 A.
dyyeXoTrpeTrSf, adv. in

dyydpios, ov, 6, a n g a r i u s servant, messenger. dyyapeia. 2. ngaria Et. M. 7, 25.

Lyd. 264,

7.

dyyapo(j)opo>, rjcra, (<j>pa>) to

perform dyyapeia,
Ill, 2.22, 1.

a manner becoming an Pseudo-Dion. 181 D. 2. A n ayyeXos, ov, 6, messenger. Classical. gelus, angel. Sept. Tobit 5,22. Job 20,
angel.

or to carry burdens.

Prnc.

Et.

15.

Ps. 77, 25 "Aprov dyyeXcai/,


fi'om

that came

M.

6,

45

'

A.yyapo<j)opeiv, fVl tov (popria 0epeu'

down
1,

heaven.
2,

Kara Sm8o;^^>'.
dyyelbiov, ov, to,
little
fj,

Tpo<i>itv.

Mace.

Sap. 16, 20 'AyyeXai/ Philon 11, 6. 2, 15, 23.


ela-i

dyyfioj/.

Genes. 84, 20.


angiology.

164, 27 'AyyeXoi yap arpaTos

6fov d<rm-

ayyeioXoyia, as,

(dyyeiov, Xeyto)

fiaTOL Ka\ evSaiixovfS i/n;xO'(^tXdo-o(^oi

Paul. Aeg. 92. Galen. HI, 395 C. dyyCwv, ov, to, L. vena, blood-vessel.
10. 27,

Baip.ovas,

^. Organ. Sext.lZ,\. ala-dijTiKa, organs of sense.


fj,

Gell. 18,

6vop.d^eiv.
p.evai.

^vxai

6'

Ovs oXXoi dyyeXovs Maa-ijs e'lcoBev tlo\ Kara tov depa niTO263,
7 1.

Philon 1,73,

264, 23.

332,

642, 11.

468, 19 'O

ayyeXi'a, ar,

word, speech.
1, 3,

Sept. Prov. 12, 25.


rj

hi iiropivos BeSi Kara dvayKotov crvvodofiropois XprjTai Tols aKokovBois avTov Xoyotr, oils ovopa(eiv i6os dyyeXouE.
11,

Joann. Epist.
rjv

11 Avrrj ea-nv

dyyekia,

387, 20 "AyyfXoi X-

an dpxrjs, Iva dyanaiiev dXX^Xous, commandment, precept. 'AyyeXiKoi, wv, oi, (dyyeXotds) Angelici, an obrjKovo'aTf

Cels. apiid Orig. I, Tovpyoi N. T. passim. 1516 C. Athenag. Legat. 10 Doctr. Orient. 725 C Ol yap f| dvBpimaiv els ayyeXovs fieTa-

scure sect.
ayyikiKos,
rj,

Epiph.
ov,

I,

849 B.

vaa-Tdvres

X'^""
els

^''^

iiaBryrevovTai

utto

rmv

(ayyeXos)

angelicus,

per-

dyyeXoiV

TeXeLOTrjTa

aTTOKa^tOTd/xevot.

Phryn. P. S. 26, 6 'AyyeXtKJj pr](ns, at Totv dyyeKav ev Tals TpayaSiais pfjcrets, the part of a messenger in a Clem. A. I, 692 A. Athen. 14, 27, tragedy. Diomed. 512, 23, opxr)ci.s, a kind of dance. fierpov, a hexameter verse without the last
taining to a messenger.
syllable.

The nine
<j)ip. :

orders of angels are divided into


KvpwTTjTes, 8vvdp.eis

three triads, namely Bpovoi, xfpowlS'V, crepae^ovcriai,,


."

ayytXoi,
7,

dpxdyyeXoi,
12.

dpxai.

Const. Apost.

Pseudo-Dion. 200 D.
Also, Jos. B. J.
Orig.
I,

For

35.

8,

the names
Clementin.

of angels, see Ta^piijX, MixarjX, Oipi^X, Pa(fyafjX.

2, 8, 7.

2.

Angelicus,
Clem. A.

angelic,

angelical.

133 C.
C.

Ignat. 680 A.

1316 B.

Pseudo-ZacoJ. 14, 1. Heges. Hippol. 684 C. II, 288 B.

Ol eTrra ayycXoi, the seven angels that stand in the presence of God. Sept. Tobit
12,

708 A.

Marc. Erem. 1041

Haer. 134, 75. Orig. I, 72 C. 219 C. Iambi. Myst. 69, 10. Gi-eg. Naz. II, 820 C. Isid. Prod. Parm. 635 (45). 349 A, TayfiaTa. Applied to Pseudo-jDioJi. 240 C, Td^us.

15.

Clem. A.

II,

369 C.
1,

(Compare
Apoc.
8, 2.

Sept. Sir. 32, 21.

Luc.

19.

Patriarch. 1053
Kvpiov.

Oi &yye\oi tov rrpoaaiirov

1084 C 'O ayyeXof roC irpoa-amov.)

Digitized

by Microsoft

ayye\o<s

65
Saturnilians, see

ayeXatoT/jo^o?

For the seven angels of the


Iren. 674

A.

Hippol. Haer. 380, 47.

Applied
292

Apoc. 12,9.

Barn.

14:9

B.

to priests.

Sept.

Hermias 1X59 A. Mai. 2, 7 "Ay-

"0 Sopv(f)6pos ayyeXos, tke

guardian angel.

Matt. 18, 10.

Mand.

6, 2.

B. 772 B. Basil. I, 364 B. HI, 185 C OJ (jivXaKcs t^s Did. A. 584 B. Macar. foj^s jj/xfiv ayycXoj.
irriV/iaTos eKa<TTOs \a/i/3ov
Trj &pa Tov ^aayyeXov irapa tov Chrys. H, 512 C. VII, 599 D. IX, 6ov. (Com211 "Ekootoe TjiiSsv ayyeXov ex^'" For the 8opv(j)6poi pare Hesiod. Op. 251.) of Jesus, see Iren. 465 A. 'O ayyeXos Tfjs /ieTavolas, nuntius poeniten-

Hena. Luc. Act. 12, 15. On^. I, 452 Just. Apol. 2, 5. Eus. VI. 564 A. 11, 733 B.

yeXos Kvpiov TravTOKpdTop6s i<Tnv {6 Upeis). Chrys. IX, 937 C ==: Upevs. Pseudo-i>wn.

'O Ka6' fjpas Upapffris ayyfXos laiplov

iravTOKpaTOpos vtto tlvcov Xoyitov oavopatTTm.

Applied to monks.
'ETTi'-yetoy

Pallad. Laus. 1220

221

ndvref

oi

XptoTtavol iv

Euagr. 2456 A. 2461 A. 4. Malachi ('JxSd dyyeXocdr), the name of the prophet grecize.d- Sept. Mai. 1, 1. Clem. A. I, 852 B. Greg. Naz. Ill, 1595
ayyeXos.

Auui'V/xov T

ayyeXov Makaxj-av.
angelic nature.

Theod.

Mops. 597 B.
dyyeXoTqs,
rjTos,
fj,

'PavaA-Athan.

IV, 540 A.
dyyeXo(f)dvem, as,
gels.
fj,

tiae, the

Mand.

4, 2.

angel of repentance. Herm. Vis. 5. Syncell. Clem. A. H, 652 A.


^Ae

(cpaiva>)

appearance of an-

Leont.

I,

1369 D.
6,

18, 10 OvpirjK TOV eVi t^s piTavoias dyye'Xou.

dyyeXTTjp,
Sibyll.
2,

rjpos,

(^dyyeXXto)

ayyeXos.

'O ayyeXoj t^s

e/cKXijo-i'aj,

an^eZ o/ (Ae
I,

214, OupiijX.
rj,

church.

Apoc. us. V, 428 C.


A.

2,

seq.

Orig.

449 C.
II,

dyyeXriKos,
22, Xo'yos.

BasU. IV, 889

'O ayyeXos

Just. Apol. 1, 6v, announcing. Porphyr. Abst. 221 ToO per oXr

TTJs cKiOuja-ias ecjjopos.

Greg. Naz.

492 B.

Pallad. V, Chrys. 35

469 Hpoo-

dyyeXrpta,

yov peXXovTOS dyyeXriKd. as, fj, female announcer.

Sibyll. 8,

ev^dp.evoi,
(rtas.

trvvTa^apeda tw dyycXoj

Tfjs eKKkr)-

117 SdXTrty^ iroXeptov dyyeXTpta,


ayytvos, ov,
dyyoBrjKt),
sels.
6,

'O ayyeXos ttjs elpf]vqs, the angel of

^=

ayytov
drjKxj,')

peace.

Patriarch. 1104 B.

Chrys.

I,

614 C.

rjs, ij,

(ayyos,
5, 45.

receptacle for ves-

ayyeXov tov im. T^s elprivris. 'O idvapxt^ ayyeXos, the guardian or patron angel of a nation. Sept. Dan.
Const. Apost. 8, 36.

37

Toi'

Athen.

dyyovptov, ov, to,

Adm.
261.
J>

138, 22.

10, 13.

12, 1 Mip^a^X 6

ayyeXos 6 piyas 6
crov.

iarr)-

Porph. (riKvos, cucumber. Achmet. 243. Anon. Med. [According to Forskal, the Arabic

xas

dm

tovs vioiis tov XaoO

Patriarch.

1056 B. C. 1104 B. Clem. A. n, 389 A. 409 B. {lamU. Myst. 236, 6 Kaff eKacrrov re Wvof tS>v em yrjs SuncXripaTai ns vw avTwv Basil. I, 656 B. Koaios irpoaTaTqs.)
Oi KO(Tpimoio\ ayyeXoi, the angels that
the world,

Cucumis chate. Compare gheragur kin, gourd, German g u r k e .]

ayyovpov, ov, to,


I,

preceding.

Anon.

Ideler.

429, 22.
6,

ayyovpos, ov,

a kind of pie.
Psell.

Hes. "Kyyovpos,

made

el&os irXaKOvvTOS.
irqKTov.

Stich. 298

=z

peXi-

according to some Gnostic sects. Clementin. Just. Tryph. 62. Iren. 675 A. 413 A. Hippol. Haer. 256, 96. 380, 47. Athan. II, 129 382, 73. 398, 93 (222, 23). C. (Compare Plat. Tim. 41 C. Herm. Vis. Qpr]trKeia tSiv dyyeXiov, the worship 3, 4.)

(Compare Solon 38
r),

(26), 3 yovpos.)

dyypia, as,
dyypif<t

grief.
irritate,

to

Hes. 'Ayypias, Xinas. Symm. to make angry.

Prov. 15, 18.


ayyav,
<Bi/of, 6, barbed javelin, used by the Franks. Agath. 74, 11. [Apparently connected with dyKtt)!', an con, oyxos, uncus.]

of

angels.

Sept. Tobit 11, 13.


19, 10.

Paul. Col.

2, 18.

Apoc.

Patriarch. 1056 C.

*dye'\.pa,

epa>,

to

collect

1104 B. Just. Apol. 1, 6. Clem. A. H, 261 A. Tertull. 11, 46 C Simoniae autem magiae disciplina angelis
serviens.
Orig.
I,

pose.

Her.
Il,

4, 35.

Plut.

presents for any purI, 36 F. U, 235 E.


Tjj

Lucian.
a-iiv

221. Ill, 395 'as, dyelpoiev

pr)Tp\

avXols Koi KvpfiaXois. Et.


Toiovra.

ayyeXovs.

(Judaeos) (rt^eiv IV, 425 A (Judaei) XaTpevovTes dyyeXovs. Eus. IV, 193 C. Laod. 35. Epiph. n, 748 B. (Compare Paul. Tim. 1, 5, 21 AiafiaprupopAU ivamiov tov 6eov Clem. R. 1, .... (tai t5>v i<XcKTS>v dyyeXav.
708
Ke'Xcror Xiytov avTovs

pm, TO Trepuevai Ka\


pa>
Tivi

1185 C.

2.

M. 14, 33 irepivoareiv em vUrj


To
or
impostor.

'Ayeir]

ere-

be a mendicant,
Cels.

rnountebank,

charlatan,

apud
34.

Orig.

I,

753 C. 773 A.
rh,

Max.
fj

Tyr. 75,
cow.
11,

Philostr. 180.
ov,

dyeXabiov,

(dyeXds)

/3o0r,

56 'H
fier

rrpbs tov 6e6v koI tovs dyiovs (angelos)

Porph. Cer. 464.


729 Povv dyeXalrjv.)
dyeXaioKopos, ov,
6,

(Compare Horn. H.
dyeXriKopos.

oiKTtppStv fiveia.^

3.

Angelus,

applied to Christ.

Just.

Pallad. V.

Clem. A. I, Tryph. 55. 76. 93. 116. 127. 321 A. (Compare Sept. Esai. 9, 6 KaXeirai Applied to delicydXris /SouX^y ayyeXos.) mons. Matt. 25, 41. Paul. Cor. 2, 12, 7.

Chrys. 14 C.
dyeXaioTp6cl>os,
ov,

(dyeXrj,

Tpetjia)

feeding or

keeping herds.

Max.

Tyr. 105, 31, imcTra-

Digitized

by Microsoft

ajeXap'X,eco

66
dyevvia, as,
rj,

dyia^cc

=^

ayevvfia.

Polyb. 30,

9, 1.

19.

herd,
I,

or

company.

Philon

I,

658,

22.

39, 2, 10.
dyevrrjiTip^fiovs

P/uJ.

1060

Ta>v iraKKoKtSayv rrjv dyeXap-

dyevrris Iv prj^ovs,

the Latia
dycvri-

agentes in rebus,
Athan.
Trepl
I,

certain magistrates.

j(ov(Tav.

a dyeUpxns, ov, i, {dyiKr,, &px<i>) leader of Philon I, 304, 35. 650, 48. H, 90, herd. Lucian. 11,422, Pint. I, 20 E. 40, et alibi.
ravpos.

crnpUovs.

608 B, incorrectly written (Compare Plut. U, 468

TS>v

rds irpd^ets virovpySiv.)

Suid. 'AyeXapxr/s, '^' dyeXrjs tS>v

/SoSv apx<^v.

*dyepu.6s, ov, 6, (dyclpio) collection of presents by begging. Arist. Poet. 8, 3, referring ap-

dyeXapxla, as,

rj,

Ae
6,

leading of a herd.

PseudoII,

parently to Horn. Od. 17, 362 seq.


I,

Dion. H.
Ael.

Dion. 137 D.
dyeXapxas,
144,
5.

274, 11.

PoU.
8,

3,

129.

9,

142.

V.H.

ov,

dyeXdpxv^-

Philon

4, 20.
p.6s,

Athen.

60.

Bekher. 326, 21 'Ayep-

nav to

dyeipoficvov.

Hes. 'Ayep/ios, adpoi-

dycXdf,

dSos,

fj,

(dyeXr))

belonging to a herd,

ais, (rvvaymyfi Bvaias.

feeding at large.

Schol. Apollon.

R.

2,

89

<f)op^ds.
i),

dyeptox'"' "^' ^' (Ayepaxos^ haughtiness, arroSept. Maco. 2, 9, 7. 3, 2, gance, insolence.


3.

dyiXaa-TiKos,

6v,

{dyeXa^op-ai)
23.

gregarious.

Polyb. 10, 35, 8.


2, 9.

2.

Display.

Sept.-

Philon
140, 5.

II,

202,

238,

1.

Max.

Tyr.

Sap.

Philostr. 80. 501. 591.

Euagr.

2768 C.
(Kopfa) tending herds.

dyeX))Ko/ios, ov,

Nonn.

dyepa>xos, ov, haughty, arrogant.


3, 1,

Sept.

Mace.
Polyh.

Dion. 47, 208. dyeXripmos, see dyfXipMos.


dyeXriTp6(f)os, ov,
1,

25.

Hes. 'Aycpa>xos .... vjiipri^avos.


^dv. haughtily, arrogantly.
18, 17, 3.
axftrira,
fj,

dyepa>x<'>'y

(rpi^oi) keeping herds.

Poll.

2, 8,

7.

181.
i],

ayeoTa or dyi<TTa, also


6v,

the Latin
rroXe-

dyeXiKos,

gregarious.

Basil.

I,

172 A.

aggestus
I,

or

aggestum,
4, 27.

mound. Proc.
^vXav
Koi x"^

dyfXipdios,

incorrectly dyeXripaios,

herd: common, low, vulgar. 625 B.


dyfXoiias

a, ov, of a Macar. 605 D.

271.

Euagr.

Suid."Aycirra,

piKov

p,rixdvT]p.a

ck Xi6a>v Kal

ey(.p6p,evov.

"AKfooa, PafuuKov

tl pr/xavrifm

(dyeXoios),
Arist.
ij,

adv.

without

laughter.

K bevdpoTOp.Las npos epvfivoTTjTa p.era<TKeva^6p,evov.

Argum.
I,

dyeXoKopiKos,

6v,

Ran. I. of an dyArjKopos.

Clem.

dyevarta, as,

rj,

(ayeuoroy)
eating.

=
m

dnaaria, fasting,

732 C 7j dyeXoKopiKj], the art of breeding and tending herds.


ogy, of

abstaining

from
ov,

Schol. Arist.

Nub.

621.
dysa>iiTpr]Tos,

dyeveaXoyrjTos, ov, (yeveaXoyeo)) without geneal-

not geometrical,

applied to

unknown
rj,

descent.

Paul. Hebr.

7, 3.

irregular figures.
ayrjpxi, aros, to,

Sti'ab. 5, 1, 2, o-x^jpa.
,

dyevrjcia, as,

the being dyevrjTos, the not being

made.

Hippol. 837 B.

dyevrjTos, ov, (yt'yvo/xat) that is not, or

cannot
1235,

be,
9.

made, created, or done. Dion. H. Aihan. I, 469 A. H, 73 C.


dyevriTois,

II,

a the Macedo(aya)) a g e nian royal guard (cavalry). Polyb. 5, 25, 1. Plut. 1, 264 F. App. I, 5, 65, 1. 31, 3, 8. Arr. Anab. 1, 1, 11. 583, 3.
r),

dyripaoia, as,

the

being dyrjparos, perpetual

adv. without being


C.
fj,

made

or created.

youth.

Schol. Horn. H. 11, 1.

Adam. 1817
dyevvrjola,
as,

dyfiparos, ov, that does not


the

grow

old.

2. Subplant.
fi'om

being dycwrjTos, the not

stantively, TO dyrjpaTov,

ageraton,a
C.

being begotten.
84. 272, 78.

Hippol. 837 B. Haer. 178, Dion. Alex. 1269 B. Basil. I,

Diosc. 4, 59.

Galen.

XHI, 150

'Ayi7paT0f, ov, 6, Ageratus,

an emanation
is 'Evmo-is.

512 B.

Caesarius 861.

Did. A. 385 D.
created
II,

dyfvvrjToycvfis, es, {dyevvtjros, yiyvop.ai)

Adyos and 449 A.

Z<aij

liis

spouse

Iren.

by the unbegotten.

Arius apud Epiph.

dy7]poK6p.r]Tos, ov, (yrjpoKopL<o) not

212 A.
dyevvrjTos,- ov,
ten.

in his old age.

Theophyl. B.

I,

taken care of 78 B.

(yewdm) L.

innatus,
2, 6.

unbegotPtol.

dyr)pa>s, mv,

Just. Apol. 1, 14, 49.

Theophil. 1, A. 1289 C. B. Did. A. 332 to dyevvrjTov dyevurjola. [Often confounded with dyevrjTos.^

Gn. /ren. 561 A. 1108

dyi)poa-i

ever-young.
dy^po)s.]

[s. H, 1276

roif

dytdfft), aoto,

(ayios) to hollow, sanctify, conse-

crate.

Sept.

Gen.

2,

3.

Ex.

13, 2,

nvi n.

19, 14. 22.

28, 37.

Lev. 16, 19

"Aytdo-Et airb-

'

Ayivvr]Tos, ov, 6, Innatus,

Epiplianes apud Iren. 569


294, 15.

a Gnostic figment. B et Hippol. Haer.


Plut. II,

dyewi^Tms, adv. without being begotten.

ano tS>v dKaOapfTLav Ta)V via)v 'icrparjX. 21, 12 To fiyiao'pevov Tov 6eov, the sanctuary. Num. 20, 13. Deut. 33, 3 ol riyuurpAvoi, the saints. Reg. 3, 8, 64. Esdr. 1, 1, 3. 47. Tobit 1, 4.
Sir. 32, 11.
3, 9.

1015 B. Ong. n, 49 B. 189. Bus. II, 1544 B.

Iambi.

Mathem.

33, 4.
3, 2,

49,

7.

Joel

1,

14.

2, 16.

Mace.

9 'Ayidcras t6v rdnov toxjtov-

Digitized

by Microsoft

a'VLaafJka
LS ovofia crot.

67
To read
Porph.

wyLO's
Basil.

X. T. passim.
the blessing

dytao-n/cds, ^, 6v, sanctifying.

I,

660 A.
one

the

of Cer. 140, 4
office

seq.

3.

of water.
fifj

Macar. 624 D.
dyuKfiopos, ov, 6,
ij,

To

desecrate, defile,

(<t>^po))

Upa(j)6pos,

pollute.

Sept. Deut. 22, 9 "h/a

Ayma-Brj t6

who bears
481.

the holy vessels in

a temple.

Inscr.

yivvriiia Kai

to (nrepfia.
(tiytafo))

dyiatriMa, aros, to,

fied,

2. Sanctuary, the tabernacle or the Temple.

a hallowed, Sept. Ex. or consecrated thing. Ex.


25,
7.

sancti29, 34.

dyta^ds!
47.

interj.

huzza! hurra!

Porph. Cer.

281, 19.
(;ypd<f>ai)

dywypacjios, ov,

written by inspiration.

Par.

1,

22,

19.

2,

26,

18.

Judith 120 C.

5, 19.

Ps. 95, 6.

Sir. 36, 18.

47, 13.

Esai. 8, 14.

Mace.
I,

1, 1,

Orig.

917

C 3.
Eus.

21. 39.

Clementin.

of a Christian church.

11, 6 7 7

The holy A.

4.

table,

Pseudo-Dion. 376 B, Se'XTot, tJie holy Scriptures. 2. Substantively, to iyt6ypa(f)a, sc. l3t/3Xia, a name given to the books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth, Kings, and Chronicles. Epiph. in, 244 B. Isid. Hisp. 6, 1, 7, Job, Psahns,

The sacramental elements, commonly in the Greg. Th. 1048 B. Basil. IV, 797 A. B. 804 A. Greg. Nyss. 11, 225 C. 5. Holy water. Jejun. 1913 A 'AyiW/io tS>v
plural.

Proverbs,

Ecclesiastes,

Canticles,

Daniel,

Chronicles, Esdras, Esther.

Porph. Cer. 141, 13. Ex. 28, 32. Ps. 92, 5. Patriarch. 1068 B.
biyrav.

6. Holiness.
Sir.

dywSpopos, ov, {Spapeiv^ walking in Ant. Mon. 1432 B.


dyioXfKTfiB,
rj(ra>,

holiness.

(Xeyco) to give the

title

ayie to

Sept.

45,

12.

an

ecclesiastic or
6v,

monk.

Stud. 1664 D, nvd.


Orig. HI,

dyioTTOios,

(TTOteto)

sanctifying.

ayuuTiios, ov,

d,

holiness, sanctification.
Sir. 7, 31
1
7,

Sept.

812 A.
dyionpiirem, as,
r),

Judic. 17,

3,

'consecration.

Bva-iav

the being dyiowpeTnjs.

Nicet.

cLyuKTfiov :=! dyiav


ao'fiov ^iz

Bwiav.

8 '^Ovoy.a ayi2,

Paphl.497 A.
dyioirpeTnjs, is, (TrpcTTO)) befitting the holy
:

dywv

ovofia.

Amos

11 ^EAajSoi/

holy.

fK

rmv

viS>v

ifiav els wpocpriTas, Kol fK tS>v


els

Clem. R.
I,

1,

13.

Polyc. 1095 A.

Cyrill.

A.

vavL(TK(ov vfiav

dyuwpov, for Nazarites. Dion. H. I, 54, 16. Paul. 'Siom. 6, 19, 22. Cor. 1, 1, 30. Thess. 1, 4, 3. 2, 2, 13. Hebr.
12, 14.

176 D.

dyioTTpeiras, adv. in
Cyrill.

A.

II,

Petr.

1, 1,

^"Ev ayiatrfLa 1,

TTvevfiaros

(subjective).

Clem. R.

30.

Patriarch.

dy loppi^os, ov, IV, 944 B.

a manner befitting the holy. 249 B. Pseudo-Djon. 144 B. (fiiCa) of holy root. Fsend-Athan.
Orig. II, 817

1068 B. 2. Sanctuary, the Temple. Sept. Mace. 2, 2, 17. 3, 2, 18 Toi' oocov tov d.ycao'iMOv Carth. 3. Sacrament. Toi/ ayiov oiKov.

ayios, a, ov, L. sanctus, holy.

'O ayios 'Iwdvvfjs.


fieyav

Jul.

378

tov dycaraTOv

^dpaTTiv.

Tov 3e6v tov 389 A TJjy

dyLcoTaTTjs Beds ArjpTjrpos.

407

''Epprj dyie.

Can. 72. 4. The blessing of water. Stud. 1717 D "ApxfTOi 6 iepeiis Tfjs ev^rjs tov ayiatrfwv. Porph. Cer. 140, et alibi.
'H cLKoKovBla TOV fiiKpov
office

Epiph.

I,

540 C *0

dyttoTaTOff aTToa-ToXos Tlav-

Doroth 1836 B \os .... 6 aytof 'laKw^os. "Ayios dy iov, most holy. 'O aytof }iXrjiJ,r)s. Sept. Ex. 40, 9. 29, 37 "Eo-tui to dvaiaiTTri-

ayiatrpxiv, the lesser

piov

dywv Tov

dylov.

30,

may
the

(Jbrm) of the blessing of water, which be read by the priest at any time and 'H aKoKovdia tov /icyaXov ayiaapov,

iarl Kvpita.

Num.

4, 1 9
;

10 " Ay cov rwv dyiav "Aym t5>v dyiav.

2. Holy, as a
lative dyiaraTos.

title

regularly in the super-

place.

Alex. 1051

Toi

dyiardia
Carth.

of the blessing of water, which is read only on the day of the Epiphany (Beocfydvta), that is, on the sixth of Jangreater office
uary, after the Xeirovpyla.

Km
1

fiaKapiaTaTa iinaKomo 'Adavaa-im.

255

A 'AyHBTare Trdn-o AvprjXtf.


rjfji.av

255

C Upos
Kmy-

avTov TOV dyioiTarov aSfX^dy

tov

Trjs

Euchol.

(Com*

aTavnvomroKeais

enia-KOTrov.

Synes. 1345 C.

pare Her.

1,

51 'O Se dpyvpeos, eVi tov irpoe^aKOtriovs

vrjLOv TTJs yavirjs ;^G)pea)i' dp,<poptas

imKlpvarm
Tertull. I,

yap vno Af\cj)S>u Qeo^avLouri. Ckrys. II, 369 D Aid toi 1204 B.
Kara
ttjv ioprrjv TavTrjv

Ephes. 932 D. CyriU. A. X, 44 A. 'During the last epochs of the Byzantine period, it was given also to the emperor, but only in Const. IV, 832 B Tdj/ ^aa-iXea the positive.
fip.S)v

ToiJTo KOL iv fiea-QVVKTLa

TOV dyiov.

Porph. Cer. 680, 17 Has


Pa>p.rjs
fip.Siv

diravTes 'vbpevtrdp.evoi o'lKade rd vdjiara airoTtdevTai, Kot


(TLV,

eX^L 6 dyiaTOTOS ima-KOTTOs

6 Trvevpan-

1!

iviavTov oKoKXrjpov (jivXdTTOv-

KOS iraTYip

TOV ^aa-CKews

tov

dyiov

are

Sf)

crfjiiepov

dyiacrSfVTav rav vSarcov.

Adm. 186
\ecos.

Theod. Lector
vbdrcov
ev

2,

48, p. 209

Tjji'

iirl

tSsv
rfi

Ilapd rav x^i-P^" "" ^7^^ fiaa-iPhoc. 240, 12. Vit. Kil. Jun. 109 A.

roXs

Qeo(j>aviois

iriK\r]<np

Cant.

I,

ecnrepa yivetrBai.^
dyiaarripiov, ov, t6, (dyid^ai) sanctuary.

a-TavpoeiSSis

198 'O Trarpiapxns Se t^ dim pvpa imXeyaiv peXP^" "" ^"'^'^^'^

Sept.

ydXrj
Toil

(jxovfj

dyios. dyios.

AiaSexofievot. 8e oi
ttjv (pavrjv eV

cm

Lev. 12, 4. Ps. 72, 17 (Symm. dyida-fiaTo). Theoph. 177. 2. Baptistery.

dp^aivos lardpevoi

rpiTov Koi

avToX \eyov(TLV

Curop. 90, 11 seq.

Digitized

by Microsoft

ajio'; 3.
rj

68
6 dytos,
8,

ajKicrrpoeioBco'!
Eiff

Substantively,
saintess.

(a)
1,

a saint;
Ps. 15,

Ta dyia,

^=

ets Trjv

peyoKrjv

e'laroBov, zin

iyla,

Sept. Tobit

15.

65, 10 'HviKa peXKovcri Siep^fO'dai Ta ayia.

3.

Sir. 45,

24.

Mace.
9,
1,

52.

Luc. Act.
1,

with or without the numbered with, is Did. A. essentially the same as o ayios. 920 B "Qf Tis tS>v iv iyloLS Trarepav <ro(l)ias Greg. Nyss. yefiav dayXKoyiarois idlBa^ev.
Christ.
eV dytois,

Sept. Tobit Joann. 'O


23,
9.

Rom.

7.

Eph.

Matt. 27, Paul. 32, Christians. Const. Apost. 7, 9. 1.


1,

46.

(h) holiness. Sept. Ps. 59, 8. 88, SG'Qij.oira iv Ta dyia p,ov, I have sworn by my holiness.

Amos

4, 2.
rj,

13, 9, the
6,

Holy One, God.


'O

Sir.

dyioTrjs, rjTos,

(ayios) holiness, sanctity.

Sept.

69

ayios

tov

deov,

Maco. 2, 15, 2. Paul. Hebr. 12, 10. Clem. A. I, 221 B. n, 109 A. Did. A. 517 B.
Pseudo-Z)jon. 969 B.
Tpi7r\a<riairpa ttjs

participle a-vvapidnovfievos,

Method. 357 C aS^s tov Tpiirkatjiatipov


k. t. X.

Tai
ttjs

dyioTTjTOs elcrayayovres, referring td the


ayios, dytos,

hymn

dyios Kvpios (Ta^aaQ,


1

m, 12 A '0 iroKvs iv ay Lois BoctiXeios. Ephes. 1100 B 'O eV dylois Kwva-Tavrivos. Cyrill. A.
X, 349
narepas

2, Holiness, as a title. Ephes. Theogn. Mgn. 857 B. dyioTTjTi.


dyioTpi(T(ro\oyea,
the
Tiva.
rja-a, (rpifraos,

T7

vp.eTipa

Toi/ ev dyiois

narepa

(Tov

tov Icairo-

a-ToXov eeoipiKov.

Chal. 956 C.
dyiots

932

A Toiis
ayiot

Tpia-ayios

iip-vos

to.

Xeya) to sing Did. A. 593 A,


holy.

tovs

eV

O'VvapiOfj.ovfMevovs.

Const. (536), 1152 B.

Joann. Mosch. 2853

C ToO
TrdvTcs,

ev dytoiS Trarpos ^fiav Saj3a.

Ot

dyiotpavrjs, is, ((paivopuii)

appearing (being)
replete

Bust. Ant. 621 A.


dyio(f)6pos,
ov,

(Compare

aio(f)avrjs.)

All-Saints.

Jejun. 1916 D.

Stud.

((f>ipa)

with

holiness.

'H KvpiaKq twv dyicov Trdvriov, AllSaints' day, the Sunday next after Pentecost. Porph. Car. 189, 10. (Compare Paws.

24

Ignat. 708 A.
dyicTfios,

ov,

6,

(dyi^a)

offering

to

the

dead.

For Upov koivov.) of the saints, see Sept. Dan. S, 35. Greg. Th. 1104 A. Method. 381 B. Greg. Naz. I, 1128 B. 1181 A. 1193 B. Epiph. n, 737 A Tlepa rov de'ovrbs ov XPV Tijmv TOVS dyiovs, dXKd Tifidv tov avrav SfCTTroChrys. VII, 81 A Kat ravTO Xeya ovx TTjv.
1, 8,

9 QcoXs Tols irdaiv

Diod.

4, 39.

dyiaBr)s, es,

dyios.

Philon

I,

675, 4.

the intercession

dyias (dyios), adv. in a holy manner.

Clem.

A.

II,

244 B.
rjs,

dyiadivYj,

^,

dyiorrjs.

Sept. Ps. 29,


2, 7, 1.

5.
1,

Mace.
3, 13.

2.

2, 3,

12.

Paul. Cor.

Thess.

Holiness, as a

title.

Amphil. 117
13

B.

Carth. Can. 7 'H v/jicTipa dyiatrvvt],


fj

iva

fif]

iKTeva}p.V

tovs dyiovs,

K. t. \.

Aster.

Tt T^pbs TavTa Xiyei vp.av

dyiao'vvrj

Pallad.

D ^Hfiels pAptvpas ov TrpoirKvvovoKKa TLi^apev as yvT)a-L0vs TrpocrKvvrjTas Nil. 580 B. 581 A. Bcoi. (b) angel AyyXosf Sept. Job 15, 15 (5,1). Sir. 45, 2. Paul. Thess. 1, 3, 13. Clem. R. 1, 56. (c) oi aytoi, the holy people, the Jews. Sept. Dan. 7, 18. 8, 24 Kai davixaa-Tois <l>dpei Koi
325 C. 321
^ev,

Upbs ttjv dyuotnivrjv aov. Justinian. Cod. 1, 1, 7, Prooem. dyKokq, rjs, f), the bent arm. Plut. H, 9 7 7 F 'Ek
ayKoKais
(rayqvrjs,
17,

Laus. 1075 '& Tfi D. Apophth. 224

a-fi

dyiaavvri.

Ephes. 1120

meshes.
Sept.

ayKoKis, ibos,

armful of anything.
Apollon. 5.
5,

Job

24, 19, opipavav.

11 To ^op-

vo8ct>0r}(rTat

koX

irotfjO'ei

Kol

<l)6pe'L

Bvvda-Tas

Tiow Ta>v

Koi

fi^/AOi/

dylcav.

pav
Sept. Lev. 22,

a-vvTjdeiav.

^vkav dyKC^Xs \iyerai KaTo. ttjv fjperiJos. Ant. 5, 1, 2, \ivov, sheaf


(dyKoXr), (jjipa)^ to be carried

(e) TO iyiov, a holy thing.


7.

of flax.
dyKd\o<l>opiopai,

Num.
15, 17.

4, 19.

Reg.

3, 8, 7.
9, 8.

Esdr.
1,

1, 5, 4.

Judith
2,

4, 12.

8, 21.

Matt. 7, 6. (f) sanctuary, the tabernacle or the Temple in the singular or plural. Sept. Ex. 26, 33. 36, 1. Lev. 19,
;

Mace.

10, 39.

up

in the arms.
fj,

dyxeia, as,
dyxivTovp.,
4,

^=

XayKia.

Cosm. 509 C. Diod. 5, 30 as

ancentum,

v.

1.

o-ikvs aypios. Diosc.

152 (154).

30.

iSTum. 4, 15.

Par.

2, 5, 9.

Esdr.

1, 1, 5!

dyKiKa, incorrect for ayKiXKa.

Judith 16, 20. Mace. 1, 10, 42. Jos. B. J. 5, 5, 2. 8, 2. 9, 2.

dyiov, to ayiov tSjv dyitov, or Ta ayia tS>v dyimv, the holy of holies, the inner

To aytov tov

Paul. Hebr. Ant. 3, 6, 4.

Latin a n c i 1 e a small P/?.I,69A. Lyd.ii, 15. 20. 129,11. dyKiXXa, a n c i 1 1 a female slave. Lyd. 129, 13.
dyKiKiov, ov, to, the
shield.
,

sanctuary.

Sept.

Ex.

26, 33.

Par.

2,

3, 8.

Ezech. 42, 13. Paul. Hebr. 9, 3. Jos. Ant. 3, 6, 4 Kai d pev nas vaos ayiov eKoKelTO, to
Se a/SoTov, TO ivTos tSiv Tea-a-dpav laovav, tov dyiov to ayiov. (g) the sacramental ele-

ayKurrpeva, cvcra, (ayKiorpov) to hook a fish. Metaphorically, to ensnare. Philon I, 40, 20 ToOtow dyKUTTpeva-eTai. 289, 40 *Ak 8' dpa
dyKia-Tpev6fj inrb' iraQovs.
'

Clem. A.

I,

601

Ay KuTTpeiova-i

roiis dffXiovs.

Method. 397 D.

dyKKTTpoeiSfis,

is,

(ayKiiTTpov,

Laod. 14. Eus. II, 656 B. Athan. I, 272 B. Basa. IH, 1585 B. Const. Apost. 8,13. Cnrt/i. Can. 37. 41. ^opArns. 4001 B. Pseudo-Marc. Liturg. 305. Porph. Cer. 26, 7
ments.
.

EIAQ)
204.

hook-

shaped,

barbed.
Sioft. I,

Diosc.
192, 42.

2,

Plut.

H,

877 E.

dyKUTTpoeiS&s, adv. like a hook. Erotian. 174 HyxiorpeuTat, dyKia-TpoeiSSis avp.Tre(fn)Kev.

Digitized

by Microsoft

ayKKTTpoOtjpevTT]^
ayKia-Tpo6rjpevrfis,
ov,
d,

69
Toil
anf/ler.

tiyXaucjiaTK
dr/iioa-iovs "miruvs

(ayKitrrpov, 6r]pevrqs)

one

who catches Theod. n, 352 A.


aa-ca,
1

fish

with

a hook,
to

tovs iv eKdarrj dXKay^

dyKvXoKonaiv.

(Compare Theod. UJ, 917


iKKeKOfipivoi ras fie|m9.

Toy dyicvXas
hook,

Also

*ayiaiTTp6a>,
fish.

(ayKurrpov)
hold,

catch

Dion. H.
Tas TTobSiv

II,

Tropically,
Lye. 67

Synes.

340
to

B 'KyKLO-Tpwfievov
capture
Et.

1117,

l^Bihiov.
capiicate.

Km

1 T:ivovTis Te {moK6^rovras lyvvas nXaylois rois ^l(pea-i.

SiaipovvTfs.)

nd^9

8e tov Bayovros r^yKiiiTpapIvr].

dyKvXoTTOvs, oSos,
I,

d,

(novs) crook-legged.

Damasc. IH, 821 D.


arpiop^vos, KaTex6p,evos
l-)(6va>v

M.

Plut.

10,

53 'Ayxi-

408 A,

Siippos, sella curulis.

Gloss. 'Ay/cu-

diro p,eTa(j>opas tSiv

tS)V KaTe-)(op.4vav

iv Tip

dyKiarpa.

3,

XoTTovs, curulis sella.

dyKvXoptvos,
(pis) with

2.

To furnish with a
I,

barb,

of an arrow.
barbed.

Plut.

559

A 'HyKia-Tpa>p,fvas aKiSas,

more correctly an aquiline nose.


ov,

dyKvXoppivos,

ov,

Mai. 106,
dynvXabovs.

7.

ayKUXTpaiSris, s
5.

ay KvXos,

r),

crooked, curved.
oSovtibv,

dyKUTTpoeibifs.

Polyb. 34,

AyKvXos in Twv

Liber. 32, 20

Diod.
23

5, 34.
T],

Strab.

1, 2,

16.

dyKLOTpioTos,
6,

6v,

{dyKUTTpoco) barbed.

Polyb.

ayKvXoT6p,os, ov, (rifivai) cutting crookedly. Paul. Aeg. 156 to dyKvXorofiov, sc. opyavov, crooked
bistoury,

10 BeXos mSrjpoiv dyKurrpaTov,

the

a surgical instrument.

icrffds.

ayKTUpa,

as, ^,

=
6,

dyKvXoxiiXos, ov,
r)

ay^ovaa.

Psell.

1141

dyKvXoxeCXris, hook-beaked.

(quoted).
dyicrrip,
rjpos,

(ayy^a)

L. fibula,

bandage. Hes.

Fseudo-Dion. 137 A. Achmet. 133. ayKvXoia-is, cof, rj, (dyKvXom) stiffening of the eyelids, a disease. Galen. II, 391 D. Aet.
7,

Cels.

Med.

5, 26, 23.

'AyKrrjp, Sea-p,6s.

2.

Plut. II,

468 C.

66.

That part of the neck

ayKvpa,

where throttling takes place. Poll. 2, 134. Hes. 'AyKTrjp .... dyKT^pes ol iv t& rpa)(rjXa} Towoi, Si &v ayx^rSm o-u/i^aiVet.
ayicuKeopai (dyKvXrj), to hurl a javelin.
12,

as, fi, an cor a, anchor. Plut. II, 815 'H Upa ayKvpa, the sheet-anchor, the largest anchor in a ship. Lucian. II, 698. IK, 372 Trjv vtrTaTtjv ayKvpav, fjv Upav ol vavTiKXo-

Athen.

fifvoi (j)aaL

47 Kepavvov
Tjs, ij,

rjyKvKrj/ifVos,

in the act of

*dyKvprj^6Xiov, ov, to, (SyKvpa, (SoXXm)

dyKV-

hurling.
dyKvXri,

po^oXiov.

Democr'. apud Plut.

II,

317 A.

L.

uncinu
26,

tach, hook.

Sept.

495 E.
dyKvpiov, ov, T6,Jittle SyKvpa.

Ex.

37,

17.

11

^vvdyjreis

tovs KpiKovs
Ill,

Epict. Frag. 89.

(eyes)

ix

tS>v

dyKvkwv.

Greg. Nyss.

244 B, the hook at the end of a chain. Poples lyvia, the ham of the knee. Philostr. 819. Dion. H. m, 1667, 7.
2.
3.

Plut.

II,

564 C. 604 D.

dyKvpios, ov, belonging to


tively,
cable.

an ayKvpa.
Suid.

Substan-

TO dyKvpiov,

sc.

trucrpa or (T^oiviov,
Xlia-fi.aTa,
to,

Diod.

14,

73.

Anchylosis, stiffness of a joint. Cels. Med. 5, 18, 28. Galen. U, 273 E 'AyKvXrj
c'cttI

dyKvpia

a-)(oivia.

dyxvpo^oKiov, ov, to, anchorage.


16, 4, 18.

Strab. 1, 3, 18.

nUcTis tS>v TTcpi TOV Tpd\rjKov


Tjv

fj

ra apBpa

Plut. II, 507 B.

Tevovrmv, 8i

ip,nobl^eTai

f)

ivepyeui.

dyiaiKiov, ov, to, {dyKvXrj) link.


01

Suid. 'hyKvKia,

KpUoi tS>v SKvueav.


hook, for fishing.

dyKvkiov, incorrect for dyKiKiov.


dyKvkis, ISos,
1,
rj,

(EIAQ) anchor-like. Diosc. 3, &Wen. IV, 20E. Erotian. 320 dyKvpoeihas, adv. like an anchor. Pu/3Soei8e'a Tponov, dvn tov dyKvpoeiSas.
dyKvpoeibifs, is,

166(176).

0pp. Vyn.

dyKvpafia, aTos, to, anchor. Schol. Arist. Eq. 762.

155.
ov,

dyKvpwTos,
(dyxiXri, ^\e(f)apov')

r),

ov,

dyKv\o^e(j>apos,
XaxTW.
Cels.

whose

with
Tos,

an anchor.
the
title

(implying dyKvpoco) furnished Epiph. Ill, Aoyos 'AyKvpavcao'oiKos.

eyelids adhere to the eyes, afflicted

with dyKv-

of a tract.

Med.

7, 7.

dyKav,
tongue-tied. Paul.

avos,
96.

6,

z^
6,

Schol.

Arist.

dyiaiXoy\a>o'(ros, ov,

(ykwada)

Ach.

Aeg. 152, nddos.


dyKvkoyvu>p.a>v, ov, (dyxuXos, yvoDpari) wily, crafty.

dyKwvia-Kos,

oy,

(dyKmv)
(dyXaos,

tenon.

Sept.

Ex.

26,17.
dyXaoTcvKTOs,
ov,

Olymp. ^. 84 B.
dyKvKobetpos,
ov,

T(vxa>)

splendidly

(Setprf)

crook-necked.

0pp.

built,

Rome.

Sibyll. 12, 130.

Hal. 416, 30.


dyKvXdSovs,
ovros,
6,

dyXaocpap^s,

(oSovs)
barbed,

crook-toothed.

is, (dyXaos, (j)S.pos) wearing a splenSibyll. 3, 454. did robe, with a splendid robe. is,

Anthol.

Xni, 641

as

Nonn. Dion. 3, 50 with reference flukes of an anchor.


dyKuKoKOTrio),
to
rjcra,

a javelin. to the

dyXao(t)eyy^s,

((jjiyya)

splendidly shining.

Sibyll. 11, 65.

Euthal. 628 A.
((jjavrj)

dyXa6(pa>vos,

ov,

clear-voiced.

Greg.

(dyKvKr), kotttoi) to hamstring,

Naz.

Ill,

1556 A.
f),

Theoph. 246, 18 Tia^aSris Se rivat tS>v iv TlepcriSi Xpcariavav r}yKv\oK&irq<7ev, oi Theoph. Cont. 369 fiiTa Taira irepieTedTqa-av.
hough.

dyXa6(pa>Ti.s, i.8os,

(<p&s)

aglaophotis,=
Plin. 24, 102.

naiwvia.

Diosc.

3,

147 (157).

Ael.

N. A.

14, 24, 27.

Digitized

by Microsoft

dyKciTta
aykdria, see

70
Td
her.
'Ayvoryrat,
S>v,

ayvcoffTta
dyvorjfuiTa avrrjs eirevdrja-a,

ayXma.

my

not knowing

ay\a(jivpas (implying dy\d(j)vpos), adv. inelegantly.

Athen. 10, 38.


ov, TO, small ayXis.
3.

oi,

dykMpwv,
n, 257,

Ruf. apud Orib. Cosm. Ind. 469,


cr/cdpoSa.

heretics

who maintained

(dyvoia) Agnoetae, certain that Christ did not

know
to, (ayXts) sraWic.

ayXma,

<bi/,

B.
5,

written dyXdi-ia.

Hes. 'AyXma,

Tim. Presb. 41 the day of judgment. 57 B. Leant. I, 1232 D. Isid. Hisp. 8, Damasc. I, 756 68. 'AyvoijTai, oi Kal

dyX(Bo-a-oxapiV<oy (yXm<T(ra,

X^P")'

^'^^^ not pleas-

QepLKTriavoi, ot dyvoeiv dtrefiSis KarayycXkovrts

ing with the tongue, without flattery, sincerely.

rbv XpioTov

T171'

fjfUpav rijs Kpia-cws.

(Com-

Germ. 357 C.
dyi/aKOTTOj/, ou, to, (ayvos,

aKcmovf)

dvdyvpis.

pare Matt. 24, 36 Uepl Se Trjs Kal Trjs &pas ovSels oiSev, ovde
ovpavav,
ov6e
6
el
firj

r/fiipas eKeivrjs ol

dyyeXot Tav

157 (167). ayvawTos, ov, {yvdwra, Kvdirra}) not fulled ; new garment. Plut. U, 691 D. 692 A. dyvdros, ov, 6, the Latin agnatus, a relation by the male side. Antec. 1, 10, 1. ayvawros. Matt. 9, 16. Marc. aymtftos, ov, Clem. A. I, 629 A. Moer. 29 "KKva2, 21.
Diosc.
3,

6 Trarrjp fiov fiovos.

Marc.
vibs, el

13,

32 Uepl Se
iraTrjp.

Trjs

rmepas
1, 7

eKeivifS

ovbels olSev,
firj

oi (iyyeXoi oi ev

ovpav^, ouSe 6

Luc. Act.
7]

Ovx vpwv etm

yvatTjj

vai

^povovs

KOipovs ovs 6 iraTr/p edero ev


Basil.

ISia e^ova-la.
rjbrj

IV, 876

''E(,rjTrjp.evov

irapd ttoXKoIs to evayyeXiKOV prjTov

irepi

TTTOV,

'ArriKac
fj,

ayva(j)0V, 'EXXt^wkSs.

iyveia, as,

42.

2. Celibacy.
I,

L. lustratio, lustration.

Diosc. 4,

TOV dyvoeiv Tbv Kvpiov fjpMV 'lrj(rovv Xpurrbv Caesarius 889. Did. TTjv fifiepav Toil TeXovs.

Eus. H, 385 B.

A. 920.
dyvor)Teov

dyvevrrjpiov, ov, to, (dyvevco)

purification.

place of religious Ch-eg. Porphyr. Abstin. 311.


keep one's self pure from, to

Cyrill.

A. IX, 1100 B.)


dyvoeiv.
6.

bel

Philon

I,

40,

17.

Diosc. Prooem. p.

Orig. HI, 36

Oic

Naz.

648 C.
to

dyvorjTeov XpioTov imbrjfilav


vevai Tois TeXeiorepoiS.

....

vorjrrjv

yeyo-

dyveva, evaio,

abstain religiously.

Dion. H. HI, 1649,


22.

7,

dyvoia,

as,

rj,

error,

sin of ignorance.
5,

Sept.
13, et

dm Tcvos. Philon 11, 145, A Tfjv fifxepav dyvfvovrei els


01/,

Stud. 1697

Gen.
alibi.

26, 10.

Lev.
I,

18.

Par.

2,

28,

l^dias Koi cXmoil

Philon

345, 31.
VTT

(Compare PluL
elms

abstaining

from

fish

and

during the

n, 551
fj

Ols be

dyvolas tov koKov p-aXXov


p.eTa^a\e(rdaL

day.
dyvi^ofiai,
to

Trpoaipea-ei tov al<TXpov rb apjiprr^TiKov

abstain from.

Sept.

Num.

6,

eyyeyovevai

bidaxrt

y^povov.

'A?ro oiyou Kal (rixepa Ayvicdrja-eTai.

For the ayvoia of Enthymesis,


A.

ayvtvos, ov,

=^

following.

aywof,

ov,

(ayvos) of withy.
(dyvifto)
6,

Method. 185 D. Plut. 11, 693 F,

2. Obscurity, darkness of meaning. Dion. Alex. 1241 B. C.


dyi/OTTOtd?, ov, {ayvos, Troteo))

see Iren. 500

pdjSSoff.

purifying, sanctify-

dyvtcrpos, ov, d,
tion.

ceremonial purif ca8, 7

ing.

Cyrill.
ov,

A.

m,

1224 B.)
Orph. Aror characVis.
I,

Sept.

Num.

5.

Ovrco

itoir^a-eis

dywoTToXof,

(ttoXco)) purifying.

Dion. H. I, 469, 13 Tov dyvio-pbv eTTOirja-avTO. Barn. 748 B. dyvoew, rja-oi, r)iTOjxai, ignoro, not to know. Sept. Sap. 7, 12 ^Hyvoovv fie avrrjv yeveriv Kpict. 4, 8, 35 AyvoeitrBai fieeivat TovTwv.
avToXs Tov dyvuT}iov avToiv.
^

gon. 38, Kadappos.


dyvoTTjs, Tos,
ter.
fj,

(ayvos) purity of
2,

life

Paul. Cor.
4, 4.

6,

6.

Herm.

3, 7.

Mand.
C.

Inscr. 1133, 15. in the

Orig.

492
the

620 B.
ai,

X^TTjfTov npoyrov tls et

(the active would be


I,

dyvvdes, av,
stones

most ancient loom,


;

dyvoSi ae ris et).


Ka\ Trp&repov avTovs
wapa^Tjvai,.

App.

375, 3 OvS' dyvoa>

oXXas awOrjKas wpb rmvbe

hung to the warp afterward seded by the dvrlov. Plut. U, 156 B.


7,

superPoll.

Sext. 305, 24 At' dyvoovfievov to


BiSdcrKeiv.

dyvoovpevov
or

2.

36 ^Ayvitdes be KoX Xeiai,


10,

ol XiBot ol e^rjpTrj-

To commit a

sin,

pevoi Tav CTTjp.ovatv KaTa ttjv dp^alav vtfiavnKrjv.

an

error, in ignorance.

Sept. Lev. 4, 13

125 Aetas Tas Kal dyvvSas.


Plut. II,

'Edv 8e Trdcra (rvvayaryr)


a-Ltos.

'la-pafjK dyvoT^crrj

aKov-

dyvrnp-ovevojuu {dyviapajv) to be treated unfairly

5,

18 Ilept

rrfs

dyvolas avrov,

rjs rjyvorjtre,

or ungratefully.
Trjv veprjciv

484

IloXXd

irepl

Ka\ avTos OVK j'Sei.

Num.

12, 11 rjyvorja-apev

dyvapoveiiopevos ovK

riyavoKTrjcrev.

Kaff

Ti rjpdpTOiifv.

lieydKijv.

Sir.

5,

15.

Eeg. 1, 14, 24, ayvoiav Hos. 4, 15. Mace. 2,


errors

dyvcopoveto, Tjo-m, to be ungrateful

towards any

11, 31 TS>v riyvorjp,iva>v,

of ignorance.
/cat

Paul. Hebr.
vois.

5, 2

Totr dyvoovo-i

TrXavw/jLe-

Passive dyva>pove7(r6ai, to be treated ungratefully. Died. Ex. Vat. p. 90, 7. Plutn, 137 D. 766 C.
onu.
dycmo-ia,
as,
rj,

Plut.

Tjyvonufv,
dyvorjfia,

n, 533 C 'O jxkv ovv SfVOKpdrtjs committed an error in ignorance.


Sept. Tobit 3, 3.
9, 7.

ignorance

of divine

things.

Euagr.
dyvmcro-a)

aros, t6, error, sin.


5, 20.

Judith

Paul. Hebr.

2. IgnoSir.

Scit.

1236 A. dymeto. Dion. P. 173.


r),

dyvmoTia,

as,

the being

ayvaaros.

Nicom..

rance, the not knowing.

Sept.

51, 19

apud Phot.

Ill,

596 A.

Digitized

by Microsoft

ayvmaro'i

71

aypavXia
lawyer, advocate, attorney.

ayvaaros, ov, unknown. Just. Apol. 2, 10, flfdr, the God of the Jews. Luc. Act. 1 7, 23 'Ayvirtrra 6em. Paus. 1, 1, 4 Bm^oi 8e Beav re ovoiui^ofievaiv dyvaiaTCDU, at Athens.

PhUostr. 566. (b) f, dydpaws (proparoxytone), sc. jjixepa, court-day.


Strab.
13, 4, 12. 10, 21.

710 D.

Plut. II, 530

Luc. Act. 19, 38.

6,

14, 8 'A'yj'moTtoi' 6fS>i/ ^afios.


'&6rivr](Tiv,

Jos. Ant. 14,


mpia-7ru>fjievms,

Philosir.

Suid. 'Ayopa'ios, (npo)

232

^01 iSpvvTai.

ov xal dyvoMXrav Sai/xovav /3a[The altars at Athens had


;

ArNQSTQI eES2I the altar at Olymhad ArNQSTOIS SEOIS. Paul apparently saw only one of the altars at Athens.]
each
pia
dyvaxTTtas,

dyopa dvaarpecjiopevos avdpawos .... npowapo^VTOvas 8e dyopatos, fj rjfiipa iv 17 dyopd reXelrai.


6 iv
TTj

dyopavop.ia>,

rjo-co,

(ayopai/d/xof) to be
5.

an

aedile.
P<b-

Dion. H. IV, 2120,


paltov.

Plut.

I,

316 C,

adv.

ignorantly

without

proof.

App. n, 175,
as,
rj,

16.
aedilitas,

Pseudo-Dion. 997 B.
dyoyyvOTos,
ov,

dyopavop.ia,
,aedile.

L.

murmuring. 1528 A.
ing.

(yoyyv^a) not grumbling, not Eus. Alex. 361 D. Ant. Mon.

Polyb. 10, 4,
8.

1.

the office of Diod. 20, 36. Dion.


Plut.
I,

H.ll, 888,

Strab. 4, 1, 12.

408

A
murmurClim. 1200 D.
not to he enchanted.
(yojjTeuo))

Ayopavop.iav 8e
rj,

tt/v p,ei^ova TrapijyyEiXe.

dyoyyva-Tois, adv. without grumbling or

dyopavop^Kos,
the aedile.

Nil. 273 D.

ov, L. aedilitius, pertaining to Dion. H. II, 1262, 13, i^ovaia.

ayoi]TVTos, ov,

Plut.

I,

709 F, ^CKonpia.
6,

Plotin. 11, 811, 3. 812, 1.


ayor)TevT<os,

Synes. 1285 C.
Cic. Att.

dyopavojxos, ov,
3, 26, 1.

the

Roman

aedilis.

Polyb.

adv. guilelessly, sincerely.

10, 4, 6.

10, 5, 3.

Diod. 20, 36.


Schol.

12, 3.
Aydfievai, see aya>.

dyopaa-eia (dyopdfo)), to desire to buy.


Arist.

Ran. 1068.
as,
rj,

AyovaTos, ov, knee-less.


born, applied to Socr. 709 A.
uyovia, as,
fj,

Metaphorically, stub-

dyopaa-la,

Chrysostom by his enemies.


sterility,

328.

Diog.

2, 78.

VII, 20 D.
Jos. B. J. 4, 8,
2.

Artem. Dion. C. 68, 2, 1. Orig. Aster. 169 B rfjv nokvhdnavov


(dyopdfm) a buying, purchase
npaa-is.
Sibyll.
2,

(dyopafto) purchase.

(ayovos) unfruitfulness,

dyopauiav Tav ix $d(riSor opvldmv.


dyopacrp,6s, ov, 6,

unproductiveness.
I,

Plut.

32 F.

II,

103 B.

App. n,

15, 28.

opposed
Aristeas

to
2.

Sept.

ayovovoios, a, ov, (ayovos, ttoicw) that renders

329.

2.
an

Prov.

23,

20.

Purchase,
19.

'AyowKKlrai,

Did. A. 700 A. (yow, icKivco) Agonyclitae, a sect opposed to kneeling at prayer. Damasc. I, 757 B.
barren or unproductive.
S>v,

the thing purchased.

Sept.

Gen. 42,

oi,

Nehem.
dyopevo'is,

10,
ecos,

39.
fj,

(dyopevo))

addressing.

ayopa, as,

rj,

Caesarius
dyopcuT-ds,

892.

Aster.

297

ayopf

Ezech. 27, 12.


chase,

2.

ifmopla, trade,

traffic.

Sept,

write dyopcvaea-iv.
17,

Sophrns. 3353 B.

avfj.

Emptio, a buying, purPorph. Cer. 473 'ifidna e|


bought in
the

6v, (dyoptvco) utterable ; explicable,

Just.

Tryph.
ov,
6,

4.

uyopds
ket.

diro

tqv <^6pov,
'ESo'Si;

mar-

ayovpos,

(Koipos)

youth,

young

man.

674, 21

inrep

Roman. Jun. Novell.

dyopas hi^depimv. 285. 3. Harbor,

Porph. Cer. 471, 13.

Comn.

I,

360, 12.

Theoph. Cont. 821. Eust. 1788, 56 'Axaiol fie


illiterI,

haven; Thessalian use of the term. Theon. Progymn. 186, 11. 4. The Roman /or-wm. Dion. H. n, 958, 3. 5. Nundinae. Dion.

Kovpovs, OpaKes 8e dyovpovs.


dypapp-aria, as,
rj,

{dypdjxpaTos) illiteracy,
ypaiJ,p.aTiKrj.

ateness

H.

m,

1446, 16.

T/)iT?)

dyopd, trinundinum,

opposed to Ael. V. H. 502, 34.


;

Philon

8, 6.
illiterately.

three nundinae,

dyopd^a,
10, 31

dcrco,

to

seventeen days. buy. Sept. Par.

dypafipdras {dypdp.iiaTos), adv.


1,

Phi-

21,

24

lon

I,

195, 4.

Epict.

2, 9,

10.
'4yypa<f>os,

'Ayopd{^a>v dyopda-(o iv dpyvpico d^ia.

Nehem.

aypaiTTos, ov, not painted ;

opposed to

OvK

dyopS>p.ev Trap

avrcov ev a'a^^dra.

Aristeas

8.

Polyb.

6, 17,

av7Q\ Tas iKBoo'CLS.


iavToif ^pa>p.aTa.

4 'Ayopafou(7t Trapa Tav Tt/iijrav Matt. 14, 15 Ayopdo'ao'iv


'

Theoph. 611, dypdptov, ov, to, a kind of boat. Porph. Cer. 601, n. Adm. 233, dXtivTiKdv.
14. 20.

27, 7 'Hyopafrav c|

avT&v
them.

235,

18.

19.

Comn.

I,

321,

12.

Tov dypbv ToO

Kepafuas, bought with

361, 15.
dypapiaiTT)s, ov, 6,

Luc.

9,

13

'

Ayopdcra/iev els jrdvra rhv \abv

rower in an dypdpiov. Porph.


(aypavXos)
to live

Apoc. 3, 18 'Ayopdtrai imp ip.ov xpvo'lov. Mai. 59, 19 'Hydpatre Se dm Tav 2apaKrivS>v. Porph. Cer. 674, 12 Ta Kal dyopaa-devra dnb roiis d^^ddas. 3. To ransom, Chron. 592 'Aj /ier oKi\vTpovpMi.
TovTov ^pap^ara.

Adm.
try,

242.
rjaro),

*dypav\eti>,

in the coun-

or in the open air.


Plut.

Aristot.

Parth. 29.
2, 8.

Strab. 4, 4, 3, of swine.
I,

Mirab. 11. Luc.

61 F.
the being in the country, or in

yov dyopd^ei ix
dyopdios, a, ov,

Trjs aij(fmKa)a'ias.

dypavkia, as,
the

fj,

of

the dyopd.
sc.

Substantively,

open

air.

Diod.

II,

599,

2.

Dion. H.

II,

(a) d dyopalos,

dvrip,

L. homo forensis,

1140, 8.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aypavXi^ofiat
aypavXl^ofiai
dypa<pia, as,
scribing.

72
4.

a'ypi,oj(r]vapi,ov

^=
ij,

dypavXeco.

Sbnoc. 179,

dypLOKOKKvfiTjXea, as,
1,

rj,

wild K0icKvpt]\ea.

Diosc,

(aypa^os) the not writing or deTheophyl. B. EI, Stud. 481 C.

174.
Diosc.

aypioKOKKVjxrjkov, ov, to, wild KOKKVjJurjKov.

700

CIV,

312 C.
the Scriptures. Iren.

1,174.

(SaZe?i.

VI, 357 A.
rjs,
rj,

aypa(j)os, ov, not written in

dypwKoXoKVvrrj
KoXoKvvdrj.

or dypioKoXoKVvdri,

wild

520 B 'E| aypa(f>a>v avayivaxTKOvrcs. VI, 728 C, wapdBoa-is. II, 1544 A, Basil. IV, 188 Aihan. n, 801 A.
Theod.
aypatpas,

Eus.
(pavai.

Kvvrq.

Phot. hex. ToXvTrr), dypiOKoXoSuid. ToXvTrr], dypia KoXoKivTrj.


ov, to,

'Ek

dyptOKpop-pvov,

z^z

ayptov

Kpofifivov^

T^f a.ypd(f)ov SiSaa-KoKlas, apostolic tradition.

Schol. Arist. Plut. 253.


dyptoKvjxivov, ov, TO, wild Kvp,ivov. Schol.

m,

993 D.
not in writing.
WitJiout

Nicand.

96

B.

2.
ij,

adv.

Clem. A.

11,

Th. 709.
dyptoXdxavov, ov, to, wild Xdxavov. Sept. Bfig. 4, 4, 3 as V. 1. in the Hexapla. Vit. NU, Jun. 57 A. Schol. Theocr. 4, 52.

Scriptural

authority.

Anast. Sin. 40 C.
aypeva-is, eios,

(dypdai) game, animals caught.


291.
^,

Achmet. 178.
dypevTis, Arist.
I'Sos,

(dypevTrjs)

huntress.

Schol.

dypiopaXaxv, V^, V' 'wild pjiXaxr;. Schol. Nicand. Th. 89 'AypidSos 8e fiaXaxris, Kara 8iaip(nv,
TTJs

Vesp. 368.
r],

dypiopaXdxrjS,

rfv

Kol dXBaCav KaXovtriv.


pLTjXov,

dypevTos,

6v,

caught, as fish.

0pp. Hal.

3,

aypioprjXov, ov, to,

^= aypiov
(jxop<j>TJ)

wild apple.

541.
dypla,
as,
r),

(aypws}

Diosc.

1,

163.
ov,

aypaxms.

Suid.

dypiopopffios,

wild or savage of
Sept. Jer. 1 7,
6.

"Aypaxrns
dypia}(pds,

dSos,

fj,

=
1.

form.
dypla dxpds.

Orph. Arg. 982.


rjs, rj,

Zopyr.

dypLOfivpUr),

wild

p,vpLia).

apud

Orib.

U, 587,
little

dyplSiov, ov, TO,

dypos.

Diod. 13, S4. Epict.

dypiopapos, ov (fuapos) savagely foolish, savage and foolish at the same time. CyriU. A. HI,

1,10,9.
Tivos,

2,2,17.
tj,

Marttjr. Pohjc. 5.

1313 B.
dypionrjyavov, ov, to, wild nrjyavov.

dypieXaia, as,

izz:

dypla eXala, dypUXaios, koolive,

Aet.

1, p.

L. oleaster, wild
13.

the olive in

its

18

D,

MaXv, 6

Ttves

dypio7n}yavov ovopd-

natural state.
Strab.
8,
3,

Zopyr. apud Orib. II, 586, 9. Diosc. 1, 136 (137). 139


28, 3.
to

(ova-iv.

dypiopiyavos, ov,
(34).
,

Hes. 'Aypiojrriyavov, /SoT-di/jj. rj, wild dpiyavos. Diosc.

3,

31

(140).

Pans.

2,

dypi^a

(aypios f)

irritate,

excite.

Symm.
62, v.
1.

dypiopvWiov, ov, TO, (JipvWiov) wildfowl.


^

Antec.

Prov. 15, 18.


dyypi'fa).

Hippol Haer. 468,


(aypior)
wild.

2, 1, 16.

ayptoa-eXtvov, ov, to, wild a-(Xivov,=:z 'nnroa-eXtvov.


6v,

dypaivos,
bird.

rj,

Sybyll.

7,

79,

Diosc.

3,

71

(78).

Charis.

32,

14

Siser,

aypLoo'eXtvov.

dypipdios, u, ov,

(aypios)

wild animal.
aypiov,

Ptol.

aypioa-iKvov,

ov,

to,

((tikvos)

ujild

cucumber.

Euerg. apud Athen.


dypioambiov, ov, to,
pear.

Geopon.

12, 73.

Bekker. 1097
dmSiov, wild
Xetrat.

'AypioaUvov, dypayyovpiv Ka-

8, 37,

3 'Ax^pSov, TovTea-Tiv

aypwo-Tacjiis,

ISos,

17,

=z

o-Ta(j>is

dypla.

Lea

dypioamSiov, wild pear-tree.


dypiO^dXavos, ov,
fj,

Med.
wild oak.
rash.

109.

arypla ^aXavos,

Aquil. et Theodtn. Esai. 44, 14.


dypiofiovXos, ov, O0UX17) wild

dypiotruKapivov, ov, to, wild a-vKdp,ivov. 121.


dypioo-vKiov, incorrect for dypuxrUvov.

Moschn.

of purpose,

Polem. 230.
jSovXeu/nara.)

(Compare Adam.

S. 359''Aypta

dypwavKOfiopea, as,
136, p. 83.
dypio(\>ayiTrjs,

r),

wild (TVKop.opia.

Moschn.
the

aypio^orvs, 6,

aypios ^ovs, wild ox.

Cosm.
Orph.

ov,

6,

((^aycii/)

one who eats

Ind. 444 A.

flesh of wild beasts.


(6vp,6s) wild

Isid. Hisp. 11, 3, 16.

dypwdvpos,

.ov,

of temper.

dypw(jiavris, es, Qpaivco)

appearing wild.
ujith

Hymn.

Cornut.

1 2,

4.

151.
rj,

dypioKawa^is,

eas,
2,

(jidwa^is)

Diosc. Eupor.

31, p. 243.

wild hemp. Hes. 'AyptoKa-

aypi6(pddXpos,
Vit. Nil.

ov,

(6(j>6dXp6s}

wild eyes.

Jun. 25 A.
ov,

va^os, ^oTavtjTis.

dypio(poivUios,

(<^oiw|)

dypwKapSapov, ov, to, wUd Kaphafiov. Galen. XHI, 636 E Bordvriv l^-qpiba, rjv nves Ka\ova-i \em8iov rj dypioKdpbap.ov.
dypioKapSov, ou, ro, (c a r d u u
s
,

of wild

date-tree.

Martyr. Areth. 49 SiXov


VLKOV.
dypi6(j)pa>v,

iXa(j>p6v dypioipoi-

OV,

{(f)pj)v')

savage of mind.
((jjvXXov)

CyriU.

c ar

du

s)

;^

A. IX, 957 A.
dypid^uXXov,
Diosc.
3,

Sxavda AlyvTrria.
dypioKivapa.)
dypioKivdpa, as,
17,

Bekher. 1096.

(Compare

ov,

to,

TrevKc&avos.

82 (92).
Antec.
2.

(juvapa) z=z aKav6a XeuKij.

Diosc.

3,

12 (14).

dypioxnvdpiov, ov, to, wild xn<'^P">v.


1, 16.

Digitized

by Microsoft

ajpioxotpo'!
dypwxoipos, ov,
Plut. 304.
dypioio,
a>a-a>,

73
Schol. Arist.
dypvTTvrinKos,
17,

"7%'^/"*"'
ov,

6,

aypios x^pos.

wakeful.

Diod.

II,

597, 22.

Plut.
to

I,

142 E.

render savage.

Diod. 19, 6

dyptmvla, as,
disease.

'Hypttfl/jeVoi

ray ^n))(ds,
6,

aypicpos,

ov,

{ypmos,

Porph. Cer. 670.

grapple. [Compare gripe, German


ypXcjios)

wakefulness, considered as a 17, Diosc. 4, 65. 2. Vigilia, vigil, religious service performed in the evening

gr'eifen.]
dypiaibqs,
fr, 2,

(EIAQ)

vnld.

Strah.

3,

3,

8.

Dlosc.

158 (159).

preceding a church feast. Athan. II, 1292 Basil. IV, 764 B. C. Epiph. n, 357 B. Doroth. 1720 A. (Compare Greg. Naz. II, 20 B Hdvw)(ov (TTacnv.^
aypvirvos, ov, wakeful, troubled

'Aypiavios, ov, 6,
I,

an epithet of Dionysus. Plut.

299 F. 716 F to 'Ayptciwa, a festival in honor of Dionysus. aypoyuTav, okos, 6, (aypbs, yeirmv) one whose
926 A.
II,

with wakefulDiosc. 4, 76. dyvpvauTos, ov, untrained in anything. Muson. 1 78 Ayvpvaa-Tos 6' eh; avrf^^tv rjSovals.
ness.

field
Jos.

is

contiguous
8,

to

another man's field.


Plut.
I,

dyivaios, ov,

{yvvrj)

wife-less,

without a wife.

Ant.

13, 8, tivos.

351 E.

Dion C. 56,1,2.
Abstin.
4, 17, p.
6,

OW^. VII, 216 A. Porphyr.


360.

Antec.

2, 1,

31 'O e/ios dypoyeirav.

dypoSiairda, (dypoSiatros) to live in the country (not in the city). Theoph. Cont. 472, 8.
dypoblaiTos, ov,
(biavra)
living in the country

dyvppos, ov,
1,

(dyeipa)
1.

=
an

dyeppos.
188.

274, 11 as V.

PoU.

7,

2.

Dion. H.

Assem-

Uy, meeting.
dyvpreva, eva-a,

Babr. 102,
to

5.

Suid. 'Ayvppos,
Strab.

(not in the city).


dypomia, as,
Jos. Ant.
4, 3.
fj,

Synes. 1100 D.
villa,

eKK\r]a'la, crvvayayr).

L. rus,

country as opposed
4,
6.

be

dyvpTTjs.

7,

to city or town.
7, 8, 4.
I,

Diod.
456, 13.

Muson.

147.

Frag.
261

Plut. 11, 519 A.

Anton.
Sophrns.

78 Hepl rds TcXeraj tS>v opym(rpav dyvprevovra to irpmrov. Greg. Nyss. TL,
18, p.

Aristid.

dypoLKi^to

=
Tj,

Sext. 650, 27.

laTpov TLvos twv dyvprevovrav, mounte-

classical dypoiKi^ojicu.

bank.
bond.
dyvpTiKos,

Theoph. Cont. 421, 14,


Tj,

to be

a vaga-

3393 B.
dypoiKiKos,
ov,

(aypoiKos) L. rusticanus, rustic,


dcrrvKos.

ov,

pertaining

to,

or fit for, an
392, 8 to ayvp-

opposed to

Max.

Tyr. 55, 41.


Nicet. Byz.

dyvpm)s.
TtKov,
TToiia.

Strab. 10,

3, 23, p.

Athen. 11, 53. CAoZ. Can. 17. 709 C, fitfiXiov, stupid.


dypoiKiKas, adv. rusticfally.

charlatanry.

Jos. B. J. 4, 6, 3, Xoyo-

Plut. n, 407 C,

appHed

to the pijrpa-

Greg. Nyss.

I,

312

yvprat.
dyvpTa>8S)s (implying dyvpTaSrjs), adv. after the

Kara

a-x^pa, o dypoiKiKcos Xeyerai KoKiav-

8pov, Tov Kopiov a-jreppjxTos, in the

of the country people ; seems to be a gloss.)


dypoiKiari, adv.

language (the relative sentence

manner of an dyvprqs. Epiph. II, 401 A. dyxiKa^, anos, ov, a sore at the inner corner of
the eye.

Galen.

II,

271

'Ayxika'^^r ea-Tiv

dypoiKiKois.

Joann. Hier.

eTravdarao'iS

Ta peydKta Kav6a.
near the clouds.
Isid.

433 B.
dypoiKorrp7rS>s (aypoiKos, irpejrto), adv. in

dyxi'Ve<jiTis, s, (yttjios)

Antip.

ner becoming a rustic, rustically.


II,

a manCyriU. A.

S. 27, 14.
dyxivoeco, to be dyxlvovs.
<rot

221

^E^eor/

33 C.
((ro(j>6s')

dyxiVOOvvTt ....
rj,

ttjv Xvo'iv evpetv.

dypoiKoaoipos, ov,

ignorantly vns^, ig-

dyxlvoia, as,

shrewdness, intelligence, wisdom,

norant but fancying himself wise. Isid. 541 C, et alibi. 448, 2.


dypoiKoiTTopca),
-qirto,

Philon

I,

as a

title.

dyxlvOLav.
dyxlvoia.

{iTTopa) to talk like a rustic.

Eus. II, 1076 C T^jv vpercpav 1077 *H Trjs vpeTepas oawrrjTos Basil. IV, 537 Trjs aijs dyxtvolas.

Greg. Naz. HI, 1187 A.


dypoKTfjviov, ov, TO, (jirjiTos) villa.

Caesarius, 933.
Strah. 12,
3,

dyxivoos, ouf,

of ready
(irdKr))

wit.

l_Sext. 65, 29.

66,

11.

16, dyxivovarepos, dyp^ivovcTTaT-os.]


6,

dypoKopos, ov,

(Kopioa) L. villicus, the overseer


9, 2.

ayxiiroKos, ov,
10, 100.
dyxi-o-Tcia,

dyx^paxos.

Sibyll.

of a farm.
dypoTTohis, fcos,

Jos. Ant. 5,
f),

119, paxvrvs.
as,
17,

(dypos, irokis) ^=z KtupArroKis,


Attal. 146, 17.
Scyl. 691, 6.

rejection,

separation from.

country-city.

Sept.

Nehem.

13, 29 Mvr/a-drjn airols 6 tfeor

(Compare
fields.

dcrrvKapri.)
6,

dm

dyxta-Teia rrjs Upareias (the

word
Sept.

is

im-

dypocpvXa^, ukos,

Anihol.
Tjcra,

II,

(<^u\a|) guardian of the 259 (Antistius).


suffer

properly used).
dyxi-<TTevTr)s, ov,
6,

dyxiorevs.

Ruth

dypviTvcm,

to

Diosc. 4, 65, p. 555.


at church.
f}pS>v iv

I,

from sleeplessness. 8. To perform a vigil


793

4, 1

as V.

1.

dyxia-Teva, to separate from, reject.

Sept. Esdr.
iepareias (the

Athan.

'AypvTrvovvrav

Ta KVpiaKa.

62 'HyxiCTevdria-av dno word is improperly used).


2, 2,

rfjs

dypvwvrfriov
Isid.

^^

Set dyfnmvelv.

Eus. VI, 564 A.

dyxt4>P''"''

o"'

("VX'' 'Pp'I'O

^=

dyxivoos.

Ptol.

617 B.
10

Tetrab. 160.

Digitized

by Microsoft

ay^ovi/Maoo^
dyxovifuuos,
a,

74I

aBa8ov'^i)TO<!
Plut.

hanging.
,
-r^

ov, (dyxovrj) of strangling or tols ayxoMoer. 260 'O^vBijua


. . .

viuaiois vcKoois, that have been

hung.

Bardesan. apud Eus.

-,

TTT

strangled or TTT inn T~i

U, 1093 D. Iren. 588 A. 673 A Amaquoque et a g o g i m a dyayos, ov, 6, aqueduct. Phryn. 314 'AyayoV
toria

{= (piKTpa)
_...

m,

472

'

-' _ &i . ^ _i. 1 viv 8e oi jrepl rd SiKaaTripia pfyropfs dya>..

'Ayxovifuua jiopm gling or hanging.

d7ro6vrja-Kov(7i,

by

stran-

yoi/s KaXoO<7t Toiis


7,

oxerovs rav vSarav, Herodn.

12, 7.
S)vos,

Theod. IV, 1261 C.


6,

dyxoo-e (dyxov), adv. near, towards an object. Apollon. D. Adv. 607, 33. 'hyofim, to be appointed to *o(y(i), to lead, etc.

dyav,

dyavia, agony, fear, anxiety.


WiBpihaTrjs

Polyb. 4, 56, i^YLaav yap ol SivottcIs iv dyavi


pf) TToKiopKfiv

(T(pds 6

iyx^tpijirri.

any
lyter.

ecclesiastical

office.
to

Neocaes. 12 Eis
be

Iren.

1, 2,

2 ''Ev ttoXXw irdw dyavi yev6pvov

npea-pirepov ayea-dm,

2.

appointed presto

Sid re TO peyi6os tov ^dBovs Kal to dve^ixvia-

To acknowledge,

believe in.

arov tov iraTpos.


dywvid^opaL
dyavtdrrjs,

Athenag. Leg. 10. 4 'O Xoyos r/pMv eva 6e6v S. Partiayfi Tov ToCSe toC iravros TTOirjTrjv. j Apollod. Arch. 45 ciple, al dyopevai, cables.

z^
ov,

dyatvidto.
6,

Philon H, 573, 40.


sensitive,

(dytoi'ido))
2,

nervous

person.

Diog.

131.
to be

Ta

(rxotvia, rjyovv al dyopevai.

\_Inscr.

3595,

dyavida,
1,

dxrco, to

fear,

afraid
20, 6

15 (B. C. 273) ayijyoxe &r ?ix. 2448, I, 28 a-vv-aydyoxa Doric. 4897, d, p. 1220 Bt-ayia>xa

10

'Aya>viS> tov Kvpiov


'iSji.

of. Sept. Dan. pov tov ^acriKea ....


'

iva pfj

Polyb.
3,

1,

AywviSxrai ras
cttlto)-

barbarous for 8iayr]oxa. Demos Magnes apud Dion. H. V, 631, 8 a-vv-ayrjoxe for crvv-rjxf.
Polyb. 24,
6,

ire^iKos Svvdpfis.

80, 4 'Aya>viS>v tov


15,
7,

Batrpov TOV oxKsuv.


nd?rXif,
\lav.

Se

8"

dyavim,
pf)

3, 1

i^ayqox^vm
30, 4,

for i^i^x^vai.

26,

Diod. 20, 23 'Aywvtda-as

17 dyrjox^i for 7X"Pseudo-PAi/ipp. apud Dem. 239 cicr-a-y7;o;;(d5 i^-ayrjox^.

ra? for ei<r-T}XOTas.


rix^vai.

ITicom. 42 dyayevat for

Kara Kpdros aXavai (Tvp^^ tt/v aKpOTroKiv. Nicol. D. 99 'Ev (j>6^a rjtrav aytavimvres el Ti Artem. 90 Ol irepX p^ydKnav dytaTretVerat.
viavTes Kal iv tqIs IpaTLois i8pov(n.
strive,

Anast. Sin. 768


PZui.

Kar^yrjcrav

c=
'Ok

2 To
Just.

endeavor.

Orig.

I,

1433

'Hymviaa-cv

fy(B,

the Latin ago.

aye,

h o c ag e
rjs,
fj,

I,

69 E. 225

dvaa-KcvdcraL to. flprjpeva.


dyuivl^opai,,
to

tovto Trpam.

struggle

for

anything.

dyayrj,

a conducting, conveying. Dion. H. I, 581, 9 Tay re Ttov vdarcov dyayds, aqueIambi. Myst. 113, 2 Tas dymyar tSjv ducts. irvcvuaTrnv, the raising of spirits, in theurgy. Dion. H. VI, 939, 12, 2. Education.

14 *Y Trep ttjs avTwv (TcoTTjplas dyatviImpersonal, rjyavlaBrj, pugnatum ^opevovs.

Apol.
est.

1,

rj,

Plut.

I,

579

'Hycovla-drj 6e Xapjrpas

Trap
vl^tc,

dp<^0Tpav.

[_J^icet.

Byz. 773

dya-

i\ev6eptos, liberal education.

ner of writing.
V, 584,
4,

3. Style, manDion. H. VI, 1024, 3. 1087, 7.


Strab.
14,
1,

barbarous.]
ov, athletic, bold, heroic.

dycovto-racds-,

Philagr.
iro-

apud
cretr

Orib.

I,

378, 5 KdKS> Se dyavurnKas

'laoKparetos.

41

ras p^ydKas av^opcvas, large, copious.

'Aireptp.rjO'aTO Trjv dyoryrjv Ta>v

Sois StaXeKTcov, slang.

4.
I,
17

napa
fj

rots Kivai-

dyavia-TiKws, adv. heroically, etc.


Orib.
I,

Herod, apud

Sect, in

philosophy
iprreipLKr).

425, 10.
fj, female dymviarfis, in the sense Martyr. Poth. 1424 A.

or medicine.

Galen.

36 F,

dyavlcTpia, as,

Sext. 34, 29. 48, 29,


I,

KvpTjvaiKri.

Clem. A.
f)

oi martyr.
dyavoBecria,

764 B,

fj

'EXfaT-iKij.
ij

Diog. 4, 51,

kvvikt).

as,
3,

fj,

the

office

of

dyavoBfrrjs.

Iambi. V. P. 204,

UvQayopimfj.

Strab. 8,

30.

Plut. II, 723 A.

785 C, et
to pit

dyaiyrjp.a, aros, to, (ayco) load,

burden.

Gregent.

alibi.

608 B.
dycoyiKo'f,
17,

dyavoBereai,
ov,

fjo-a,

to
9,

set

in

competition,

(dymyij) relating to carrying or


Basilic. 56, 10, 5

against.
TovTcov

Polyb.

34, 3 'ABrjvalovs Koi tovs

conveying.

Tav Xeyopevav
carriage,
the

(Lacedaemoniorum)
strife,

Trpoyovovs dya-

dyayiKav,
dyayipos,

fjroi

irapanoprnKaiu,

VoBfTOVVTCS KOl (Tvp^dKKovTfS.

2.

To

Stir

price or expense for carrying.


ov,
to be

up war,
apII,

or sedition.

Jos. Ant.

1 7, 3, 1

delivered into bondage,

^AytcvoBeTelv (TTatTiv

avTa

Trpos tov ddc\<j)6v.

pHed
1125,
Plut.

to debtors.

Dion. H.
to.

998, 8 Toir

Plut.

I,

781

Srao-ets

dyavoBermv iv

rait
II,

Saveurrdis dyayipoi npos

16
I,

xP^'^ yeurjcropeda. 'Aymyi/iouy flvac tois Sefiawfocdcri.

Trapayyikiais Kal Bopvfiovs prjxavwpevos.

85 B.

2.

Seizable, applied to the


11,

debtor's property.
XP^p.a.ra ttoiovvtcs

Dion. H.

1012, 7

Ta

dyayipa rots SaveioTair. 3. Easily led away, complying, pliable. Plut. I, 194 C, irpAs rjSovds. 767 E 'Aymyipos xm albovs Tois SfopJvois. 4. Supposititious. Ejiiph. I, 333 C, book. 5. Substantively,

Mipois Kal opxriordis dyavoBeroivTes. Polyaen. 7, 16, 2 'ApTa^ip^rjs tov woKepov fiyavoBfTfi Tois "EXKrjO'iv del TrpoimBipevos
To7s fjTTTjpivOLS.

621

dyonvoXoyta, as,

f),

(as if from dytoKoXoyos) dis-

pute, torangling.

Galen.

11,

290 F.

dbabovx^Tos, ov, (SaSouxeo)) not lighted by torches, Apion apud Eustath. 622, said of nuptials.
42, ydpot, clandestine.

TO aymyipov, charm, philter, for exciting love.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aBaKvco'!
dSoKvas, adv.
'A8a/a,
6,

75
Caesarius 981.

aBeX^odeo^
abeiav fiera (j>oa-o-dTov emndfa-Bai. Cer. 234, 14 Mij exovTes abeiav flo-Uvat iv ra Kovourrapja.

:^

ddrjicrtos.

indeclinable,

Bios

'ASd/j,, the

Life

Adam. Syncell. 7, 12 of Adam, an apocryphal


Symm.
et Theodtn. Gen.

Typic. 79 "E^ovai 8^

eV

book.
aSafia,

aSiLas KriCtiv

ev6a /SouXoi/Toi.
yrj.

nmx, z=

Curop. 83, 17 Ouk e^ouo-U'

2,7.
'Abdfias, avTos, 6,

dbeias TavTa dnXma-ai, they are not permitted to spread them out.
cjT

Adamas, the archetypal man

Naassenes (Ophians, Barbeliotae). He is an emanation from the Autogenes. Iren.693A. flippoi. Haer. 132, 61. 146,62.
of the 502, 95 KoXoOcri
8'

3. Abundance
Arist.

15, 1,

3. Leisure. Strab. 7, 40 'AarpaTcia Ka\

3,

Metu

dbeias Qv.

dSei'a

tov epyd^foiai.

:=acl>6ovia, Sai|^iXeia. Schol.

Nub.

386.
ol,

avrbv

'ASd/juiv.

Theod.
sug-

dSeiydves, av,

adeiganes, certain Seleuciau

rV, 364 A.
gested by
^ASafuaios,
a,

[The name was apparently


ov,
('A8d/ii)

magistrates.

Polyb. 5, 54, 10.

'Afiaju.]

of Adam. Method. 368 C Toir 'Ada/ualois, the progeny of Adam. 'Afiapuu/oi, S>v, 01, Adamiani, a sect. Epiph. I, 848 B. Isid. Hisp. 8, 5, 13.
'Afia/iiTat,

aSeiKTos, ov, (beiKvvfu) not to be shown, that cannot be shown or seen. Philon I, 197, 22.

587, 11, God.


dbeikavhpos, ov, (SelXavSpos) undaunted.

Apocr.

S>v, apparently ol, 'ASafuavoL Theod. IV, 352 D. 'ASa/ws, ov, 6, the grecized form of 'ASdn, Adam. Jos. Ant. 1, 1, 2.

Act. Andi-.

7,

^vxfl.

abeiXos, ov, (SeiKos) fearless.

Adam.

S. 373.

dbeta-ibatiwvas, (dbetoiSainav), adv. without superstition. Diod. II, 614, 57.


d8eu7i8aijuci>i/, ov, (Seio'tSaip.ayv)

free from super-

dSairdvrjros, ov,
.4.

(SaTravam) inexhaustible.

Did.

stition.

Clem. A.

II,

428 B.
not fearing the gods.

616 B.
Tjs,
T],

Eus. Alex. 357 B.

dbeia-iSfos, ov,

(Seia-iBeos)

dSdpKrj,

adarca, adarce, =^
the
salt crust

diapKqs.

Jul. 297
d8e/cda-Tii)y

D
5.

(quoted).

Hippol. Haer. 94, 27.


dSapKr/s, ov, 6,

(d8efcaoToy), adv. impartially.

Max.
A.
11,

on reeds in fens
136 (137).
Del.

Tyr. 20,
1,

Orig.

I,

965 D.

Cyrill.

and marshes.
p. 15.

JDiosc. 5,
"VI,

576 A.
Plut.
Tifdr.
ijs,
ij,

Galen.
S,

adapKos, ov, aSapTos, ov,

Galen. VI, 180 E. (Sepa) unwhipped. Hes. "A&apros,


dddpiajs.

180 E.

&SeKTos, ov, (Sexoixm) unsusceptible.

881 B,
dSe\<f>ri,

Plotin.
sister.

I, 2,

12.
1,

dpMITTiytOTOS.

adoptive
8,
7.

sister.

dbyvanav, avos, f), the Latin adgnatio, agnatic. Antec. 1, 10, 1. d8Srj(l)aye(o dhrj^ayea. Philon I, 310, 35.

Job

42, 11.

2. Kinswoman. a.
dear.

Antec.

10,

2,

6(Tr),

Sept. Tobit

Sister, as

a term of

endearment,

my

Sept. Tobit 5, 21

M^

Sext. 163, 20.


dSeijy, is,

Xdyov (x^' dSeXcprj, to his wife. Cant. 4, 9. 10 'A8f\<j)rj pov vvpcpr). 4. Sister, female

(bia>)

not needing, not in need; op-

posed to ivSerjs.
dSerjTos, ov,
a&ei,a,

Max.

inexorable?

Tyr. 45, 20. 46, 41, tov. Ptol. Tetrab. 159.


:

member of Rom. 16, 1.


2,

the
Cor.

Christian church.
1,
7,

Paul.
Jacob.
Basil.

15.

5.

15.

1, 9, 5.

Sister,

applied to nuns.

as,

f],

leave, permission, license

power

Ill,

1158 C. 1156 C.
Adelphiani,
Phot.

opportunity.

Sept.

avTots a8eiav navrav,

Mace. 3, Snws tovs


Tr]v

7,

12 "eScokcv
Diod. 20,
(<f)ao-X)

'ASeXcj)iavoi, av, ol,

Mao-o-aXiayoi.

irapa^e^TjKoras

Tim. Presb. 48 A.
dSekcfuSos, ov,
a-rrjs).
6,

Ill,

88 B.
5, 1. 8, 1.

TOV $ov TOV vofxov e^6ko6pevtT(xnji.

(a8e\(j)i8ovs) the beloved (cpa1,

41

'Ore

be

fiedvaKoiTO,

adetav

Sept. Cant.

13. 14.

Movat
Tois

7rd(Tiv
I,

Dion. H.

& ^ovkoivTO rroiflv dirapaTqpqTtos. 116, 14 UoXXj^r SSeiav va^ea-dai


napea'Kevacrav,
19.
II,

dBeKcjyiKas

(dSeX^tKOf),

adv.
Isid.

Pseudo-/os. Mace. 13.

a 185 B.
like

brother.

Euthal.

<j>evyov(Ti
I,

opportunity.
Ao5eiVi;f 8e
cnrjyovTO.

629 C.
'AdeXcjiios, ov, 6,

Philon
dSeias

83,

128, 19

Adelphius, a Gnostic? Porphyr.


1.

ttjv

Trkifdvv

t&v

fifipaKiaiv

V. Piotin. 66,
abeK^is, idos,
fj,

Plut. II, 649

Tlapexeiv aSeiav.

Apollon. D.
vtto Troiriniajs

Pron. 378 B. 307


dSeias

A
fj

noXXdfur
avrds,

napfKKfTM
41,
6, 2

poetic

license.

dear dSeX^ij. Martyr. Areth. 20 'A8X(^i8es pov aymrqTai dSeX<^oya/i( (dbeXcjJri, yapia), to marry one's

Dion C.
VTrdp\eiv

"ASeidv re

(r<l>i.iTi

Soy/iaTL Tijs

own

sister.

Clementin.
f),

4,

16 as v.
fmjj)

1.

fKhr)p,ias hois.

Basil. Ill,

1324

Mijte aheiav

abf\^o^a>ta, as,
brothers.

{dbe\(\)6s,

living like

avT^ Trjs im. tov yd/iov f7na'Tpocj)rjs. 84 A M.rihep,iav 'i)(OVTes abeiav ms c| av6fVTelas iepanKrjs els to Svvao'Bm nvds /3XdTheod. IV, 577 B "Abeiav biSwa-i. ra n-Teiv. Theod. Lector 2, 34 depi Kxpfja'6ai Trj cpvo'ei.
Ephes.
11

Pallad. Vit. Chrys. 18 D.


rj,

dbf\(j>odeta, as,

the being dbeXcjjodeos.

Anast.

Sin. 288 B.
dbeXcjJodeos, ov, 6, (dbe\<j>6s, 6eds)frater

Domini,

an epithet applied

to

'O 8e

7ra(Tt

ToXs xp'ortaw'feti/ eSeXova-tv ahciav

SfSioKfv.

Porph.

Adm.

80, 21

M^

evpia-KovTes

Pseudo-Dion. 681 D. Sophrns. 3364 C, applied also to Joses, Ju-

James the Less. Alex. Mon. 4072 A.

Digitized

by Microsoft


76
1,
|

aSeX^oKOLTta
das,

aSeairoTO';
30. 28, 15.

and Synieon.

(Compare Paul. Gal.

Paul. Tim.

1, 6, 2,

et alibi.

Just.

19 'laKia^ov ruv aSe\(j>6v rnv Kvpiov.) ISfXc^oKoma, as, fj, (<oirr,) incest with one's Theophil. 1, 9. 3, 6. sister.
lBe\<jioKTov<o, n<ra>,

Apol.

1,

65
Ill,

'Em

Tovs Xeyofievovs dSeX^ovi.

own

Lucian. 1, 471

337. Clem. A. I, 976 C. TertvU. Fratrum appeUatione censemur.

(i8eXcj>oK.T6pos)

to

murder

8. Brother, a
lishment.

member

of a monastic estab-

one's

own

brother or sister.
1.

Jos. B. J. 2,11, 4.

Clementin. 4, 16 as v.

Pallad. Laus. 1018

Pachom. 948 C. Basil. IV, 356 A, TTvevpartKos. Macar. 468 C. 848 C. Pallad.
Laus. 1026 D.
dSeXcjsorrjs, rfros,
rj,

B.
18fX</.oKTowa, af,
ij,

{ib^\<l>oKT6vos) fratricide.
Jos. Ant. 1, 2, 2.

(d8eX(j)6s) brotherhood, the

Philon I, 210, R. 1, 4.
ISeXc^oKToVos,

5.

Clem.
Sept.

state of being a brother.


9,

Pseudo-/os. Mace.
38, p. 472,

p. 510.

Dion Chrys.

44 'H

8e

ov,

Sap. 10,

3.

(KTeiva) fratricide. Plut. 11, Philon I, 555, 10.

d8eX<f>6Tris Ti

aXXo iarlv, rj dSfXcfjoiv ofiovoia. Theoph. Cont. 228 To noiiia-acrdai nvevfumiajs


spiritual brotherhood, brotherhood by

256 F.
JSeX<^o^ii|m, ar,
17,

dde\<p6Tr]Tos (Tvvbcajiov irpos 'ladmrjv rbv rai(aSeXc^^,


/:ii|if)

incest between Basil.

Trjs viov,

brother

and

sister.

Method. 41 A.

adoption.

Cedr. H, 192, 12. 236,


Sept.
1,

22.-2.
Tijv irpbs

IV, 800 B.
i8i\(t>6nais, aiSos, 6,

Relationship.
ij, (aSeX0df, nephew, niece.

Mace.
12, 17

1, 12,

10

Trair) 6ro<7ir's

vpas
fipmv.

dSeXcfyoTrjTa.

or

sister's child,
1.

Dion. H.
5, 8, 14.

11,

T^s d6eX0on;7-or
applied
to

S.

Brotherhood,

the
1,

796 as V.

Harmen.
'

2, 3, 3.

Christians collectively considered.


2, 17. 1, 5, 9.

Petr.

iSeXcpcmoUm (ttok'cd), to make one a Jrof/jer. Sophrns. 3360 C ASeXcjionoie'iv aWrjXois ij/xas
eiScbs
Tiji'

Clem. R.

I,

212 A.

Iren. 825

dydmiaiv, knowiinj that charity makes


to

us brothers

one another.
f),

aSeX^owoiT/o-iy, ea>s,

(abfk<^oTroi.ea>)

L. adoptio
a.Be\cf)o-

in

locum

fratrii, the

making of an

Martyr. Poth. 1429 B. Serap. 1373 B. Greg. Nyss. HI, 277 I, 57 A, et alibi. 4. B Trjv irpos rbv Xpurrbv d8cX(j)6rr]Ta. Brotherhood of monks, or sisterhood of nuns. Basil, m, 996 B. Greg. Nyss. 976 C. Marc.

A.

Orig.

TTotjjTos, the

brother.

taking of a stranger as one's own Theoph. Cont. Nic. CP. 1064 A.


(a8eX(^d9,
ttoujto?)

820, 10.
dfifX^OTroii/Tdf,
dia-ei

Erem. 1032 B 'Ek avarr^paTi oScX^ott^tos. Macar. 848 A. Pallad. Laus. 1028 A. Nil. 217 A.
5. Brotherhood, as a
title.

ov,

6,

=^

Synes. 1436

dSeX0dr,

adoptive

brother,

brother by

Upbs

Trjv

ipimpav

dSfX<j)6njTa.

Men. P.

353,

adoption.

Theoph. Cont. 656, 12.


as,

Anon.
Stud.

Byz. 1249 A.
abe\(j>oiToua,
fj,

a8e\(j>onoiria-is.

1820 B Ov (rxotris fifTO. Koa^\UK>v a8(X<f>oirotias. Nic. CP. 1064 A. dScX^tm-pfiraif (implying dSfX(^07rpew?}s), adv.
as becomes a brother.
dSe\4>6s, ov,
6,

22 Xdpiv dTTOvejxopev Trj dBeXcj^orriTi ToC Kaiwe thank our brother the emperor of the Romans: said by Chosroes, king of Persia, in his letter to the emperor Justintrapos,

ian.

Pseudo-Zo,*.

Mace.

10.

TTvevfUinKOS,

brother.

Antec.

dBe\(j}o7rotriT6s.

2. Kinsman.
1.

1,

10, Veto's or

354 'H dbeKipdrqs Toii Kaiaapos, our Chron. 736 'H dSc\(j)6vrjs vpS>v Toi ^acriXeas tS>v Pwpaiav, you my brother the emperor of the Romans.
brother the emperor.
rjfra,

d8eX(j)o(ji6op(i>,

(d8cX<i>ri,

(jiBeipio)

to cor-

Sept.

Gen.
2,

13, 8.

Mace.
or

11, 22.

3. One of
2,

14, 16 as v.

Job

42, 11.

rupt one's

own
6, 7.

sister.

Clementin.

168 C.

the

tribe.
8,

Sept.
26.

Ex.

11. 4, 18.

same nation Lev. 19, 17.

Caesarius 980.
'ASeprjs,
ov,

Ademes, a Gnostic.

HippoL

Deut. 15, 12. Par. 2, 31, 15. Tobit 1, 3. Philon II, 285, 21. 4. ComSept. Esdr. 2, panion, associate, colleague. Paul. Cor. 1, 1, 1. 2, 1, 1. 3, 2. Job 30, 29.
2, 2,

Num.

Haer. 502,

a8ev8pos, ov, (8ev8pov) without trees, destitute of


trees, treeless.

Polyb.

3, 55, 9.

Dion, H.

I,

12.

5. Brother, in the sense of friend,


Sept. Tobit 5, 11.

92,

7.

Strab. 13, 4, 11.

d8evoeiSr]s, is, (dS^i',


I,

EIAQ)

like

a gland. Galen.
II,

dear friend.

Juditb

7,

30,

42 A.

in the vocative.

d8va>87]s, s,

dBevoeiBrjs.

Plut.

664 P.

6. Brother, used by kings dress, or speak of, each other.


2,

when they
t^

ad-

Galen. H, 374 E.
dbe^ios, ov, (Se^ids)

Soran. 257, 20.


iTKaios,
2,

Jos. Ant. 13,


dSeXi^cp.

^=

awkward, clumsy,

2 Baa-iXevs 'Akf^avSpos 'imvdBrj


Ill,

Eus.

1160 B, applied by Constantine to

Sapores, king of Persia. Men. P. 353, by Chosroes, king of Persia, to the emperor
Justinian.

Lucian. HI, 387. Jid. 348 D. Basil. Ill, 272 C. dSepKTjs, 5, (SepKOftat) invisible. Agath. Epig. 90.
uncouth.
Epict. 4,
2.

dBea'CTov, to,

aKv<r(70v.

Diosc.

3,

95 (105).

Porph.

Cer.

406,

14,

by the

Byzantine emperor to the king of Persia. 7. Brother, Christian brother, a member of the true Christian church. Luc. Act. 9,

dbea-noTos, ov, uncontrolled, free, as to action. Plut. 740 D. 2. Anonymous, as a literiiry

performance unauthentic. Alex. PolyhisL apud Eus. in, 709 B 'Ev dBtwirdTois Se evpopev.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aBecTiroTcoi
Jos. Apion. 1, 31, p. 465, /ivBot.

77
Plut.
I,

aStaSeKTO?

848

C, vnofivrj/iaToletter.-

868 A,
without

itntTToKr],

anonymous

aOTjpoo'UvTos, ov, (Brjpoo'teva)) unpublished, secret. Basil. IV, 188 C. Chrys. X, 250 E. 2.

11,

6 D, napaSocns.

737 B, \6yos.
authenticated.

Actively, not having published or

made known.

aSeoTTOTcos,

adv.
1,

being

Simoc. 150,
dSrjpocrtcvTais,

2,

twos.
Clim. 848 C.

Jos. Apion.

16, fivBoKoyciarSai.

adv. secretly.

dbearpaTos, also ahiarparos, ov, (a


led by the right

hand?

d e x t r a ?) Chron. 731 Mera

dBrjpiTos, ov, uncontested, undisputed.


2, 3.

Polyb.

1,

4, 74, 3.

Kcti K linrwv dduTTpdrav creXKaptmv, supernumerary horses. Substantively, to dScirrpaTov or dSlcrTparov, (a) a supernumerary horse in an army, to be used in ease of necessity. Mauric. 5, 2 ^A8i(rTpaTa (ripeiv

vearipav

dbripiTcos,

adv. without contest.

Polyb.

3, 93, 1.

"AiSrjs, ov, 6,

Hades, the lord of the under-world, called also Pluto. Classical. So apparently,
Sept. Sap.
1,

14 Bao-iXEjov "AiSou cVl t^j y^j.


20, 13. 14 Kai 6 edi/ai-or
els
ttjv Xip,vrjv

Toiis

arpandrras dia rav TrdKKlKav avraiv. (b) led-horse, a horse led by the bridle in a procession for show. Mauric. 1, 9 Xpiy ircpirjyeiuSai,

4^oc.
AiSrjs

6, 8.

mi

i^\rj6ii)orav

tov irvpds.

Pseudo-iVicod.

11.
TTf

(Compare Clementin. 281


^vxfj 6
cfcel

C OvK
Xav

iv abji

KaBforr/Kms ap-

waTovvToe roO (TTparov

tov tov iravrds


Tifj.rjs

(8<o'e() TTjV dvaTravo'cv.)

(TTpaTryyov 7rpo7ropevoiJ.evo3v

avrov

VKU

Twv
tS)v

eTriTLfiloyv

kol IdiKap avrov dv6pa)7ro3p p.Ta

dSea-Tpdrav koX

^ovKeXKapmap

fidvhav.

2. Hell, the under-world, the world of departed spirits. Sept. Deut. 32, 22. Job 38, 17. Ps. 6, 6. 29, 4. Jonas 2, 3, et alibi.

Leo. Tact. 10, 12.


abrjKTos, ov, unbitten.

For
Classical. Diosc. 2, 64

the

Harrowing of
1, 4, 6.

Hell, that

is,

Christ's
1, 3,

descent into the under-world, see Petr.


18. 19.

'AdrjKTOvs

55

lo^okav (f)v\dTTeiv Xeyerai. Metaphorically, uncalumniated. Plut. 11, 864 3. Not biting, not pungent, as a
tS>v

dno

Patriarch. 1056 A. 1148 A.


Iren. 689

Marcion apud
7rn. 1058

{Epiph.

I,

700 D.
8,

r^eorf. IV, 376 B).

Sibyll. 2, 377.

310.

medicine.
dSrjKTas

Diosc.

1, 29.

(Compare

Plut. 11,

C ^appoKa ra
(aSrjKTos),
I,

SaKvovn.)

adv. without being

bitten.

Plut.

619 E.

Anton.
elp,i.

11, 18 ^ikoaT6pya>s

Kal dSrjKTas
dSrjXeofiai

=
fj,

rfj

yjnx^, tropically.

aSrjXos

Philon

I,

13,

42.

Sext. 79, 8 "ASrjKa, Smep .... r]pXv dhrjkeiTai.

318, 24 To fvSctKTiKou TOV dd?j\ov/xeKou TrpdypjOTOs.


d8rp<la, as,

(aSriXos) uncertainty.

Cornut. 38.
dSijXi'a.

laTrM. Myst. 289, 18 *H toO jeX\oj/Tor

Greg. Nyss. TH, 420 A.


tirement

2.

Obscurity, re-

from
fjirai,

the

world, privacy.

Pallad.
Kara-

CZem.^.II, 268 A. Hippol. 701 A. B. Orig. I, 864 C. HI, 980 C. IV, 260 B. Method. 372 B. Eus. II, 128 C. IV, 281 C. J.<Aan. 11,693 A. 748 A. 1060 A. 1117 B.. Basil. IV, 129 B. 772 C. Greg. Nof. n, 657 A. Cyrill. H. 848 C. Macar. 552 D. Amphil. 89 A. Epiph. I, 276 D. 933 D. Cyrill. A. X, 37 C. Apocr. Anaphor. Pilat. A, 9. Act. Thom. 10. Pseudo-Mcorf. n. (For the expressions used in the passages referred to, compare Dion. ff. V, 139, 4 T^j/ etr'AiSou Kard^aa-iv of Ulysses. Artem. 236.) For the preaching of John the Baptist in

B.C.

5.

Vit. Chrys. 17
dSijXojroieo),
<rrpe(j)a).

A.
(dbrjKoTroios)
9, 5.

Hades before the arrival of Christ,

see Hippol.

^= d<pavi^a>,

Symm. Job

For the intermediate


Iren. 1135 A. B.

764 B.

Orig.

11,

1024 A.

Anast. Sin. 764 C.

dbrjKonoios, 6v,
structive.

(S&i^\os, jroiem) destroying, de.


. .

Apollon. S. 16, 28 'Ai8rj\ov


uncertain.

TTOTe 8e TOV dSiyXoTTOJOC

a&tj\os,

ov,
rjv

Polyb.
X.

5,

26, 6 USjriv

ahrjkos
yva>pr)s,

inl tI (jjeperai Koi


aSrjXov
rj,

cm

noias

vndpxH
Polyb.

see Just. Tryph. 1209 B. C. Hippol. Haer. 484, 44. Anast. Sin. 581 B. Orig. 3. Hell, the place of punishment. For a description of Hell, see I, 392 C. Hippol. 796 seq. Fsendo-Cyrill. A. X, 1072
state,

:=

rjv, K. t.

B. C.

Apocr. Act. Thom. 52 seq.

d8i)XoT7)s, TjTos,
5,
2, 3.
I,

(abrjkos) uncertainty.
2.

dhia^i^aa-Tos, ov, (fiia^i^d^a) intransitive verb.

36, 4,

Dion. H. TO, 1840, 16.


1, 6, 17.

Philon
dhripMiv,

277, 5.

Porph. Cer. dno dbrfpiov. dSi]pLovpyriTos, ov, (hr)fucwpyiai) not made. Diod. 8. 3, 27, p. 194, 97, jrpds n, not adapted.
TO,

Paul. Tim. a kind of leather f

Apollon. D. Synt. 286, 6. 287, 20. abia^XriTas (dStd/SXT/Tos), adv. without incurring Cyrill. A. I, Clem. A. I, 1157 A. censure.

466 MfTO

Kivo'Tepvris SeppjxTivrjs

388 D.
dSidyKvipos, ov, (8my\v(j)ai) not hollow ; opposed to SmyeyXv pp.evos. Polem. 240, Sra. Adam,
S. 406. dhiAyvaa-Tos, ov, (fimyivoKTKat) undistinguishable ; not easy to understand. Diod. 1, 30. Hippol

Uncreated.
a&rjpuxvpyriTa>i,

Epiph.

II,

621 D.

adv. without being created. Did.


not

A. 841 B.
ddrjpMKpdTTjTOs,
cratic.
ov,

(^bripoKpaTcofuu)

demo-

837 C.

Athan.

I,

64 A.

Dion C.
as,
V)

43, 45,

1.

dbripovia,

anxiety.

JXosc. Del. 10.

Plut.

I,

Philon U, 99, 38. 62 A. II, 78 A.

dSidyayyos, ov, (Siaycayr)) intractable. 118, 2. n, 268, 30.

Philon
1

J,

aSidSfKTos, ov,

dSidSoxos.

Tit.

B.

169 B.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aBiaSoTO<;
iSidSoTos, ov, (SmSlSafii) undistributed
be distributed.
:

78
not to

dhtdirTataTO'i
particular number,
as

avSpanoi,
Jacob.

iirj\a.

Fsendo-Dion. 301 B.
:

Metaphorically, impartial ?
per-

3, 17.

aSmBoxos,
petual.

ov,

(bidSoxos) without successor

Method. 368

C Baaikea
II,

atSiov koI

dSioSoxov.

Greg. Naz.

609 B.

Did. A.

6. Indiscreet, thoughtless. Porph. Adm. 242, 10 EvKoXov yap r) )cou(^OT7;r Koi dSioKpiTos yvapjj 'Jtpbs anav to KaKovpyas Xeyopxvov Koi
v7roTidep.evov

424 A.
aStaSoxmy, sAy. perpetually.

dTronXavdirdai

xal

eKKvXUirSai.

Max. Conf. Comput.

Bekker. 213, 22 'AStdKpiTos


KOL enl

Aap.^dveTm 8e

1252 D.
d&idBpaa-TOS, ov, (BiaSiSpd(7Ka>) not to be permitted
to

Twv

pfj

vas (pXvapovvToiv.
Ta
SioKpia-iv.

escape.
I,

Aristocl.

apud Eus.

Ill,

1341 C.

ywatTKOVTav to hkovra, ^ dcj)p6Hes. 'A8i.dKpi.Tov, p.fi xovPorph. Adm. 240, 16 to dhid-

Clem. A.
dSid^evKTos,

700 B.
ov,

KpiTov, indiscretion, thoughtlessness.

(Sia^evym/ii)

inseparable.

dhiaKplras, adv. indiscrete (L.), without distinction.

Cornut. 49.
dbidScTOs,
ov,

Prod. Parmen. 603 (216).


{biaTidrjjj.1.)

Patriarch. 1096 C.

intestate.

Plut.
1,

I,

(184).

2.
I,

Prod. Farm. 584


Ignat.

Inseparably?

685 B.
in^

341 D.

Carth. Can. 81.

Antec.

11,

2.

Clem. A.
cessantly,

285 A.
intermission
constantly

Novell. 1, 1, Justinian. Cod. 1, 17, 3, f. y, 'E| dSiaderov, intestato or ab intestato,


without

dhmKeLirras (dhioKeiTrros), adv. unceasingly,


without
Sept.
;

will.

assiduously.

Maoc.

1, 12, 11.

Polyb.

obcaBeras, adv. without

making

one's will.

Nic.

9, 3, 8. 3,

Posidon. apud Athen.


Strah. 16, 4, 25.

4, 37.

Died.
1,

CP. 852 B.
d&tatpeTos, ov, not carved.
12, 56,

12.

Paul. Kom.

Trias.

Indivisible, applied to the 220 A. II, 49 B. 1065 A. (Compare Hippol. Haer. 108, 67 "'E,<l)a(rav

meat.

2.
I,

Posidon. apud Athen.

et alibi.
dhidXifieras (hidkfyyw), adv. unceasingly.

Clim.

Athan.

(Aegyptii) tov deov


KaTea-Kevda-Bm.)

eivai fiovdba dSiaiperov kol

865 C. dSiaXKdKTas (aSidXXaKToy), adv. irreconcilably. Dion. H. H, 1166, 4, e;(eH' Trpos Tiva.
dbidKoyuTTos,
thoughtless.
ov,

avTrjv iavTTjV yevvcoo-av Koi e^ avTrjs

3. Inseparable.
7rvvp.a
:

rd navra Athan. II,


rrjs

{pidkoyi(fiiiaC)

unthinking,

801

To 5e dyiov

.... ddcaiperov

Sin.

44 B.

Marc. Erem. 1104 B. Meet. Byz. 728 C.

Anast.

OlXTias TOV viov Koi TOV TTUTpoS.


dSiaipeTcos, adv. indivisibly
I,

dStaXm/ST/Toy, ov, (SidXa^dofUu)

:^

ov or

p.fi

\m-

inseparably.

Orig.

^rjTos.

Cyrill.

A.

11,

413 D.
undivided.

1525 A. Athan.

I,

517

'AiSi'mr

peTcas S>v e| avTov, said of

the Son.

Ka*dbuuPseudo-

dbiaviprjTos, ov,

(bi.avip.a>)

Longin.

22, 3.
a8iavor]Tevop.at

Dion. 952 A.
dSiairriTos,
ov,

^= dSmvorjTos

flpj,.

Schol. Arist.

(Siatraco)

not based

upon any
264,

Av..l377.
dSidvoiKTOs, ov, (Siavoiyoa)

written
6eia.

law.

Porph. Novell.

awqJos.

unopened.

Damasc.
Galen. IV,

m,
5, 5, 4.

692 C.

dSiaKKeuTTos, ov, (SiaxXei'm) not shut out.

dSid^eoTos, ov, (Sia^eco) unpolished.

B. J.

574 A.
unperformed, unexe1, 1.

dSioKdvriTos, ov, (SiaKovcm)

oSidTrautTTOs, ov,

cuted order.
81, 8.

Jos. Ant. 19,

(bunrava) incessant, constant. Polyb. 4, 39, 10.


(abidnavtTTos),

dSidKOTros, ov, (Shikowto)) indefatigable.


1,

Philon

abumavoTtos
constantly.

adv.

incessantly,

Polyb.

1,

57, 1.

22. 11, 7.

d&utKopEvTos, OV, (SiaKopevm) undefloured. Soran. 256, 36.


dStaKocrp-riTos,
ov,

abumvev(TTea>, to be dSidTrveva-ros, not to evaporate.

Galen. X, 528 A.
ij,

(8iaKoo-p,ea>}

unarranged.

abtaTTvevaria, as,

the being dbidirvevaros, the

Dion. H.

I,

434, 10.
r/,

Philon H, 488, 19.

not evaporating.

Galen. X, 25 7 B.

dSuiKpia-ia, as,

(dSidxptTos) indiscretion,

of judgment. 1037 A.
Airai ai

Macar. 580 A.

want Marc. Erem.


1

abidnvevoTos,
rate, that

does not evapohas no vent. Symm. Job 32, 19, where the Septuagint has SeSe/xcVos, tied.
ov,

{biaTTveai) that

dbidKpiTos, ov, miscellaneous.

Sept. Prov. 25

naiSe'iai 2a\op,SivTOs ai dSidxptroi.

2. Inseparable.
TO dSidxpiTov

Ignat. 648

A 'l,,o-oOs XpioT-As
live in

Diosc. Eupor. 2, 109. Galen. VI, 434 A. Metaphorically, unwearied, indefatigable. Iambi. V. P. 144 Sivrovov tc kw. dbidTivcv(TTov.

TjpMiv ^fjv

(wB

him).

676

2. Not

ventilated.

Galen.

X, 251

"ApMijiov Sidvoiav koX dbidxpirov.

213, 22 "AStaKpiTos, dStaxapiaros. 3. distinguishable, unintelligible. Pohjb. 15


9.

Belcher.

AbidTTvevo'Tov Koi appimoTOv.


dbiairovTjTos, ov, (SiajroKe'o))

Un12

^.
28.

91,

5.
36,

Undecided.

Lucian. U, 671.

Sext.

D. Synt.
KpiTa

Not distinguishing. Apollon. 3 To KaXoipeva irXrjevvTiKd dfiiaany

that has not labored or tcorked, applied to the flesh of such animals as sheep, goats, and swine. Athen.
9,

66.

aSidTTTatoTos, ov,

ovra tov dpi6p.ov, not denoting

(btaTrraito)

unerring.

Iambi

Adhort. 360.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aSutTTTmcria
abiawroMTia, as,
libility.
ij,

79
infald8iao-Tp6(f>as,
tion.

ahLa^op7)Ti,K6<;
adv. without perversion or distor690, 22. Clan. A. I, 425 B.

the being abiawrtoTos,

Fsend- Hipp.
ov,

1282,

56.

Iambi.

Sext.

Adhort. 354.
dStaTTTcaroy,
infallible,
6,

Did. A. 972 C.
(Sian-iWoo) not liable to error,

sure.

Polyb.

4, 60, 10.

5,

98, 10.

dStd(TC(>aKTos, ov, (8tao-<^dX\co) infallible, unerring. Heron Jun. 228, 2.

Dion. Thr. 629, co/recf pronunciation. Apollon. D. Pron. 399 B. Sexi. 212, 31. Cfem. ^. I, 1065 A. Diog. 6, S9, faultless, in general. Longin. 33, 5, faultless as to
37, 6.
style.
ahiajrriyrais,

aSido'axTTos, ov,

(Siatrmfm)

7iot

well preserved.

Plot. Tetrab. 49.

abidraKTos, ov, (hiardcTo-a)) unarranged.

Dion.

H.

I,

434, 10.
(bmTip.va) indivisible.
Cyrill.

dbidTjxrjTos, ov,

A.

(abiawraros) adv. without


unfailingly.

liability

n,129C. X, 260A.
earnest.

Eustrat. 236b C, eager,

to error, loithout error

or mistake, unerringly,
Polyb.
1, 6, 26, 4.

vnth certainty
6, 41, 11.

aSiarpdvaros,

ov,

(8iaTpav6a) not clear, obscure.

10, 47, 3.

Diod.
11,

50.

Cornut.

6.

Athan,

I,

689

C To

dhiaTpdvtOTov

ttjs

yXamis,

Sext. 280, 6.

Eus.
oj/,

1073 D.
noi

obscurity.

dSiapTraoTof,
Basil,

(SiapTrdfm)

plundered.

aSidTpeirros, ov,

m,

(SiaTpeira) stubborn, bold, forSept. Sir. 26, 10.

600 A.
broken or torn
Galen. U,
Hippol. S17 D.

aSidpfxriKTOs, ov, {Siapprj-ypv/ii) not

in pieces.

aSidcreia-Tos, ov, {Siaa-eio))

unshaken.

84

'

AvepiKTmv, dSma-ciortov (rather doubt-

To dSuirpeirTov Eus. IV, 828 C. dbiaTpeTTTcos, adv. boldly, etc. Eus. IV, 204 D. Marcell. apud Eus. VI, 1016 C.
TTJs

ward, impudent, barefaced. 42, 11. Clem. A. I, 565


dvawxvvTias.

ful).

ddiarpc-^la, as,

fj,

the being dSidTpiirros.

Sueton.

aStacKeirras

(fimcKiirrofim),

adv.

inconsiderKoi dSca-

Calig. 29.

ately. Diod. A. 585 OKewras ijrpd^aTf.

Uptmeras

*dbiaTxmayros,

ov,

(SiarvTioa)
Ocell.

unshapen,
2,

un1,

fashioned, unformed.
10.

3.

Diod.

adidcTiraaTos, ov, (StacTTrdo)) not pulled asunder,

Philon

I,

50, 4.
(^dSidtjidopos)

unbroken, as a line of soldiers.


34, 5.

Polyb.

1,

abia(^6opia, as,

f],

uncorruptness.

Paul. Tit.
9.

2, 7.

dSido-Taros, ov, (fiiacraToy) continuous, constant.

dSid(pdopos, ov, uncorrupted, chaste.

Diod.

1,

59.

Philon I, 37, I, 1315 C.


dimensions.
701, 30.

105, 38.

214,

8.

Ciem. A.
rpids,
the

Cyrill.

A. X, 996 B,

indivisible Trias, :z= ddiaipeTos.

Plut. II,
I,

Without 601 C. 926 B. Sext.

2.

Plotin.

88, 8.

1025 A. Just. Apol. 1, 18, jrals, before the age of puberty. Heges. 1320 A. Athenag. 964 C. a8ia<l>66pas, adv. incorruptibly. Damasc. II, 265 C.
Plut.
I,

dSuurrdTcos (dSidaTaTos^, adv. continuously, con-

d8ia(f>opea}, rjaa, (^d8id(j)opos^ to be indifferent

or
90,

Philon J, 34:2, 3S. Athan.U, 733 B, indivisibly. 2. Without dimensions. Caesarius 860. Prod. Parmen. 543 (117). abuurriKTos, ov, (crri^at) L. indistinctus, indistinct, not well defined. Philon 11, 297, 47 (doubtful reading.) Tzym. Novell. 301.
stantly.

unconcerned.
Tivd.

Polyb. 31, 22, 10.


Gell.ie,9.
'

Nicom.

Epict.2,e,2.
2.

Apollon. D.,

Synt. 203,

204, 14

kbia(^opovai, rds a-vv-

SeVfw

noiettrSai irpos yivrj Sid<j)opa.

Anton.
Sext.
II,

11, 16 '"Edv irpbs ra dBidtjjopa ddiacjyop^.

42, 25, Kard n.

639, 10, wepi

rii/os.

Eus.

dSuKTriKTios (aSidoTiKTos) adv. without distinction.

317

Ai8do-Kiv re dbwx^opeiv eldaXoOvrav

Antec.

2, 15, 3.

diroyevofxivovs.

Impersonal,

ddiatjiopel, it is

abidjTToKos, ov,

(SmoTcWa)) not determining, not determinative. Apollon. D. Pron. 273 A Al


wpasTOTvnoi (avrawfilai)
8ia fiev t^s

a matter of
'Etti

indifference.

Philon U, 243, 26

fieVTOi
(jxovTJs

yevovs

dSido'ToXoi

el(Ti

irdvTOTc Kara

irpSrrov Koi bcircpov irpoa'amov,

the personal
genders. 279

pronouns iya and

<tv

are of

all

Tavrqs yap dbiafpopei idv Te &ppv to Apollon. D. Pron. Upuov, idv Tf Kal BfiXv. 317 'A8ia(popn yap rj eva 8pdv ^ ttXcious-, rf 2. Not to difi(j) v6s bpdtrBaL rj nXfiovav. Philon I, 285, 19, p.ovdov 8ia<l>pa>. fer

C
T]

'Ek rots yiveaiv abidrxTokoi


OTj).

elirtv (ij fya> (cai

8os.

304, 24, oKkrjKav.

442, 11,

ema-Trnj-ris.

yevovs.

2.

306

'

AJ&iaxTToXoi elaiv al irpaTorviToi

n,

100, 18 'Qs d8ia^opeiv fjpepav wktos.


to

Indeterminate.

Ibid. 306

'Ei^

TavSoi d8idffTo\ov t6 yevos.


iiaarpofpos, ov, untunsted, unwarped.
cal.

Plut. n, 780 B.
Sept.

Metaphorically, un3, 3,

Classi-

have no difference, said of the minuend when it is equal to the subtrahend. Thus, 7 is d8i,a(j}opovpevos apidfios with reference to itself. Nicom .86.87.
3. Middle dSuupopoviuu,
dbm^oprjo-is,
o)s,
fj,

perverted.

Mace.
Diod.

3 Ti7 irpos roiis

(dbiac^opia)

indifference,

0ain\eTs eSvoiav Kal ma-nv dSid(TTpo(l)ov rjaav


8ia(j)v\d<r<rovTes.
II,

in the sense pt neglect.


d8ui(^opriTi,K6s,
rj,

Pallad. Laus. 1091 A.

594, 73,

cfrvins. 1,

6v,

being indifferent about any-

Dion. H. VI, 950, 16,


Sext. 167, 13.

Kpliris.

Anton.

15.

thing.

Epict.

2, 1,

14 TO d8m(j)opriTiK6v, in-

difference.

Digitized

by Microsoft


aBba(j>opr]TO'i

80

aSiopdwro}';

dSuUpopriTOS, ov, (Sia0opa)) not throwing off hy Alex. Trail. 2, 7, p. 155 'AStaperspiration.
(fioprjTov
off-

indescribable. PhidSiei^ytiTos, ov, (SieltjyeV") 2. Without outlet. Achm^t. lon I, 407, 20.

airfip

noie'i,

prevents

its

throwing

141, v^. dSieioSevTos, ov,

z=

a8te|o5os.

Basil.

I,

369

C.

dSui(j)opia, as,

fj,

(a6ia0opos) L. in
Cic.
2, 5,

differen-

tia, indifference. Attic 2, 17. Epict.


Just. Apol. 2, 3.

20.
7,

Acad. Pr. 2, 42. Plut. JI,1071F.


37, in the Stoic

Pseudo-/s(. 1221 B. Greg. Naz. IV, 81 A. Theod. Mops. 136 C. Chrys. V, 851 A.
dSLc^oSos, ov, (Sie'IoSos) without a way through, without outlet. Nicarch. 20, unable to get out.

philosophy.
looseness of

2.
life.

Diog.
Zjd.

Dissoluteness,

dissipation,

Plut. n, 679 B.
dhtepevvrjTos,
ov,

App.

I,

792, 44, x<^piov.


uninvestigated.

^. 980 A.
C.

Pallad.

(Stepevvda)

Laus. 1091 D.
aSmcpopos,

Ml. 437

Philon
indifferent,

I,

303, 42.

n, 513,

20.

Plut.

II,

596

ov, L. neither good nor bad, in the Stoic philosophy. Cicer. Fin. 3, 16. Sept. Sir. 7, 18. 27, 1.

indifferens,

B.

Iambi. Myst. 11, 14.


ov,

dbievKpivrjTOS,

(hievKpivia)

not clear, as a
20.
is

writer.

Hermog. Rhet. 389,

Philon
alibi.
2, 3.

I,

17, 19. 182, 38.

Epict.

1, 9, 13,

et

Plut. n, 424 E, et alibi.

Just. Apol.

dhiKmo&oTqTOS, ov, (hiKaiohoTea) where justice Died. II, 616, 66. not administered.

^nton. U, 15. Sext. 162, 24. Z>w^. 7, 2. In versification, common, as apphed to the last syllable of a verse. Heph.
37. 104.

dhLKaiapxos, ov, not Dicaearchus, unjust ruler, with a play upon the name AiKalapxos. Cic.

Att.

2,

12.
fj,

4, 6 IlavTos fi.Tpov dSidipopos

ianv

17

reXevrata

aSiKOO-ia, as,

(Sonxfto) essentially

dStKia,

o-vWa^fi, &<TTe divaa-Bat elvm airfjv Koi ^paIt is applied also to the Xfiav Kol jiaKpdv.

Symm.
dSiKeva-is,

Ps. 54, 10 (Sept. dvTi\oyid).


ea>s,
r),

(as if

from
19.

dSi.icfvci>)

:=

to

first

foot
.

of an iambic verse, which


,

may

dSiKilv.
aStKfto,

Stob.
to

n, 554,

be -^^,
/Si'or.

for ^-. -, 3, Dissolute, dissipated, loose.

Heph.

5, 6.

Soz. 1037 C,

d8i.a<p6pas,

adv. indifferently.
600,

Dion. U. VI,
Sext.

do wrong. Sept. Par. 2, 26, 16 6f& avTov, he transgressed against the Lord his God. dhiKTjTLKos, rj, ov, (d8eci>) disposed to do wrong.
r}a-a>,

'HSiKijo'fi' v Kvpico

1124, 11.
41, 29.

Plut. n, 1061 C, et alibi.


9,

Plut.

n, 537 A. 562 D.
adv. wrongfully, injuriously.
Stob.
Orig.

Athen. 10, 50. Drac. 144, 17 Tlavros fisrpov cation.

Diog. 7, 160. xJ' irpdr n. 2. Indifferently, in versifit)

d'biKr)TiKS>s,
I,

1245 A.
ov,

n, 603,

53.

re-

dbiKr)Tos,

(aSwceo))

unwronged, unharmed,

Xevraia avKkaPfj dSia<f)6pa>s TlBerm, eire fiaxpa

Tvxv

oSa-a, e'lre ^pax^ia.

3.

uninjured.
logical

Petr. Sic. 1285 C.

[The
to

anar

Dissolutely, etc.
I,

form would be
r)(ra,

av-abiicifros.^

Th'eophil. 3, 15.

Clem. A.

1144 B,

C^v.

aSiKofiofe'o),

{aSiKos,
1,

So|a)

have

evil

Clementin. 332 B.

Orig. HI, 793 B.

Cyrill.

designs?
dSiKoSo^ta,

H. 396 A.
ddidxvTos, ov,
91, p. 755.
cise,

Pallad. Laus. 1067 A.

Diod. 31, Clem. A. II, 792 C.


as,
rj,

p. 515, 25.

Schol.

Metaphorically,
(bui^evhop.ai)

(Stapffffl)

not dissolved.

Diosc.

5,

(aSiKos,

8d|a)

evil

design

not diffuse, con-

as applied to style.

2.
TO

Chrys. Wanting amusement. dhidxvTov, want of amusement.

Longin. 34, 3. I, 178

A
,*

Polyb. 23, 16,


fairly.

7.

Frag. Gram.

6.

dSiKO/mp^Eo), rjo-m, (aSwcor, fiaxofua) to fight un-

Poll. 3, 154.
7]<Ta>,

dSiKOTrpayeo),

(dSocowpay^ff) to wrong.

Phi-

abidy^evuTOs, ov,

not deceiving
5, ST.

lon Jl, 195, SG. 329,

42 'Eav

irepl

ras oialas

unerring, infallible; true. Died.


4, 49.

Anton.

abiKOTrpayaxTi tov irXri<rlov.


dSiKOTTpdyrifia, aros,

Plut.

H, 501 A.

Sext. 232, 20.

to,

(aSiKOTrpayea)

aSi-

d6iai//-euo-To)s,

adv. unerringly, etc.

Sext. 232,

Krip.a.

Orig.

23.

aSiKos, ov,

709 C. Stob. U, 589, 35. unjust. Paul. Hebr. 6, 10 Ov yap


I,

dStSaKTos, ov, that cannot be taught or learned,

aSiKos 6 6eos cmXaBccrSai tov fpyqv

vp.S>v,

not

said of things.

Lucian.

11,

45, Smpov.

Sext.

331, 16. 601, 33 'ASiSaRTov S.pa to fifj ov. 2> That cannot be instructed. Pallad. Laus.

unrighteous (so as) to forget.


dSioSevTos,
ov,

(bioSeva)

not
8.

to

be

travelled

1002.

3.

through.

Themist. 252,
Poll. 5, 150.

Not

acted or represented on the

dSidpavos, ov, (fiiopaxa) not to be seen through;

stage, as

a play.

Athen.

6,

98.
;

unseen.
in-

dSiSaKTms,
tuilioely.

adv. without being instructed


Plut. II, 673 F.

abuypydvuTTos, ov,
dSiopydvoiTos,

following.
(8iopyav6a>)
_

Syncell.i, 17.

Sext. 331, 19.


11,
to
. .

ov,

unorganized.

Clementin. 401 A.

Clem. ^.
not
. .

196 B.
he

Iambi. V. P.

154.

dbuKhvTos,
ov ovK

ov,

(SiekSuo))

escaped.

dSiopBcoTos, ov, incorrigible.

Apollon. S. 116 NijSv/ior

rj

dSuKSvTos,
scrutinized,

can

8iKbvvai.
ov,

Dion. H. n, 1085, Epict. Frag. 106.


Tjj 8e Xinrr;

3.

Diod. Philon

11, 609, 10.


11,

269,

5.

cSic^cVao-Toy,

(Sif^eTa^ai)

not

dSiopdrnTtos, adv. incorrigibly.

Diod. U, 576, 5

randem.

Sept. Sir. 21, 18, words.

abiopdaiTas trvvexofievos, incurably.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aSiopicrTia
aStopiaria,
as,
rj,

81
indefiniteness.

aBoTTTlCOV
Dion. H. I, 573, 4 'Ek tov dBoKqTov, ex improviso, unexpectedly. 2. Substantively, f, dBoKriros irapcovv-

(aSidpiCTTos)
Ill,

dSdmjToy, ov, unexpected.

596 A. aSiovTojp, opos, 6, the Latin a d j u t o r :=i ^oi)5ds, iiro^oridos. 341 D. ij/d 158,

Nicomach. apud Phot.

ML

xia.

Diosc. 4. 54.
(a&oKlpacTTOs),

12.

196, 12.
6,

aSuTKos, ov,

Macedonian,
(Siordfo))
1, i.

dBoKcpda-Tois
KVKeoDv.

adv. without

trial.

Hes.

'ASutkov, KVKfava.
aSioTOKTOf,
ov,

MaKeSoves.

Can. 21. Joann. Mosch. Basil. Porph. Novell. 309.


dSoXftrXEo),
ijo-m,

Choi.

3001

A.

Ptolem. Geogr.

3.

undoubted,

certain.

to

prate.

Classical.

Sept.

Undovbting.

Clim.

Ps. 68, 13, Kara nvos.

1113 B.
abiaraKTas, adv. undouhtingly.

n,
Aenesid. apud Martyr. Path. 1432 A.
I,

to trifle.

2.

Eus. H, 1253 B, nepi


talk,

To

in general.

Sept.

Ps. 76, 13

Ei/ Tols EmTrjBevpao-t (rov

PAo. in, 693 D. Hippol. 776 B.

Onj?.

581 B.

Anthol.

a-xw'^, J will talk of thy doimjx. think, meditate. Gen. 24, 63. Ps. 76,

3.
4.

dSoXe-

To
118,

IV, 124.
aSlarpaTos, ov, see dSeoTparos.
d8tTU(B

15

Ev

Tois eVToXals crov dBoKecrxrja-ai, I will

meditate on thy precepts.

(aditus), adire, a law term.


tbvos,
r],

Antec.

aBoXea-xqreov

Sei dSoXfO-;(eI,

one must prate.


Plut.

Clem. A.
dStrio)!',
_

I,

461 C.
fj,

aditio.

Justinian. Novell.

dBoXeo-xia, as,
II,

idle talk.

1; 1,

8'-

a&ivKitTTos, ov,

{jbivKi^ai)

not strained, as wine.

Galen.

XIU, 613 E.
Pseud-

502 B, garrulity. 2. Talk, in general. Sept. Reg. 3, 18, 27 'ABoXeaxla avra io-nv, he is talking with somebody, he has com4, 9,

Classical.

ahiimvuTTos, ov, {hwirvi^ai) not waked.

pany.
TTjv

11 'Ypels otSare tov avBpcoTTOv Kai

Athan. IV, 909 B.


dSlxaoTos, ov, (St^d^w) that cannot be bisected

d8o\e(Txiav avTov.

3.

Complaint.

Keg.
Sub

1, 1, 16.

Ps. 54,

3.

or divided into two whole numbers.


78.
dSixoTOfiriTos,
ov,
(8t;(0T0/xc's))

Xicom.

dSoKea-xos, ov, nonsensical.


stantively, d d8dXe<7xor,

Sext. 631,31.
babbler.

Plut. II,

not cut in two.

502 C.
dBoXUvTOs,

Moer. 25

'

ABoXea-xris,

'ArnKas

dBo-

Anon. Valent. 1280 C.


aSL\jfriTos,ov,

Xea^xos, ^'EXXrjvtKais.
ov, (^BoXievopxit)

(Sn/'do))

not thirsting; green, as


Sibyll. 1, 132. 185.
3,

the roots of a tree.


403.
aSi^os,
ov,

Arist. Plut.

1158

zz= adoXos.

SchoL
Diosc.

oTrXois.
1,

aSoXos, ov, unadulterated : unalloyed.

not affected by

thirst.

Sext. 20, 10.

79.

Poll. 3, 86, coin.


8,

Galen. XIII, 848 D.


neat wine.

iToirfTiKos.

thirst ; opposed to &'v\^ovs Xenocr.GT. Diosc. 1,1S3. Galen. 3. SubstanVI, 316 D. Athen. 2, 22. 52.

2.

Not causing

Geopon. 20,
Petr.
ov,

oTvos, sheer, pure,

1, 2, 2,

pure doctrine.

tively, TO aSi\jrov,

adipsos,

dBo^adTos,

(bo^d^a) having no opinion or

yXvKvppiCa.

Diosc. 3, 5 (7).
abpivcriav, less correct for dhpia<Tii>v, mvos,

any subject. Plut. II, 1058 B. Numen. apud Ens. Ill, 1209 C. Diog. 7,
theory on

the Latin

admissio
incorrect
8.

17,

102.
d8o|d(7T(Br, adv. without

elirboxr).

Porph.

any opinion or
no esteem.

theory.

Cer. 394 *0 irpo^Lp.os tS>v

dBfitvo'icovitiv.

Sext. 6, 9.
d8o|e'ci),
rjo-a,

7,

33.

dBfUvaowdKios,

for

dS/ieo-o-ioi/dXioy.

to

be in

Classical.

Porph. Cer. 23,

520.

Sept. Esai. 52, 14 Ovtcos. dto^rjo'ei

a8pi<r(riovdKios, less correct dp.urtnovdkios, ov, 6,

the Latin admissionalis ela-ayysXevs, the chief of the sUentiarii, a sort of lord in
waiting.
15.
"

dvBpdmcov to elBos

a-ov.

2.

dm

tS>v
to be

Indignor,
1, 8,

indignant:
^ovvTS
fl

to disdain.

Apollod.

2 'a8o-

Lyd. 183,

6.

Porph. Cer. 405,


Antec.

dSvaros,
10, 1.

6,

the Latin

adnatus.

1,

napovTav dvBpSiv yvvrj rd dpUTTcia Jos. B. J. 1, 6, 4, Trpos n, to feel XrjyJAeTai. contempt for. 2, 16, 4, p. 190, ttjv Pmpalav mep-ovtav, to deem it umoorthy to be under the Roman rule. 4, 10, 2. 5, 9, 3, nvd. App. I,
169, 69.

d8v6p,iov, incorrect for dBvov/uov.

597, 39.

780, 39, rd ovopa.


Tixi'm

II,

893,

dSvovpid^ai, acra, (dSvovfuov) to muster.


7, 2.

Mauric.

52,

TTpdmiv n. 894, 76 'O

perd

a-irov-

Phoc. 187, 11.


6,

Curop. 85,

1.

BSiv dBo^rjo-as.

dBvoviuaarffs, ov,
5.

muster-master.

Curop. 11,
Leo.
Suid.

85, 1.

dSvoifuov, ov, TO,

Tact.

6,

15.

9,

(ad n m e n) muster. 4. Leo Gram. 305.

dBo^pa, oTos, to, (dBo^eco) disgrace. Plut. 11, 977 E, failure in wrestling. App. I, 599, 69. dBoiia, as, r,, contempt. d8o|o7roiJ)TOf, ov, (So^oTTOie'o))- forming no opinion
:

'ASvovfUov, drroypa(l)fi ovofjuiTav jrapa Pafiaiois.

unreasoning, irrational animals.


mvos,

Polyb.

Oi Be dwovfiivos, TO dBvovfiiov. Se dBvov/xiov


tpaariv.

Id. 'Avvovfii-

6, 5, 8.

vos, ditoypa^T] ovofiaTcav irapa Pm/uai'oir.


*

Oi

dBotrriav,
viodea-ta.

17,

the Latin
1, 11, 1.

adoptio

Antec.

11

Digitized

by Microsoft

aBocroXrjTOi
aSoa-oXriTos, ov,
(8oo-oXj;i//-e'ci))

82
no
traffic

aBeo
Kovcoprds.

in which

Philon

I,

494, 5.

Diosc.

5,

9,

or Imsinesn
aSovXsvTos,
serve.

is

going on.
10, 1.

Chron. 628, 16.

strong, rich.

ov,

(SouXeum) unwilling
2,

Epict.

2>

to work or Unsubdued

to XfTrrodSpopep&s, adv. summarily ; opposed Hippol. Haer. 2, 20. p.epS>s, or Kara Xmrov.
300, 4.

aSoiXaros.
aSouXof,
PZu?.
01/,

Sibyll 10, 22.


slaves.

owning no
831 B.
ov,

Epict.

3, 22,

45.

dSpd/iio-l^os,

ov,

(fjiia-eds)

receiving high wages.

11,

Scymn. 353.
dSpoTTopos,
ov,

*a.Sov\aiTos,

jugated.

(SouXdm) unsubdued, unsubCrates apud Cfem. ^4. I, 1065 B.


Plut. n, 754 B.
Sibyll. 5, 18.

dSpoiis

fX""

'^^<'

rropovs.
elcrl.

Cass. 160, 9 01 TToXvirorai dbponopoi


dbpos, 6v, great.
Classical.

Diod.
7,

1,

53.

Oi dSpoi, the great,


Sept. Reg. 4, 10, 6.
5, 5. 5,

93.

or the rich of a place.

ahoiirriTos, ov,

(Soimea)

noiseless.

Agath. Epig.

4, 10, 11.

24, 8.

aSovnos, ov, (Soviros)

=
I,

nXova-ioi.

Job 34, 19. Jer. (Compare Hei:


fj,

Hes. 'ASpoi,
oi

30

naxees.)
Jos.

preceding.

Epiph.

I,

dSpoa-ta, as,

(Spd(7or)

want of moisture.

632 D.
aSpdvfia, as,
f),

Ant.
(dSpavrjs) inactivity, listlessness,

2, 5, 5.

dSp6a-(j>aLpos, ov, (dSpds, o-<pa'ipa)


ball.

having a large
2, 8,

weakness.
dbpdveos,
rj,

Clem. A.
ov,

145 C. Palladas 141. ^=l dbpavfjs.

An:

P.
rj,

M. E.

65.

dBpoTrjs, rjTos,

abundance.

Paul. Cor.

dSpav^a (dSpaKijf), to be inactive, listless, or weak. Greg. 0pp. Hal. 1, 296, et alibi. Nyss. I, 784 C.
abpavfjs, s, (Spam, bpaivai) inactive, listless,

20.

'Adpvds, dSos,

f),

'Apadpvds.

Nonn. Dion.
Sept.

22, 14, et alibi. dSpvvoi, vvS>, to grow, ripen.

weak;

Classical.
iraibiov.
ttjs

imbecile.

Sept. Sap. 13, 19 To dbpaveararov


<*s to its hands. Babr. 25, 3. 114 (124), Kwrd n, as a medicine. Plut. 11, 657 C, et alibi. 7, 13.

Ex.
11,

2,

10 'ASpvvdevTos 8e tov
'H&pvv6rj(Tav
1, 8,

Judic.

Tois x^pf^Vf

01

vlot

yvvaiKos.

Diosc. Epict.

3,
3,

Mace.

14 Oil nepie^dKero 7rop(j)vpav aarc

dbpvvdrjvai iv airfj, apparently a mistake for


a^pvvBrjvai.
dboTjKprjns, incorrect for dm/Kprjns.

Hippol. Haer. 380, 54.


ves.

Hes. 'Kbpavis, dcrde-

ddpavla, as,
116,
7.
rj,

rj,

^zz ddpdveta.

^seudo-Demetr.
Simoc. 139, 23.

dbwafiew,

to

be dbvvapos.

Sept. Sir. Prolog.


rrjv eppjjveLav

Herodn.
ov,

dSpaviKos,

2,

10,

17.

'E0' ols dv BoKcopev tmv Kara


7re(l)t\o7rovj]p.evQ3v rttrl roiv

dhpavqs.

Xe^ea)V dbvvap.eiv.

^AdpavovT^t for ' AhpavovT^iov, ro, Adranutzi, a


place.

ahvvap,La, as,

17,

weakness

incapacity.

Polyb.

Porph.
ov,

Adm.
(dSpof,

207.
fViJ^oXof)
8, 1

15, 34, 5 TrjV tov ^iXoTrdropos dSwafiiav tov

d8pe7ri)/3oXof,

aiming at
ray
vorja-fis

^a(ri\eviv.

great things.

Longin.

To

Trtpi

ddvvafios, ov, (^dvvap.ts) weak.


oivos.

Diosc. 5, 13. 17j


politically
in-

iSpeTTTj^oXov, loftiness

of thought.
Sibyll. 9, 310.

Epiph. H, 381 C.
ov,

dbpea-Tparos, incorrect for dSecrrpaTos.

dSvvdiTTcvTos,

^8vva<TTfia>)

dSpeva, incorrect for dpSeia.

dependent.
d8vva(TTiti, as,

Synes. 1085 B.
rj,

abpew,
2,

rjato,

(dSpo'f)

to

rijpen,

neuter.

Diosc,

dSvvapia.

Dion. H. VI,

107 Oi irpdo-c^aTot Km TeXetos fjSprjKOTes. Hes. 'ASpeiv, av^caSai ipvTov (corrupt).


'ASpiavitTTaif S>v, oi,
tics.

1037,

5,

of Style.

dSvvaToa,

Hadrianistae, certain hereTheod. IV, 345 B.


eios,
17,

aa-co, (ddvvaTos} to weaken, debilitate. Erotian. 222 Kany7ropr)drj, ^Swaraft;. Anon.

Med. 229 'Abwarol


avTa.

Se to vevpa Kal fiXawra

'Abpiavov TToKis,

Hadrianopolis.

Soz.

1169 A.
'ASptoTiKo'r,
17,

dbwdrtos, adv. weakly, feebly.


oV,

Philon

I,

397,

Adriatic.

Diod. H, 539, 38,

6d\a(r<ra, the Adriatic.


aSpifiDf,
w,

p.c6vav dSuTOTcos KaTciKafieiv clx^v, teas unable. Epict. 2, 22, 24. Orig. I, 252

20
C.

(Spipvs)

not sharp, not pungent.

Plotin.

I,

636,

9,

ex^iv Trpos n.

Lucian. IH, 663.


dSpd^mXof,
lumps.
12, 19.
coi/of ,
rf,

Eust. 540, 22.

d8v7rKri6r)s, es, (r/Svs, 7r\rid<o) full

of

sioeetness.

ov, (dSpds, jSraXor) consisting

of large
Plin.

Method. 209
TOA,

Diosc.

1,

80.

5,

176 (177).

veKrapos,

C Kparfipes dSvnXrjdifs wpoKetvr^ TrXrjpeis ^Se'oi viicrapos.

aSva-atmjTos, ov, (Suo-oiTTfa)) not to be

dhpoyanav,

the Latin
1,

adrogatio,
^n(ec.
1,

countenance, inexorable.
'

arrogatio.
dSpoyaTCBp, opoy,
11, 3.
d8poK(j)cLKos,
ov,

Antec.
d,

11, 1.

adrogator.
KecjjdKrf)

put out of Philon H, 236, 7 ASva-wirriTov cxei Sapedv, he need not be ashamed. Plut. II, 64 F. Clementin. 69 C. 531 rd ddu(rcB7n7roi/.

(dSpds,

big-headed.

dSuo-a)7ri)T<Bs,

adv. inexorably, etc.


"AibtToi Xdyos, there

Plut. H, 534

Paul. Aeg. 304.


&Spop.pris, is, (dSpdj, fiipos) consisting

B.

of coarse
5, 26,

900), to sing.
it

is

a report
8e'

parts

opposed to

XeTrropfprjs.

Diod.

i said.

Philon

I,

189, 16 'AiSerai

rtr

Digitized

by Microsoft

aSco/j,a

83
ae/ywjTor,
rj,

aeinraK
ov,

KoX TotovTos (Of cV dTTopprjTois Xoyos, bv aKoals


irpea-fivTepaiv n-apaKaTariBea-dai )(pr).

(yiyvop-ai)

eternal, everlasting.

348, 12

Orph. Argon. 15, vi^.


deibia, as,
7, 5, 5,
rj,

IlaXaior yoSv gSfrat Xdyos.

A
io.

'Qf TToXis adfTat \6yos.

Epiph. I, 1072 HI, 245 B 'fiy


422,

(deiSiyy) uncomeliness.

Jos. B. J.

p.

414.
r],

a8fra( Xoyos.

Theoph. Cont. 426, 22.


epv6pd, ipvBporqs.

detSouXeia, as,
Poll. 3, 80.

(bovXeia) perpetual

slavery.

(Compare the Latin perenni(rpex'"!

aSmpi, ilDlK,
2, 1,^1.
'A8<Bi/ai',

:::;

Jos. Ant.

servus.)

aeibpopos,
ior-f/,

ov,

bp6p.os)

ever-running.

'JIS,
1, 1, I,

applied to God.
xupte.

Sept.
2,

Greg. Naz. JR, 429 A.


dei^cota,

Reg.
Orig.

11

'ASmvm

S%Z;.

240.

as,

fj,

(del^aos) eternal

628 A.
ov,

620 D.
("ASmvif
'

Orig. VII, 168 A.

'ASwj/aios, a,

.^)

Adonian.

Orph.

*dei'f<oor, ov,

evergreen.

Hippol. life. Did. A. 553 B. Cornut. 55. 2. Sub-

Arg. 30 'Aiaivairiv
'ASavatos, ov,
6,

A<j>po8iTriv.

the Greek form of 'ASavat. Pha. II, 756 C. Cek. apud Orij?. I, 1245 B. Orirj. I, 1348 X. Sept. Judic. 13, 8. 16, 28

sempervivum, applied to several species of plants.


TO
dei^aiov,

stantively,

aizoon

Abavaie Kvpie
not
'A8<Bj/ai'e.

2.

is

apparently 'Abavdle xvpie, Adonaeus, one of Justi.*)

Theophr.Y.'S..\,W,i. 7,15,2. Diosc. 2, 4,88(89). 89(90). 90(91). Galen. n, 104 E.


217.
dei^morrjs, rjTos,
r/,

^=

dfi^ata.

Jsid.

841 A.

nus's angels.

Hippol. Haer. 218, 82.


sonnet
?

*deidaXr)s,

es,

abasvdpiov, ov, to, (oSib

Proc. Gaz.
2.

Alex. 48.
3.

(BaKKa) ever-green. Mel. 2, 9. Strab. 3, 4,


I,

Nicand.
11.

11,4,

n, 2787
dSatvi,

D 'Adcovapia nep,^ai
^=
i},

appv6p.a.

Philon

37, 8.

II,

'JIS

Kvptos.

Jos.

'ASaviaicos,
4, 8, 38,

dv, ("Afifflwy)

Ant. 5, 2, o/ Adonis.

stantively, TO deiBaXes,

266,

36.-2.

Sub-

dei^aov to p,eya.

Epict.

Diosc. 4, 88 (89).
delBovpos, ov, (dovpos) ever-warlike.
2,

fc^oj.
6,

adapdrap, opos,
d7r6p.axos.

(adorea)
33.

pensioner
1.

0pp. Cyn.

189, cock.
ov,

Lyd. 158,
the Latin
2.

159,

dSmpfa, as,
Sola.

17,

adorea

dei6pvXr)Tos,
iroXep.ov

(dpvXXea) ever-noised.
(deiKivrfTos)

Lyd.

244,

9.
fj,

Lyd. 159,
f/,

deiKivr/aia, as,

perpetual motion.

dSapia, as,

the being

abmpos, incorruptible,
Poll. 8, 11.

Galen.
C.

II,

with reference to bribes.


dhmpin,

lUiKTos, ov,

Prod. Parmen. 874 (101). Basil. Sel. 512 (eiVm) unyielding.


245 A.
(XdXos) ever-talking or babbling.

D'^ns, Nehem. 3, 5.
as,

nobles, princes, leaders.

Sept.

deiXaXos, ov,
f},

dbaipoboKia,

(dbtopohoKOs)

^=

dhapla.

Mel.

95, 5.

DionC. Frag.
bribes.

40, 1, p. 37.

deiXixvos, ov, (Xixvos^ ever-greedy.

Philon

I,

dBapoSuKos, ov, (SmpoSoKor) incorruptible, as to

348, 15, TLvos.


deiXoyeco,
ijcrm,

Nonn. Dion.
dbapoboKos.

4, 33, et alibi.

(Xoyos)

to

be

always talking
S. 21, 18, con-

dbapoKrjTTTOs (^bapov, Xa/zj3ai/G>) ^z: abapos,


poboKrjTos,
'

dbaSchol. Thuc. 2, 65

about anything.

Phryn. P.

demned.
Tov

Cyrill.

A.

Ill,

705 C.

X, 953 C
Jos.

AbaporaTos, dbapoXrjTTTOs.
the Arabic

iv ypdp.fj.a(rtv deiXoyovvTes v6p.ov.

AE, a diphthong, see AI.


nc,

ya

deinaKapKTTOs, ov,
Nicet. Byz. 737 C,

^=

del futKaKapurros.

3.

Hymnogr. 988 B.
delpjipyos, ov, (pApyos) ever-greedy.

et alibi.
dci,

0pp. Hal.

adv. always.

Polyb.

I,

42,

10 'Aei

Km

2,

213, belly.
ov,
(^p,vrip,oveva>)

fiSKKov,

magis

magisque,

more and more.

deifivrip^vevTos,

ever to be re2.

Cleomed. 17, 17.

(hSd)
brjiia

Sext. 467,

5.-2.
3, 3.

SeZaS
9,

Smi^aX/ia.

^gtuV. Ps.

17

membered. B.
deifivr]p.oveiTa>s,

Jos.

Ant. 17,

6,

Socr. 177

'Qibfj del.

Sept. Ps. 19, 17

(Hexapla) MfXiaft?

adv.

by always remembering.

dfl (3, 3
7)s,

Aia Travros and


^,

dfiai/yoCcTTa,
\ls,

reXor).

Marc. Erem. 1029 C.


deivavTai, av,
01,

del avyov(rTa, aliovia ^acrititle

(yairrjs) perpetual sailors,

semper augusta,a

given to

name given
'Aeivovs,
ov,

to certain Milesian magistrates.

Galla Placidia.
del (3a(7tXeuj, 6,

alamos ^acrCKevs, perpetual king or emperor, given to Theodosius the Great. Chd. 821 E.
(|3Xvfo)) ever-gu^liing forth.
II,
fj,

Chal. 825 C.

Plut. n, 298 C.
6,

(vovs)

Ainus, a Valentinian

dei'^XuoToy, ov, ov,

Aeon, whose female counterpart is Sivecris. Both are emanations from avdpamos and 'EkIren. 449 B. KXrja-La.
deiVatf, aibos,
fj,

Max. Conf.
dfiyevea-la, as,
tion.

1245 C.
(deiyeverrjs)

(irais)

perpetual genera384,
? 9.

to the Virgin
Sel.

Mary.

demdpSevos, applied Caesarius 876. Basil.

Jul.

150 B.

Stab.

I,

deiyevviiTijs,

ov, 6,

^=

deiyevcTqs

Macrob.

1,

Sibyll. 8,

Gregent. 672 A. (Compare 481 B. 463 'H 8' dei novpr), referring to the

17, p.

301 ' AfLyevvjyn) ApoUini immolaht.

Virgin.)

Digitized

by Microsoft

aei'KapBevt.a
aenrapBfvia, as,
ity.
fj,

84
deixBrjs, es,

aepo^arot;

{dtiirapdevos) perpetual virgin-

deiKrjs.

Dubious.

Eudoc. M.
Strat. 71.

CyrUl.

*afi7rdpdvos,

H. 949 A.
act

345.
deixpovios, ov, (xpovos) everlasting.
detxpva-ov, ov, to, (xpva-os)

perpetual virgin.
in

napdhos, ov, i), ever-virgin, Sapph. 93 'Aei napdevos,

aeiCaov to pAya.

two words, changed by Ahrens into amdpSoph, Aj. 793 Ai del irapBevoL, the

Bevos.

deKKopdxos,
storms.

Diosc. 4, 88 (9). ov, {aeXKa, paxopMi) struggling with


Jul.

Erinnyes.
Tijs

Philon

I,

46, 16, Athene.

497, 5

Aeg. 49.
Apollon.

denrap6evov Koi dfirfropos f^hopdbos,

the

de'hXaihris, es,

(aeXAa, EIAJJ) stm-m-like.

number seven, and consequently the Sabbath. Dion C. 37, 35, 4. 37, 45, 1. 51, 19,
2 Tds re Upeias
vestales.

S. 9, 28, KoviopTOS.
devvat^to,
10

2.

Tcir

aemapBevovs,

virgines
it is

nriyfj

vSaros

Tseui-Afric. 100 render devaos. TnjyfjV nvevpuTos dewat^to.

In ecclesiastical writers,

de^irpotpos, ov, (ae'^m, Tpttpta)

promoting growth.
working.

applied to

women

vouiing perpetual virginity.

Orph.
Cyrill.

Hymn.
A.

51 (50), 17.

Bus. 1177 A. Pachom. 952 D. Epiph. U, 825 A. Theod. Ill, 937 B Tats del 7rap9evois. (Compare Id. Ill, 1109 C TIapdevap Tfjv 8ia
^lov -TTapBeviav

depyrjTOS, ov,

(EPFO)

depyrjs, not

Semper Virgo, an epithet of the Virgin Mary. Hippol. 840 A T^f Travayias demapdevov MaeTrrjyyeXpevcov.')

3-

aepyos, ov,

1057 D. apparently a mistake for avepyos


Dioclet. G. 8, 11.
oi,

Vm,

dvepytwTOS.
'Aepiavoi, mv,
us,

Aeriani, the followers of Aeri-

pias.

Petr. Alex. 517

Trjs ayias

ivbo^ov
kcll

corresponding in some respects to the modera Presbyterians. Epiph. 11, 337 A.


depiCo),
ia-to,

8ea-7roLvr]s r]p.cov

BeoTOKOv Kal devnapBevov

(drip)

to

be air-like.

Kara dkrjBeiav BeoroKOv Mapias.

Did. A. 404

'Aepi^ovn ra
Id. 5, 85.
depLKOs,
T),

'Atto Trjs decTrapBevov ev vcrrepois Katpois tea

2. To he sky-blue. drpa. 100. Epiph. 11, 231 A.

Diosc.

1,

83

^CKavBpamiav dfjlpdcrras erexBrj. Epiph. I, 341 C. II, 57 D Mapias rrjs demapBevov. Gregent. 656 C.
aemrkavfis, es, (TrXarao)) ever-wandering.

ov, (drip)

of the

Nil. 1144 B,

(f)i\ia.

2.

air,

airy

evanescent.

Substantively, to

depiKov, the air-tax, levied

by Justinian and
to the

Greg.

his successors.

It

may be compared

Naz.
14.

m,

1347 A.
Aristeas

delppoos, ov, {petti) ever-Jlowing river.

English benevolence. Proc. HI, 119 Upos 8c Tov tS)V TTpaiTtopimv endpxov dvd irdv eras TrKeov
Tj

TpiCLKOVTa KevTTjvdpui irpos TOIS br^potTLOis

deitre^atTTos, ov, 6,

{del,

ae^atTTos) L. perpetu-

eTrpatTfrero (popois

ols

Si)

ovopa to depiKov
St]

us augustus,

semper augustus, ever august.


'

eTTiTeBeiKev, eKeivo, 0ip.ai, irapabrjKoiV otl

ov

Ephes. 984
avyovcTTOs

Aeitrefiaa-Tos avyovtrros,

where

Teraypevrj Tts ovde ^vetBtapevT) ovcra

rj

(jyopa

is

superfluous.

eTvyxavev
Greg. Naz.
71.

airrq,

dXKd

tvxjj tlvI totnrep e^ depos

deurBevfjS, es, {aBevto) ever-strong.


Ill,

del avrrjv tpepopev7)v eXdp^ave.


Cerfj-. II,

Leo. Tact.

20,

1263 A.
ov,

521, 14.

(See also

aeptoi/.)

deitji.Tos,

(o-iToj)

always fed, applied to


9,

depivos, ov,
Tertull.
I,

aerinus,
1312 B.
the air.

sky-blue.

Poll, i, 119,

those

who

lived at the public expense in


Poll. 6, 34.
^AeitriTos,

the Prytaneum.

40.
e(j>*

Inscr.
eKatrrrj

aepios, ov,

of

Patriarch. 1141

C ToO

189

aitTiTOs.

Hes.

deploy TTvevparos tov 'BeXidp.

Hippol. 864

fjpepa ev
delaTpo(j}os,

to
ov,

TrpVTavelto deiirvoiv.
{(TTpetptti)

Tas deptovs dpxds.


ever-

Iambi. Myst. 62, 15.

ever-turning,

247, 13, gai^oi/fs.

Euthal. 69S A.

2.

Vast
the

changing.

Pisid. 1592 A.

Diod.
ever perfect.
depiov
'Aepios,

1,

33.

17, 49, pAyeBos.

deireXeios, a, ov, ^=. del Te\eios,

classical

Eugen. Diac. 1304 D.


delTpeiTTOs, ov,

oipdvios.)

3.

(Compare

Substantively, to
19.

TO depiKov.
6,

Porph. Cer. 451,

(rpema) ever-changing (neuter).

ov,

Aerius, a sort of heretic

who

Pisid. 1463
dei.(j)avris, es,

A.
Hipparch.
I, 9,

{(paiva) always visible.

1057 D.
dei^aros,
ov,

Cleomed.
(tparos)

12.

Stoh.

196, 16.
Sibyll.
3,

maintained that there was no difference between a bishop and a presbyter. Epiph. II, 337 A. Hieron. II, 362 C.
depLTis, tbos,
7],

ever-famed.

(dqp) =. dvayoKKls.

Diosc.

2,

415.
deitpeyyrjs,
es,

209.
(tpeyyio)

ever-shining.

Grey.

depias (depios), adv. OS air: in the air.

lamld.
tcl

Nyss.

I,

984 D.
Caesarius S56. 1072, ever-twittering.
ov,
(<l>S>s)

Myst. 33,
916 C.
'Aeppav, see
the air.

Ta pev

alBepias to
p,eTexei.v.

fie

depias,

deitjjBoyyos, ov, ((pdeyyopai) ever-speaking, ever-

Se evvSpia>s avrav

Vit. Nicol. S.

talking.
dei(f)<oTos,

ever-hright,

ever-shining.

''Eppaiv.

Caesarius 860.
dei)(eipa<rros,

Pseudo-Dion. 697 C.
()(eipd^a>}

depo^drris, ov, 6, (drjp, ^aivw)

one who walks in


in
the
air.

storms.

ov,

ever-disturbed ever
-

by

Plut. II, 952 F.


ov,

Metaphorically,
Clim. 996 C.

distracted,

depo^aTos,

(^aivto)

walking

ever-troubled.

Pseud-^;/ian. IV, 909 B, Spop.eis.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aepo^ioi
depd/Stos, ov, (^los) living in the air.

85
Caesarius
traverse the
II,

a^vfio<;

337 B.

Socr. 300 B.

Theod. IV, 421

1073.
aepohpofiia,
air.
rja-io,

B.
(depoSpd/iof)
to

dcnCa,

Lucian.
ov,

II, 77.

to-a, (dfTos) to be embroidered with figures of eagles. Genes. 7, 2.

aepoSpo/ws,

(Spajuflv)

traversing

the

air.

'AeVior, ov, 6, Aetius, the inventor of the

Ano-

Bust. 1503, 10.


aepodev, adv.

moean
Genes. 26,
1.

doctrine.

Athan.

ex roO depos.
6,

aepoKopa^, okos,

(xopo^) air-crow, an imagi(Kavayjf) air-^mosquito,

BasU. I, 500 B. Epiph. n, 337 B.

689 B. 760 D. Greg. Nyss. II, 256 D. Philostrg. 525 B. Theod.


II,

nary being.

Lucian. IV, 82.


6,

IV, 417 A.

aipoKoivw^, wTTos,

an

aerlrris, ov, 6,

(deros)

aetites,

the eagle-stone.

imaginary being.
afpo/iavreia, as,
rj,

Lucian.
Hisp.

II,

82.

(fiavTfvofiai)

aeromantia,

aiiromancy.
afpop^xia, as,
battle, battle

Isid.
ij,

8, 9, 13.

(as if from depofiaxos) air-

ra ws iripov yKVfia>v Xidov virdpxav. Ael. H. A. 1, 35. Philostr. 65. Orig. I. 1161 B.
5,

Diosc.

160 (161)

'Actiti;j Xidos, 6 ev

KLveto'oaL rjxov dirorcXaiv,

in the air.
to,

depdpeXi,

iTos,

also Spoa-ofieXi.

Lucian. II, 84. honey-dew ; called Galen. VI, 399 E. Athen.


(peXt)
Diorf. 17, 75.)

dcToetSijr, is,

(EIAQ)

eagle-like.

Orig.

I,

1341

A.
derds or aUros, ov,
6, the Soman aquila, the standard or principal banner of a legion. Dion. H. IV, 2088, 7. Jos. B. J. 3, 6, 2. Plut. I, 181 E. App. H, 259, 36. 307, 56.

11,102.
64, 28.

(Compare
Cornut. 99.
es,

depopiyj;?, is, (^fi,iymp.i)

mixed with air. Cleomed.


Diog.
7,

145.

aepofU)(\ai8Tis,

(6/it;(X<n8j;s)
i/di-os.

foggy,
air.

misty.

Dion
cies,

C. 60,

8, 7,

a-TpaTiariKos.

Ptol.

Sign. 900 D,

of fsh.

Artem. 167.

2. A spe 3. Eagle, a

depdpop^os, ov,

(/uopc^ij)

formed of

Orph.

floating

garment worn by military men


Theoph. Cont. 19.
ov,
6,

Hymn.
aepofwQea,

14, 11.
r](ra>,

16, 1 riepofiopfjios.

called also BoKaaaa.

(depd/uvdof) to talk at
30.

random.
Phi-

derotpopos,

PMlonI, 457,
Ion 11, 268, 46.
dfpoKo/ie'o), Ti(T(o,

legion.

Plut.

the aquilifer of a Roman 732 F. I, Sibyll. 8, 78


it is

aepojivBos, ov, (fivBos) talking at

random.

'ArjTo^opmv Xeyfmvav,- where


jective.
d^avirris, ov, 6,

an ad-

(as if

from

depovofios) to

move
shy.

==

in the air.
depoTTfTTis,
is,

Heliod. 406, 26.


(jtiirrai)

d^a^rjX, 7tStJ7,

SiaKOVOS.

diroirop-Tralos.

fallen

from

the

Philon Bybl. apud Bus.


ieponopia,
rjira),

m,

84 B.
I,

be the name of an evil Jren. 628 A. Orig. I,


a^fvKTos,
ov,
I,

I, 424 B. Supposed to demon. Enoch. 182. 1364 C.

Epiph.

(depoTrdpos) to traverse the air.


5.

(^evKTos)

unyoked, unharnessed.

Philon n, 116,
aepimovs, ohos,

Greg. Nyss.
trovs)

268 C.
the

Dion. H.
d^rjKia, as,

302,

8,

horse.

Antip. B. 1765 C.
6,

fj,

(a^rjXos)
I,

(drip,

air-footed,

eiwy.

Clem. A.

freedom from jealousy or 1028 A.


unenvied.
29.

name of a
the

bird.
Tf,

Schol. Arist.
(drjp, vKoirioi)

Av. 1354.
divination from
I,

dfT/XoTiJTnjror, ov, (^rjKorviria)}


II,

Pint.

aepotrKOTTLa, as,

787 D.
Sext.
7,

appearance of the sky.


fj,

Cedr.

20.

df^TTjToi, OV, postulated.

364, 19.

ifpoTffus, iSos,

(jifivat) air-cleaving ;

coined

479,

2.

697, 4.

by Theod. IV, 876 C'Aprefuv


dep6irtp.iv.

av6iia(Tav, oiov

d^riTryrms (d^firriTos}, adv. without examination.

Philon
(rifwco) air-cleaving.

I,

96, 35, ex^iv nvos, to be incapable

depordjiior,

ov,

Clem. A.
dtporo-

n, 64 A"ApTiiis irpos nvwv


pos Tjs oiaa.
dcpo(j)avris, is,

fiprjTai,

deipoeiSrjs.

Cyrill.

A.

I,

732

C.

depoxpoos, ov,
p. 745. 5,

(xpoa) sky-blue. 131 (132).


(drip}
to

Diosc.

5, 85,

aepdm,

ciio-to,

transform

into

air.

Tsead-Heraclid. AUeg.
to

Hom. 439

dtpova-Sai,

become
ijo-a),

air.

Ofprdo),

deprdfto.

Antip. S. 14.
Aristot.

of investigating. Clem. A. I, d^vyfis, is, ((evywiu) not yoked. 265 B Toils d^vyels KaKta, roiis ddafidarovs not under the power of vice. irovrjpla, Diomed. 498, 26, otIxoc, versus injuges. Greg. Naz. II, d^vyia, as, fj, (a^vyos) celibacy. 576 C. a^vyos, ov, (fuydy) unwedded. Lucian. 11, 446, Phryn. P. S. 12, 13 "Aft/|, d a^vyos Koirri. 2. Not Hippol. Haer. 270, 46. Kai povos. Strab. 6, 1, 8 matching with one another.

depmSijs,

es, 3,

(.drjp)

air-like.

Part.

SavfidXia inroSoujuew; S^vya, to p.ev vyjnj\6v, to


8e Taneivov.
d^vpLiTris, ov, 6,

Anim.
gauze.

Achmet. 158, very thin, as 2. Sky-blue. Diosc. 5, 170 (171)


6, 8.

Aepa&ris ttju xP"""'Aeriavoi, av, oi, ('Aertoy) Aetiani, the followers

one D, the Latins.


ov,

that uses a^vpa.

Cervl. 741

a^vp-os,

(Cvp-ri)

azy
6,

mus

unleavened.
12, 39. 20, 2.
j:.

of Aetius the heresiarch.

They

are the

Sept.

Gen.
2, 4.

19, 3, sc. aprovs.

Ex.

same as the 'Avoiiotoi and Bivofuavoi

Epiph.

Lev.

Num.

15.

Galen. VI, 310

Digitized

by Microsoft

d^V/lOTl]^

86
1, 5, 7

aaavfiaaTLa
fioKaveiov.-

'a

Athen.
pure.

3,

74

TropicaUy, Paul. Cor.


a^vfui,

Epiph.

I,

3. Substantively, to
aproif a^vfxa \dyava.

Sept.

(a) Ex. 12,


3',

=
5,

cloth for covering both the


a^v)U>i,

3. A square 417 A. paten (SiVkos) and


;

the chalice (Trorqpiov)

called also KoKvp-pji.


elXriTov.

15.

18.

Not

to

be confounded with the

Deut. 16.

4.

8.

./os.

Ant.

10, 5.

i^es.
rrpo8.

"A^Vjia, TO aVV jrdKatas


ivfoj.

Tropically,

Cifirjs,

KoKelTm
1,

Paul. Cor.

Porph. Cer. 15, 19. 1025 B. Pseudo-iSerm. 400 C To KaTanerairfjui, e'lrovv 4. Area. Heron Jun. 198. 1. 6 dfjp.
Const. TV,

(b) ike feast of unleavened bread, comprising the seven days immediately following tlie irdaxa. Oftener called fj coprfi rmv d^vSept. Ex. 23, Hav, or ai fi/iepm Tu>v a^vjiav.
15.

206,

7.

drjT0<l>6pos,

see derotpopos.

dfjmjTos, ov, unconquerable.


vos.

Muson.

173, n-

Lev.

23, 6.

Esdr.

1, 1, 17.

Marc.
Jos.

14, 1.
3,

d6aKa(Taia, as,
13.

f),

the being dddXaairos.

Secund.

Luc.
10, 5.

22, 1.

Act. 12,

liav

18, 2, 2.
TrdcTxa.

'H

3.

20, 6.

Ant.

639.
ov,

TTpaiTri

riptpa

twv d^v14, 12.

dOoKao-cos,

{6aKa(Tfra)

Matt. 26, 17.

Marc.

Luc. 22, 7 'H fijikpa tSiv d^vp-oov, sc. TrpmTTj. (c) the holy wafer of the Latin church. Cerul. 753 A. (Compare Philipp. Sol. 884 B
Chatzitzarii
rfiv

Max. Tyr. Not mixed


expers,
dOdkifs, es,
sc.

2, 17.

Galen.
Sat.

^= dOaKdfro-airos. XHI, 903 C. 2.

with sea-water.
2,

Diosc.

5, 11, olvos.

(Compare Hor.
(flaXXto)

8,

15

Chium maris
Plut.
I,

vinum.)
not verdant.

in avTwv
the

rrpocrayoijivrjv irpo-

635

(T(j)opdv a^vpxiv iroiQva-L.^

B.

d^vpoT-qs,

rjTos,

Tj,

being afu/ior.

Macar.
of

'AdapjivTiKos,

f],

ov, (J A6dp.avTes)

of Athamania.

665 A, metaphorically.
d(vp,o^ayia, as,
fj,

Diosc.

1, 3, fiTJov.

(<lfu/iO0ayof) the eating


Just.

d6ap.^T}s, es, (6dp.^os) fearless.


1, 3, 21.

Mel. 91. Strab.

unleavened bread.
alvfiocjidyos,
ov,

Tryph.
t^ayeiv)

14.

Plut.

I,

49

'A6ap.fiJj (tkotov Kai

un1328 B. d^wta, as, fj, (aftuos) lifelessness. Porphr. apud Stob. I, 347, 27. Hierocl. C. A. 174, 10. Prod. Barmen. 646 (62). following. Psell. 1152 B. d^avLKos, Tj, 6v, Psell. 1152 B. a^avos, ov, {iavrf) of no zone.
(a^v/Ms,

eating

npbs

leavened bread.

Pseud-^tfion.

II,

d6avarl^a>, to immortalize,

.4. II, 37 B. with reference to the Dion C. 74, apotheosis of the emperors.

ep-qpLav axpo^a.

Clem.

^'
,

^'
,

d6avario-p.6s, ov, 6, (a^avaWfo))

immortalizatlo)).

Diod.

1, 1.

ddavaroiroLos,

ov,

(dddvaros,

Troie'o))

rendering

a^aos,

ov,

(fcoiy)

lifeless,

inanimate.

Prod.
563, 4.

immortal, immortalizing.
Trjv dBavaroTroiov irpbs

Clementin. 117

Barmen. 600 (211).


alms, av,

airov dvBpanwv

iTTop-

a^aos.

Plotin.

I,

512, 14.

yf)v.

Method.

204 B.

Eus.

II,

1213 A,

Prod. Barmen. 543 (118) rar a^as. App. I, 143, afrntrror, ov, ungirded.
o-rot

a-fjipayis,
1 7

baptism.

*Af<Btheir

dBdvaros, ov, immortal, as a

TO

$t(f>ri,

not

having girded on

swords.
dr/Srjs, fs,

disagreeable.

Men. Rhet.

152, 9 ToS

dKOviraL drjdeLs, to hear.


drjSla, as,
fj,

nausea at the stomach.


(oT/S^s)
to

Sext. 14,

32.
aT/Sifoi,

title. Chal. 1537 C 'H 6ela KOI dBdvaros Kopv^i), the divine and immortal head, of the emperor. 828 'Oi^e/\op.ev yap Tjj dOavdra woKei aTOvefieLV ev irda-i TO irpcoTela, aeternae urbi: said by Galla Placidia. (Compare Dion. H. I, 586, 10 seq.) 2. Substantively, (a) dddvaros

iVm,
yeva-iv.

disgust.

Sext. 22, 17,

Xvxvls

TTjv

Artem. 231.

Zosimas 1696

(114).
727, 17.

(TTe(j>ava)paTiKrj,

a plant.
the

Diosc.

3,

104

(1)

o(

dOdvaroi,

immortals, a
Scyl.
25, 14.

'Arjbicra avTov,

shall

make him

feel unpleas-

body of men

antly.

Doroth. 1693

OiSe drjSi^ovTai airov,

Byzantine army. Bryen. 133, 20. Comn. I,


in the
dddvaroi.^
to

pSeXvTTovrai.

Schol. Arist.

Eq. 892. 946.

(Compare the Persian


ddavaroai, axro),
Ger7ii.

Av. 961.
aTjbiapos, ov, 6,
fjSovT].

render dddvaros.

Pseudo-

(&qhi^ai)
7.

disgust;

opposed to
Diog.
2,

408 C.

Sext. 21,
f),

ddavfjs, es,
rjhovr).

dBdvaros.
Sept.

Max.

Tyr. 60, 13.

arjSovia, as,
2,

absence of

89.

ddaviv, ]r\X.

90.

drjBi^opai (drjBrjs), to be
4, 4, 5.
7, 3,

unaccustomed.

Strab.

Reg. 3, 8, 2 'Ev fiTjfi 'ABaviv, WiViHn m', in the month Ethanim, the seventh month of the Jewish calendar.
fj,

18, p. 34.

'ABdpa,
1, 9,

^=

'Arapydns.

Strab. 16, 4, 27.


Plut.

df)p, epos, 6, air.

Paul. Cor.
1, 14,

26 Ovra vain
;

ttv-

ddapoTjs, es, (dapa^eco) deficient in courage.


I,

KTevto

as depa

heptov, laboring in

a pro-

525 F.

878 D. n, 80 D.
Plut. 11, 150 C.
fj,

verbial expression.

9 "Eo-co-^e yap els

ddapaSis, adv. timidly.

depa XdKovvres, talking in vain ; a proverbial expression. Theophil. 1121 B. 3. place in a bath so called. Galen. X, 348 E, toO

d6avp,aaTia, as,

{ddavfiatrros) the being aston-

ished at nothing {nil admirari).


16. 21.

Strab.

1, 8,

Digitized

by Microsoft

aSavflaaTO'i
Mavfuurros,
admired.
II,

87
wondered
at or

aOereo)
ov, incurable,

ov,

(5au/xaf<a) not

aBcpdwevTos,

applied to diseases,
151, 38.
II,

7s&\iAo-Demetr. 32, 20.


Cyrill.

Lucian.

or to persons.

Philon

I,

473, 5.

412.

A.

I,

232 B, not without

Erotian. 92
liovqrov.

'

hvrjKearov, dBepdnevTov, dwiro-

wonder.
Mdjiatv,
ov, (fieaofuu)
3, rivos.

i3iosc. Delet. p. 6.

Lucian.

11,

GGH.

not having seen.

Men.

Galen.
vov,

II,

254 F.

Moer. 72

'Avaxis, o^iro-

Rhet. 239,
ideeio,
ri<ra),

to he aBeos.
fj,

Did. A.

39TD.
f),

3.

'AttlkSis

....
2,

dBepajrevTOv, 'EXXr/viKms.

Not

dressed, not prepared, in its natu-

aBerjiriri, r\s,

Ionic for aBeatria, as,


Aret. 121 B.
(aBtos) atheism.
I,

(a6earos)

ral state.

Diosc.

93. 95.

the not seeing.

dBcpaircvras, adv. incurably, irremediably.

Phi-

Meta,

as,

f),

Greg. Naz.

II,

lon n, 404,_ 20 ABepairevTcos els dnav exovras.

24 B.
adeiaa-Tos,

Theod.
ov,

889 A.
uninspired.
Plut. 11,

Achmet. 236, irraxiveiv.


dBepaSrjs, es, like dBdpa.

(flftafo))

Galen. U, 272 A.

417 A.
44 B.

758 E.
without volition.

dBepwjia, aros, to, (dBrjpa)

atheroma,
Med.
7, 6.

a kind

aBeKijs, es, (BeXco)

Anast. Sin.
II,

o{ pustule or tumor.

Cels.

Galen.

1173 C.

n, 272
Athan.
fifj

'ABepwfM ecrn

^ltoiv vevptoSrjs dBe-

Ade\rjTos, ov, (BeXai) unwilled.

461

pSySes vypov nepte^oiv.


ddea-ia, as,
rj,

'Ap' oZv inel (jivaei Ka\


rjbr]

ex ^ovXfioems

{aBeros) faithlessness, perfidious-

iariv 6 vlos,

Kcu aBeXrjTos

ian ra
eanv

irarpl,
;

ness.

Sept. 3er. 20, 8.

Mace.
nva.

1,

16, 17.

2,

mi
Toxi

fifj

^ovXa/ievov toC irarpos

6 vlos

15, 10.
ei'y

Polyb.
14,
1,

2,

32, 8.

3, 70, 4.

4, 29, 4,

dKKa koI 6f\ofiev6s itrtiv 6 vlos irapa 2. Without volition, := ddeXijs; opposed to deXriTtKos. Anast. Sin. 1165 D.
Oifievovv
Trarpos.

TLva.

4, irpds

Diod. 18, 32.

II,

589, 12 T^ uvvrjBei tols Kprjo-lv dBeala.


9,
7.

Theodtn. Dan.
aBea-pios,
ov,

MeXriTais,

adv.
5,

vnthout

volition,

unwillingly.

dBecfiios, ov, ^=1 aBe(Tfxos.


(6ea-p.6s)

Apollin. L. 1485 B.

Athen.
97.

61 (quoted).
II,

Hippol. Haer. 358,


fir^v

laidess,

wicked.

Sept-

Athan.

461

C Ov

dPovXrjTcos Kal

Mace.
2, 2, 7.

3, 5, 12.

3, 6, 26.

afffXriTcos

iariv ayaBos.

2, 3, 17.

Diod. 1, 14. Petr. Plut. I, 712 C, et alibi.


ov Keirai

aBifieXlaTos, ov, (BefieXioco} without foundation.

Hes. "ABeo'fios
"ABeo'fios
dBea-fuos,

ffXdPrj, ((p' fjv vofios

Secund. p. 639,
oBefits,

oiKia.

8iKr], avojios.

unlawful..

Classical.

Sihyll.

1,

169

adv. unlawfully, lawlessly, wickedly.

aBefiiaraTOS, superlative.
.ade/xKTTia, as,
rj,

Sibyll. 2, 283, et alibi.

Hes. 'ABeo-fias, wapaSchol. Arist.

(adefucrros) laiolessness, wicked28.

vopMs.

Nicet. Paphl. 569 B.

App. I, 626, Eus. in, 468 B.


ness.

Bardesan. apud

Nub. 1371.
ddeTea,
rjo-a>,

{aBeros}

to

put away,

to set aside.

dBefUToyafieai,

ij(7<,

{aBijUTOs, yajiea) to contract

Hence,
null
3, 8,

to reject, to refuse, to set at

naught,

to

an unlawful marriage. Bardesan. apud Eus. in, 468 A. Just. Imp. Novell. 9.
aBefUToyafiia, as,
ij,

disregard, to violate, to transgress, to render

and

void, to bring to nothing.

Sept.

Reg.
thee.

unlawful marriage.
to

Just.

50 Ta dBeTqjiaTa
1, 2, 7, 2,

airaiv, a rjBeTrjtrdv aoi,

Imp. Novell.
uBefUTovpyea,

9.

wherein they have transgressed against

do unlawful deeds, toactunlaivfally. Epiph. 1, 1069 'B. PseudoChrys. 11, 287 A.


jjo-to,

(EPrO)

Par.

els

to dvdBepa, in the thing ac14, dBerripjiTa,


to

cursed.

36,

transgress.

Judith 16,5 Kvpios vavTOKpaTap


Toiis iv X"p'' BrjXeias,

rjBeTri<rev

av-

a6ejUTOvpyr)Tos,

ov,

(^ajBefuTovpyeai)

wicked.

frustrated their designs.


Xaaiv,

Meet. Byz. 721 C.


aBijUTmifryia, as,
f),

Ps.

32,

10 'ABerel he \oyitTp.ovs
the devices

he
ef-

the

Eus. YI,

en

B.

doing of unlawful deeds. Epiph. II, 185 B.


living by injustice.

maketh
fect.

of

the people

of no

Sap.

5, 1

Tail'

dBerovvTav rois ttovovs

'aBeiUTO(j>a.yqs, ov,

((payelv^

avTov, despising, treating with contempt,

mak-

Ptol. Tetrab.

159.

Sdeos, ov, atheistic,

gods.

Substantively,
clvai.

denying the existence of the atheist, applied by the


Just. A-pol.

ing light of his sufferings. Esai. 24, 1 7, tov vofiov. 31, 2 'O Xdyos avTov ov firj dBerrjBfi,
his

pagans to the early Christians.


1,

26.

words will not be taken back. Ezech. Mace. 2, 13, 25, rof biaa-raka-eis,

22,
to

Kal

ofjioXoyoviMev tS>v Toiovrtov vofj,L^ofie-

break, to

make
58, 5,
11,

null.

2,

14,

28

aKvpa.
^i
2,

vav BfStv aBeoL


A'/3c Toiis

dBiovs.

Martyr. Polyc. 1036 C Athenag. Legat. 4. Clem.

Polyb.
rfjv

2,

mariv,

x^P''" *"' <^'^''"'' 29, 3, tovs opKovs.

5,

12,

14,

A. n, 404 A.
^Beonjs,
r/Tos,
rj,

lamhl. Myst. 179, 12.


atheism.

'ABereiv Tols virb


elprjfievois.

Tifialov

Kara

Arfpo^d-

Philon

I,

360, 14.

povs

16, 12, 11

To

6'

vnepaipov

Plut. II, 757 n, 164, 31. 216, 35, et alibi, B. Just. Apol. 1, 4. Tatian. 22. Athenag. Legat. 4. Theophil. IIU A. Clem. A. 1,89 B. Dion C. 67, 14, 2, applied to Christianity.

dBeTeicBco.

27, r5, 2 'Etti


rjBerrja'Bai

Ta rds
{mo

eirupavetrTa-

ras avTov ripus


nowrjo-co, to

tS>v iv IlfXo-

inayyeXiav.

have been refused. 30, 3, 7, ttjv Diod. II, 562, 67, ttjv Trio'riv.
ivroXrjV tov Beov.

Jul.

805 D.

Marc.

7, 9, ttjv

Luc. 10, 16.

Digitized

by Microsoft


88
adiyrjii

ddeTTjfia
7,

30

TrjV /SouX^K roO 6eov rjdeTr)(rav fls iav-

Tovs.

Paul. Cor.

1, 1,

19 Tf/v trvvicnv t5>v

(tv-

unfavorable, inconr HOeros, ov, unfit, improper, Polyb. 17, 9, venient ; opposed to evderos.

viTQiv aBfrrjcra,

where the Septuagint (Esai.


it is

29, 14),

from which
21.

taken, has Kpi-^ai.


Epict.
Just.
2,

Gal.

2,

3, 15, SiaBfiKriv.

12, 11, 16,


9,

Diod. 11, 15 Toj/ irepl rov 'la-dp^v rimov 10. dmcpatvero rravreXais aderov eirea-dai Trpos rf/v Diosc. 1, 151 'JEtti piv twv wvvavjiaxiav.
pea-a-ovraiv ia-rlv adfros.
jravri.
2, 1,

to reject.

Pint. II, 662 E.


3, 2.

Tryph.
of

159,

ra vevpaSei
^^^<-

Seov.

TheopUl.

Sext. 247, 16.

299,

123, jrpos larpiKr)V

XRW'"-

TCLs ala-Sria-eis, to reject the testimony

the

230, 25.
ddecoprja-ia, as,
fj,

senses. 741, 8 'Aflenjo-awcs brj koI to Kara rovs XaXSalovs apoa-Komov, having refuted. 2. To deal deceitfully, or treacherously,

(dBeaprjros)
37.

want of observa-

tion.

Diod.

1,

dBeaprjTos, ov, not having examined, not being

with any one, to act perfidiously towards any Sept. Ex. 21, 8 'B-derria-ev iv aurfj. one. Deut. 21, 14 OvK adeTTjO-eis avrrjv. Judic. 9, 23
'HdcTrja-av av8pS SiKifiaiv iv

versed in.
ddeaptjTov.

Tov iv Plut. U, 405 Athenag. Leg. 13, nvos.

Xo'yots

ddeaypfirms, adv. without examination.

Plut.

I,

ra

o'lKa 'K^ijie-

71 E.
'AdrjXd,
as,
ij

\eX Tou anayayiiv rfjv abmlav, K. t. X. rs. 14, 4 'O 6fivvQ>v TO) irXrialov avrov Kat ovk aoercov,
does not forswear himself.
Jer.

*fpo-e(^dw;.

Athenag. Leg.

20.
adrjXos,

Esai.
3,

33,

aderav ip-as ovk aSfTct Marc. 6, 26 Am rovs SpKovs Koi tovs ir cfie.

20 'Kdirrja-^v

with ov, 6riXriv pfj exav, eunuch; reference to his being an imperfect woman.
Cyrill.

A. X, 1109 B.

3.
4,
8,

(rvvavaKipiPovs ovk TjOeXrja-ev avTrjv d6eTrj<TaL.

ddrjXvvros, ov, (OrfXvva)

To

revolt, rebel against.

Sept. Reg.

1,

13, 3.

3, 12,

19 'WdeTTjO-ev

'la-paffK cis

tov

61-

Kov AaviS.

4, 1, 1 'H^eTTjo-e

Mma^
under

iv 'Icrpa^X.

20 'Hderria-ev 'ESap. vTroKarcodev x^'P*

'loiSa,

Edom

revolted from

the

hand of

having no female comAnon. Iren. 457 A. 3. Unwomaned, mascuClem. A. 11, 321 B. line. Ptol. Tetrab. 69. Hippol. Haer. 270, oBrjXvs, o, =. ddrjXvvros. 45.-2. Unwomanly. Plut. II, 285 C, et
panion.

Nicom. Valent. 1281 A.

53.

Juilnh.
a-vpiav.

4, 18, 7 ''HOeTrjaev iv

ra

^acrikei *Ao-

Esai.

1,

2 AvtoI 8e p ideTq<Tav.

alibi.

ddrivatia

'ABrjvaUs dpi.

Pseudo-Js. 1484

4. To

reject as spurious, said

of books, pas-

C.
'A&fjvais, for 'ABijvaios, 6,

Dion. H. V, 647, 17. sages, or words. Clem. A. /ren. 1203 C. iuc/ra. n, 117. I, 989 Oi CLTTO rSav alpia-ecov dOcToijcn ras

Athenaeus, a proper

name.
d6r)viaa>

Inscr. 265. 267. 272.


'Adrjv&v

imSvpa.

Lucian. HI, 180.

Trpos Tipodeov

imcTToXds.
Orig.

Diog.
I,

7,

34 Tav 64 A.
faith,

aBrjpa, as,
:

rf,

=^

dddpa, gruel, porridge (Ameri-

aderovpevtov avTov.

57 A.

Dion. Alex. 1241 B.


aBirripa,

aros,

t6,

(dSereto)

breach
50.

of

treachery.

Sept.

Reg.

3, S,

Par.

2, 36, 14.

Jer. 1
II,

2, 1

Ot dderovvTes dderfipara.
Tclii' etff
r),

Dion. H.

708, 11
as,

TOVS deoits ddeTTjpdTcav.


ddeTrjtTis.

dderria-ta,

=z:

Pseudo-GVejr.

can) bread-pudding, or boiled bread. Diosc. 2, 114 'A6j}pa Se ix t^s aX-qXcap^vris els XcEpiph. 11, 801 C. TrTov fas a-Kevd^Tai. Cassian. I, 1010 Pubnentum lenticulae, quod illi atheram nominant. ApopTi. 81 B. Sophrns. 3604 'Adrjpav 8e Trpoa'ayopevavo'iv TOV aprov rov iv rats x^'^P^'-^ pera Treyj^tv hjro-

Naz.

II,

728 B.
fj,

pevov.

Schol. Arist. Plut. 673.


{dripdto)

dSeTTja-ts,

a>s,

{dQcTeai) rejection, disannull-

dBfjpaTos, ov,
1,

not caught.

0pp. Cyn.
1, 4.

ing, annulling, violation.


rqa-is ista

Cic. Att. 6, 9 'A^e-

514

dBrjprfTos, Ionic.

Ael. H. A.

nuhi tua, non ivoxri, videbatur. Paul. Hebr. 7, 18. 9, 26, dpaprias. Sext. Orig. I, 520 B Eif ddeTrimv twv 318, 15. dpapnaiv 'irjirovs m(^avija>Tai. 2. Rejection of a spurious passage or work. Apollon.

3,

2. Not to be caught. Hence, unattainable. Philon n, 307, 16. dBrjpia, as, fj, {adrjpos) want of game. Ael. H. A. 8, 1. 2. The not hunting or being hunt-

ed.

Ibid.

7, 2.

14, 1.
(^otyciv)

D. Synt.

5, 8.

163, 5.

Diog.

66 '0/3eXoj
Basil.
I,

(Xap^dverai) Trpos

ttjv ddeTTj(nv.

89

dB^po^ayos, ov, (aBrfpa, Sophrns. 3604 D.


'A^iyyai/ot,

eating

djBr)pa.

A.
dderriTeov

=^
ov,

Sel ddfTelv.

Polyb.

3, 29, 2.

Ptol.

coj/, oi, Athingani, z^ MeXxwreSextTai. Tim. Presb. 335. But Theoph. 759, 8. 771

Tetrab. 128.
d6enfn)s,
6,

Orig. Ill,

873 B.
violator,

et Genes. 31, 4 et Theoph. Cont. 42, 52,


breaker.

=:

{dderia)
vd/iou.

HavXiKiavoi.
d6iyr)s, is, (Biyyavat)

Method. 353 B,
949

Nicet. Paphl. 548 C.

untouched, with respect to

dSfTiKwy (a^ETor), adv. irrelevantly.

Did. A.

carnal opxXia.

Tais aXXaty rais

(j>epofievais iv

rm

irtpi

1097 C.
447,
1.

2.

Athan. H, That cannot be touched. Sext.


Anthol. TV, 271.

TOV dylov TTvevparos \6y(a dOeTiKa)s


Kprivfiv
rrjv

fls

to apt-

448, 5.

dirupopiyiBrj

kcu

vewnjv avrov

touched.

450, 2.-3. Not having Porphyr. apud Eus. HI, 341 B,

^vaiv KixpV"^'""

nvos.

Digitized

by Microsoft

adiym<i
d6iyS>s,

89
Athan. H,
Sibyll.

a6vpo(jTOfJt,ia

adv. without carnal SfuKla.


(affKevai)

A.

Ill,

865 B. 1548
ov,

C Ta m\vdpi6pa
Basil.

dBpoi-

1128 A.
affKevfUi, aros, to,

(Tpara, Lva drrXovfrrepov ovopdtroi, enKXrjo'iaiv.

^=

&0\os.

dBpoia-pMTiKds,

i],

gregarious.

I,

172

10, 90.

B.
to

aSKia,

ijo-o),

contend.

Epict.

3, 22,

57

'Yvro

dBpoitTfios,

ov,

6,

Tov Alos d0koinvos koI yv/iva^oiievos, trained.


Sibyll. 2,
viicqs

kind of amplification.
dBpoia-TiKos,
fj,

L. congeries, in rhetoric, a Longin. 23, 1.


Apollon. D. Synt.
nouns, nouns of
122, 13.
collective

42 'Em

adavaroicriv aeffkois aSkr](Ti

ov, collective.

jrepiKoKKeos.

Martyr. Polyc. 1044 A,

42,

24, ovofiara,

of Christian martyrs.
aSh)(Tis, eats,
J],

multitude, as
497, 4,

8rjp.os, ifK-qOvs.

Conj.

(aSkia) contest, combat, athletic

a-vvbecTjioi,

collective conjunctions, in

sports.
letes.

Polyh. 5, 64, 6. 7, 10, 2. 4, of athDiod. 15, 16, tSk epymv, practising.

such examples as Ka\ iya koI tKelvos Kal 6


pa(TiKfiis.

16,

17,

ray

iroKefUKoiv

epycou,

cultivation.
1,

aBpovos, ov, (Bpovos) without a seat, that

is,

an

Strab. e, 1, 12, p. 417, 13.

aUbi.
struggle.

Sext. 684, 2.

Tropically,

Plut.

8 C, et
conflict,

episcopal see.

Greg. Naz. IH, 425 A. 1146


(aBpoos,

A.
dBpooTTotria, as,
(^drinking').
t],

Paul. Hebr. 10, 32, TTadrifiaraiv. Athan. 11, 860 T^s affKfjaews 'AvtcovIov, his contest with the flesh and the devil. Basil, m, 237 A, with reference to martyrdom.

ttiVib)

copious draught
I,

Herod, apud Orib.

424,

1.

dBpooTTjs, rjTos, ^, (dBpoos') wholeness, entireness,


totality.

Alex. Aphr. 'Prohl.'ib, 35.

Apollon.

aSkqreov,

=z

Set d6\eiv.

Erotian. 70 'Atnajreov,
do'icrjTas ol

d6Xi]Teoi'

TQvs yap d8\r]Tas

'Arrt-

Diog. 10, 106. aBpviTTos, ov, {Bpvirra) not crumbled. Tropically, not enervated or enfeebled. Pythag.
Orib. II, 65, 11.

apud

KOi KoXovfrtv.
dSkrjTTis, oO, 6, athlete,

applied to Christian sufto

Carmin. 35. Nicom. Harm. 7. Plut. I, 53 A. n, 1055 A. 38 ViaBapa. Km SBpynra

ferers.
dSkririKos,

Clem. R.
i],

1, 5.

KoXaKcla.

6v,

belonging

an

athlete.

Sophrns.

dBpxmTios, adv. not weakly or feebly.

Plut.

I,

3685 A, hpop^s, tropically.


dBKrp-pia,
as,
fj,

175 E.
Aetius apud
dBpv^la,
as,
rj,

female

athlete.

the

being aBpvwTOs.

Plut. II,

Epiph. n, 536 A, with reference to Christian sufferers.


dSKr]^6pos, 6,

609 C.
d6vp.ia, as,
rj,

= =

d6\ocj)6pos.

Pseud-^tAan. IV, 1173 B. Did. A. 777 A.


Galen. XIII,

despondency, etc.
7rai/Ti 8'

Dion.
e'lre

II. II,

1214, 8 'Ev

dBvfiias iyeveo'Be,
TJpIv,

ein

pj]

aSKi^os, ov, (Ski^to) not pressed.

(TVvapoLpeBa rav
reff

dyavav

opyfj ecjiev-

746 A.
affkiiTTOs,

ov,

affkL^os.

Galen. IV, 668 C.


tropically.

as tovs 7ro\ep.iovs of the greatest fear.


6,

Tpeyj/oip.eBa, in

state

Vni, 290 F.
d8\L7rrats,

dim. 801 D,

dBvp,

athyr, the

adv. without being pressed.


(dSkoBiTrjs) to propose

Simplic.

Plut. II, 356

Ench. 168 (104 C).


aSKoBeTea,
to
Tj(ra>,

'ABvpi

name of an Egyptian month. D. 866 D. 378 E.


Plut. 31 i B.

'lo-iy.

a prize

dBvpibtoTos, ov, (Bvpis) window-less.

Chrys. X,

reward.

Polyclit.

apud Athen.

12, 54,

nvi

92 A.

Pallad. Laus. 1059 C.

iff\os, ov, 6, labor.

Pseudo-/os. Mace. 17, p. 519. Diod. 4, 11 UpStrov eXafiev iSKov dnoKTeluai tov iv tiefiia Xtovra, the first
labor of Hercules.

aBvpp,a, aros, to,

a Jester.

Jos.

Ant. 12,
rjcrco,

4, 9.

Philostr. 490.

dBvpoyXao'crca), or dBvpoyXcoTTfCo,

(dBvpo-

yXaa-aos)

to talk flippantly.

Epiph. H, 109
(dBvpo-

aW\.o(j)opi,Kds,

Tj,

6v,

of an

d6\o(j)6pos.

Nicet.

B.

Isid.

1016 B.
rj,

Paphl. 324 A.
adoXos, ov,
61.

dBvpoyXaxTtrla or dBvpoyXioTTia, as,


clear, pure.

(BoKos)

Lucian.

11,

yXcocra-os) flippancy.

aBopos, ov, (^ffopos)

n, 237 C.
dvoxevTos.
Liber. 22, 26,

Cyrill.

Polyb.S,12,l. A. I, 760 D.

Athen.
II,

171

A.
dBvpoyXaxTcajs or dBvpoyXwrras, adv. flippantly.

Xlpwpos.
SBpeTTTos, ov, (Tpe<j)a))

unfed ;
to

stinted.

Plut.

II,

Epiph.
II,

I,

348 A. 600 B.

499 D.
dBpoia-ip.os,

SBvpos, (6vpa) doorless.


ov,

pertaining

aBpourcs.

Greg.

603 C.

Tropically.
^(jo),

Nicol.

D. 150.
I,

Plut.

Philon

558, 35

Naz.

II,

561

C Hv
1.

8e ^fiepa

Koi dBpola-ifios, V.

ddpoia-fios,

Tav 'E7TL(jiavt<ov on which the

'A/cXeio-Ta pkv iira,

298, cTTopM.

aBvpov Si yXarrav. Polem. Clem. A. I, 384 B. Theod. IV,

people assembled at church.


adpouTis, e(OE,
jj,

1308 A.
dBvpoaTop.(o,
20, 9.
d6vpO(TTop,ia,
as,
ij,

collection.

Dion. Thr. 642, 10,

:^ dBvpoaropos

elp.1.

Genes.

impprjiiara, collective adverbs, as apSrjv, a/ia,


r]Ki6a.

{dBvpooTopxis)

^=

dBvpo-

oBpourpjo,

oTos, TO,

church.

assembly of Christians, a Clem. A. II, 444 B. Orig. I, 1005


12

yXoMTtrla.
Cyrill.

Plut.

H, 11 C.

Nil.

217 D.

A. X, 293 B.

Digitized

by Microsoft

advpoaTofiayf
aBvpotrrofuos, adv. ^=. a6vpoy\o>(rcra>s.

90
Anast.
vowel-sound.
(j)a>s

AI
Sext.

625,

17

Km

avaajpd-

Sin. 41 'D.

ea-eaBai

nvd

4>a<nv ewoi

rav

(fiiKoa-ocfKov

advTos, ov, to

whom no

sacrifice has been offered ?

Dion. H. in, 1556, 10.


aBaos,
ov, clear,

nXflova aroix^la Bidcpopov exovra bivapiv rav to AI, Koi to a-vvrjBas irapaMopevav, olov Koi

OKO

Tivos.

2.

free from.
Guiltless,

Sept.

Gen.

24, 41,

OY

KOL Tvdv o TfjS opotas ea-Ti (pvcreats

innocent.

Num.

'Ettei

ovv 6 TOV AI

Km EI

(fiBoyyos &Tr\ois ecrTi

32, 22, "'Ea-ea'de


'l<Tpar]K.

ddaoi evavri Kvpiov Ka\ otto Deut. 27, 25 nard^ai Trjv ^XV"
to

Kol povoeiSfis, ea-TOi Koi Tavra crToix^la.

626,

7,

"Gore

(TTOiX'^lov ea-Toi

t6 AI.

dlfiaTos

ddmov,

slay

an innocent
ra
opKto

person.

Josu.

aov rovra, we are blameless of this thine oath. Reg. 2, 3, 28 'Adaos elju iyw Koi rj fiaa-CKeia pov dm Kvplov Koi e(t)S alavos aTTO rmv alpdrtov A^ev2,

17 'AScdoi

e(rp.ev

From the commencement of the fifth century downward, AI was not distinguished Thus, in pronunciation fi-om the vowel E.
enaia-ev

was pronounced

like

eirea-ev,

mis
;

vrjp

viov Nijp, guiltless before the


the blood.
3, 2,

Lord forever
Ps. 14,
Kaphia.
in
rf;

ova-a like ireeroCcra, Kvai(TTa>p like KveiTTiop the infinitive bopevai rhymed with hopive.
Isid.
^01.

from
5.

5 Alpji dSaov.
i^"'-

729

C
Tris

El' 6e tls to eirea-ev eirdra^cv enXd-

23, 4

'Adaos X^P""'
Matt. 27,

i"iSapos

....

25, 6 Nii/^o/iat iv ajBaoLS rds ;^eipaff p-ov,

ypa(f)opevr]s, K. t. \.

Sevrepas (TuXXa/S^s 6ta Bi(f)66yyov Palladas 31 Ovk cWXoj,


xa>

innocence.

4.

24 'ABaos

elpi diro

hopive, ov

yap

Sopevm.

Theon. Prog.

Tov cuparos rev hiKatov tovtov.


dBaorrjs, rjTos, ^, (dBmos) innocence.
25, 6 'Ev dBmorrjTi,

187, 7 'Ev piv ydp iari to

v(^' ev koi dSiaipe-

Aquil. Ps.

Tov, avKrjTpls eaTOi neu'ovo'a Brjpoo'la, erepov 8e

where the Septuagint has

TO Bcrjprjpevov, avXrjTpls irais ovcra earco drjpo<rta.

eV dBaocs.

Lyd. 140

ZriTrjOrm

ddaooi, aa-ai, (dB^os) to hold guiltless, to absolve,

vopL^co TL piv itTTi


O'

Be d^wKoyov eifoi KvaiuTOip. Tt Be Kvai-

forgive, acquit.
6

Sept. 3,

2, 9,

dvrov.

Sap.

1,

IT cop' Kol tL pev

crrjpaivei

8m

Tjjs

Bi^Boyyov
to'lvvv

OvK

ddao3(rrj ^\da<l>r]pov

dno x^iKeav avTov,

ypa(j>6pevov. tl Be

-yjnXTJs.

Kvaio-roip

will not

acquit a blasphemer of his words.


16, 11.

^r)Tr)Trjs

dm

tov

quaerere,

oXov epevvdv.

Sir. 11, 10.

Jer. 15, 15 'ABmcoitov pe

....
Xe^is,

"Ore Be

dm
ABas,

tS>v KaTaSLcoKovriov pe,

revenge

me of my

dWd

pfj 8i,(j)6oyyos ev irpooipiois ^ ^iXfi ypd^erai, ovBerepov pev tq}v

persecutors.
<o,

elpripevcDv

aTjpaLvei,

tov

Be

pep^lpoipov

6,

Athos.

Genes. 82, 11, anchorets

^\da(j}rjpov Bid rrjs ypacprjs emBei^ei, Sri

mi que-

there.
dBmaxris,
ecos,
);,

L. acceptilatio, quittance, ac-

quittance.
AI,

Basilic. 26, 6, 1 seq.

a diphthong, represented in Latin by AE. [The following facts show that the I was originally audible, (a) In verbs beginning with AI the augment affects only the first vowel as aLTia> ^irqaa, alviaaopai r]ivi^dpT]i>. (to) Contractions like Kaym for koi iyd>, koito for KoX LTa, imply that both the vowels were pronounced, (c) Plato (Cratyl. 421 D) derives SUaLOv from Biaiov (Sieijai) by inserting K between AI and A for the sake of euphony, (d) DionysiusofHalicarnassus(V, 167,6-10), in speaking of the hiatus in koi 'ABrjvaicav, remarks that lA do not coalesce which implies that the I in Kal was not a silent
; ;

ror, pep<f>opai. Here the word ypdcpeTai has reference to the orthography of xuaiAs to ^jriXi], it o-T<op and Kveo-Tcop. seems to agree witli o-uXXajSiJ understood. (See E.) The orthographical rules of Choeroboscus and of Theognostus render it clear that the uneducated were apt to write AI for E, and E for AI. Choerobosc. p. 177 Aiyeipos,
Bia

BitpBoyyov Ta Bvo.
Bi(j)Boyyov.

NAI

BicjiBoyyov.

1 78 'A i/ a i 5 ^ y to 179 Aia-xos, Bid tt/s AI Theognost. Can. A, 'H E mik,

\aj3rj ev dirXfi Ka\ dKtv^rco

Xe^ei Trpo BittXov ovk

dvexeTai

rrjv

Bid ttjs

AI Bi<p66yyov ypa^tjv
^ea-rjpeiaTai to ai'^a
Tfjs AI BtCan. H, "H AI Bi<p6oy-

olov e|a), dXe^io


eirippripa

Km

to ai^rjos ovopa Bid

^Biyyov ypat^opevov.
yos ev apxfl Xe'^eo)? e'X" ro aiSo) prjpa
.

letter,

(e)

'AXkuukov with II with one I. (f)

Plirynichus says (p. 39) that is preferable to 'AXKa'iKov

(nraviajs
.
.

evpio'KeTm,

a)S

Ta

S aXKa

Bid toC

The Latin name

C'aeso

\jftXov,

was written also Kaeso. was used chiefly before A

the Latin the orthography Kaeso, therefore, shows that the first element of AE (corresponding to the Greek
;

Now

In the lexicon of Suidas, words beginning with AI are put between A and E, because, when this author
etrBla, k. t. X.

eBa TO

lived, there tion,

was no difference, in pronunciabetween AI and E.

had the sound of A. Terent. ilf. 799 Saepe Kaesones notabant hac vetusti litAI)
tera.

The early Boeotians represented this diphthong also by AE. Inscr. 159 AecxpdivBas, AeyiT .... nXavxae IlXavxai (the origi-

In the time of Sextus, AI represented a simple sound peculiar to itself ; that is, it -was a monophthong resembling no other

nal dative of nXavxas). The Boeotians of the Alexandrian period changed AI into H in writing as well as in pronunciation; as

Digitized

by Microsoft

ai,

91

atSeofiai
Strat.

tvepyiTifs, KeKOfium], ajToypaX^ea-Br), Tavayprjos,

'FeKanrj

=
;

aly\o<^avi]s, cs, (aiyX?;, (jtalvio) effulgent.


5.

FeXariat (the original dative of


all

FeXdna)

occurring in the Boeotic instep

alyo^drqs,

ov,

6,

(ai|,

fiaivco)

-^

alyifidrrjs.

scriptions.

The next

was

to shorten

Mel. 49.
alyodopos, ov, (Sopd) of goat's skin.
5,

into

its

corresponding vowel E.
(caXeiTE,
leve.

Hence
''H<|)e-

0pp. Hal.
29.

the barbarous orthography, Inscr. 628


OTOS.

356.

1051

ocrreL fivpies ai^ovficvov.


Kc,

'ApiarevcTOS.

1066 So^cs &' iv lOSl KfKpvTrrc. 2693 3902, n, 6eive, i'a-Te. 3987

alyofibris, is,

(EIAQ)
fj,

goat-like.

Eudoc. M.
to the

alyodripiKos,

ov, ifirip^

pertaining
14, 16.

huntgoat's

ing of goats.
horn,

Ael.

N. A.

Ke alavTois.

4556 Tvx^av. In the following epigram of Callimachus,


:

alyoKfpas, aros, to, (jtipas)

aegoceras,

TrfKis.

Plin. 24, 120.

Galen. U,

?;( corresponds to vaixi (Epig. 29)


(TV

Avtravirj,

81 E.
alyoRep'iTT)S,

oKKa Trptv elireiv Tovto aa^&s, 'H^o) <^)a-t Tty, "aXXos x"- This is assonance (not rhyme, strictly so called) Part of the for AI is long, and E is sJiort. difficulty, however, is removed, if we suppose that J;he Macedonians of Alexandria pronounced vaixi and e^ei after the manner of the Boeotians, vfj-xi and ?x' ] Nil. 557 A Ai fie /iri anoppi^ai ai, dh ! woe !
8e valxi' Kol^os koKos
;

Sibyll. 5,

ov, 6, (aiyd/cepcar) of Capricorn. 207 Tpo^os a^ovos alyoKeplrqs.

alyoKeptas, ayros, 6,
2,

124.

Galen.

^= alyoKepas, XHI, 335 B.

TijXcs.

Diosc.

alyofieXrjs, es, (/ieXos) goat-limbed.

Orph.

Hymn.

11 (10),
93, 8.

5.

alyovofios, ov, (yeiioi)


I,

feeding goats. Dion. H. Leonid. Alex. 12 d alyovo/ios, goata species of


Anthol. TV,
Philostrg.

herd.
alyoTrlBrjKos, ov, (in'ft;Kos) goat-ape,

TO <j)opTiov
,
.

TTJs

dfiaprias 8ia Trjs p,eravoias


fir)

Ai

/le

Tas KriXLSas

aircmkivairBai.

ape.

Philostrg.
ov,
6,

496 C.

'Aia, see

'la^L
ov,
6.
ij,

alyoiroSris,
6,
i),

:=

alyiiroSrjs.

aiyaypos,

(ai^,
8.

aypios)

wild
1,

goat.
71.

205.
alyoa-Kekfis, es, (o-kcXos) goat-legged.

Tryph.
oiyra, as,
18, 6.

Bdbr. 102,

0pp. Cyn.

alyeia, goat's shin.

Jos. Ant. 1^

496 D.
alyoTpix^'",
rjo-a,

aiyeiof, a, ov, goat's.

2.

(jSpi^)

to

have goat's hair.

Substantively,
Sept.

ij

tu-

Strab. 17, 2, 3.
alyo<l>dyos, ov, ((jjayctv) goat-eating,

ycia, sc. 6pi^, goat's hair.

Num.

31,

an epithet
Plin.

20.
aiyeipivos, ov,

of

Hera

at Sparta.

Pans.

3, 15, 9.

of aiyeipoi.
ov,

Alex. Trail. 373.

aly6<l>dakp.os, ov,

(^6(l>6aKp.6s')

goat-eyed.

alyfipo<p6pos,

(<pipa>)

producing

aiyeipoi.

Max.

Tyr. 118, 38.


6, {alyeipos)

alyap&v, wvos,

black-poplar grove.

Strab. 16, 4, 14, p. 325, 18.


aiyeXdiT/j, ov, 6, {cu^, iKavvco) goatherd.
I,

Plut.

a precious stone. alyvnTid^a, to be like an Egyptian. A nasi. Sin. 2. To speak Egyp)tian. 257 C, Tov vovv. On^. I, 1508 A. iurian. in, 57. PhiAlyvm-uiKos, r), 6v, {Alyvimos) Egyptian.
37, 72

aegophthalmus,

621 A.
ov,

Philipp.

7,

2 (Anthol. II).

lon
shore.

I,

310, 6 TO AlyvirrtaKov

^=

oi

AlyvTmoi.

aiyiaKfios,

(alyioKds)

of or on
the shore.
1,
7,

the

Jos. Apion. 1, 14

TO AiyuTTTia/cd, history oj
Alyvirrla,

Athen. apud Orib.


alyuiKins, cSos,
f\,

Ill, 185, 1.

of or on

Archias
p. 284, 9,

Egypt, by Manetho. Alyvwnds, dhos, rj, =z


Sibyll. 5, 507, y9j.

fj

Egyptian.

117 (Anthol. II). Strab. 4, Philon n, 141, 6. ^(f>os.


(uyiBrikas, a, 6,

Alyvirnaa-ri,

adv. in

the

Egyptian language.
Porph. Cer.

alyodrjXrjt.

Ael.

N. A.

3,

Jos. Apion. 1, 14, p. 445.

39.

AlyimnKos,
Kvrjp.ij')

ov,

z=

AlyvTrriaKos.

alyiKvafws, ov, (at^,

goat-shanked.

Agath.

473, 11.

Epigr. 37,
alyiK6v,

1.

ov, to,

(ai|)

= aypoMms.

AlyvTmoi,
Diosc. 4,

30.
alyCKttmiK6s,
r),

Aegyptii, a name given to the of Thebdosius and Jacobus the Monophysites. Damasc. I, 741 A.
cov, ol,

followers

6v,

of alyiKay\jr.

Paul. Aeg. 138.

AlyvTrrias, adv. in
30, 1.

Egyptian

style.

Dion

C. 48,

oLyCKinnov, ov, to, small alyi\(o\jf,

aegilopium.
in the cor-

Diosc.

2,

118.

alyawxov,

oiyiXai^, amos, 6,

ner of the
alyivrj, r)s,

aegilops, fistula Cels. Med. 7, 7. eye.

Diosc.

1,

155, et alibi.
Jj,

(ai|)

Diosc. 3, 148 (158). 2. Active alheopm, to reverence, to respect. oLhea, to cause to respect, to inspire respect.
\i66<Tneppa, a plant.

ov, t&,

(a% Sw^) aegonychos,

iTepuO\.vp,fvov.

Diosc. i,
goat-

Basil. HI,

572 C Ilparov
Ulysses

p,kv

alhiaai

ttjv /3o-

14.

o-iKiSa ot\>6ivTa,
caios, 6,

when he was

seen .by

Alymav,

(al^,

Hdv)
5, 1.

Aegipan,

Nausica.

footed Pan.
cdyiTis, i8oj,
fj,

Plut. 11, 991 A. Plin. Diosc. 2, 209. dvayoKXis.

Can. H.

Greg. Naz. IV, 103 A. TheognosL Justinian. Cod. 1, 12, 3, Prooem.

timeo.

Digitized

by Microsoft

atSec70fio<!

92
venerable.
9.

AiXia

alheaifxas,

ov,
6,

{dibeais)

revered,

Paus.

3, 5,

nvL
I,

m,
375

35.

Orig.

Anton. 1021 A.
'

2.
I,

1,

Lucian.
Revered,
Jul.

aWepep^aria,, r,<Ta,, {aW^p, ip^area,) to walk in Anthol. IV, 232. ether. Just. Cohort. 36 aWepoeiSi}!. aWepiaSrjs, er,

respected, as

title

regularly in the superOrig.


rfj

'Ev

ra aWepimSei mpiTTa
,

trTOtxe'?-

lative albea-ifiaTaTos.

88 A.

aWeplas (aWeptos) adv.


33, 7.

ethereally.

Iambi. Myst.

'lovkiavos
I,

Qeohapq
373
Ill,

alBe(n.fio>Ta.Tri.

Atlian.

348 A.
Nyss.

'A6avaa-ia

t&

alSe-

aWepofiaTiuj,

ijcro),

;=

aWepep^aTea.

Philon

I,

cniiaraTa ema-KOTra.

Basil. IV, 321 B.

408

465, 11, et alibi.


Nil. 437 B.
aWepoeiSfis,
II,
e's,

Pseudo-iucMn. HI,

614.

B.

-Greg.

1000

Tov mSco-i/im^TJ~

TaTov 'EXXdSwv.

Attal. 7 (titul.) AlSeai/xa-

(aWrjp',

EIAO)

ether-like.

Plut.

TOTOv KpLTOv eVt TOv LTnTobpo^ov Kai rov


\ov.
alSea-TiKos,
i),

430 E.

Alex. Aphr. Probl. 23, 23.


rjira),

alBepoXoyeo),
6v,

(alSepoKoyos) to talk of ether


regions).

modest, respectful.

Clim. 1180

(the

etherial

Fsend-Anaximen.

Pseud-^i7iO. IV, 952 C. Clim. 345 C. albea-TiKms, adv. respectfully.

A.

apud Diog.

2, 5.

aldepoKoyos, ov, (aWrip, \eya>) talking of ether.

albea-Tos,

r),

6v,

(atSeo/iai)

revered,

venerable.

VsenA-Anaximen. apud Diog.


to Thales.
aldep6(f)opos,
ov,

2,

4,

applied

Plui.
at5e&>,

II,

67 B.

796 A.

see aldeofiai.

aiSrjs

or alSts, the Latin

aedes, aedis

Sofios, c'Sof.

Lyd. 147, 15 ras mSrjs

=
roiis

(aldtjp,

(ptpo))

borne by ether.
642, 36.

Eus. VI, 125 A.


aldepaSris, es,

aWepoeiSris.

Philon
7,

I,

vaovs.
diStos, ov, eternal, everlasting.
""

Plut. n, 432 F.
Sept. Sap.
7,

Diog.

152.

Orig. IV,

26

Airavyaajia yap
14.

ecrrt

(sapientia)
a'iSi'ou,

(fyoyros didiov.

433 B. aWiom^a,
guage.
4,

Iambi. Myst. 132, 11.


i(rai,

{Aldio\jf) to use the

Ethiopic lanDiosc.

Plut. n, 1013

E
4,

'E|
21.

/ro?7i

eternity.

Heliod. 411, 33.


fj,

Anton.

2,

.Srai.

204, 21

To

aibiov dyevvrjTov KadeaToys ovK el^cv dpx^v.

he

aWwTTLs, iSos,

aethiopis,
f],

a plant.

103 (105).
r/s,

2. Perpetual.

Dion. H.

II,

646, 14, (pvyds,

AidLoma-a-a,

(AWioijr) Ethiopian

woman.

perpetual exile (compare


d'iSicos,

dcicfivyta).

Sept.

Num.
d(T(x>,

12, 1 Trjs yvvaiKos ttjs Al6iom<T-

adv. eternally, everlastingly.

952 A. 41 A.
aldouKos,
r],

Iambi.

Mathem.

189.

Athenag. Athan. U,

<rr}S, Tjv

eXajSe Mwiio"^?.
to be

aldpid^ui,

in the open air.

Greg. Xaz.

620 C.
ov,

of

the alhola.

alSoiov, ov, TO,


II,

pudendum.

Classical.

Paul. Aeg. 244. Galen.


Iambi. V. P.

*dl6pios, a, ov, in the


tively, TO dlBpiov,

open
L.

air.

2.

Substan-

atrium,

area, court

370 E, TO yvvaLKelov.
fj,

in the centre of

a house.
206 A.
47,
1.

Callixen.
Sept. Ezech.

apud
9, 3.

alSais, ois,

respect, modesty, etc.

Athen.
10, 4.
3, 8,

5, 39, p.

ovopA^nv HvOayopav, the disciples of Pythagoras did not mention him by name out of respect they only said Hierocl. Carm. Aur. 55, 12 'H avTos, ipse.
fiev noiov/icvwu
;

314 AiSeS

40,
6, TTJs

19.

Jos. Ant.

3,

6,

2.

a-Krjvfjs.

Lucian.

II,

884, r^s

avXrjs.

aWpo^drris, ov,

6, (^aWrjp,

/SaiVm) one that walks

iavTov

al8a>s, self-respect.

through ether, an epithet of Abaris.

Porphyr.

aleTOS, see deros.


AirjTivri,
tjs,
rj,

V. Pyth.
daughter

60.

Iambi. V. P. 286.
to,
7.

of

Aiijnjs,

Medea.
Sept.

diBvypa,

aros,

(aWvcrcra))
20, 5,

spark;' vestige.
irpo-

Dion. P. 490.
alBoKr),
rjs, rj,

Polyb. 4, 35,

4 AlOiypaTa r^s
667, 21.

(a'ldaXos)

^=

Te(j)pa, ashes.

yoviKTjs 86^rjs.

Dion Chrys.

Plut.

of the furnace. Lucian. I, 241. Galen. VHI, 294 A. XIU, 263 B. Phryn. 114 AMoXos Xeyerai, Kai dpaeviKws, oKka pfj 2. synonyme oi aripa^. aWakri BrjKvKas.
9, 8,

Ex.

Kapivaia,

ashes

n, 966 B.
hints ?

Iambi. Adhort. 100.

Math. 212,
Sept.

Diosc.

1,

84,

Xi^avaiTov.

oikdp, D7lX, the porch of Solomon's temple.

fj,

Reg.

3, 6, 7
1.

(Symm.

npoTniKov).

alKapiv, v.

iKappcip., plural.

43 toIs Ezech. 8, 16
3, 7,

Diosc.

1, 79, p.

83.

aWoKoKopirla, as,
696.

(aWdKrj,

ko/xttos)

yjfo-

\oKopma, (leydKobo^ia.
aWaKoco,
1,
ma-co, to

Schol.

Arist.

Eq.

(Theodtn. ov\dp, Aquil. Trpoards). 40, 9. 16 alXapwd (Symm. n-cpi.a-rda-ea-t), plural. 40, 29 TO alXappwv, V. 1. alKapp,a>B, plural.
aiXfC, dS'N.
AiXi'a

burn

to soot

or ashes.

Diosc.

96 Etoff &.V aWaXaajjs Xtyvuv aiirapKij. 5, 170 (171) "Ot 8e V o-ToSos aWdXaefi, jJtoi
ear,
r/,

depatbrjs p.aK\ov yevrjrai ttjv ^poav'.


alddkcoa-is,

Ezech. 40, 21. 37. or simply AtXi'a, Aelia 17, Capitolina, or Aelia, a name given to Jerusalem by Publius Aelius Hadrianus. The first word has reference to the emperor's
Sept.

KamTcoXiva,

as,

to aiddKovv, the act of

aWdka.

Tyr. 163, 11, 'Ek ^avvov aidaXmo-Eis, a rising of thick smoke.

Max.

nomen ; the second, to Jupiter Capitolinus. Dion C. 69, 12, 1. Nic. I, Can. 7. Chrys.
I,

645 D.

Philostrg.

549 B.

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AiXiew
AlKieis, 0)1,
fj,

93
is,

aiflOTTTVlKOi
f),

salem.

Cyrill.

a native of Aelia, that ^. X, 96 C.


Sept.

Jeru-

alfiaria, as,

= piXas ^apos
ov,

of the Spartans.
Diosc.

Poll. 6, 57.

AlKicmos, see 'EXmaior.

aipariKos,

rj,

bloody.

Classical.

3,

*mim,

Gen. 9, 4 Kpeas iv aijian ^x^s ov <^ayc<T6c. Lev. 17, 11 'H yap ^^xh 'rdoT/ff trapKus aipxL avrov iari.. Dent.
aros, blood.

127 (137) BoX^oy 6 aipariKos, haematicon,


zrz ^pcpoKaXXis.
aipdrcov, ov, ro,
little

alpa.

Diosc. lobol. 17.


5, 4.

avTov '^xhaifiArav, a bloody man.


12, 13 A(/ia
Tos.

^^sg- 2, 16, 7 'Avrjp

Epict.

1, 9,

33.
rj,

Anton.

Luc. Act. 15, 20


Just.

aiparls, IBos,

suffusion of blood in the eye.

'Aarexco'dm ano .... rod ttvcktov Koi toC aliiaJos.

Leo Med. 139.


Alparlrai, &v,
heretics.
oi, (aiparirrjs^ Haematitae, certain Clem. A. n, 553 A.

Ant.

3,

11,

2.

Tryph. 20

Kpcas iv

aifjuin i^p^^s, oTTtp (7Ti venpificuov.

(Compare Plat. Phaedo 96 B Jlorepov to aipA i<mv a (j>povovp.ev ; Sext. 355, 10 To yap iv alpan Ket(T6ai ttiv im6aTa<Tiv Trjs ijnj)(rjs ovk
ivapyes.}

aip.arirr)s, ov, 6, blood-like.

Diosc.

5,

143 (144),

Xi'dos,

haematites,
r),

blood-stone.
I,

Hermes
(Jiold-

Tr. Latrom. 390, 5.


aiparobeKTLKOs,
ov,

Clem. A.

140 B.
754.

(Sixopai) receiving

2. Blood-guiltiness.
(jyeuyetv,

Dem. 548

'E<^'

murder.

Sept. Judic.

9, 24.

alp^n Reg. 2,

ing) blood.

Schol. Arist.

Thesm.
116.
to

aiparocLdrjS, is, (_alpa,


17, 41.

EIAQ)
5,

blood-like.

Diod.

1,

16 To alpa. o-ov im,

rrjv Ke<^aKr]v (tov,

you

17, 90.
Tjtra),

Diosc.

own death. Ezech. To alpa avTov eVt rrjs KetpaX^s avrov earm. Matt. 27, 25 To atp.a avrov i(j) fjpas Kal eVi ra rixva rjpav. 3. Person slain or about to be slain. Sept. Deut. 27, 25. Reg.
are the cause of your
33, 4

alparoTToiiai,

(ai^aroTTotdj)

make or

change

into blood.

Alex. Trail. 432.


17,

aiparoiroirjo-is,

eas,

ro

alparoTroif'tv.

Protosp. Urin. 265,


aiparonoios, ov, (ttoico))

1.

making

blood.

Hermes
Porphyr.

1,

19, 5.

1,

25, 26, ddaov, in all the passages.

Susan. 62, avalriov.


ses.
ai/zart, Kat

Matt. 27,

4.

4. Men peova-a ra oafiari

Tr. latrom. 388,


aipaTOTToa-ia,
as,
I,
fj,

6.

=^

alpoTroo-ia.
1.

Sept. Lev. 15, 19 Tvvr) ijns hv

apud

Stob.

438, 25, as v.

eorat

rj

pCtrts aiirij^ iv

alparoTtoriai,

r)a'a>,

(alparoTrmrrjs} to drink blood.

avrrjs.

Moschn. 13 'YTrepnepirrevov ro alpa


to irapa naBaipcrat.

Schol. Arist.

Eq. 198.

rov iraparos els ravro ddpoi^frai Kal jrporpeirirai, koi

alparoppoia, rjcm,

aipoppoeco.

Hermes

Tr.

latrom. 394, 12.


alparovpySs,
ov,

5. TTie
26, 28.

sacramental mine, which repre-

(EPrQ)
Ill,

sents mystically the blood of Christ.

Matt.

Porphyr. apud Eus.


50, ^e'Xoj.

causing 204 D.

bloodshed.

Marc.

14,'

24.

I^uc. 22, 20.

Paul.

alparoipvpTos, ov, (<pipa>) blood-stained.

Mel.
Tatian.

Cor.
66.

1, 10, 16.

1, 11, 25.

Just. Apol. 1, 65.

Iren. 5, 2, 3 Hrtp eK rov norrjpiov avrov,

aiparoxva-ia, as,
23. 16.

rj,

irzz

aiparcKxvo'ia.

o eart ro aipa avrov, rpt<pTai, Kal iK rod apTov,


<rri

Joann. Mosch. 3005 C.


acrco,

Theoph. 510,
into blood.

ro O'ap.a avrov, av^erai.

liippol.
ra'is

628 B.
atparos

Petr. Alex. 480


rrf

"Ev re

irpo-

aiparoa,

to

make or change

aevxats Kal

peraXrixj^ei

rov craparos Kal toC

Abuc. 1553 B.
alprjTTorrjs,

Toil

Xpia-rov.
11,

Greg. Naz.
grape, wine.
14.

Juice' oi the Sept. Gen.- 49, 11. Deut. 32,

217 A.

6.

Athan.

I,

268

C.

ov,

6,

alpoTTorrjs.

Apollon. D.

Adv. 602,
aipo^oros,

25.
(iSdo-Kco)

ov,

feeding

on

blood.

Sh-. 39, 26, a-ra(pvXfjs.

Mace.
1,

1, 6,

34,

Porphyr. V. Plotin.
alp^diyjfos,
Ill,
ov,
(8i'i//-a)

77, 4, |3ios.

aracjjvXrjs Kal p.6pa>v.

Just. Apol.

32, rrj!

blood-thirsty.

Lucian.
II,

dpiriXov.
aipaypos, ov, 6, (alpda-(rai)
Ptol. Tetrab. 181.

670.

a shedding of blood.
Diosc.

aipoeihrjs, is,

=
Ill,
fj,

alparoeibrjs.

Philon

244,

19.

Philon Carp. 120 B.


fj,

aipayayos,
3,

ov, (3ya))

drawing off blood.

alpoXdirris, ihos,

(alpa,

Xdnra) blood-sucker.
Gregent. 584 A.

127 (137) IlfO'O'ds iirriv vbpayayos Kal alpayayos. Ruf apud Orib. 11, 214, 6. 2. Substantively, Tramvta. Diosc. 3, 147

Greg. Naz.
aipopi^la, as,

655 A, fibiXXa.
Phot. IH, 281 A.

(pl^is) incest.

Jejun. 1921 D.
alpoTTocrta, as,
fj,

(157).

(alpoTTorrjs^
I,

a drinking of blood.
Apollon.

alpoKamis,
Diosc.
2,

l8os,

fj,

(atpdXa)\jf)

clot

of

blood.

Porphyr. apud Stob.

438, 25.

95

AipaXai'Trls Kal oiovcl (rap^ eilSpv-

aipoTrorrjs, ov, 6, (ttIvoi) blood-drinker.

TTTos V rots oa-riois evplo'Kerai.

alparcia, as,

fj,

(alpa)

D. Adv. 602,
?

25.

Sibijll. 8,

94.

aiparta

Erotian.

aipoTTTOiKos, incorrect for alponrviKos.

206 Ewot 8e
dtpareKxvo'la, as,

rrjV irap

rjplv

KaXovfuvriv alpa-

alpoTTTviKos,
1,

fj,

6v, (nriia) spitting blood.

Diosc.
Ptol.

Tflav KapvKrjv &vopacrav ovk 6p6S>s.


17,

27. 82.

Ruf. apud Orib. U, 206,

4.

{iKxi<o) a shedding

Paul. Hebr.

9, 22.

Epiph.

I,

of blood, 676 A.

Tetrarb. 152. 199.

Galen. VIII, 539 D.


alibi.

540 B.

Xm,

546 A, et

Antyll.

apud

Digitized

by Microsoft

aifioppoew
Orib.

94
Geopon. 150 htjxaTos
PartidisTreiov,

aopea-io/Ma'Xp'}
Sext. 310, 9, Aitroi-

n, 186,

4.

Alex. Trail. 248.


2,

aivtyfia, arcs, to, riddle.

12, 28, 1.

(Compare Diosc.

Esopic fable.

alviyp,aTias, ov, 6,
nijioppoeai, to

have a bloody flux.

2.
Matt.

alviyp.an(m]S.

Diod.
1.

5,

31.
alviyiuiTiC<->

ciple,

ij

aifioppova-a, the

woman who was


9,

^=

alvia-a-opM.

Genes. 22,

eased with an issue of blood.


Iren.

20.

alviypMTKTTTjS, ov, 6, t
i s t

(alviyp-aTlito)

aenigmaOng.
II,

472 A.

Orig. Ill,

VI, 541 C.
alfioppoos,

Athan.

II,

460 D. 884 B. Eus. 925 C. Caesarius 893.

one who propounds


Sept.

riddles, or speaks

in riddles.

Num.

21, 27.

Soz. 1 280 B.
ov,

sufferiny

(See also BepovUrj.) from hemorrhage.

668 B.
a'Lvi^is,

eas,

rj,

{alvi(T<rofW.i)
7.

2. Substantively, ij aip.6ppovs =^ fj aljxopCaesarius SSi. Philostrg. o37 poova-ayvvT]. ApopUh. 165 A. Epiph. Mon. 269 A. C.
alfj.o(TTapis,

Plotin.
aivoTTOLCio

n, 1380,
(alvos,

a hinting, allusion. Epiph. I, 845 B.

Troiea)

eiicprjiica,

Aguil.

incorrect for alp^trraa-is.


rj,

Ps. 31, 11 (Sept. Kavxda-de). 2. In the ritual, alvos, ov, 6, L. laus, praise.

aip.6cTTaa-is, ems,

2.

or hemorrhage.

a stopping of blood Galen. XIII, 546 C, a recipe.


(Ja-TTj/j.!,)

Haemostasis
17,

vrjpiov,

a plant.

Diosc. 4, 82.
aifioa-TaTiKos,
6v,

good for slopping or stanchafraid of blood (bleedfollowing.

ing blood.

Alex. Trail. 296.

Laudes, the Lauds, forming the conIts distinctive clusion of matins (Spdpos). portions are the last three psalms, and the [Tlie Stud. 1717 C. Gloria in excelsis. name alvoi was suggested by the verb alvevrf, laudate, which occurs many times in the last
ol alvoi,

alp.o(f>6l3os, av, ((^o/3eofiai)

two psalms.]
a'l^,

ing).

Galen. X, 210 E.

aifi.o(p6pos, ov, {(^epai)

Eust. Ant.

7,

alyos,

fj,

she goat.

2.
to

p,eydKa Kvp.aTa, high waves.

In the plural, alyes Artem. 154.

629 A.
alp6(pvpTos, ov, (at)ua, (j>vpb>) blood-stained, coh-

aioXi'fo), la-to,

(aIoXls)

use the Aeolic dialect.

Strab.
AloXiKos,
7.

8, 1, 2, p.
rj,

95, 11.

ered with blood.

Polyb. 15, 14,

2.

Posidon.
835, 4.

6v,

Aeolic.
7,

Drac. 167,

4.

Heph.

apud Athen.
thirsty.

4, 38.

Dion. H.

II,

aip.oxapris, ei, (xaipai) delighting in blood, blood-

perpov or eiros, Aeolic verse, a series of dactyles with a disyllabic


8.

11,

Sibyll. 3, 36.
17,

aip.oxvo'ia, as,

basis.

aipxiToxva-ia.

Theoph. 510,
Plut. II, 16

AioXikSs, adv.
dialect.

171

Aeolic Greek, in the Aeolic


Plut. 11, 1132 D, mood, in music.

16 as

V.

1.
ij,

Sext. 616, 27.


v6pj)s,

aip,vXia, as,

(ai^iJXor)

wiline'ss.

Aldkios, ov, Aeolian.


the Aeolic or Aeolic

B.
aifia>&T)s, (S,

ai^oeiS^s, aijiaTOiihr)s.

Lucian.

AloXls, iSos,

r\,

the Aeolic dialect.

Strab. 8,

1, 2.

m,

456.

Pseudo-(?aZen. X, 648 E.
be set on
edge,

Caesa-

Sext. 428, 22.

Iambi. V. P. 474.

rius 888.
aip.<t>Sidw,

spoken of the teeth. Sept. Jer. 38, 29 Oi oSovres t&v Ezech. 18, 3 Tov (j)aTCKvaiv fifuobiatrav. yovTos Tov op^aKa ai^biafTOV(Tiv ol obovres
d<ra>,

to

AioXwrri (aioX/fm), adv. in the Aeolic dialect. Strab. 8, 1, 2, p. 95, 9, buiKeyeaBai, to use the

Aeolic dialect.
mjroXocds,
27.
rj,

ov,

pertaining

to

an alnoKos.

Met
C.

avTov.
alpMiros,
21.
aiv,
r],

alpdpws,
ov, ^=z alfiaTOTros.
7.

a, ov,

the Latin aerarius.

Philon

II,

585,

Frag. 57,
tively,

71, substantively.

2.

Dion

SubstanTafuelov.

Sext. 12,

TO

alpdpwv
rjira, to

z=:' 6rj(Tavp6s,

yy, the name of the Hebrew letter y. Eus. Ill, 789 Sept. Thren. 1, 16, et alibi. A.
i],

Inscr.

4033 "Eirapxov alpaplov tov Kpovov.


be a aipemapxyis.
Basil.
I,

aipetnapx^fo,

449 A.
aipea-MpxTjS,

Greg. Naz. HI, 1352 A.


ov,
6,

a'lvfo-is, eats,

(alviei) praise.

Sept, Lev.

7, 2.

(alpea-ts,

apxa>)

leader or

Par.

1, 16, 35.

Esdr.

2, 10, 11.

alvereov,
alvfTos,

^=

Sci alvfiv.

Orig. U, 1684 A.

17,

ov, (alveco) to be

praised, praheioorthy.

Sept. Lev. 19, 24 'O xapiros airoC &yios alve-

founder of a sect. 5ex^ 179, 6, Zeno. Inscr. 6607. 2. Haeresiarcha, he'resiarch. Tertull. II, 548 A. Hippol. Haer. 80, 6. Eus. n, 168 C. Epiph. I, 317 C. H, 804

Tos
lon
aiVeo),

Tm
I,'

Kvpico.

Reg.

2,

14, 25, et alibi.

Phi-

B.
aipetriapxos, ov, 6,

348, 4.
praise.
Sept. Par.
2, 7,

to

3 "Hlvovv

^rz aipecridpxrjs.

Leant.

I,

1232 D.
aipe<riofj.ax^<^, rjtrta,

Kvpla, OTL dyaSos,


avToij.

on

els

tov alciva ro eXeos


(jiwVTJ fi-

(alpetrtopdxos')

to fight

for

Luc. 19, 37 Alveiv t6v 6e6v


4, 31, nvi.

or defend a

sect.

Did. A. 865 A.

yoKj] irepi Traa-av Stv elbov bvvdp.etov.

Theodtn.

aipea-iopMXOs, ov, 6, (aipecris, /idxofuu) fighting

Dan.
Alvrjis,

i'Sor,

^,

Aeneis, of Virgil.

Lyd. 126,

15.

for or defending a sect, partisan. Philon II, 2. Heretic. 84, 31. Did. A. 741 C. 897 A.

Digitized

by Microsoft


aipe<rt<;

95
1, 6,

aurOavofiai
TtfravTo

mpeiTiS! (01,

T],

choice.

Polyb. 36.

kokuiv,

ev

Tois

ivroXals

avrov,

consented,
a-rjpepov

choice
life.

2.

of

evil.

Philostr. 254,

/Si'oi;,

choice of

obeyed.

1, 9,

30 2c oiv ^peTia-dp-eda
i]p,iv

Sect, school of philosophy,

medi-

ToO eivai avT avrov


12, 18.
r),

els

ap^ovra.

Matt.

cine, literature, or religion.

Polyb.
2, 29.

5, 93, 8,

of the Peripatetics.
4,

Diod.

Cleomed.

alperiKos,

15 'AptOTOTeXijy 8e /cm

oi otto

t^j aipcaeais.
8,
6,

eivdpwTros.

Nicol.
2t(b1'k^.

D. 164 (19). I>ion. H. V, 134,3 "Hy 'l(roKpdTovs Koi rav


186, 10.
733,
2.

ineivif

yvwpifiav atpems.

5^raJ.

factious. Paul. Tit. 3, 10, 2. Haereticus, heretical. Clem. A. I, 813 A, pd7ma-p.a. Orig. I, 89 D, U, 285 D, a-vvaymyri. voTifiara. Athan. I, 225 D, 'Apeiavoi. 257 B, "Apetos. 3. Sub-

ov,

17,3,22, Philon II, 475, 40, of the TheraKvprivaXKri. ic. Act. 5, 17, tSv SaSSouKaimv. peutae. 24, 5, tSv Naf<apai<ov, 15, 5, rSw tpapuraicov. of the Christians. 28, 22 T^s alpea-eas raithe Christian sect. /os. Ant. 13, 5, Tt]s, B. J. 2, 8, 1 ^Hv Sc oStos 9, Jewish sects. (Judas Galilaeus) (ro(f)icrTrjs ISlas aipi<T(a>s. Epict. 2, 19, 20. Plut. I, 520 A. II, 673 C. Just. Tryph. 17. 108, the Christians. Heges. 1321 B. Theophil. 2, 4 OJ t^s aipia-ews avTov. Galen. I, 37 A, ^ 'Apto-xoTeXouf. 47 F 02 Se.rt. 6, 13 Ei ^e'v tis aldjro rav aip(Tea>v.
13, 4, 3, 'ATToXXoStipetoj.
petriv

14,6,3.

stantively, 6 aiperiKos,
tic,

haereticus, a
CTem.

here-

/ren. 776 A.

852 B.

.4. I,

B. Hippol. Haer. 2, 17. Porphyr. Vit. Plot. 66, 1.

Terlull. II, 18

Athan.
Diog.

I,

812 A. 236 A.

Adam. 1884 A. aiperiKas, adv. from


2. Heretically.
aiperis, iSos,
fi,

choice.
II,

7,

126.

Athan.

216 C.
Sept.

{alpea) one that chooses.

Sap.

8, 4,

nvos.
6, (alperl^ai)

alpena-pos, ov,

heresy.

Epiph.

II,

432 A.
aiperuTTqs,
ov,
6, 6,

{a.ipeTl^a>)

Polyb. 22,

11, nvos.

2.

one who chooses.


Partisan, an Polyb.
1,

Xeyet

TrpofT/cXtO'ti'

Soyfiaai ttoWols aKOk. t. X.

adherent to a party or faction.


79, 9.
2,

\ov6iav fxovcri npos oXXijXa te,


Tats Kara (f>iKo(ro(piav alpetreo'i.

41, 7

38,

55, 5 Tmi' Ka-

3.

Member
II,

ra

larpiKrjV aipecreaiv.

262,

2.

361, 7 Oi otto
1,

Clem. A.

Diod. 18, 75. Jos. B. J. 2, 8, 2. of a sect. 400 B. lamhl. Adhort. 354.


7.

2,

55, 8.

T^s 'ETTtKoupou aipeaecDs.


4, 53.

Diog.

20

Athen.
11, 18.

4. Founder of a

sect.

Diog.

7,

161.

aiperas (aiperos), adv. by arbitration.

Eudoc.

3.

Party, faction
Pe^r.
Tgnat. 649 B.

Paul. Cor.

4. Haeresis, 680 A. Just. Apol. Theophil. 1, 26. Tryph. 35. Heges. 1317 C. Ser-op. 1373 C. Clem. A. I, 812 C 2, 14. Tas aipea-eis .... awrat St fJcrii' at nji' c'^ apX^s dnoXeiwovcrm cKKKrjtrlav. 989 A Oi cmo tS)v alpea-eav, the heretics. Tertull. II, 16 B. 18 A. Clementin. 381 D. Hippol. Haer. 440, 13, et alibi. Orig. I, 357 B. 800 C. 933 B. 1029 C. IV, 92 C. Alex. A. 576 D. Eus. n, 169 A. Basil.-IY, 665 A. Proc.
Gal. 5, 20.
2, 2, 1.

1,

M.

22.

alpea, to take, etc.

Eus.

II,

J473 A.

Kara

Merest/.

rov alpovvra xp'<''"awcr/i^ Xdyoj/, according to Christian principles. [Polyb. 15, 22, 4

i^eXoipevos.
eXelo'dai.

aiprjcm.

Diod. 18, 62, p. 304, 2 napKicol. D. 81 Dion. H. I, 305, 6 aiprjcrai. II, 785,
II,

533, 38 etXavro.

15

hi-eXelrai.

Plut. II,

560

dv-mprjcrrj.
I,

Sext. 577, 21

eXeirm.

Clem. A.

221

eTXrjrm

=;

ijpijTai.]

aipivos, ov, (alpa)


2,

aerinus, of darnel.

Diosc.

137, aXevpov, darnel-meal,

Archigen. apud

ni,

73,

18 HpitTTiavav 86^ai
Trdu-Tj rfj

d7r6j3\7jroi TroXXat

Orib.

n, 270,

12.

^ eicrtv

ev

PafMilav apxv^ dcnrep aipeaeis


{alpea-is)

aipa, dpS), to raiie, hoist.


paias.

KaKfiv vevop.iKao'tu.
aipeaiaTrjs, ov, 6,
sect

one belonging
alpenKns.

to

Sext. 5, 1.

2. To deny 3. To
put
4.

Diod. 13, 12, rds Ke;

opposed to

riBrjpi.

take away, to do away,


Sept. Esai. 5 7, 1
1, 5, 2.

of philosophy.

p.

335.

2.

Porphyr. Abstin.

Heretic

4, 11,

to destroy, to

to death.

Just.

Tryph. 80. Eus. II, 525 B. 712 A. ^(Aare. H, 821 B.


alpen^o),
love.
5, 8,
Icrio,

1548 D.

VI,

(aiperos) to choose, to prefer, to

Sept.

Gen. 30, 20. Num.


1.

14, 8.

Judic.

Dion. H. Luc. 23, 18. Act. 21, 36 Afpe avrov, away with him ! 22, 22 A'pe oTro rrjs yfjs rbv rowvrov, away with such a fellow from Martyr. Polyc. .Toann. 19, 15. the earth!
a'lpeaBai, to perish.

Mace.

n, 641,

in the v.

Par.

1,

28, 4 'Ev 'lovSa ripi-

1036
ists

Aipe

roils dSeovs,
!

away

with the athe-

TiKf TO ^atriXeiov.
fivai
1,

1, 28,

6 'HipenKa iv avra
to

(Christians)

Apophih. 97
pov
ij

pm)

viou,

I have chosen him

he

my

son.

avrrjv, inei aiperai

KecjjaXri,

C Mi) erxi-T my head will


1.
1'4 rjpocrav

29, 1

vlos fiov els ov ^pcTKrev iv

avra
10
1,

be taken
i^-dprj
ripav.l

off.

\_Nicochar.

apud Athen.

Kvpios.

2, 29,

11 'Ev vp'iv TjpenKf Kvpws arri-

short A.

Sept. Josu. 3,

62

val ivavriov

avrov XeiTovpyelv.
sc. trviviropevfirdw..

Esdr.

1, 8,

aipen^ovras,
oovXeveiv.
6o(j)
rj

Judith 11,

Ps. 24, 13 J^opoOeTrj{rL avroo iv


131, 14 ''HLpeTLtraTO avrrjv

rjpeTLfraTO.

[Orig. I, 540 B. alaOdvopm, to perceive. 1529 C alirBriBrjvai. II, 325 B al(r6av6r)<reTai. Vit. Nil. Jun. Munich. 1433 B alaBridrjvm.

(Is

KaroiKiav iavrm.

Maec.

1,

2,

19 'Htpf-

145 A.

olaBrjvBevres.^

Digitized

by Microsoft

96
ala-6rjTiKa>s,

ai/rew

adv. perceptibly to the senses.


13, 14.

HerSex;.

mes Tr. Poem.


267, 12.
ata-driTos,
17,

Epict.

1,

14, 7.

Pallad. aia-xponpayla, as, 17, disgraceful act. Nil. 112 C. Laus. 1251 C, otmpveia.
ala-xpoTvpaypoa-vvr),
rjs, fi,

(as if

from

aicrxpoirpd-

dy, sensible.
ai(r6r]TSii.

Sext. 756, 22 Trnv Trpoy

ypcov)

=:

ala-xponpayia.

Phot. HI, 124 B.

njv opaaiv

ala-xpopprip.ovai, rjo-w, {ai(TXpoppT)P^v)

alcrxpo-

aia-BriTas, adv. sensibly, perceptibly to

the senses.
iiMS.

Xoyeai.

Patriarch. 1077 C.

Eus.

Ill,

285

PAzYon
aio-doixm
III,

I,

312, 39.

Plut. II, 953 C.

D.
alo-xpopprjpoa-uvri,
rjS,
r),

alcrddvoiMii.

Oenom. apud
I,

al(rxpo\oyia.
1,

449 C. 1409 D.

Clem. A.

1121 C.

Oriff. I,

Porphyr. Aneb. 30, 16. Abstin. V, 160 D. Athan. I, 760 C.


ala-xpopprjp-av, ov, (p^pa)
8,

34.

Eus.
Poll.

alaLoofiai (a'icnos), to take or

omen.

Plut. II,

774 B, to

regard as a good 775 B x'^'P'""-

aicrxpoi^oryos.

80.
d,

Ala-tovfievov
T7;v.

(eum)

npoo-ayopiixraL NiKoerTpo-

alcrxpos,

ov,

ugly.

-4^)7J. I,

669, 65 Eis ro 'AXf^ayfipou Tray-

Aia-xiO-Tov d(j)dfivai.

Tropically,
alaxpd

Dion. H. IV, 2341,

disgraceful.
rjv.

boKeiov KaTe\v(Tv alatovfievos (ipa epBa irep ^AXe^avdpos aveiravfTaTo kcu MiQptbdrqv crraBpevo'ai.

Polyb. 35,

4, 6 5,

"As Kal Xeyeiv pkv alaxpov


12 Alaxpov itrn koI
r],

Paul. Eph.
20, 3.

Xe-yeu/.

ala-xpoTokpia, as,

=zl

ToKprj.

Genes.

dLtnros, see aettrtrof.


atcrxi]P-oa-ivq,
rjs,
ij,

{ala-xw""'}

shamefulness.

al(Txpovpyia>, alcrxpovpyos, see alcrxpoepyeco, al-

Clem. A.
al<Txiu>s,

I,

adv.
foc,

453 B.
ala-xtov.

o-xpoepyos.

Bust. Ant. 644 A.


Just.

atcrxivj],

r/s, fj,

shame.

Sept.

ala-xos,

to,

disgrace.

Apol.

1,

25

TTpoiprjTais rrjs ala-xvvqs, the

Eeg. 3, 18, 25 Toif infamous prophets


5e/)i.N"ahum

"Oa-a 'dwpa^av .ala-xos Ka\ Xeyetv (^Paul.


0,

Eph.

12 Ta yap
KCLL

Kpv<^fi

yivofieva vtt

avrStv al-

2. A euphemism
3, 5.

of Baal.

Prov. 9,13 Ovk

iirliTTaTai alaxvvrfv.

for ai8oio!'.

(Txpov e(TTi

Xeyeti^).

Esai. 47, 3.

Ezech.

22, 10.

Agathar.

altrxprjpaiv, ov, (al(rxpds)

shameful, base. AntTiol.

126, 16, Tov (ToapaTos. 162, 86.


alcrxvvrjs.

Hippol. Haer. 12, 81.

IV, 206, ev&eia.


ala-xpo^ios, ov, (/3iof) living shamefully or dis-

Athan. 11, 1252 Epiph. 421 D.


II,

To pe\os

rijs

gracefully.

Sibyll.

3,

189,

cpiKoxpil'^oa-vvr],

alaxvvopv<os (^alcrxvvopat), adv. decently, modestly.

fiWnj.

Dion. H.
as,
r),

1421, 11.
bashfulness,

al<Txpoyevrjs, es, (ylyvopai) low-born.

Cyrill.

A.

ala-xvvrriXla,

(^ala-xvvrrjXos^

X, 1036 D.
m(rxpopyeco,
jjcro),

modesty.
(aL(rxpoepy6$)
to

Plut. II, 66 C.

disgraceful or flthy act.

Clem. A.

commit a I, 649 A.
170,
5.

alax^vo), WO), to shame.

Mid.

alax^vopai., to be

or feel ashamed.
drjO'eTat aTTo

Sept. Sir. 21, 22 Alcrxvvsc. ttjs

Contracted
Diog.
1, 5.

alcrxpovpyeo).
77, 16, 2.

Sext.

Trpoadmov,

oiKias, before

Dion C.

Schol. Arist.

the house.

41, 17 Ala-xivca-de anb irarpos Ka\

Vesp. 1275 T(5 crropan aldxpovpyovvra, committing dpprjTOTroua. alaxpoepyia, as, fj, disgraceful act. Jejun. 1904
B.
ala-xpoepyos,

prjTpos "Kepi TTopvelas, to connnit Tvopvela before

father and mother.


rai

Esai.

1,

29 Ala-x^vdfia-ov-

dno rav eiSwXeov


Ki)?fois,

avrayv,

....
28

Kal rjfTXvv-

dr/aav eVi Tols

they will be
1, 2,

ashamed of

Txpos,

EPrQ)
II,

contracted aiaxpovpyos, ov, (atcommitting a disgraceful act.

their idols.

Joaiin. Epist.
avToi) iv
ttj

M^

ala-xwto

6apev
be

diT

napovcrla avroii, not

Philon

268, 37.

Dion
123.

C. 79,

3, 3.

alcrxpo'koyos, ov, (Xe'ym) talking indecently, foul-

mouthed.
C.

Poll.

6,

Damage.

11,

424
Poll.

ashamed before him. 2. To diihonor Dion C. 77, 16, 1. Frag. 87, 3 a female. Upos eva pev Tiva iTrirea r]0-xvv6r], committed
poix^la.
\^Drac.
7 7,

12,

15

yax^^a,

perfect.

ala-xpo\6ya>s, adv. by talking indecently.


8,

Dion

C.

16, 1 ^(TxvyKei, pluperfect, im-

81.
ly,

alo-xpoTvdBeia, as,

(aia-xpowa6ris)

plying (TxvyKa.^
to aicrxp^s
*Ala-a>Tr(ios,
ov,

(Aio-coTror)

Esopic.

Arislot.
Quintil.

wdaxeiv.
aWxpoTTadrjs,

Nil. 281 B.
is,

=
01,

Rhet.
Philon
310,
9,

2,

20, 3, Xoyoi,

Esopic fables.
11,
^iCflot.

aicrxp<i's nda-xtov.

5, 11, 20.

Hermog. Prog.
demand,

Sext.

n, 268,

38.
(aia-;(po7roiof)

aiviypa.
beg, request.

AlaxpoTroLoi, mv,

a religious

aiTe'o), Tjo-a), to

Sept. Tobit

sect of India, notorious for its


rites.

Epiph.

II,

797 C.

abominable [Compare the VdIndia.

19 Ilap' avTov a'trrjcrov owas .... ysviovTai. Diod. II, 619, 55 'HtTrja-avTO 8e trapa
4,

mis, or Fdma'c/faVi's of
tic

modern
to

Asia-

ratv

'EXKrjvajv

x^-P*-^

ottois

tovs

BovXcvovras

Researches, Vol. XVII, 224 seq.]


ijo-o),

....

diroa-TeiKaaiv.

al<Txpoirpayett>,

(7rpd(r(T(o}

commit a dk-

graceful act.
Xeia.

Pallad. Laus. 1076 D, of uot-

Aayov aneiirBai, to Paul. Col. 1, 9 AiTovpevoi Iva TrXtjpmd^e eTTiyvaia-iv toC BsKripaTos avToi. Jos. Ant.

Dion. H. II, 964, 3 ask permission to speak.


Trjv

14,

Digitized

by Microsoft

aiTTjfia
10,

97

curccofia

TTOictv.

17 TouTO re alrrjaafiivoK Iva i^ji avTois Just. Ti-yph. 30 AiToC/iev avrbv ol

alrMnnas, adv. causatively. A.


alnokoyea,
cause
;

Pseudo-Dion. 956

TOVTiO'TlU OTTO

tnoTevovTes fls avTov Iva an6 tS>v aWorptcov, T&V TTOVTJpaV KOi TrXuVtOV WUevfifias-

^o-6), (alria,

Xeyto) to inquire into the

to

give a reason.

Strab.

7, 3, 9, p.

25,

.fidrav iTvvT7ipfi(rii

Dion C.

69, 16, 3

20 AmoXoyfT &i6n rals diairais .... evreXels


'ivTes

Ou TTpoariKci vp.lv oiSte nap' ipov aixeiK iva Apocr. Act. oKKoTpiov hovKov iXfvdfpaxra. Pet. et Paul. 83 Aira oSv iva avv ipol Cartk. fuplha e^axnv Iv Ty ^airCKeia. <tov. Can. 91, p. 1322 B Pdrovp^ev en p.rjv "iva ... Antec. 2, 3, 1 HtT) (rfj imoypa^ dyiaxrvvr).
.

evvopovvTai, states

it

as ike cause.

7,

7,

8, p. .67,

8 Alno\oyovvTes ap,a oti .... ^pS>v-

Tai.

Plut. n, 689 B.
r]7rai8evTrf(ras,

Apollon. D. Conj. 501,


baprjcTTj

18 "Ori
Galen.
pevov.

Kai

rjv 'iroKtv

TO TOiovTov eK TOV (rvvSecTfiov ifTioXoyrjpevov.


II,

365 F.

Sext. 40,

18, to

fjjrou-

Ti\(Ta (re Iva

e^

poi

imnOevai.
oi

Mai.
iva

Diog. 10, 82.


alTioXoyovvTas
XpiiTTov
for

Orig.
tt/v

I,

1052

'lou-

264,

15 "HiTTicrav

8e avTov

TToXiTat

Saiovs

kot-

avTovs pe\-

iroirja-r].

Xovaav
to beg,

embrjpiav.

[Artem.

307

assume without Epict. 1, 7, 22 AtT^o-ai nva vnodeaiv proof. Sext. 698, aairep iwi^dBpav t^ e^s \6yto.
2. To postulate,
to

aiTtoKoyripevaiV

rjTioXoyrjpevov.']

atTtoXoyrjTeov =rr bet aiTioXoyetv.


VTTep TIVOS.

Diog. 10, 80,


allegation

31 'AXX'
aiiTo.
TTjS

fl

p.ev

oKriSes

ian, pr)Be alToip,eda

alnoKoyla,

as,

rj,

aetiologia,
Strab.

of
7.

697, 15 To i^ vnoOiireuii alre'urBai ras


aros, to, petition, request, the

cause or reason.

1, 3, 4.

17, 3, 10.

yeaperpias dp)(di.

Philon
thing asked
17.
6.

I,

570, 24.

Apollon. D. Conj. 498,

<iiTi)/xa,

Sext. 40, 10.


alTioXoytKos,
7],

for.

Sept.

Keg.

1, 1,

3, 3,

5 AUrrjO-ai
II,

ov, causal.

Strab. 2, 3, 8, p. 155,

airrjpa (reavra.
2.

Ps. 19,

Dion. H.
4, 6.
alTrjTiKos.

1201,

Luc. 23, 24.


r),

Paul. Phil.

alrrjpaTiKos,

6v,

(avn^pa)

Artem.

318 (19
aiTTjiTK,

aiTT/TiKos).

^iTTj/i(M-o>87;9, es, like

a postulate. Plut. 11, 694 F. Eus. II, 825 C Tr/v opoiav airqaiv itepunrovbdaTas irpos pe neTTOLrjKaaLV, drjXovoTL iva prjde els rav XpiffTtaeas,
rj,

petition.

ydp eari to aiTiokoyiKov irapd aira Koi TO dpioTOTeXi^ov, fondness for giving reasons, or for inquiring into the causes, Philon Galen. 11, 365 B To alnoXoyiKov I, 570, 22. 2. In grammar, causal, pepos T^y larpiKris. applied to the conjunction (avvSea-poi) Iva,
IloXii

22

OTTtus,

eveKa, ovveKa, otl, bio, biOTi, Ka66, KaBoTi,

vav rals jrokea-iv evoiKolr), they petitioned. 2. Rogation, one of the component parts of Sophrns. 3992 C 'H irpaTrj a1.Tr)tlie eKTeVTjs.
<ns.

Kad6(Tov, ocjipa, ydp, y(dpiv.

Dion. Thr. 642,


Conj. 480,
3.

25.

643,

3.

Apollon. D.

22.

Adv. 613,
40 D.

10.

Arcad. 185,

amoXoyiKfflf, adv. causally.

Max. Conf.

Schol.

Euchol. 'H pj.Kpd a'tTtj<ns, the lesser rogation, applied to a portion 3. Postulation, the act of of the enTevrjs.

Stud. 1688 C.

alnoKoyurpos, ov,

6,

alnoKoyia.

Eus.

Ill,

45 D.
a'lTiov,

postulating, assumption.
deo'i.v

Sext. 698,

2 'Ytto-

ov,

TO,

cause.

Philon

II,

381, 11, to
first

KoKovpev dp^rjv dirohei^eays airqo'iv ov<Tav


(alrea) one
75.

dva>TdTa>

Kai
9,

npecr^vTaTov,

the

cause.

irpdypaTos els KaTacrKcvt'jv Tivos.


.alTrjTrjs,

Sext. 431,

TO TToiovv, the efficient cause.

ov, 6,

who

asks.

Dion C.
Plut.
II,

Orig.

I,

705 B, to nparov.
(est)
Trjs

Pseudo-/M,<i(.

Frag. 66,
jiiTTjTucor,
ij,

2, p.

1193

A
u,

6v,

begging, demanding.

....
a'lTios,

To 8' a'lnov Ka\ T^ boypari


ov,

iva re

Kevobo^

Kivbvvabovs avTov

334 F,
alTTjTiKcis,

o'Ti^os.

bia6e<Teais eiTavaiTavr]Tai,

adv. in a begging manner.


ei)(ov.

Diog.

6,

guilty,

Joann. Mosch. 2904

31 lipos Toiis yoveas alrrjnKOis


alria,

IIoXXwv Kai peydXav aiTCos KVpiio

UTrappfO),

as,

f),

cause, reason.

Eus.

II,

393

A
<^r)-

/ am
the

guilty of

many

great sins in the sight of


causal.
(_oti)
7,

Ov e^

aiTtas Trjs tov MeXtToyvos ypatjirjs

Lord.
es,

a\v eavTov trvvrd^m,

on account

of,

Pallad.

alna>br]s,

(amov)

Laus. 1204

'E| ahias ToiaaSe.


be Uporepiov. Strab.
1, 2,

Euagr.

Pron. 267 B, irvvbeapos


Sext. 5, 8, dpxr).

Apollon.

D.

ainoXoyiKos.

2528

A 'E^ alrlas
to

Diog.

72 AlnaSes be
Toii bioTi

aiTidopai,
alTiOTai

accuse.

19 "Ayvoiav
2, 1,

ecTtv d^itcpa to o'vvrao'O'opevov bid


oiov,

T&v p,v6imoia)v,
etrrt.
ij,

=:

KarayivaxTKei.

Aion
a'inov

rjp,epa earXv, (jjcis eo'Tiv

....

oioxci

30 A

S'

Sv Tis alTidcraiTo tov 'EpaToaBevovs,


ov, (aiTiaTos) causative.
T]

yap

to

irpaTov tov

bevTepov, causal

TotavTa
mTiariKos,

2.

proposition, a sentence beginning with biori.

Sub-

2.
ly
13.

stantively,
tive case,

alnanKr], sc.

TrrcDcris,

the accima-

Substantively, to ainabes,
alnov, the cause.

essentiali,

Anton,

21.

5,

the case denoting the object of a transitive verb. Dion. Thr. 636, 6. Dion.

ainaibats, adv. causally.


alriiopji,
7.

Clem. A. 593 A.

H. VI, 800, 8. Apollon. D. Pron. 272 A. Pseudo-Denje^r. 89, 2.


13

aros, t6, :^= aWiana.

Luc. Act. 25,

Digitized

by Microsoft

aiipviBia^co
alf^vibia^a,

98
311 A.
in

'

AKaSrjfialKO'i

daw,

(ai0i/lStos) to surprise, in miliCyrill. Scyth.

tary language.

V.

S.

Theoph. 380, 19.


al(f)vi8iaa-ii6s,

ov,

6,

(ai^wSidfo))

surprise,
7,

military language.

Leo. Tact.
captivity,
5,

39, et alibi.

Phoc. 224, 11.


at)^lidKa>a-ia,

as,

fj,

capture.
5.

Sept.

Deut. 28, 41.

Polyb.

102,

Diod. 20,

Judith 15, 10. Esai. 13, 20. a Hebraism (dSij;). Eccl. 3, Matt. 13, 22. Paul. Gal. 1, 4, et alibi. 11. 5. Age, Tatian. 852 B. Ignat. 659 A. the space of a thousand years. Andr. C. Method. 1329 C. Epict. 2, 5, 13 Oi ydp 6. Divine entity. elfil alav, aXX' avdpawos, fiepos Tav navrav,

4.

5ep.

Ex.

14, 13.

World

2.
ered.
54.
1, 7,

61.

jl^oc. 13, 10 Etj alxi'^'iKaxTiav virayei.

Booty ;
Sept.

captives,

collectively consid-

Num.
1, 7,

31, 12. 19 'tfieis


4, 24, 14.
e'k

Km

ij

alf^fxaKatria vjiwv.
1, 5, 64.

Reg.
6 Oi

Esdr.

1, 5,

T^f alxiMKairias.

10 Oi moi T^s alxfMK'^a'ias. Ps. 67, 10. Esai. 45, 13. Ezech. 1, 1. Mace. 2, 8, 10. Diod. 17, 70. Apoc. 13, 10. Patriarch.

(Compare Numen. apud as apa fjpepas. Eus. ni, 872 B.) In the Valentinian system 7. Aeon. of theogony the Aeons are the divine entiThe ties of the intelligible world (TrKripapu). supreme Aeon is called TeXeios alav, npoapXVi TrpoTraTcop, or Bv66s, having Siy^ or 'Evvoia for his consort.

The

other Aeons are

1072 B.
alxftaK<^Teva>, fv(ra>, (^alxiMXaiTos) to

make
2,

pris-

oner of war,
14.

to

lead captive.
1,

Sept.

Gen. 14,
28, 5 'Hi-

34, 29.

Reg.

30, 2.

Par.

Xii^^Tev(Tev ^ avTwv alxfJ^^oitTiav 7ToKKr]V. Esdr. 1, 6, 15 Toy 'Kabv rixfiaKaiTV(Tav els BafivXSva.
liver.

Tobit

1, 2.

2.

To

rescue, to de-

Just.

Tryph. 39

Ai;;(fiaXmT-fCa-ai

avrbv

emanations (indirect, except NoOj) from the they are emitted in pairs. One first Aeon of each pair is male, and the other, female the latter being the counterpart or subordinate power of the former. The Aeon 'Opos alone is without a companion. Iren. 445 A. 739 A. Doctr. Orient. 657 A. Tertull. H, 560 B. Orig. IV, 156 C. Hippol. Haer.
;

fjfias OTTO Trjs TrXdvrjs.

414, 43, the three


Sept. Judic.
(tov.

alxfidXaTi^a,
5,

itra,

^=
1,

alxiid\a>Teva>.
alxfJi'oXcoo-Lav

alavtdptos, ov,
10.

Aeons of the Docetae. Coined by Lyd. alavios.


remain forever.
fjLVrjfjt.7]v,

51,

12 Ai;^/iaX(irt(rov
46.

Reg.

3, 8,

J^ivevtj,

Tobit Juditb

10 "Ore

rixfJitXaiTLa'6r)fiey els

alavi^a

(aimi'),

to

Theoph.

16, 9

To koXXos

aiTrjs nXI^"~

Cont. 449, 8 Els alavi^ovcrav


vlav.

r^

ala-

Mace. 1, 9, 72. 1, 10, 33 Ttjv alxiiaXwTia-6e1a-av dwo yrjs 'loiSa. Phryn. 442 hlxjiokancrBTivai Tovff ovTcos dSoKifjLOv .... AioKvav ovv Xeye alxjJ.dXwTicre ^vxfjv airov, captivated.
XaiTov yevicrBai.
reva-ev,

alavios,

a,

ov,

eternal,

everlasting.

Classical.

63 ^Ev adov biareXelv Tip,apias alaviov Philon I, 557, 36, fuij. Plut. Tvyxdvovn.
4,

Diod.

\_Theoph. 456,

alxiJ.a\ay-

witbout tbe augment.]


6,

olxfJuiKaTurnos, ov,

alxiiaXaxria.

Herm.

H, 351 D Trjs alajviQv Carjs, r/v 6 6e6s elXrjx^v. 450 A Tip.apiais alaviois vtto yrjv. PseudoJos. Mace. 9, ^da-avos. 3 2, nip Koi jSacravos.
13, ^aaavio'p.os, in Hell. 2. Eternal, a title applied to the emperor, or to the empress. Athan. H, 685 A. 692 B. Chal 821 A, ^a~ o-iKevs. 828 B, avyovcTos, semper augustus, 821 E, /3ao-iXis. 3. Secular is. Herodn. 3,

Vis.

1,

1.

Macar. 545 A.
L.

Schol. Arist.

Nub. 186.
alav, covos,
6,

aeTum,

age.

Sept.

Gen. 6,4

'EkeItoj Ti(rav oi yiyavres ol air alavos,

of

old,

the ancient.
T}K0v<Tajiev,

Esai. 64, 4 'Atto tov aiSvos ovk since the beginning of time. Barn.
alaiv, the

8, 18,

ludi seculares.

756

'O aytos

holy age, the world

to come, the

kingdom of heaven.
Sept. Ps. 109, 4.

2.
17.

alaviorris, rjTos,

Time

517 B.
'H

2.

fj,

(^alavios)

eternity.

Did. A.

without end.

118, 89 Els
3,

emperor
cidia.

Eternity, a title given to the or to the empress. Chal. 829

TOK alava, forever.


almvas.

Sap.

5, 1.

8 Els roiis
Sext.

fjiieTepa alavioTr/s,

says Theodosius to Pla-

Luc.

1,

33.

Petr.

2, 2,
rjv

406, 10 'H Se ye 6e&v evvoia


otafxevei.

Kal els alova

638, 28 Els alava ^laxiio-ovTai ttoos

a)iXr]\ovs.

*alav6^ios, ov, ever-living, imm/>rtal, applied to Ptolemy. Inscr. 4696, 4. 8. 9.


auavoBdKrjs,
es,

El's

alava alavos, for ever and.

(alav,

ddXXo))

ever -blooming.

ever.

Sept. Tobit 6, 18

Ovk

eiraveXeitreTat

Eus.

11,

912 C.
Synes^
12, p. 1612, Trarfip.
is,
I,

els TOV alava tov alavos. Ps. 18, 10. 44, 6. Paul. Gal. 1, 5 Qt t] fio^a els rovs alavas tuiv aiavav. Eph. 3, 21 Els irda-as ras yeveds tov alavos Tav aiavav. Apoc. 14, 1. Iren. 1, 3,
1

alavoTOKos, ov, (reKeiK) eternity-begetting.

Hymn.

7,

aiavoxapr)s,

Clem. A.
aiaprjTds,
r),

(xaipw) 681 B.
(alapea)

rejoicing

in

eternity.

AXXa

Kal Ti/ids enl t^s evxapurrias \eyovTas

ov,

hanging, suspended.

alavas rav aiavav," per omnia saecula saeculorum ; the usual conclusion of

" Eir Toiis

Mel.

77, iaria.

a prayer or
jectively,

hymn

in the Ritual.

accompanied by xp^""?!

3.

dK, see vK.


'AxaSTj/iaiKoj,
tj,

Ad-

6v,

CAKaS^/ueta)

Ac ad ami-

aeX &v.

cus

Academic, Platonic.

Cie. Att. 13, 12.

Digitized

by Microsoft

Aicahrifiia
16. 27, 2. 12.

99
Epict.
1,

aKatpoXo<yo<i
sung, all standing, on the Saturday of the week in Lent, in commemoration of the

Strah. 14, o, 14, p. 163, 26.

Pint,

n, 621 F. 791 A.

Sext. 3, 10.

fifth

Dio^r. 1, 18. 50, 5. 3, 41, aipeiris. 3. Substantively, d 'AKaSruxdUos, Academic, one belonging to the school of Plato. Epict.
2,

repulse of the Avars and other barbarians from the walls of Constantinople in the reign

of Heraclius (A. D. 625).


'EopT^s ayopivrjs,
rjv

Pack.

I,

257

20, 5.

PZ.

n, 1077 C.
Academia,

Lucian.
the

II,

115.

Sext. 52, 16.


'

229, 25.
fj,

kKabqfiia,

as,

Academy,

the

Academic

the school of Plato. The Academy is divided into Old, Middle, and Ptut. I, 520 A, fj naXaid. 984 E, fj via NeiL'.
sect,

dKaBiarov aivijdes ovopdfv, the day on which the aKoflioros vpvos is read or chanted. Curop. 72. [The received account is, that, on the evening succeeding

Kal fii(rq.
ri

519 F,
I,

r]

via.
7.

Galen.
1, 14.

11,

22"

D,
4,

dpxaia.

Sext. 50,

53, 23. 29.

546, 10.
2,

the destruction of the hostile fleets by a hurricane, the people met in the church of the Deipara at Blachernae, and, all standing (or rather standing up all night) rendered thanks
to their patroness for their unexpected de-

Clem. A.
28. 59.

764 B.

Diog.
2,

47.

2,

47, ^ npwTTj.
'AfcaSij/iiaj,

83, ^ vearepa.

liverance.
is

Mc. CP.

Histor. 21, 11.

But

it

'O eK
/itias,

TTJs

or 'O otto

rfjs 'AkoSt;-

to

be remarked,

first,

that the office of the

sc. <^tXdo-o0os, <Ae

Academic, the Plato-

nist.
(Toc/joi.
/ii'as.

SfraJ. 13, 1, 66 Oi i^ 'AKaSr/nias tpiKo13, 1, 67 'Ap/ceo-tXaof 6 ex ttJs 'AkoSt;-

PZu(.

n, 1059

Oi EK

TTjS 'AKaSrjpias.

have been composed in one day secondly, its distinctive portions, namely, the twenty-four oIkoi, do not contain the sUghtest allusion to that
aKoOia-Tos vp.vos could not
;

Sext. 52,

10 Oi 8e otto t^j

war

53, 11 Oi djro T-^s 'AKa87jp.ias.

Plut.
II,

'

AKaBrjpias.
II,

event, and therefore

it is

not easy to believe

549

E Tmv

V *AKabT]fiia <piKotr6<l)Q>v.
t),

'AKaSrjfuaKos,

6v,

'AKaSrifmiKos.

Aristocr.

apud Plut. II, 1033 E. Galen. H, 16 A.


afca^s,
e's,

Plut.

102 D.

any reference to it. It is possible that they may be identical with the eyKmpia, wliich, according to Theophanes, were used in the time of the emperor Mauricius, but of which we have no
that they
originally

had

{Kaiai)

unburned.
I,

Diosc.

5,

96.

further notice.

ojcaBaipfTos, ov, {Kadaipiai)

not to he put
p.dx')-

down

great.
Xefios.

Philon

39, 40,

372, 28, 776-

Theoph. 409, 20 (A. D. 580). See also Cyrill. A. X, 1032. Sophrns. 3237 B. As to the Kavav attached to this office,
it

696, 38, x^tp. aKoBapo-ia, as, i\, impuriiy.

was composed by Joseph Hymnographus

Classical.
19, 23 of

Sept.

(1020 seq.)

who

lived in the ninth century.

Lev. 18, 19 of
aKa6dpm)s,
4.
ryros,

Karafirivia.
17,

= aKaBaptrw.

a tree.
1 7,

Apoc.

oKadapros, ov, impure, unclean.


2.

Sept. Lev. 12,

Tj vweppAxco aTparriym (mentioned by Porph. Cer. 609), may have been composed a few hours before the vigil commenced.]
Its KovraKiov,

5,

of a

woman

after child-birth.

II,

670 D, LeviticaUy.
spirit,

Plut.

aKadoa-iaros, ov,

(Kadocn6a>) disloyal

.Theod.

unclean

N.
ing.

T. passim.

3.

demon.

oKadaprov Sept. Zach. 13, 2.


Ilvevpji

IV, 1451 B.
aaadoa-iaiTms, adv. disloyally?
Glial.

1292 B.

Not capable of

cleans-

dKaBvrrpTipr)TOS, ov, (KadvTrepTepiai) unsurpassed.

Aret. 127 C, riv6s.

Ptol. Tetrab. 157.

wcaffdpras, adv. impurely.


(SioCc.

Clementin. 332 B,
ov

dKaivia-ras, adv. without innovation.

Leont.

I,

aKaffeKTeofiai

1749 D, ex""OKaBcxTds
elfu,

KarixopuuSept.

aKtuvoToprjTos,

ov,

(jcaaioTopia)

not innovated.

Sext. 149, 26.

oKaBcKTos, ov, (jcaTex"')

Phot,
dKarda-xeTos.
I,

il,

368 A.

oKaipeiopai (&Kaipos),

axaipos

elpi.

Philon

Job

31, 11 as V.

dKaBiicTws,

adv.

1.

Philon

313, 15.

n, 280,
II,

8, Trepl irdvra.

aKaTatrxirios.

Philon

aKnipia,

rjo-a,

(axaipos) to have no opportunity.

48, 2.
ijcaBriKovTms (o.koBtjkw'),
erly.

adv. unmeetly, impropundutiful.

Diod. Ex. Vat. p. 33, 8 (30). Theod. Mops. 925 10 -adai.


(jyrjtrlv

Paul. Phil.

4,

C To

rfKaipe'urOe

Orig.
ov,
I,

I,

949 A.
KajBfjKto)

dvri Tov CKioKvea-Se.

aKa&rjiuov,

(Ka6r)Ka>v,

dxalpios, ov,

z^

6 pr)

exov

Kaipov.

Et.

M.

810,

Athan.
andBurros,

753 B,

Tripl rAi;

dSeX^dv.
sitting,

20.

ov,

(jeaBl^a)

not

standing.

aKaipo^oas, a,

6,

(Podat) unseasonable brawler.


to talk

Stud. 1733
<r6a,

Srjpo<l)ayiav aKadurrov

he must eat standing.

Unsteady, unsettled, of a roving disposition, Apophth. 112 A. Ant. Mon. 1517 A.


office

860 D.

S.

iirmpATheogn. Mon.

Clem. A.
sonably.

I,

464 A.
(aKaipoXoyos)

aKaipoKoyia,

r)a-<a,

unseaBasil.

Phot,

m,

432 D.
talk.

aKaipoXoyia, as,

rj,

unseasonable

HI, 873 A.
oKaipoXdyos, ov,

Phot,

m,

72 C.
talking

2. In the Ritual, 6 wcdSurros vpivos, the of the Virgin, partly read and partly

(Xeya) Philon n, 268, 45.

unseasonably.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aKMpoTreptTraTrjroi;
aiuuptmcpmarrjTos,

100
dxavBeav, avos,
C.
dis6,

axapet
(Sxavda) a place overgrown

apparently

a mistake for
1,

aKcupmrepia-iTtuTTos.

Const. Apost. 4, 14.

with brambles, a brake.

Greg. Naz.

Ill,

25

4 incorrectly written aKcupoTrepmaros.


aKaipoTrepiaTraaros,
tracted.
ov, (nepurmia) easily Fseud-Athan. TV, 837 A.
6,
I,

dKavdiv for dxavBiov, ov, to,

anavBa Apa^iKrj.

Diosc.

3,

13 (15). {aKavda) of thorns. Marc. 15, 17. Sibyll. 1, 373, areipavos.


Diosc. 4, 82, irdw-

dKaipocmovSacn-fjs, ov,

(iTTrovSd^a) intemperate

dicdvdivos, ov,

admirer.

Hieron.

753 (534).
AKaKfp.(paTos,
KaKrjs

dxaKeiKpaTos, ov, (KaK(iJ.<paTos) not in ill-repute.

Joann. 2. Of
iros.

19, 5.

the thistle, axavBa.

Method, 100 A.
<prjp.Tfs

Hes.

'

d7njWayp.ei/09.
f/,

dxdvdiov, ov, T&,

aKwcla, as,
to

(aKUKos) goodness, a

name given
earth,

thistle.

Diosc.

ac an thi u 3, 16 (18).

a species of
'

a small

purple bag

containing

which, the Byzantine emperor held in his


left

hand on solemn
Curop. 51.

occasions.

Porph. Cer.

25, 21.

(Compare Porph. Cer.


tree, or

766 seq.)
dKOKia, as,
T),

acacia, an Egyptian
Diosc.
1,

2. Substana surgical instrument for extracting fish-bones from the throat. Paul. Aeg. 162. dKavdoKoyos, ov, (oKavBa, \eya) collecting thorns. Tropically, quibbling. Antip. Th. 45. Philipp.
aKavSo^oKos, ov, shooting thorns.
tively, TO dKav6o^6\ov, sc. opyavov,

the

gum

of it.
es,

dKaKoridr/s,

(^<aKor]6j)s)

3,22,(25). guileless. Eus. II,


Iambi. Adhort.

15S.

44.
dKav6ocj)opea>, rfo-a, (aKavBoipopos) to bear thorns.

441
350.

'AttXw koX aKaKOTjOet TpoTra.

Orig.

I,

265 B.

Greg. Naz.

I,

949 B.

dKaKorjdais,

adv.

guilelessly.

dKavdo(l>6pos, ov, (oKavda, ipepa) bearing thorns.

Cynll. H. 389 A.
ill.

dKaKOTradrjTois (KaKonaOeai), without suffering

aKavBoijivia),

rj<ra>, (<l>va>)

Greg. Naz. HI, 1433 A. to bear thorns, or thorny


hedgehog.
Psell.

Apollon. D. Mirab'. 198, 29.


aKOKos, ov, simple,
1, 4.

plants.

Diosc.
ov,

3,

18 (21).

weak

in intellect.

Sept. Prov.

aKavdoxoipos,
Stich. 322.

(xolpos)

8, 5.

14, 15.
ov,

aKUKOvpyrjTOs,

( KaKOvpyeta )
. .
.

uninjured.
iv

OKavdav, avos,

6,

dicavdeav.

Charis. 553, 35

Harpoc.

93, 12 Aiaa-eia-rovs

dKafcoiip-

Dumetum,
aKavovia-Tos,

6 dKavBav.
ov,
(fcai/oviftn)

yqToi pdXKov SxTiv.

Schol. Clim. 760 C.

dKaKovpyrjTcos, adv. without being injured.


Ill,

Epiph.
Cyrill.

trary

to

the rules

uncanonical, conof the Church. Hippol.


C.

116 A.
fir]

856
Koxovpyos.

'

Axavovia-Ta Soyfiarl^eis.
Cyrill.

aicaKOvpyos, ov, zr= ov or

/3t(3\ia.

A. X, 141

Laod. 59, Apophth. 149


Basil. IV,

A.

I,

477 A.
9.

IV, 953 A.
33, 22.

D.
dKavovioTois,

dKaKvvTos, ov, {KOKvvai) not to be harmed. Hierocl.


C. A. 18,

adv.

uncanonically.
5.

681 A.
Polyb.
C.
aKaTrTJkevTos,

Ephes. Can.
ov,

Cynll.

A. X, 141

aKaKms (aKaxos), adv. unsuspectingly.


aKOKosTos,
ov,

(KaTnfKfva)

unsophisticated.
Isid.

(KOKoa))

uninjured.
316,
32,

Philon
i^Br),

I,

Synes.
Cijrill.

490, 33, hapjoKis.

11,

sound.
II,
_

1377 A. 1516 B. A. Ill, 53 A.


7.

1381 D.
Strab.

Anton.
754 A.
yvvij.

5, 18.

Dion C.
I,

77, 15, 2.

aKaTrrjKos, ov, (xaTnyXos) guileless, sincere.

dKohXrjs, is, (koKKos) without beauty.

Plut.
I,

11, 8,

Lucian.

197.

Clem. A.

572 A,

axdnvia-Tos, ov, ((caTrwfm)


I,

=z

anamios.

Strab.

9,

23, iieXt.

*dKaKkannmos, ov, (KoKKwirl^ai) unadorned. Ceb. 18. Philon I, 146, 42. Plut. U, 397 A.
Lucian.
dKaXinrTcos
Sept.
I,

uKawvos, ov, (KaTTVos) unsmoked.


II, 15 (16).
Xi,

Plin. N.

H;

Aet.

7,

7.

50, p. 133, 34, pA-

580.

(aKaXuTrros),
3, 4, 6.

adv.

being

unveiled.

I,

honey taken without smoking the bees. Substantively, to aKawvov crdp.\jrv)(ov.

Mace.

Patriarch. 1041 C.

dKdKv<pos, ov, :=: dKaXv(jirjs, aKoXunror.


8,

Diog.
Synes.

DioKc. 3, 41 (47). *dKdphios, ov, {Kapbia) having no heart.

72.
o,

dKafw-vTOTToSas, a,

dKafiavrafirovs.

737E. eXc or s
16.

/amftZ. 136, 15.


,

2.

Plut.

Vecors,
17,

foolish.

Sept. Prov. 10, 13.

1616, 52.
aKafiiTTos,
ov,

Su-. 6, 20.

Jer. 5, 21.

(Compare Hos.
Galen. X,

{Kajmrai)

from which no man

returns.

Antip. S. 110 'Er yap aKap.irrov, is

3.
118

^,11

Qs

Trepiarepd avovs ovk e;(ov(ra Kapdlav.)

Heartles.i, timid, coicarclly.

Tov avoarTTjTOV x^wpov e^jjs ivipav. aKav, avos, 6, fj, oKavos. Sept. B,eg. 4, 14,

9.

(See also aK^ovx-}


oKavda,
3,
rjs,
fj,

Tour aToX/uouy he koI bfCKovs UKapSlovs ovopd^ovo-i. (Compare Archil. 60 (33) KapSiris nXios.) 4. Pithless. Theophr. P. H.

a prickly plant.
3,

Diosc.

1,

77.
.

3' 12, 1.

12 (14).

17 (19).

3,

17 (20).

3,

13

dxapci

(oKapris),

adv. instantly.

Dion. H. V,

(15).

87, 4.

Digitized

by Microsoft

axapfji
aKoprjs,
is,

101
Eus.
11,

aKaraXKifKoTTj's
Luc.

short,

of time.

992

'Ev

aKaraKpiTos, ov, (KaraKpivoi) uncondemned.

S>pai aKupel ponfj.

OKapiaims (aKapiaios), adv.


T,

Act. 16, 37.


dxapei.

22, 25.

Ptol. Tetrab. 159.

Clem. A.

oKaTOKplTcas,

adv.

without

being

condemned.
Epict.
2,

7J6 A.

Fseudo-Dion. 533 D.
dKaTaKriKnKas

aKaprripr)Tos, ov, (xapTepe'ci))

portable.

5,

unendurable, insup733 B. Method. 381 B. 2. That cannot endure or hear. Damasc.


Plut.
II,

djcaToKrjKTas.

23,

46, ^x^i-v TrepL

Tt.

aKardXrjKTos, ov, (KaTdKrjyai) unceasing, endless.


Ocell. 4, 1.

II,

289 B.

Epict.

1, 17, 3.

Biog.

7,

151.

oKapros, ov, (jcfipai) unshorn, unshaved.


47, p. 211 E, TTiayav,

Athen.

2.
7.

Aoatalectus,
;

acatalectic,

in versifi-

oKapms, adv.
ImuTTos, ov,
fj

untrimmed.

cation

axapei.

Schol. Arist. Plut. 244.

opposed to KaraXi/KTocdr. Drac. 134, Heph. 4, 1, perpov. Aristid. Q. 50.


adv.
unceasingly,
incessantly.

rj,

L. acer, maple.

Hes." AxatTTos,
not
subI,

aKaTaXrjKTws,

<T<l>ivhapvos.
ov,

OKOTc^anTUTTOs,

(KaTo^airri^ai)

Agathin. apud Orib. II, 402, 9. Cyrill. A. Vn, 536 B. Pseudo-Xjon. 237 1, 193 A.
C.
a/caTaX))7rTc<B,
ijcrco,

merged,

not overwhelmed.

Theophyl. B.

355 D, tropically.
aKara^LaaTos, ov, {KaTa^ui^a>) not compelled or
controlled.
yvtiiprf.

(dKaTaKrjTTTOs)

^=

oi

Kara45, 9.

Xap^dvco, not
671,
12,
Trepl

to

comprehend.

Sext.

Cyrill.

A.

I,

160 B.

IX, 937 C,

eKdiTTov.

736, 32

Tovtwv de

dKaTaKrjTrrovpevcov.

dfcardyyfXroj, ov,

(xaTayyeXXa))

Dion. H.
Plut.
I,

I,

146, 10, TrdXe/ior,

unproelaimed.
aKijpvKTOs.

*dKaTd\rj'7rros, ov,

{KaraKap^dva) not caught or


to
(caTaXi/TTTOf.

taken
Probl.

opposed
1 9,

Aristot.

68 C.

OKarayeXao'TOs, ov,

App

I,

112, 88.

42,

3,

not touched, as a string of a

ov Karayt XaoTos. Theophil.

musical instrument.
captured.
Jos.

2> Not
3, 7,

to

be taken or

1041 B.
aKaToyvmoTos,
acquitted.
to

B. J.

7,

noXcpLois.

ov,

(KarayiyvaxTKa) uncondemned,

Sept.

Mace.

2,

4,

47.
2, ?.

2.

Not
360

Metaphorically, incomprehensible. Cic. Acad. Philon I, 156, 49, ala-drjo-ei. Diosc. 2, 6.


Jobol.
p.

be condemned.

Paul. Tit.

Jsid.

47.

Epict.

4,

4,

13.
/rere.

Plut.

II,

c.

1056 F.
unconquer-

Athenag. 908 B.

456 A.

OKarayaviaToi, ov, (Karayiovi^opai)


able.

Sext. 3, 8, et alibi.
'AKaT-dXTjTTTos, OV, 6, ^4cato/eptos,
sibilis,
a,

Diod. 17,26. Ptol.TetTah.159. Martyr. Path. 1436 B. Stob. II, 592, 4.


aKaTaSiKaa-Tos,
ov,

(KaraSticdfa))

Athan.

II,

1105 A.

uncondemned. 1117 C. Clim. 993


noi eifslaved,

IncomjirehenGnostic figment. Epiphanes apud Iren. 568 B et Hippol. Haer. 294, 12.
adv. iy noJ comprehending:

dKaTaXijTTTtoj,

by
78,

A.
OKaTaSovKarros, ov,
not compelled to

not being able to comprehend.


(KOTaSoi/Xda))
10, exeiv.

Philon

I,

Orig.
rj,

II,

81 B,

fj^ctv rtvdr.

Porph. Novell. 263, TTJ (TTpaTdq. Theophyl. B. Ill, 498 E. ditarafi/T^TOJs (implying aKara^jTajTos), adv. indisputably. Epiph. n, 268 E.
service.
aKa.ra6vp.ios,
tested.

do

dKaToXTjyjrla, as,
bility,

(dKardXT^Trroff)

incomprehensiJobol.
49.

incomprehensibleness.
I,

Cic. Att. 13, 19.


p.

P/jjfora

384,

10.

Diosc.
Ill,

Numen. apud ^ms.


T^v 837 D.
5
irepX

1208 B.

Sext. 376,

ov,

(KaTaSvpios)

disagreeable, de-

dirdvrav
2,

aKardXriyfrlav.
9, 6.1

Hippol.
aKaraXri-

Artem. 230.
ov,

Soz. 1052 B.

Diog.

92.

To T^r

aKaraiTrnTos,

(Karamdopai)

not

accused.

yjrlas Kal ejroxrjs EiSoj,

the doctrine that nothirreconcilable.

Jos. B. J. 2, 14, 8, et alibi.


Cyrill.

A.

I,

328 B.

B. 1176 A. Hes. AxaTmriaTov, dveyTit.


'

ing can be comprehended.


aKaToXXaKTos,
ov,

(KaTaXXdaa-o})

kKtjtov, aKaTTjySprjTov.

aKaTaKoKimros,

as a Lev. 13; 45 as v. 1. for dxaXvTTTos. Polyb. 15, 27, 2. Philon I, 72, 13, undisguised. 11, 309, 44 AKaraKaKinrT^ Ke<^a\r), capite nudo. Paul. Cor. 1, 11, 5. 1, 11, Eus. in, 1061 D, (txovr). 13, yvvfj.
ov, (KaTaKaXvirro)) unveiled,

Diod. 15, 89. Philon pos.

Ex. Vat.
I,

p. 110, 4 (98), TrdXeII, 3, 34.

593,

9.

woman.

Sept.

dKardXXdKTas, adv. irreconcilably. Polyb. 4, 32, 4 'Ex^pSys Koi aKaraXXaKTms del nore irpos
avToiis
Tiva.

'

exovTos.
7,

U,

29,

13, biaKfiuBai itpos

12,

5 To'ls 8e Kara npoaipeo-iv dxaraX-

XoKTCDs ex^iv.
13, 8, 2.

Philon

I,

479, 14.

Jos.

Ant.

oKaTaKoKvirTas, adv.
with the

^=

aKoraKciKvTtTa

Ke(j)dXfj,

head uncovered.

Damasc. H, 653

dKaToXXrjXla, as, n>

(dKaTaXXrjXos)

incongruity.

D.
aKardKavoTos, ov, ov, QiaTaKaiai) not burned up.
.ipollon.

Apollon. D.

Synt.
8.

199,

4.

Herodn.

Gr.

Schem. 579,
*diicaTdXX;;Xos,

D. Mirab. 198,
ov,

34.

ov,

(icardXXijXos)
6, 6.

incongruous.

dKaTaKotrpTjTos,

(^KaroKoirfieca)

unadorned.

^r^s(o^
iy.

Mund.
1.

Plut.

n, 424 A.
t),

VI, 1038,

Polyb: &, i2, Z. Dion. Ejrict. 2,9,12. 2,11,8.


fj,

aKaraKpuria, as,
ing.

(dKardxpiTos^ the not condemn-

aKaToXXrjXdTTfs, tjtos,

dKaTaXXTfXla. Apollon.

Clim. 804 A.

D. Adv. 619,

31.

Synt. 43, 27.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aKaTaXXr'iXwi
dxaraXXijXcBf (dxaraXXijXos)
a<l

102
incongruously,
j

aKaradTepiaro^
oIkos, said

of the Church Universal.


Pseudo-Z!'on.

Cyrill.

ApoUon. D. Synt.
OKaToKvTos,
structible.
ov,

7,

2.

89, 18.
in /I is soluble,

(juvrdKia)

inde-

A. I, 164 B. 2433 A.
aKaracreia-Tais,

429 C.

Euagr.
II, 1

Dion. H. IV,
16, fmij, endless.

2074,

3.

Paul.

adv. firmly.
ov,

Cyrill.

^.

73 A.

Hebr.
Xem.

7,

Pseudo-,/os.

Mace.
\ '

Pseudo-X>ion. 204 D.
dKaraa-ljpavTOS,

10, pda-avos, in

Hell

Hippol. 684 C, ^a<nnot

{KaTacrrjpaiva)

unsealed.

Herodii.

3, 11, 19,

not in writing, oral.

dKardfiaKTos,

ov,

(fm(T(Ta>)

Schol. Arist. Lys.


pos.

656

worked
a-yjnjKTos,

at

all.

dKaracrKeTiTos, ov, (KaraiTKf'iTTopai) inconsiderate,

(TkXi;-

thoughtless.

Cyrill.

A. IX, 949

C.

H, 348 B.
unformed,
Hes.
'Aiea-

524 D,
(KaTapA-)(oii.ai)

Tpoirq.
ov,

aKarajidxriTos, ov,

not to be subSept. Sap. 5,

aKaracrKevaa-TOS,

(Karao-Kfudfoi)

dued
20

in battle,

unconquerable.

unfinished.

Sept.

Gen.

1, 2.

Oenom. apud

Aiji/^erai
8,

Anton.
Strab.

48.

aKaTafieTprjTos,
2, 1,

dawiSa dKarajjA^rfTov 6(Ti6rrjTa. Dion. Alex. 1240 C. ov, (Karafierpea) not measured.

Eus.

Ill,

373 B.

Philostr. 247.

raa-KfvaaTOV, d^CKoKoKrjTov.
aKaraaKevda-Tois, adv. without

ornament of style,
8.

21.

with simplicity.
247.

Dion. H. V, 614,

Philostr.

oKaTavdyKaa-Tos, ov, (^KaTavayKa^a) not to be compelled.

0;%.

I,

1125 A.
Diod.
5,

Dimjenian. apud Eus. HI, 453 -D.

aKarda-K^vos, ov, (Karao-Kcvrj) without preparation,


inartificial,
simpjle.

Eus.

m,

340 B.
ov,

39,

/3ior.

dKaTav6r]Tos,

{Karavoeto)

inconceivable.

Pseudo-ician. Uf, 598.


d<aTavoT]Tas,
1 7

Substantively, rd dKarda-Kevov, want of Dion. H. ornament, as applied to style.

2,

adv.

inconceivably.

Suid.

1009,

VI, 882, 10.


dKaToa-Keias,

fiovfias

....
Clim.

adv.

without preparation,
Polyb.

in

aKardvyKros, ov, (^Karaviacrai) not contrite.

simple manner, inartificially.


IlpcciTTj fxkv

6, 4, 7

1108 D.
athlete.

Annst. Sin. 757 D.


Schol. Find.
ov,

ovv aKarao-KeiKos kol ^vtTLKws ovvi10?

dKaTairdKaia-Tos, ov, (KaraTraXaio)) unconquerable

ararai p.ovapxla.
crvve^aive
tqls

H,

Ao-fj^aXi^eaOai

N.

4, 153.

Pto/xatoty

Trfv

OTpaTOTredeiav

dKaTamTriTos,

(KaTairaTea) not to be trampled


20, 18 as v.
1.

Kara

ttjv

ivTos

e7n(j>dvecav

aKaratTKevois vtto

upon.
sant

Sept.

Job

T Tqs

Xip.vr]S

Kal TTJs
5,

eiTi

Sdrepa

6a\d(T<rr]s.

aKaTdiraviTTos, ov, {Karanavai) unceasing, inces:

Hermog. Khet. 397,

of style.

perpetual.

Polyb.

4,

17, 4,

orda-cts.
irresisti-

Diod. 11, 67, that cannot be stopped,


ble.

dKaTaaKTjVwros, ov, (^KaTa(TKriv6a>) not fit for encamping. Onos. 10, 8, p. 22.
aKaTacKOTnjTos, ov,
Ill,

Petr. 2, 2, 14 'AKaraTiaiarrovs dpiapTias, cannot (or do not) cease from sin. Plut. n, 114 F. Clem. A. I, 292 C.
that
dKaTairaiiTTcas,

=
B

dKordcrKoiTos.

Greg. Naz.

510 A.
ov,

d(caTd(rK(wro5,

(^Karaa-KOTrea))

unseen, not obI,

adv.
1,

unceasingly,

etc.

Schol.

served,

unobserved.
*Ei/

Clem. A.

657 B.

Apollon. Rh.
dKaraTrXT^KTOff,

1001.
(KaraTrX^O'tro))
tJ/'ux^.

Clementin. 345

dKarao-KOTrm ^airrlaai

dv
112, 118,

undaunted.
ff.
I,

avTTjv Bvvi]da>iJ.v.
dKaTda-KioTTTos, ov, {KaTaa-KamTO))
Cyrill.

Diod.

14,
II,

-Dion.

210.

irreproachable.

Philon
T7)s

14.

Jos. Ant.
TTtOTetOff

15, 8,

4 To

A.

I,

793 B.
ov,
(KaTa<ro(f)i^oiJ.ai)

VTT^p

TQ>V

VOflCHV

dKaTdwXT/KTOV.

dKaTaa-6(j)uTTos,

not

to

be

Epirl.

2, 8,

23.

^pp.

II,

372, 65.

outivkted.
i, 12,

Philostr. 396.
fj,

OKaTon-XriKTas, adv. undauntedly.


p. 258, 43.
I,

Diod.

dKaTa(TTa(ria, as,

{aKardxTTaTos) disorder, conSept.

Dion. H.

I,

145. II, 1115.

App.

fusion, tumult, disturbance, commotion.

255, 56.
in war.

Tobit
Epiph.
Ill,

4, 13.

Prov. 26, 28.

Polyb.

1, 70, 1.

aKaTOKoXepjiTos, ov, (KaTairoKejiiai) not to be sub-

31, 13, 6

dued

41 C.

unsettled state.
14, 33.
levity

dKardiTOTOi, ov, (/caraTTtVo)) that cannot be swal-

T^v aKaTairrafriav -rfis fiatrCKeias, the Luc. 21, 9. Paul. Cor. 1, Epict. 3, 19, 3. 2. Unsteadiness,

lowed.

Sept.

Job

20, 18.

of character.

aKardpyriTos, ov, (KOTapyco)) not to be abolished.

aKaTaoTarecD, ijam,

Anon.
plant,

Valcnt.

1277 B.

Tobit

1,

aKaTdoTardr /. Sept. 15 Ai 0801 avToi r)KaTa(rTddi^(Tav, in-

Polyb.

7, 4, 8.

dKardpSfvTos, ov, {KaTapBivto) not watered, as a


ajrill.

A. IV, 857 A.
unfixed,

correctly for riKaTatrraTTjOrfvav 1 Epict. 2, 1, 12. 5, 2.

Herm. Mand.
Sept.
1,

aKarapnoTos,
imperfect.

ov, (^KaTapri^a) unsettled,

aKardaTOTos,

ov,

unsteady,

light, fickle.

Iren. 1106

Aid to aKaTdpnarov

Esai. 54, 11.

Polyb.

7,

4,

6.

Jacob.

11.

avT&v

Km

aadeves

Trjs TToXiTelas.

Plut. n, 437 D.

714 E. 767

C Td

oKaTOOT-a-

aKaTaa-pfiTTos, ov, (ncaTacr/Sevyu/ti) unslacked lime.

Tov, unsteadiness, fickleness.

Galen.

XIH, 349
ov,

C, riravos.
that

aKaraaTiptoTos,

ov, ((caracTTepifco)

UKaTda-euTTOs,

(Karaa-eia)

shaken, firmly established.

cannot be Did. A. 549 C,

into constellations.

not arranged AchiU. Tat. Isagog. 996

Digitized

by Microsoft


aKaTaaTpocpo<;
axaraa-Tpocjios, ov, (KaraaTpicfxi)) without

103
proper Dion. H.

a-60a\o9

cadence, not rounded, as a period. V, 168, 8.

aKcvoSo^os, ov, (Kev6Bo$os) free from vaingloriousness or conceit. Amphil. 124 B. Pallad. Vit. Chrys. 32 E, voCs. 2. Substantively,

axaracrxfTos, ov, (KaTexco) not to be checked or restrained. Sept. Job. 31, 11. Mace. 3,
6,

17.
3, 8.

Diod. 16, 10. Jos. B. J. 2,


adv.

17,
1 7,

38, Sdicpva.

Jacob.
34.
;

freedom from vainqhriousness. Anton. 0, 30. 1, 16 To dK^vdho^ov mp\ rds BoKova-as nfids. Chrys. VII, 360 D.
*aKevos, ov, (ksvos) not empty, without a vacuum.

TO oKevoSo^ov,

1.

Plut.

I,

432 A.
17,

MKaraaxeTois,
II,

irresistibly.

Diod.
I,

Epicur. apud Diog. 10, 89.


dKevda-wovSos, ov, not KEvoVffouSor.
15, 17.

613, 59
aiTO

TSv

TToXemj' dfftca-Tanevau aKara-

Cic. Earn.

(Tx^Tws
Plut.
I,

Pcofimcov.

Philon
not

174,

10.
:

Anton.
ov,

1, 6.

148 F.
I

Athati. II, 889 A.

oKevrpos,

(Kevrpov)

without prickles, as a
simple,
1,

aKoraTaKTOs,

ov,

(KaTarairaai)

reduced

to

bramble.
Orig.
I,

Metaphorically,

stupid.

order; indefinite, undefined.

Prod. Parmen.
fiovdSfS

388 A.
ov,

Longin. 21,

without point,
Apollin. L.

560
4-01

(146)
el(ri

Ai

yap KaTaTeTayjiivm

as applied to style.

elKoves

tov aKaTaraKTOv.

Pseudo-Z)iO?l.

aKcvaros,

(Kevda) inexhaustible.

A.
(jcaTanrpcuo) not holloio, as a

Ps. 74, p. 1420 C.


aKepaiouvvT},
rjs,
rj,

aKaTarprfros, ov,

(dKcpaios) purity, integrity.

bone.

Galen. IV, 522 D, oo-toSv.


ov,

Barn.
its

3.

10 Ev aKepaioo-vvj] TrepiiraTovvTes.
rj,

aKaraTpiin-os,

(KaraTpi/Sw)

inexhaustible.

aKcpaioTrjs, tjtos, 73, 6.


3,

freshness, vigor.
6,

Polyb.

3,

Polyb.

[Tbis word owes ence to conjectural emendation.]


3,

89, 9.

exist-

105,

7.

40,

9.-2.

Integrity.

Macar. 469 B.
anepaias (dKepaios), adv. righteously. 388 B, diKd^eiv.
dxepdaios,

aKardx^XeKTOs, ov, (KaTa<f>Xeyti>) not con.iumed by

Athan.

I,

flames.

Sophrns. 3636 A.
ov,

dKaTd\jreKTos,

(^Kara^eyo))

blameless,

irre-

incorrect for dxr^pda-ios.

Sibyll. 9,

proachable.

Cyrill.

A.

I,

1049 B. X, 205 D.

110.
aKepao-Tos, ov, (Kepdwufii) not coalescing, as

dKareioSos, ov, (fcaTeuoSdo)) unsuccessful in his

two
koj.

undertakings.
dKaTtfydprjTos,
ov,

Achmet. 170.
(KaTrjyopea)

alphabetic
not

sounds.

Dion. H. V, 167, 10
<j)a)va\ TOii 1
is,

accused.

AK^paa-Tol re yap ai

Km

tov

Diod. 11, 46.


dKarrjxriTos, ov,

Jos. Ant. 17, 11, 3.


{KaTrjx^aa) not instructed in re-

aTTOKOTTTOva-ai TOV rixov, that

lA cannot be

contracted into one long syllable.


aKepavvcoTos,
ov,

ligion,

not catechized.

n, 212 556 A.

Arius apud Epiph. et Theod. IE, 912 B. BasQ. Sel.


ov,

(Kepavvda>)

not struck by the


670.
profit.

thunderbolt.

Lucian.

II,

aKarovofUUTTOs,

(KaToyo/iafm)

nameless.

aKepbas (dKepSfjs), adv. without deriving Plut. II, 27 D.


aKepjiia, as,
rj,

Hipparch. 1109 C.
Philon
I,

Dion. H. V, 146, 11.


Plut. II, 898

dKfpp.ana.

Lyd. 208, 11.


Aret.

630, 46. II, 597, 41.

a<epxyos, ov, (Kep^vos) without hoarseness.


91 C.
aKepcoTos, ov,

D.

1118 E.

oicarouXwToj,

CeU. apud Orig. I, 1481 A. ov, (KarovXaa) not cicatrized.


II,

aKfpcos.

Anthol. U, 224
Plut.

(.4c?-

Herod, apud Orih.


afcardpfffls

409, 4.
being
held.

daeus)
dK(Tipos, OV, (aVftris) medicinal.
II,

(Kdro^os),

adv. without

956

Method. 353 A.
oKavXos, ov, (icauXdr) without stalk, as

F.

an herb.

aKeo'ca, see ayfo-ra.


dKeoTrfpios,
ov,

Diosc.

1, 7.

a.

Substantively, r6 aKavKov,
Diosc.
3,

(^aKfaTrjp)

fitted

for
I,

curing.

ov, TO, =zz

(pvWins.

111 (121).
Strab, 5,

Philon
KOK&V.
aKea-ns,

I,

628, 27, nvds.

App.

425, 98,
diteoTijf ?

aKavarriplaaTos, ov,
1, 9,

=^

aKavrqpiadTos.
1.

p. 339,

24 as v.

ISos,

fj,

literally

a female
740.

aKaioToss (fiKavaros), adv. without being burned.

Plural, ai dKea-rlSes, a sort of screen placed

Achmet. 160 "Efjiepe nvp iv ra ifuvrlm airov


OKaiKrrws.
nieavTripiaaros, ov, (^Kavnipm^to) not

over a forge.
OKfOTpa, as,
r],

Diosc.

5, 84, p.

(^dKea'Tpia) large needle.


fj

Lucian.
rj

branded, as

1,

341.

Schol. ibid. AKco-rpa,

^eKovr)

/xet-

a horse.

Slrab.
rj,

5, 1, 9, p.

339, 24.
the

Co>v, rjv

vvv o'aKKOppdcjitov KoKovcriv.


fj,

oKavxrja-la, as,

(xaipfijo-tr)

not boasting,

aKfOTpia, as,
wife.

(axfor^s) female physician, midI,

humility, modesty.
(UiiaaTos, ov,

Fseud-Tgnat. 868 A.
indivisible.

Plut.

((tea^m)

Greg. Naz.
or

2. Needle

259 B.

Lucian. IH,

25.

aKcarpa.

Erotian. 70 Oi 'At-

m,

404 A. 414 A.
1.

dufKbajidx, v.

aKeXhapA,

TiKoX Tas pa<f>Ldas aKstrrplas KoKovfTtv, Trapd to


p^wptoj' atjiaros,
1, 19.

aKfiO'dat Kal vyid noielv


dKe(j}a\os, ov, headless.

rd ifmna.

aypos alfmros. Matt. 27, 8.)


OKevo&o^la,
KevoSoiia.
as,
fj,

Luc. Act.

(See also

(Jmevoho^os) freedom

from

Plut. II, 397 D. 520 A. 611 B 2tIxos diceipaXos, headless verse, a hexameter verse whose first syllable
Classical.

Ml. 1141 A.

Clim. 725 B.

is short,

as

'ETretSi) vtjds

re

^.

t.

X.

Drac.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aK'r}Be/j,ovevTO<!

104
Max, Conf.
TTOJTa,

aKKOV^lTOV
Sehol. 49

138, 8
OTTO

AK6(pa\ov

fieu

ovv (ndOos) i(TTiv orav

'AK^Xi'Smra 8c, dppi-

Pseudo^paxeias ap^r/Tai ot/XAo/S^s. Plut. Metr. 1284 C. Heph. 6, 2 'AKecjxiKou lafi^iKov, sc. fierpov, an iambic verse without
the
first

oKfjirevTos, ov, (jayTreva)

not cultivated in

a garGreg.

den.
aKrjTTos,

Athen.
ov,

9, 8.

syllable

as

Tereni.

M.

2427.

2459.

2. Minor
citizen,

for

(^Krinos)

without a garden.

having

lost his

Artem. 57.
se. da-Trjp,

3. In astrology, d aiKecpdKos, a star preceding a planet 9 Clem.


dKeCJjoKos TTpbs tSuv p.adrip,anKS)v

rank as a

capitis,
arijios.

gardens that are no gardens, bad gardens. dxripao'la, as, f), (^dKrjpdaios) purity. Apollon. L. 1328 B. 1333 A.
Ill,

Naz.

29

Toiy

dKrjTrovs Kr/TTovs, the

A.

I,

429 C 'O

diaipoTaTos,
dKTjpaTos.

7],

ov,

an irregular superlative of

KciKovfievos, 6 TToo

KorapiBnovfievos.

4.

Tov d(rTpos Tov

TrXavoJ/iei/ou

Strat. 88.

Insubordinate.
pride.

Clim.

969

Trjv aKeCpaXov TrKavrjnv,

5.

Substantively, 6 'AKe(j)a\os,
plural 01 'AKe<f>a\oi,

commonly

in the

Acephali,

the here-

tics who rejected the authority of the Chalcedonian Council. The name was suggested by the fact that they had no bishops. Tim. Presb. 45 A. 56 C 'AKi(j)aKoi Se fxXij6rj(rap

(Krjpoa) unwnxed. Polyaen. 2,. Lucian. 11, 754. dKia, as, J), the Latin a c i e s rank, row, or line Mauric. 1, 5. Leo. Tact. 4, 6 of soldiers. Tou o\ov arixov, yyovv r^s aKias.
dKrjpioTos, ov,

20, TTTv^.

dKipSrjXevTos,

ov,

(Ki^SrjXeia)

unadulterated,
Cyrill.

Philon
I,

I,

144, 12.

217, 29, xapd.

A.

409 B.

Hes. 'Aki^St/Xcvtos, aKOKOvpyrfTos,


6,

8ta

Cyrill.

to m"? ^X^^^ avTovs iinaKQTrovs. Scyth. Vit. Sab. 306 B. Leant. I,

aboKos.
dxiSovKTos, ov,

the Latin
(aKls")

aquaeductus.
Sept.
10, 133.

1229
T(B

^KeyovTO

oi roiovToi
pfj

^AKeCpaXoL Stort

Theoph. 780.
aKiSaros,
ij,

irarpiapxa avrmv
(Koivaivovv,

dKoXovdrja'avTee Kaff

6v,

pointed, sharp.
Poll.
1,

iauToxis

at

Alexandria.

MoscJi. 2904 A, Sfmjpos.

Joann. Anasl. Sin. 200 B.


Phot. Ill,
rf/v

Prov. 25, 18, To^cvpa.


dKiKovXa, the

97.

Suid. 163, 6 *AKtS(urdi/, to xov dKidas.


Dlosc.
dKivriTos,
2,

Leant. Cypr. 1709 C, Sevrip'iTm.

1089

'O Sipos

'idfcco/Sor,

e| oS

enam-

Latin acicula, =:= 167 (168).


immovable.

a-icdvbv^.

piav TO tS>v 'AKi^akav aipfTCK&v etXKva-e aidia)Mp,6vtvTos,


ov,

ov,

(icrjSfiwvcvs)
I,

not cared for,


Jos. Ant. 6,

neqiected.
dKTjbfVTos,
ov,

Theod.
I,

192 C.

Qajhevai) unhuried.

2. Immovable, real, as applied to property. Pseudo-Gre^. Naz. Ill, 389 B, oio-ia. Cyrill. ^. X, 364 C, Krqa-is. Olymp. 457, 11, ova-ia, real estate. Tiber. 18,

899 B, TWOS.

Classical.

Plut.

H,

14, 8.
dio/Si'a, as,

Pint.
17,

167 C.

anxietas,
spints.

am), aXvs, L. taedium, F. ennui, anguish, heaviness, low


(dxijdijs)

Sept. Ps. 118, 28.

Sir. 29, 5.

Cic.

Att. 12, 44.

Esai. 61,

3.

Lucian.

I,

821.

896 B. Marc. Erem. 1036 B. 1273 'O r^y dKr,Sias Salfiaiv. Pallad. Laus. 1017 D. Nil. 1157 C 'AKqbia
II,

Aihan. Euagr.

Immovable, as applied to Horol. 'AKivr)Tos ioprrj, imr feast, that is, a church feast celebrated on the same day of the year; a& XpuTToiyevva, SSto, EiayyeXurpos j opposed to KlVrjTTj iopTT).
Trpdypxcra.

3.

church movable

feasts.

Scit.

'AKivrjTos, ov, 6,

Ao'yof

and

Zmij.

Cassian. I, 359 C Sexnobis certamen est quod Graeci diaihiav voeant, quam nos taedium, sive anxietatem

ia-Tiv drovia ^vx'js.

'SiiyKpuTis.

JEon emitted from His female counterpart is Iren. 449 A.


Acinetus, an
Sext. 563, 5, jrpds

tum

dKivrjTms, adv.

immovably.

btaKeiaBai.
dKivioi; ov, of&Kivos.

cordis

possumus nuncupare.
oS,
6,

Theod.
dKrjSidai.

I,

1832

A.
diaj8i.aa-p.6s,

Athen. 15, 26,


wild
basil.

aretjiavos.

oKivos,
the act

ov,

fj,

acinus,
o,

Diosc.

3,

of

m,

Basil.

43 (50).
aKmrfiTios,
ov,

881 A,

TTJs
6,

\jra\pM8las.

dKTjhuia-Tris,

one subject to dia)hia. 1157 D, povaxos. Ant. Man. 1516 C.


ov,
(^dieriSia)

Nil.

acipensis,
44.
dicKo, TO,

the Latin acipenser, or a species offish. Athen. 7,

dKrjbidai, da-a,

to be low-spirited, to be

distressed.

Sept. Ps. 60, 3.

101,

1.

142, 4
spirit is
^

HKr/Staa-ev

eV

f/ic

t6 TTvevpA pov,

my

overwhelmed within me. Sir. 22, 13. Baruch Athan. II, 869 A. 3, 1. Macar. 209 B. 2. To neglect, to be careless of. Nil. 112 B

the Arabic dKKar, infallible (according an epithet of the day of judgment. Nicet. Byz. 772 B {Koran, cap. 69).
to Sale),
OV,
TO,

aKKfTTTov,

the Latin

acceptum,

in

accounts.

Ignat. 725 A.

Eav
537

prj aK-qbtda-aa-i

tovs irovovs

ttjs

peravoias.

AKrjdia)pev Trjv npocrevx^v.


ov,
9,

dxKov^iTdpK, the Latin accubitalis, spread over the table-couches. Dioclet. C.


1,

21,

TaTrrjs.

aiajKiSmTos,

(loyXiSdo))

spotless,

unsullied.

Sept. Sap. 4,
I,

^los.

7,

26,

156, 25.

n, 443, 41.

UowTpov. Philon Clem. A. I, 252 C.

dKKoi^LTov, ov, tA, ttc Latin accubitum, seat or couch to recline on at table. Laod. 28. Quin. 74 'AxKov^ira KTrpavvieiv. Pseud-

Digitized

by Microsoft

aKKov^iTO<;

105

aKotvavTjTO^
Polyb.
i)(ovTos-

Athan. IV. 805 D. Stud. 1713 C Kd^ijjrat 8^ Hard rpaiTc^av aKKoi^irov Q, they sit nine in each seat. To rpi^ovvakiov t&v iweaKaldtxa oKKov^lTav, the name of a hall in Con-

aKpalas (aKfialos), adv. in full vigor.


32, 15, 7

Kara

Trjv

rjKiKiav oKiiaias

avTov, he being in the prime of life.


aKpAUTTTis, ov, 6, (oKpa^os)
1, 17,

=;

aKpmos.

Herodn
oKpaios.

stantinople.

Histor. 64.

Theoph. 616, 17. Nic. CP. Called also, Porpk. Cer. 20, 13

24.
rj,

OKpawnnos,
Galen.
oKfirj, ^s,

ov,

(oKp^ia-Tris)

z=

To i^depov rav Scxaevvea okkov^Itiov. (Compare fiKoo'aKXu'o;.) preceding. Dioclet. C. aKKov^iTos, ov, 6,

Hermog. Khet. 250,


II,
fj,

16, axop-ara, in rhetoric.

1,

23.

9.

242 B. VI, 373 B, rjkiKia. Hermog. Rhet. 2. Critical period. Sept. Mace. 2,
vigor of style.
ffKi^ei Kai iv
ttj

249,,
1, 7

iKKOvfi^i^ai, ura,

the Latin a c c u
meat, to

m b o :=^ kotosit at

'Ev

tji

Kkivoiiot, to recline at
sit

meat, to

fipiv.

3.

dKp.fi

tji

ine^Boicrri

Eruption on the

face,

'lovBos.

down

at table.

Nicet. Byz. 768 B. Porph.


o'l

Cass. 155, 37.


dKpijTi (aKpris}, adv. without
toil,

Cer. 47 "Ore aKKCiv\i^liTaMTW

T^j rpmre^Tis.

SeoTTdrai

eirl

easily.

Jos

To

lean against or

upon

B. J.
158.

1, 16, 2.

Theod.

Til,

1077 C.
7,

anything.
8iC<o.

Suid. 'Ajrfpei'fiopit .... aKKOv/Ji-

aKva(f)os, ov

^^

ayva(j)os.

Poll.

37.

Achmet.

aK\a&VTos,

ov,

(icXaSeuci))

unpruned.

Greg.

aKvripos, ov, without Kvripri.

Plut.

11,

520 C.

Th. 1073 C.
aid^ripea, rjo-a, (aitKripos)

dKO^TjTov, incorrect for oxkov^ltov.


to be

poor or hapless,

dKori,

ris,

ri,

hearing.

miserable, unfortunate.

Sept.

Mace.

2, 14, 8.

aKoriv,

within hearing distance.

Diod. 19, 41 Ets (j}av^s 2. Hearsay,

Polyb.
12.

1,

7,

4.

9,

30, 3, et alibi.

Diod.

3,

report.

Sept. Sir. 41, 23 'Ano bivTcpao-eas


aKorjs

Koi
(aitKrjpta))

\6yov
2,

:=
p.

dKo^s \6yov.
9.

aKKfjpqpa, aTos, to, tune.

Agathar.

124,

3,

mishap, misforDiod. 11, 516, 54.


poverty.

2,

3 'AKofjv i^ dxo^s ypd<peiv,


4,
1, 1,

Strab.
Sept.

156,

3.

from

Polyb. 4^ hearsay.

Obedience,

610, 27.
aKKr)pia,

B*g.

15, 22 'Ako^ iinep Svo'iav dyaBfi,.

as,

r),

mishap,
9.

misfortune

obedience

is better

Polyb. 23, 8,

aKolprfTos, ov, sleepless.


(KkTipovop,e(i>)

than sacrifice. Sept. Sap.


579,

7,

10,

0ey5.

aKKnpov6iu]Tos, ov,

without heirs.

yos,

everlasting.

Diod. Ex. Vat.


I,

139,

Leo.

NoveU. 128.

aMlpajUi
ijkXo/^s,
I,

=
1,

Sfta-iSaipovia.

Philon

6,

oppa of God

axKfiptjpa.
1.

Diod.

II,

516,

54.

584, 26, 6^6a\p6s.


dicoipriTOis oppa(Ti.

11,

219, 15 Tols hiavoias

610, 27, as V.
is,

in both places.

inflexible,

firm:
p.

straight.

Philon
10,

194,

et

alibi.

Paul.

Hebr.

23.

Athenag. Legat.

31,

961 C.

Theophil.
11,

1077 B. A.
aKKivSis,

Iren. 545

Clem. A.

465
I,

adv. inflexibly, immovably.

Philon

I, 232 B, </)a)s. 772 C, Svvapts. Jul. 406 A. Basil. Greg. Naz. 11, 412 A, a-KaXri^, in I, 160 B. 2. Substantively, Did. A. 584 B. Hell. oi 'AKolpriToi, the Vigilists, a name given to the inmates of a monastery in the vicinity of Constantinople, from the circumstance

Clem. A.

Orig.

I,

174, 31, et alibi.


aKkKTia,
as,
fj,

Iambi. 21, 5.
indeclinableness,

(afcXjToj)

in

that in the church of that monastery divine service was going on day and night, without
intermission.
Xo) dpxtpavbpirri

grammar.
530, 19.
okXitos,
ov,

Apollon. D. Pron. 273 B.


(kXiVo))

Adv.

MapxtXTheod. IV, 1365 Theod. Lector ' AKoipriTotv.

indeclinable, not declined,

in

grammar.

Dion. Th. 641, 23.

Apollon.

'AKoiprirav.

D. Pron. 273 B. Arcad. 173, 20. Aneb. 31, 10.


A.
Orig. II,

2.

Herodn. Or. Philet. 434. Inflexible. Porphyr.


unshaken.
Hippol. 595

180 B. Euagr. 2&Z& A'n povri t5>v Theoph. 175. Porph. Cer. 801, 14 'H cKKKria-ta rav 'AKoiprirav. Horol. Dec. 29 ToC 6<Tiov Trarpos fipS>v MapKeWov iiyovpe173 B.
TTJs

vov

povqs
ov,

tS>v ' AKOiprjTav.

aKKovTjTos, ov, (/cXoveo))

dKoipifrms, adv. sleeplessly.

289 B.

Damasc. TH, 820 B.


269 B. IX, 205 B. iAai cannot be stolen.
not lashed by
iirjv

dKoipuTTos,

(jcoipl^a)

Anast. Sin. 1164 B Diod. aKolpriTos.

aicKovos, ov, (xXtfyoy)

undisturbed, regular, as the

n, 616,
A).

48.

pulse.
aicXoTTos,

Galen.
ov,

Vm,

&Kotvos, ov, not Koivos.

Themist. 169, 19 (142

(/eXEnrfo)

Greg. Naz.
waves.

m,

1533 A.

dKoivavria-ia, as, v,
tion,

(aKotvavriTos)

excommunica-

a<KvhiivuTTos, ov,

(^KKySavi^o/iai)

Polyb. 10, 10, 4 TS>v ye

SKKav

irvevftdrav dKKvSajvi&Tos iiv Tvyxdvei.

TTJr

the not being allowed to partake of the Carth. Can. 29 'Ev t^ xaip^ sacrament. Theod. Lector 205 dKotvavria-ias avToiJ.

aKKiarms (axXvoToy), adv. without being lashed by waves. Theoph. Cont. 301, 22. SkKvtos, ov, (kKvco) unheard, noiseless, calm, still.
Plut. II, 722 E, drip.

paKapla Aeovn.
dKoivavriTOS,
ov,

A.

Leont.

I,

1236

'

AKoivavrjo-iav

eVoi'ijo-e

incommunicable.

14, 21, ovopa, that is

mn'.

2. Not

Sept.

Sap..

in com-

14

Digitized

by Microsoft

aKoivmvta

106
thus,
1
,

aKOTTUUTTI.
less correct

munion, excommunicated, not allowed to partake of the sacrament for some fault. N'ic.
1, 5.

acolythus

or

aco-

16.
9.

Laod.

Eus. II, 497 B. 628 A. Athan. I, 584 A. 11, 704 IV,

Ant.

1.

Cijprian. Epist. 28, 3. y t u s an acolyth. Hieron. I, 532 Eus. II, 621 A. 1064 A.

'Akoi'Evtre-

(260).
7,

Justinian. Novell. 59,

3.

Isid. Hisp.

vcovrjTOVi 8e 7rE7rot7}Kaxrtv
fiiov.

^AcTepLov Koi

12, 29 Acolythi

Basil.

also ra>v &ymiT]iATa>v.

797 A, toIs iyiaafxacnv, Tim. Alex. 1301 C.


Cyrill.

dicuntur.

Pallad. Laus. 1106 A.


Const. (536), 1148 C.
aKoiviovLa, as,
fj,

2. That has not partaken of


=^
aKoi,va>vr]<Tia.

A. X, 365 C.
the sacrament.

the captain of the Porph. Cer. 523, 14.


sistency.

Follower, (b) = emperor's body-guard. (c) aKoXovBov,


Trpo^ifws. the

Graece, Latine ceroferarii

to

con-

Sirab.

2, 1,

11.

Philon

I,

209, 10

Kar aKoXovdov,
Theod. Lector
28,

quid

consistently.

Hermog. Prog.

(d)

to
9,

anoXovdov,

189 A.
aKoXaKevTtos (aKoXnKevTos), adv. without flattery.
Cic. Att. 13, 51.

Apollon. D. Synt. 149,


Clem. A. H, 641 A.

tov Xdyou.

(e)

context.

to

anoXaKos,

ov,

{KoKa) not flattering.

Diog.

2,

aKoXovdov =^ aKoXovdca, profession. Apophth. 185 D, ToO fiovfjpovs plov. aKoXoidcos, adv. conformably or agreeably to.
Diod. Ex. Vat. p. 109, 17 'AkoXovScos rfj <pv^v, to lice according to nature. Dion. H. VI, 800, 5, rfi Koivfi a-vvrjdeia. Philon I,
a-ei

141, ^rjcftur/ui.

dKoKaa-TVTov (as if from dicoXao-revta),


aKokacrraiveiv.

^=

Set

aKoXacTTeai
vo.

Clem. A.
;

I,

aKo\a(TTaiva>
II,

512 C. opposed to cra^po-

456,

8.

(Compare

Cic. Tusc. 5, 28 Con-

Orig.

68 A.

dKoXXi/Tos, ov,

(jioKkda) not glued on, not ad-

hering

to.

Galen. X, 385 A, toIs viroKeipi-

vois (Tapaaiv.
fitting.

gruere naturae, cumque ea congruenter vivere. Fin. 4, 6 Convenienter naturae vivere 2. Con.... secundum naturam vivere.)

Tropically, incompatible, not

Pseudo-i'ion. 444 B.

2.

sequently

in the next place.

Cleomed. 28,9.

Not

co-

Sext. 299, 2 'P^6koi6a>s 8c eXSioficv koi els ras

alescing.
fie

Dion. H. V, 155, 15
tlie

'A(rvpiJ,iKra

Kara pepos.
aKoXnos,
ov,

rfj

pvuEi ravra ra arot-x^la Kol dKo)(\r]Ta,

(koXttos) without

belly.

A el.

H.

combination NX. Apocr. Martyr. OKoXovBeo}, Tjo-ai, to follotv. Mai. 412 Oi Trjs crvvoSov Barthol. 8, nva.
referring to

A.

15, le.
ov,

aKoppepnevTos,

duty or excise.
266, 9 (218 B).

(Kopp.epKeva>) exempt from Tzym. Novell. 301.

aKoXovdovvres

ra Neoropt'ov

(fipovovacv,

the

a.Koppa>Tos, ov, (^Koppoin) not decorated.

Themist.

partisans of the council are in favor of the tenets of Nestorius.


a.<o\ov6la,
as,
fj,

aKopy^evTos, ov, (ko/zi^cug)) unadorned.

Dion.
unth-

conformity.
^p,<ov

Apollon.
follows

D.
Trap'

H. V,

160, 4.
:

Pron. 380
"laaiv
Sext.

C 'H

rpia-vWa^ovo-a

aKovhvXos, ov, {kovBvXos) without knuckles

vvep^aivei

aKoXovdlav,

the

out being struck on the

head with

the knuckle.

analogy of such forms as raxecov,

fiaa-iKeav.

Lucian.
Diosc.
(iKovos

I,

491.
(axoi/ij)

2.

6,

14 ^AKoXovOiav
ToXs

e^^ouo't Trpos
2,

oKXrjXa.

aKoviov, ov, TO,


1,

Obedience.
f)fx5iv

Jos. Apion.

31 Tfjv ede-

XovcTLov

v6pois

aKoKovdlav.

3.

129.

5,

=1

aKivos.

a medicine so called. 143 (144). Diosc. 3, 43 (50).


Plut.
T, 1

Rule, order, in ecclesiastical affairs.

in, 1033 B.

Damasc.

II,

72 A.

4.

Theod.
Office,
I,

aKovTi, adv.

=^

dicoDcrimr.
ff,

aKovriao-ts, eas,
Tias.

the darting

of

the

76 E. snake

clkov-

order, profession,

382 B.

5.

as priesthood.
office,

Chrys.

Epiph.
I'o-m,

I,

1049 D.
Sophrns. 3653

In the Ritual,
Yit.

order, pre-

aKovTi^a),

to hurl.

'Ett

scribed form, formulaify of devotion.

Martyr.
68 D.

avTov TjKOVTi^ev eavTov to d<p68evpa.


dKovnov, ov, TO,

Hippol. 557.

Epiph. 33 A.
ttjs

40
Xa-

A
28,

paari^ for stimulating beasts


Strab. 4,
alibi.
6, 7.

"Airaa-av

aKoKovdiav

nvcviiaTiKijs

of burden.
Plut.

Dioclet. G. 16, 17.


12,

rp^Las iKTfXca-avres.

Sophrns. 3981

'Airqp-

aKOVTia-pa, aros, to, javelin.


7, 3.

Tiapevrjv Upovpyias aKoXovBiav.

Porph. Cer.
aKoXovdiav.

I,

129 D, et

16 Kara

ttjv

eKKXrja-iaa-TiKfjv

dKovTia-pos, ov, TO,

(aKovrl^as) the hurling

of a
I,

115 'H aKoXovBia toO Xv)^vi.kov, the order for 6. Ceremony. Porph. Cer. the Xu^wKoi'.

javelin.

Strab. 11, 5, 1, p. 449, 8.


alibi.

Pint.

653 B, et

Antyll.
TO,

apud

Orib. II, 48,

2.

79,

24 'H

TTJs TpaTri^Tjs

OKoXovdia.

dKovTUTTTipiov,

OV,

(dKovTiaTrjp)

dicoXovdi(TKos, ov, 6,

a little aKoXovBos, foot-boy. Ptol. Euerg. apud Athen. 12, 73, p. 550 A.
ov,

engine for hurling stones.

a warlike Agath. 147, 13


Ptol. Tetrab.

Ta

Tcoi/

peydXav

Xi6a>v dKOVTurrfipia,

aKoXovBos,

analogous, analogical.

Apollon.
Ka\ o v ovk

dKovTiarfis, ov, 6, shooting star.

D. Pron. 386

'A?r6

yap

ttjs

102 Oi aKovTUTTal t&v darepaiv.


aKowia, as,
Cic.
fj,

eliriv dK6Xov6oi nXr)6vvTiKai, the pronoun 1 has no analogical plural. 272 C Ovk aKoXov6oi elarlv ai dvTa>mp.lai, dtpaTa Be ifita. 2. Substantively, (a) 6 aKoXovdos, a c o 1 u -

(afcoiroy)

freedom from fatigue.

Fam.

16, 18.

aKOTnaa-n (Korridfo)), adv. 697 B.

dKowidaTtos.

Socr.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aKOTTiaa-TOt;
wanriaaTos,
ov,
7.

107
Hermes
Tr.
Plut.
II,

UKpancrfioi;
ple, pupil, L. auditor.

indefatigable.

Dion. H. V, 577,
L. auditorius,

7.

Poem.

65,

1136 F.
17,

axxmiaxmni (aKowlacrros), adv. lovthowl fatigue or Sept. Sap. 16, 20 as v. 1. Macar. labor.
636 C.
a'KOTTiaTfflr

aKovoTiKos,

ov, (aKova-Tqs)
:

pjer-

taining to hearing
ing. 14,

having the power of hearSivapis.


3, 1, 13. 3, 23,

CyrUl.

A. X, 1021 C.
Sept. Sap. 16, 20.

Epict. 2, 23,

2,

preceding.

nvos.

Plut.

II,

898 E.
Sext.

Alex. Aphr.
13, 12, iropos,

oKOTTOf, ov, (icorrof)

refreshing.
sc.

Substantively,

Probl. 23, 16, veijpov.


the acoustic duct.
(j>va-is,

TO aKOjroi/,

(a)
5,

(^apfiaKov,

restorative, soothing salve.

acopu Diosc. 1, 50

(8,

2.
To

132, 8, nvevpa.
01

255, 23,

Substantively,

aKova-nRoi
Gell. 1, 9.

88.

4, 14.

125, p. 793 Kottou XvT^pwv).

aKova-paTiKol, of Pythagoras.
d/couo-TtKcoj,

Lucian."n, 230.

Galen. YJ,

HI

B.

132 A.
3,

adv. by the power of hearing.


dKOutrTtKoC

Sixt.

(to)

a synonyme of

avdyiipts.

Diosc.

267,

nddovs

dvab^KTiKhv

157 (167).
&KOWOS, OV, (fcoTTTo)) noZ

dKova-nKois Kivelrai, & Si aKovtrnKois Kiveirai,

pounded.

Alex. Aphr.

UKOIJ ioTLV.

Probl. 22, 5.
wcopeoTtos (d/cdpeoToj), adv. insatiably.
1,

aKovTi^o), iaa,

{duovaTqs)

to

cause

to

hear

tO'

Philon

declare,

make known.

Sept. Judic. 13,

23

333, 31.

Cfem. A.

11,

296 B.

Jul.

120 A.
S.

HKOUTto"ev ripas raiira.


/ie

Ps. 50, 10 ^KKOVTieis

Themist. 367, 4 (304 D).

Eunap. V.

13

dyaKKia(nv koi
Cant.
2,

fiffipoa'vvrjv,

make me
ttjv
I,

to

hear.
OKopiTTjf, ou, 6,

14 'Akovtictou pe
thy voice.

(pavfjv

flavored with uKopov.

Diosc. 5,
Diosc. 1,2.

o-ov, let

me hear

Orig.

509 C,

73,

owof.
ov, to, (7te rooi

not

classical.

ampov,

of the

aKop(Ss.

aKovai, to hear.

Just. Apol.

1,

62 'O Se {uroAuKareXdetv, he

aKopo-toTor,

without Koparj.

Theophyl. B. IV,
unfinished.

crdp^vos

KOI Ttpoo'eXBav dxi^Koe

308 A.
aii6pv(j>os, ov, {Kopv(\)J))

without top

Diosc.
&oiia,
16.
ij,

H. V, 168, 8. the Latin aqua


a>v,

:=

vhtop.

Lyd.

70,

'A/couawTai,

ol,

:=z Mavt^^aioi.

Epiph. U,

heard that he must go, he was commanded to go. Pallad. Laus. 1241 D Et St BcXere dKovoai TO prj hv iva ccttg), neTrpa^^a, if you vnsh to hear me say what is not true. Impersonally, rjKova-dri, it was heard. Damasc. II, 289 D OiSc yap rjKovirBr] iroTf, fj iv rair

29 A.
dicov^iTov, cLKovp^L^ta,

SeoTTveiKTTOLs ypafjjais,

'Iva

ns

dvabi^rjTai dpap-

incorrect for aKKOv^irov,

rias iripov, that


himself.

OKKOVplBl^a).

2.

any one should

To understand
pfj

take

upon
Sext.

inato).

aKoipfvTos, ov,
p. 57,

(^Kovpevo))

unshorn.

Steph. B.

606, 26

12 ^hKapvavia
sin of ignorance.

Aia to [Anast. Sin. 188


dupdbavTos,

ndvras iravnav aKoveiv.


aKrjKoav zzz dKrjKoacn.^

C
1,

aKov(na^opai., dirBrjv, (aKoirnos) to sin ignorantly,


to

ov, (^KpaSalvio)

unshaken.

Philon

I,

commit a

SepfSvccn.

231,2.
I,

Clem. A.

use.
Philon
8.

15, 28.

(See also aycoeo).)


reaching the ears
Suid. 'Akovo-i-

dKpaSdvTcas, adv. without being shaken.

QKoviriBfos, ov, (aKot/u, 6f6s)

352, 27.

Nicom. Harm.
Diosc.

of

the gods.

Antip. Th. 13.

aKpaiirdKos, ov, {KpaiTraKrf) preventing drunkenness, as

6iov, TO els 6eov

aKoas epxopcvov.

a medicine.

1, 25.

155.

oKovtrpa, aros, to, instruction, lesson, discourse,

dxpaicpvas (dKpai<pvr)s), adv. purely.


100,
6.

Philon

I,

applied to the public lectures of Pythagoras.


Iambi.

V. P.

1 74,

Posidon. apud Atheh.


airSiv elcriv ol
47.

2. Singer. 49 Ta Se aKoia-para KoKovpevoL ^dpdoi. Athen. 5,


dvanoSeiKTOv.
6,

OKpa^dviov, ov, TO, {aKpos, a^mv) the extremity of Eudoc. M. 314. Poll. 1, 145. the axle.

dxpareva

aKparcvopai,.

(Compare axpoapa.^
r},

aKova'pariKos,

ov,

pertaining

to

duovapara.

aKparffs, es, not

Plut. Frag. 838 C. having the power over. Dion.

2. Substantively, oi aKovcrpanKoi, the hearers,


or pr6bationei:s in the school of

I, 96, 8 lav ;(pv dupaTcis noiovvTes 2. Incontinent. tying their hands behind.

H.

Pythagoras

Polyb.

8, 11, 2, irpbs

yvvaiKas.

they were taught dogmatically, not demonstratively.

dKpdTrjTos,
able.

ov,

not

to be controlled,

uncontroll-

Clem. 4. n, 92 A.
/amftZ.

Porph. Vit.

Iren. 513 B.
1,

Pyth. 68.
216.

V. P.
little

66.

174.

Mathem.
Pseudo-

Frag.

aKparrjTais,

688 B. 668 A. SibyU. Hippol. Haer. 448, 45. 36. adv. uncontrollably. Iren. 512 B.

OKOuo-pdnov,

ov,

to,

axova-pa.

Lucian.

Ill, 604.

dtavtrrripiov,

ov, t6,

(dKouor^s) L. auditorium,

aKpari .(aKparris), adv. without control. Arei. 'AxpaTL TO. ovpa CKxeec. 34 Philon U, aKpari^opai, to drink oKparov otvov.

an auditory, audience, assembly of hearers. 2. Auditorium, 9. lecture-room. Galen. I, 39 D.


Porphyr. Vit. Plot. 65,
OKovarr)!,

461, 31.
tropically.

166, 5 'Apiyoiis rjKpana-co

a-ocjylas,

'oS, 6,

hearer.

Classical.

2. Disci-

aKpana-pos, ov,

6,

(wcpaniopm) a breakfasting

Athen.

1,

19.

Digitized

by Microsoft

OKpaTo^opof
axpaToipopO!, ov,
6,

108
acratoAgathar. 148,
yot

OKpOaTlKWi
9.

(axpaTos,
for

(j)epa>)

Strah. 16, 4, 12 'Axpi^o^d-

phorum,
wine.
dxpea, as,
ij,

a vessel

holding unmixed
Hen.

....
as,
5,

fScrt 8' ottA dxplSav.


17,

Jos. B. J. 5, 13, 6.

oKpia-ia,

indiscretion,

want of judgment.
I,

maid,

girl.

Macedonian.
prime of

Polyb.
(plKovs.

106, 8.

Lucian.

114, jTspl tous

'AKpea, TTols BfjKeia.


aKpfifiris, 6,

MaxcSo'i'cs.
life.

{axpos, rj^n) one in the

axpia-pa,

Psell. Stich. 290.


&Kpr)vos, ov,

aros, to, (aKpi^a) castrated animal. Hippol. Haer. 168, 44 To Karrjipes aKpurpM

water. (kp^vti) without springs of Greg. Naz. IV, 83 A, Kpijmi, springs that are

Peas,

"Am.
(axpa) L. mUes limitaneus, a sol-

oKpirrfs, ov, 6,

no springs.
oKptlSafffl,

da-w,

dKpiP6a>.

Sept. Sir. 46, 15

'Ev ma-Tei airov rjKpiPda-dr) 7rpo(j)riTr)s, was Matt. 2, 7 as v. 1. proved to be a prophet.

on the frontier of the empire. Porph. Cer. 489, 12. Phoc. 190, 3. aKpiTiKos, rj, 6v, (dxpiTijr) L. limitaneus, pertaining to the frontier of the empire. Phoc.
dier stationed 186.

Aquil Gen.
luvos).
els

Judic.

49, 10 oKpi^aCoufvos (Sept. r,yoi{Sept. 5, 9 toXs aKpi^a^opivois

aKpiTo^ovXos, ov, (oKpiTos, ^ovKrf) indiscreet, injudicious.


Sibyll. 1, 110.
to.

To).

TO 8taTTaypeva, Symm. els to. npoardyfuiTheodtn. Ps. 59, 9 aKpi.^a(6p.ev6s p-ov (Sept. KpaTaioxns Tfjs KecjyaXfjs pov).
to,

axpiTos, ov, not subject to trial, not amenable

Athenag. Resur. 18, p. 1009


TOVTO Ka6' eavTO kol vopov Koi Polyb. 3, 19, 10. discreet.

D "Ajcpirov
8lK7)S.

wtpi^atTpa, aros,

(aKpi^d^a) statute, commandment. Aquil. Deut. 6, 20 (Sept. 8iKamEpiph. I, 225 para, Symm. npoa-TaypaTo).
B.

2.

yap
/?^-

aKpiTas, adv. indiscreetly, injudiciously.

Epict.

Frag. 86.

Sept. wcpi^aa-pos, ov, 6, (aKpi^dCa) exactness. 2. Statute, commandJudic. 5, 15 as v. 1.


1. 4, 17, 15 asv.l. Reg. 3, 11, Portion,gift. Aquil. ^5i7.Ps.ll8, 118. Gen. 47, 22 (Sept. hopa, Symm. a-vvra^is) a, strange meaning. AquU. aKpi^aa-TTis, ov, 6, commander, governor.

ment.

34 asv. 3.

aKpoapa, otos, to,

acroama,
31, 4, 6.

singer, player.
II,

Polyb. 4, 20, 10.


djcpoapanKos,
c
,

Diod.

583,

9.

fj,

ov,

(dxpoa/ta)
to

acroamatiPlut.
I,

u s pertaining
Gell. 20, 5.

hearing.

668 B,

Xoyoi, esoteric lectures;


Kos.

opposed to

i^arrepi-

Judic.

5, 14.
fj,

Ps. 59, 9.
precision.
Sext. 84, 26

uKpl^eia, as,

Meto

aKpi^fias. 29, 8 Ilpor aKpi^eiav, with precision.

2.
F.

Parsimony.

yap

(jifiScaXla dvri

tov aKplfieia.

Tryph. Trop. 48 Eipj/rat Plut. I, 171


inquire, in-

oKpi^fiopai, eva-opai, (aKpi;3ijr)


vestigate
; to

to

be careful.

Barn. 2 (Codex N).


64

Sext. 615, 4 "iva prjSiv Trepl tovtiov oKpi^eva-

oKpodopm, in the ancient church, to be a hearer, to be a penitent of the second grade. And. Neocaes. 5. Basil. TV, 805 G. Oi aKpoiapevoi, the hearers, penitents of the second grade or heathens wishing to be converted to Christianity. They were allowed to hear the reading of the Scriptures, but not topartake of the Sacrament, or even to pray with the believers. Nic. I, 11. 14. Laod. 5. Const. Apost. 8, 5. 12 (2, Basil. IV, 797 A.

pe6a.

Pallad. Laus.
TL

11

'HKpiPcvero itap
TrdjwoTe.

39).
oKpoao-iy, cmj,

avTOV
aKpi^Tis,
8'

rav KaKwv avT^ Karapdarai


exact, thorough.

Sext. 59, 5 Toir

2.
yav.

rj,

ear.

Apocr. Act. Thorn. 45.


lecture.

Acroasis,
3, 23, 27. 38.

Polyb. 32,
I,

6, 5.

eV

axpt/Sef olopevois

oughly,

616, 14

'Em

ravra yivao'Kfiv, thorTO aKpi^ea-TaTon, most


exactly.

Epict.

Plut.
82.

App. n, 812,
;

925 D, ^iXoXo3. The being an

2.

thoroughly.

741, 15

Koto to cKpi^es,
Matt.
2, 2,

Parsimonious.
a>cTa>,

Tryph. Trop. 274.


7

d(cpi/3dm,

to ascertain.

'Hxpi-

/Sojo-E Trap'

avrav tov xpovov.

16 Koto tov

Xpovov, ov TjKpl^ao'e irapa Totv pdya>v.


oKpi/SSs (aKpi^fjs), adv. exactly.

the second grade of penitents. Greg. Th. 1040 D, 1041 D. 1048 A. Anc. Nic. I, Can. 12. BasU. IV, 673 A. 6. 9. 724 A. 804 B. Greg. JSTyss. U, 229 A. (For the other grade^ of penitents, see Trpoa-icKavdxpoaiifvos
o-is, o'vtTTaa-is, wrOTrTtocrtff.)

oKpt^aiTepov for aKpi^doTfpov.

2.

Drac. 147, 12
Dearly,

aKpoarqpiov, ov, to,


lecture-room.

(Sucpoarrjs)

L. auditorium,

at

opposed to n-Xouo-i'ms. a high price Gregent. 616 IXoXXdicir yap TrXova-iws mvovv;

TOi KOI TroWdxir aKpi^Sts.

aKpi^aa-ts, ems,
Jos.

rj,

(aKpi^oa) accurate knowledge.

Philon I, 528, 33. Epict. 3, 2. Audience, auditory, assembly of 23, 8. hearers. Plut. II, Dion. H. VI, 1004, 4. 937 D.

Ant. 17,

aKpi^a>Tov

2, 4.

dicpoaTiitdy,

r),

ov,

acroaticus,

pertaining

to

Sfi dxpt/SoCu.

Philon
Diosc.
2,

I,

357, 16.

hearing.
310.

Lucian. TH, 509.

Iambi. Adhort.

aKpi'Sioj/, ou, TO, little

aKpls.

116.

d.Kpt&o<j>ayea>, rjaa,

(dxpiSoc^dyos) <0 eat locusts.

oKpoaTiKats, adv. by hearing.

Philon

I,

215, 17

Basil.

IV, 357 B.
(aKpts, ^ayfiv) eating locusts.

Toif dfcpoaTocmi vp&repov e<7-xiK6(n,


been, listeners.

who have

dKpi,8ocf>dyos, ov,

Digitized

by Microsoft

aKpo^d/juov
tucpoffaiuav, ov, (axpos,

109
tiptoe.

aKpoaireko'i

/SaiW) walking on

Greg. Naz. HI, 24 A.

aKpoKvpardo), wo-ai, (Ku^aTom) to float on the top of leaves. Lucian. II, 341.
wepoXiBos, ov,
extremities

oKpo^apea,
oKpo^aria),

fjo-o),

(axpos, ^apvs) to be top-heavy.


27. 28.

(Kidos)

acrolithus,
to

irith

the

ApoUod. Arch.
Tjira,

of stone.
(Xeym)

Anthol. IV, 122, ^Savov.

(^alva)
II,

to

walk
1.

on

tiptoe.
II,

aKpoXoyim,

ijcrco,

pick the tops or ears


top

Diod.
762.

2,

50.

Philon

106,

Lucian.

of corn.
aKpoKo^la,
Polyb.

Philipp. 80, a-raxvas.


as,
fj,

(aKp6\o(f)os)
18,
2,

cLKpo^ekijS,

is,

(fieXoi)

with

a a

sharp point.
skirmishing,

2,

27, 5.
1,

5.

of a MIL Diod. 18, 44.


Leonid. Alex.
Plut.

Philipp. 1

7, fioVa|.
ij,

Strab. 15,

29.

wepo^oKia,
skirmish.

as,

(aKpo^okos)
I,

dKpoXo<j)lrrjs, ov, 6,

mountaineer.

App.

194, 75.
(fiKpo^oKiiofiai)

12.

dKpoP6KuriJ,a, aros, to,

skirr)v

dKp6Xo(j)os, ov, 6, (X6(jios)


I,

dxpoXocjila.

mishing.

App.
Tj,

I,

346, 21 'AxpofioXia-paTa

108 F.
r/oco,

jrpbs ahXriKovs.

dKpoXvria,
6v,

(Xvo))

to

untie partially

(not

dKpo/3oX7T4Koj,
to

(aKpo^oKiorris) belonging
1.

entirely).

Anthol. Ill, 231.


(p,aviKiov)
the

skirmishers.

Ael. Tact. 17,

dxpofidvtKa, mv, to,


Sibyll. 3,

extremities of

(cpd/3ufor, ov,

(Bu^ay) of Byzantium.

the sleeves.

Porph. Cer. 528, 18.

474, OpfJKes.
aKpo^varea),
cised.
rfira, (aKpojSiJoTTjr) to

dKpofiidvoos, ov, {p,i6v(ros) be uncircum1.

:^ dxpodapa^.

Schol.

Arist.

Ach. 1133.
Philipp. 22, Xivov.

Sept.

(Hexapla) Lev.
Epiph.
L.
I,

19, 23 as v.

aKpop-oXi^dos, ov, (/io\t/38o9) leaded at the edge,

dfcpojSuoTijs, ov, 6, (&Kpos, Trdcrdri)

an uncircump.cu

as a net.

cised

man.

181

'AKpo/Svonjr

dKpovdpia, incorrectly for aKptovdpia.

tJ (rapxi. aKpo^varia, as,

dxpowyas
fj,

(vvoa-ai), adv.

praeputium, foreskin,
17, 11 Xlepirp-r)ip.a)v.

tremity.

Galen.

II,

by touching at the ex369 B.


Ptol. Tetrab.

prepuce.
6ri<re<r6e

Sept. Gen., 34, 14.


Tr/v

dK.p6wK.Tos, ov, (vi^) at evening.


22, so. &pa.
77,
(j)d(Tis.

Ex.

4, 25.

aapKa t^s uKpo^viTTlas Judith 14, 10. Mace. 1,


L.

1, 15.

oKpoyvxt ipvv^), adv. with the


lightly.

tip

of

the nail,

aKp6^v(TTos,

ov,

praeputiatus,
Aquil. Ex.

uncir6, 12.

Mel. 25.

cumcised.

Ignat. 701 A.

aKpoQvXos, ov,

:= o^os,

L.

licinus.

Lyd. 138,

oKpoyaviatos, a, ov, (oKpos, yiovia) at the extremity

18 Toy OKpoovXov

Trjv KOfir/v,

Licinium.

of

the corner.

Sept. Esai. 28, 16, \i6os,


2,

dKpo7raxr}s, is, (Traxvs} rather thick.

Moer. 315,
the surface.

corner-stone.

Paul. Eph.

20.

^KVToXi], ^aKTTipia dupoirax^s,

r)

<j>payyiXL0V.

anpoboKTvKov, ov, to, (SanrvKos) the finger-tip.


Steph. Diac.

dKpomjXos,
Polyb.
3,

ov,

(TnjXos)

muddy on

1129 C.

55, 2 Toij hid tSiv aKpoirqXaiv nopevo-

oKpoSfTos, ov, (8ia)


22, p. 201.

bound

at the end.

Philipp.

p.ivois,

dKpoTroSrjTi

on slippery ground. (ttovs) adv. on tiptoe.


(ttoXLtt)s)

Lucian.

I,

aKpoSUaws,
493, 10.

ov, (SiKoios) strictly Just.

Clem. A.

I,

1068 C.

Philon I, Epiph. H,

324. 441.
dKpoTroXlTTjs, ov, 6,

inhabitant of

an

193 B.
aKpoSiKawa-vvr],
tjs,

acropolis.

Mai. 216,
f],

23.

the being

oKpoSUmos.

Epiph.
2,

aKpoTTopia, as,

{aKpoiropos} travelling on high.

U, 193 A.
cLKpo^eoros,
ov, (fe(7s-os) warmish. Diosc. 146 written dicpo^ea-dos, incorrectly.
{Cvp,rj)

Caesarius 976.
dKpo7r6p(jivpos, ov, (n-o/x^upoCs)

somewhat purple.
hard drinking.

Diosc. 4, 117 (119).


aKpoTToa-ia,
as,
fj,

oKpoCv/ws, ov,
leavened.
20, 2,

acrozymus,

slightly

(aKpoirorris)
1.

Galen. XIII, 577 E.

Isid. Hisp.

Polyb.

8, 11, 4, V.

dKpaTOTTooia.

15 Acrozymus, leviter fermentatus.


{Biyydvai) touching lightly.

aKpojrpapov, ov, to, (aKpos, np^pa) the end of a


ship's
3, 4.

aK.po6iyr)s, is,

Mel.
e/iPd-

prow,

the

head of a

ship.

Strab.

2,

14.

aKpodiylos, adv. lightly.


TTTUV.

Diosc.

2,

105,

dxpoTTvpyiov, ov, to,

(nvpyos) the upper tower.

wcpodlvtos,

a,

ov,

(oKpodiviov)

chief.

Anast.

Theoph. Cont. 331, 15. dxpoppiCos, ov, (pl^a) whose roots are near the
surface.
Basil.
OV,
I,

Sin.

525 A.
cov,

109 B.
(pis) the tip

aKpoKepaia,

to, (Kepaia)

L. cornua antenna-

oKpoppiviov,

TO,

of the nose.

rum, the ends of sail-yards.


oKpoKioviov,
ov, TO,
(kio)!/)

PoU.

1,

91.
pillar.

Poll. 2, 80.
aKpoa-iBripos,
ov,
(o-t'Si/por)

Capital

of a

with

an iron point

Philon n, 147,
wcpoKvecfyfis,
is,

3.

Antiphil. 4 dxpooihapos, Doric.


aKpoiaii(j)atos.

Lucian. U,
Polyb.

337.

in, 18.
Strab. 4, 6, 10,

Carth. Can. 39 aKpos, a, ov, extreme, highest. "A-Kpos Upevs, high-priest, as a title.
aKpoa-ireXos, ov, 6,
4,

aKp6Kopx>s, ov, with hair at the extremity.

=r

^p&pos, a plant.

Diosc.

34, 10, 9.

138 (140).

Digitized

by Microsoft

UKpoaa-oi
aKpoa-a-os, ov,
less.
(/c/joero-ds)

110
aKjapa, aros,
11.
to,

aKTtvo^oXew

without tassels, fringe(TTixos) the conclu9,

aKpayrr^piov.

Theoph. 545,
G-cilen, 11,

VseuA-Athan. IV, 264 B.


(oLKpos,

aKpofTTixiov, ov, t6,

aKpap-iov, ov, t6, zz^ aKpafJila.

263
5.

sion

of a
2,

verse.

Sibyll.

17, 23.

Const.

A.
oKpapts, iSos,
dKpa>jj.iTris,
Tj,

Apost.

57, 5 "ETepdr Tiy

tovs tov Aa/3i9


aKpoo'TiX'''^

^
6,

aKpafjila.

Alciphr. Frag.

ilfaXXeVa) v/ivovs, Koi 6 Xabs ra (Sc also viraKorj.) mo^jraX)iera>.

ov,

superintendent

of schools?

aKpoa-Tixis, iSos,

rj,

(aKpos,

(ttIxos)

acrosti-

chis,

H. n, 793, IT, 365 B.

Dion. Cic. Divin. 2, 54. ^s. n, 1288 A. Epiph. In the Ritual, the aKpotxnx^s of a Kavmv consists of the first letters of the
acrostic.

Olymp. 461, 19 tovs Ta>v biarpi^Siv Trpoa-TaTas Tovs Xeyopevovs aKpaptTas, as Athens. dKpap,la f Melamp. 490. dKpa>p.os, ov, 6,

14.

aKpavdpia,

a>v, to.,

from

the legs of
2;(e\/Scs,

(aKpav) aero, strips of meat an animal. Schol. Lucian.

n, 330

to diro ray (TKiKaiv Toiv

foJfflX

TpoTrdpia of that Kavwv.


aKpou-Tokiov,
(TTov,

is pifJKOS

dipaipovpeva, cnrep <paor\v aKpavapia.


(TTqpiypMS of tj, (dxparnxos) Lyd. 19, 1 Tpeis 6c Kivr]a-is tS>v

ov,

TO,

{aKpos,

o-t6\os^

:=

acpAa-

dxpaivvxla, as,

L. aplustre, ornament at the stern of a Pint. I, Strah. 3, 4, 3. ship. Diod. 18, 75.

a planet.
dKpmmxos,

dcTTepcov, TrpoTroditrp.os, {jiro7ro8t(rp,os, aKpiavuxta.


ov, (aKpos, oi/i;|)

209 B.
mouth.
ger.

Ap>p.
ov,

I,

677, 88.
((TTopo)
77, 2.

belonging to the ex-

aKpotTTOfiiov,

TO,

the

edge of the

tremities
lx>'os,

of the

nails.

Plut. II, 31 7 E. 325 B,

Dion. H. V,

made

with the toes.


tips

2. Substantively,
Mel.
79,

aKpoa-tpaipiov, ov, to, (^(Ttpaipa) the tip

of the fin-

TO aKpawxa, the
X^pos.

of the fingers.

Protosp. Puis. 16, tSiv SaKTvXiov.

*dKpoTe\evTtov, ov, to, the clausula of a verse.

Thuc. 2, 17. 2. Refrain, burden, chorus, Philon I, 474, 11. of a hymn, {maKorj. n, 484, 18. Dion. C. 77, 23, 4. 80, 5, 3. Eus. n, 184 A. OKpoTopea, jjtro), to lop off. Jos. B. J. 2, 10, 1

aKpas (aKpos), adv.


346, 10.
aKpaTrjpidia, to
like

ivith

perfect accuracy.

Sext.

form a promontory,

to jet out

a promontory. Polyb. 4, 43, 2 Trjs Evpanrjs im npooj^s Tivos aKpayrqpia^ovfrris, V. 1. Strab. 2, 1, 40, p. 139, 19 aKpap^ia^ova-ris.

Twv
to

T evyeveCTTeptov dKpoTop.rja-at. Trjv TraTpiha,

To

'2ovviOV dKpamjpid^ei opoiats

rjj

AaKOiVtK^.

deprive of.

dKpcoTTjpiaa-pos, ov, 6, (aKpwrripid^a) amputation.

aKpoTopos, ov, (aKpos, Tepvco) cut off sharp or square; abrupt, steep. Sept. Deut. 8, 15,
TTETpa.

Diosc. lobol. pp. 56. 75. 88.

Chrps. IX, 458


Doubtfiil.

A.
dKpQJTrjpia,
as,
rj,

Josu.

5, 2.

Eeg.

3, 6, 7, \ldos.

Job

aKpcoTTjpiov.

28, 9 'Ev aKpoTop-a e^eTctve X^'^P^ avroii, sc. Polyb. 9, 27, 4, n^Tpa. Jos. Ant. 8, wfTpa.
3, 2.

Sext. 430, 16.

aKTa,

tov,

TO.,

the Latin

acta,
I,

acts.

Just.

Hes. 'AKpoTopa, o^vtutco

\l6(o,

rj

vyJATj-

Apol.
hrjdfv

1,

35 'Ek Tav eVi HovtIov HiXaTOv yevo-

Kai (TKkrjpa Tipvovri.

peviav oKTcov.

Epiph.
alibi.

885

Tav

oKratv

aKpovpavia, as,

Lucian. II, aKpovoTms {Kpova) adv. Nil. Jun. 53 A.


aKpocpvrjs,
es,
((f)va>')

(ovpapos) the summit of heaven. 342.


rj,

HCXaTov, a forgery.

Const. (536), 1112


20.

D. 1208 C, et
279.
a/crafm, ao-o),

Mai. 443,

Theoph.
on. the

loithout striking ?

Vit.

(dKrfj)

to

of high nature.

Synes.

seashore.

Plut.

II,

enjoy one's self 668 B.

1364 C.
dKpo(f>vXa^, aKos, 6, (aKpa, (jiv\da-a-a>)

aKTsavos, ov, (KTeavov) without property.

Antip,

commander
Pseudo-Zos.
Jos.

S. 90.

Polyb. of a citadel. Mace. 3, p. 501, tS>v

5, 50, 10.
ttvXSiv.

aKTepeXaros, ov,
aKTfprjs, es,
aKTrj,
Tjs, fj,

(Compare
Dion

aKrepia-Tos.

Anthol. IV, 247.

dxrepurros.

Sibyll. 3, 481.

Ant. 13, 15,

1 Tijs

&Kpas (jivXai.)
tail.

dKpo(pv<nop, ov, TO, comet's


dKpox^i'Pt.aa'fios, ov, 6,
II,

C. 78, 30, 1.

the elder.

contracted from oKTea, L. sambucus, Diosc. 4, 171 (174). 4, 172 (175)


or dypia aKT^,

z= oKpoX^ipio-fios.

Lucian.

EXetoy

dKTTi, 'Ev^o'iKq oKTr),

327.

aKpox^tptirpos, ov, 6,
tling with the

XapaiaKTTj.
(aKpo;(p/fo/iat) toresdKTrjjiotrivri, r/s,
I,
fj, (dKTrjfimv) poverty. Clem. A. n, 625 A. Orig. I, 1337 A. E, 577 A. Eus. VI, 533 C. Basil. IV, 293 A. aKTrjo-ia, as, fj, =: dKTrjfwtrvvr). Philon U, 290, 8. Cosm. Carm. Greg. 557. JS'icet. Paphl. 309 D.

hands.

Poll. 2, 153. 161.

3,

221 A.

150.

Galen. VI, 144 D.


ov,
1.
rj,

aKpoxepa-iTTjs,

5,

one

who

aKpox^ipiC^Tai.

Pans.

6,

4,

aKpoxoXla, as,

^=: CKpaxoXla.

Schol. Arist.

Ach. 211.
aKpoxopbovaihrjs, fs, (aKpoxopSav)

aKTi,vj)b6v

(oktIs},

adv.

like

rays

proceeding
278.

L. verrucosus,
Orig. VII,

from the same point.


aKTivo^oXea,
tjo-o),

Lucian.

II,

warty.

Dion
Cyrill.

C. Prag. 47.

(oktis, ^aXXco) to radiate, to

aKpvwrais (aKpviTTos), adv. openly.


C'2

C.

A.

I,

789 C.

emit raijs. Philon I, 638, 3 "Ems oSv t6 Upov i^c'yyoE 6 6eos dKTWo^oXei.

en

o-oi

Digitized

by Microsoft

uKTivofioXia
aKTivoffoXia, as,
11,
rj,

111
of rays.
Plut,
aiaipoai, jio-co,

aXai
{uKvpos) to render invnlid, to an1, 6,
I,

the emitting

781 A.

Ptol. Tetrab. 131.


(aKTis,
II,

nul. 24.

Sept. Esdr.
29.

31.

Diod.
II,

oKnvoeiJbijS, cr,

EIAQ)

4, 31.

16
'Er.'-

like rays, resplen-

Dion. H.
8, 4,

391, 12.

1219

dent.

Philon

559, 25, arf^avos.


Sihyll. 8, 191.

pois
12,

dKvpcodrjvat

Tairra

^(fiio-p.acnv.

Strab.

aKTtvSeis, e(r(Ta, v, radiant.

14, 1, 23.

10 Tavra

r^Kvparai. ra eXeyeia,

2G9 'Ajenvoevra
aKTivaSris, cs,
aKTiviOTOS,
r),

KOfirjrrjv,

incorrectly.
Philontr. 133.

z^
6v,

aicnvoei.hfjs.

aKTWoeis.

Philon

II,

560,

Mait. 15, 6. (Compare Sept. Prov. 1, 25 'AKipovs inouLTe epLas liovXds. Diod. 16, 24 Hepi roi noi^a-ai. rds
Kpio-ts tS)V
'

are of no authority.

29, arecjiavos.

Ap.cf)iKTv6va>v aKvpovs.)

'AjcTurnTm,

Siv,

oi,

Actistitae,

who maintained
increate {ukti-

dKvpois,

adv. improperly, as to the use of a


Kvpicos.

that the
(TTov).

body of Christ was Tim. Presh. 44 B.


Athan.
I,

word; opposed to
404,
2.
f),

Hennog. Rhet.
an an-

&CTUTTOS, ov, {KTi^a)) uncreatcd, increate.

393 A.

Caesarius 865.

Method, 473 C. Basil. IV, 249 C. Greg. Naz. Ill, 41 1 A. Did.


II,

aRvpaitTis, ems,

{aKvpdai) a cancelling,

nulling,

a quashing.

Dion. H.

Ill, 1548, 11,

KOTaSlVjJS.

A. 785 B.

Greg. Nyss.

28 C,

(^uo-tj.

aKvpayreov

= 8

aKvpovv.

Clem. A.

I,

504

dmoTmy, adv. without being created. n, 1101 B. Basil. IV, 332 A.


oKToXoye'o),
rjaa,

Athan.
to
SJt-

Ovbi ras evToXds duvptDriov. aKXOvx, V. 1. dxoix, ninn,


thorn-bush.

aKav,

thorn,

(oKra, Xeyo))

to cheer,

Sept. Par. 2, 25, 18.

lute

with shouts of joy.


6v,

Pwph.

Cer. 250,

aniikia-Tos, ov, (aKcoXos) without KmXa, as

a pe-

Twd.
oKTOf,
i),

riod.

Dion. H. V,
ov, (kuiXov)

1 72, 2,

neplohos.

aKTovdpios,

ov,

(Sya) brought, Plut. I, 837 F. the Latin actuarius. 6,

Justinian. Novell. 117, 11.


12.
aiennri

Porph. Cer. 304,


Polem.
'Aktooq-

312, 22.

{Kromai), adv. without sound.

without limbs or body, as a Paus. 1, 24, 3 'AxaXovs 'E/)/iaj. d/cm/ifflSijT-mj (implying dKm/ioiSijros) without being ridiculed in comedy. Lucian. II, 71. aKoivioTos, ov, (xfiyor) not smeared over loith
statue.
pitch.

aKaXos,

244.

inTcmpios

Diosc.

1,

93 Kepafieavv dyyelov

dicui-

oKTtyvapios.

Inscr.

4004

VKTTOV, tovt4(Ttiv aTTiO'a'aiTOV.


aKcovos, ov, (kSivos) without

pios \avKuipicov.

a conical

top.

Jos.

oKTap, opos, 6, the


23, 6.

Latin actor.

Antec.

1,

Ant.
aKomos,
oXa, TO,

3,

7,

3 IltXoi/ aKOivov .... KaXeiTat 8e

ILacTvaejii^Brfs,

the turban of the high-priest.


without oars.
Philipp. 32.

OKTapea, to be aitrapos.
SaXaiTiTai' (jivXarrei.

Hes. 'AKrapei, ra impa


the coast.

ov, (Komrj)

=
2

SXas.
;

Matt.
1.

5,

13.

Marc.

9,

50.

aKTcupos, ov, S, (^aKTTj,

&pa) guard of

Luc. 14, 34
aXa^apx^ia,
dXa^apxeoi,
20,
5,

as v.
fj,

Hes. 'AxTOipovs, yeatpyovs, ^ <j)vXaKas.


aKv^epvtjTos, ov, ((cu/Sepmoi) not steered, not piloted.
'

as,

^=
to

dXa^apxla.

^(rta,

be alabarches.

Palladas 30. Jos. Ant.

Philon
II,

I,

Lucian.

694.

2.

219, 10.

Plut.

II,

501 D.
unfit.

ToC

Kol dXa^apxriTavTos iv 'AXe^av-

Not
071'

qualified,
rai/

Speia.

Leo Gram. 206, 17 Etr

irpayimrav

dXa^dpxrjs, ov,
Jos.

8ioiio)(nv 7ravTf\a>s a.Kv^epvr)Tos.

6, alabarches, the title of the chief magistrate of the Jews at Alexan-

aKv^fVTos, ov, (icv/Seuo)) cautious, firm, steady.

dria.

Ant. 18,

6,

3.

18, 8, 1.

(ComJos.

Anton.
wcidripos,

1, 8.

ov,

(KvBrjpr))

dvacjipoSiTos.

Cic.

Fam.

7,

32.
=::=

pare dvapa^dx^is.) dXa^apxla, as, rj, the Ant. 20, 7, 3.


dXa^aa-Tpivos,
ij,

office

of alabarches.

aiaiXas, 0,

the Latin a q u i 1 a

aeros.

Bust.

ov,

of

alabaster.

Apocr. Act.

Dion. 165, 30.


'AfciXar, a, 6,

Andr. et Matthiae
Orig.
I,

29, dvbpias. aXa^aa-rpoeiSris') adv.

Aquila, one of the translators of


Bible.

dXa^aarpoeibas (implying
like alabaster.
dXa/Sijf,
d,

52 D. IV, 272 B ToO 'AkvXov. Eus. IV, 497 B. AicvXtvos, ov, 6, Aquilinus, a heretic. Porphyr.
the
Vit. Plot. 66.
waifuivTios (waipxaiTos),
I,

Hebrew

Diosc. 4, 77.

alabeta,

a fish of the Nile so

called.

Strab. 17,2,4:.

adv. calmly.

Clem. A.

680 C.
Anast.
to

aKvpUvTos, ov, (xvpicvd)) not ruled, free.


Sin. 77

oKaioviK&s (dXa^oviKos), adv. arrogantly. Poll. Orig.l,677A. 9,147. Plut. 11, 523 E, tarpds. dXaCoiv, ovos, 6, quack. [Comparative dXa^ovca-Tcpos. Eus. 11, 1281
B.]

D.
rja-a,

OKvpoKoyea,

(as if

from oKvpoXoyos)
I,

use

dXddrjTos, ov,

loords incorrectly.

Philon

216, 32.

forgkting.

(XavBdva) not to be deceived ; not Macar. 448 A. Did. A. 697 B.


p.vrip.r].

oKvpoXayia,
use

as,

fj,

acyrologia,
6.

inaccurate

Psi^udo Chrys. IX, 764 B,


SXai, av.

ofwotds. Dion. H. V, 462, Gr. Acyrol. 262.

Herodn.

aU (SXs) L.
Dion. H.
I,

1 i

nae

salt-works,

snll-pits.

353,

9.

Strab. 12, 3, 12.

Digitized

by Microsoft

aXa/cariov
oKaKaTiov, ov, to, (^Xcocan;) ballista.
6,

112
Leo. Tact.
Xeyofieva
aX^ovKiovp.,
ia-(t)6SeXos.

a\eKropo(j}(ovta
the Latin
Diosc.
1,

albucus
120.
2,

SXifios,

27 BaWiaTpas,

rJTOi

^yyaptKa to

199.

oXaKaTta o-Tpe<^6fiva KiiKXadev.


AXaXai, interj. alas
!

dXyevijo-tor, a, ov,

perhaps a corruption of the


Dioclet. C.
3,

Barsan. 893

Oval kiu

Latin
31.

algensis (alga).

akdKai tw yevei
dXa\a|tos, ov,
6,

^fxayv.

epithet of Ares.
AXaXrfTos,
ov,

(oXaXafo)) of the hattle-cry, an Cornut. 120.

dXy/ta, to feel pain.

Diosc. Eupor.

1,

69 Aia-

Kparelv ev

T&

(TrdfrnTi

KaTa rhv aXyovfievov


Sept. Jer. 10,

Philodem.
aKciKr)Tvs,

p. 74.

ios,

(XaXem) tmspohen, unutterable. Paul. Rom. 8, 26. Anthol. IV, aXaXi/Tor. fj,

oSovTa, for dXyoOj^a.


dXyi;pds, d, ov, (aXyos) painful.
19

'AXyrjpa
17,

r)

nXriyfi a-ov, SC. iariv.


ov,

152.

aXfavTiKos,
(oKciXriTos),

(dXfaiVto)

warming.
dX^^m.

Sext.

aKakrjTws

adv.

without

speaking.

163, 12.
dXf'^ia,
fo-a,

Amphil. 76 D.
oXaXor,
ov,

174, 26.

oKoKas, adv.
'AXapavoi,

= ^

eapM.1,

ea-6rjv,

^cAme(.
Diog.

apprjTos.

Hippol. Haer. 140, 89.

195.
oXfi/i/m, aToj, TO, <Ae time for anointing.

216, 33.
apprjTas.

Hippol. Haer. 196,

1.

5, 2

Mexpi. I^^v oXfliifiaTos.

Siv, ol, Alamanni or Alemanni, a peoGermany. Agaih. 26, 20. uXa/ima, as, fj, (dXa/iTrris) want of light. Nicom. apud Phot, m, 593 B. AXd^fvTos, ov, (Xa^eva) not hewn. Jos. Hymnog.

dXcLjipATiov, ov, t6. Utile aXeififia.

Diog.

6,

52.

ple of

dXeiTTTeov znz Set

aX.ei<j>eLV.

Galen. VI, 114 A.

aXcnrrfjpios, a, ov,

(dXeiTmjs) L. unctorius, be-

longing

to

anointing.
/(V^e

Erotian. 214. 216.


dXfiTm/f.
Schol. Arist.

dXetTTTocfis,

adv.
:i::i

an

985 A.
oKapiov, TO, (SKs)

Eq. 492
trdkapiov.

iraiboTpi^iKais.

Suid. 'AXXa-

dXetTTTOff,
I,

jj,

dv,

{aXeic^o))

anointed.

Clem. A.

ptots, (Tvrqpeuiois,

incorrect for dXapiois.

537 B.
ov,

uXapvva,

to dirty, befoul, pviraivm.

Hes. 'AXa-

aXeiTTTOS,

(XfiVm) not
I,

left

behind; uncon-

pvvai, pvnavai.

(Compare
salt.

aXipos.)
5, 13.

quered.

Gruter.

313.
(aXeiTovpyrjTos) exemption

aXas, aros, to, (aXs)


9,

Matt.

Marc.

aXeiTovpyrjcria, as,

fj,

Luc. 14, 34. Diosc. lobol. 22. 23. Archigen. apud Orib. 11, 153, 11. Plut. IT, 668 F. Clementin. 32 B. Hippol. Haer. 92, 9. [It was suggested by the accusative plural Toijs aXas of oi oXej.]
50.

from public
17.

burdens.
I,

Athan.

349 C.

2. Suspension of an
A 'Ira
/iij

Strab. 13,

1,

27, p. 25,

ecclesiastic.

Theophyl. B. IV, 340 B.

aXeiTovpyqTos, ov, (XetTovpyea) without a minister,

as a church.

Sophrns. 3704

oXaaTopia,

as,

rj,

(dXdoriBp) wickedness.

Jos.

TO eifKTTjpiov aXeiTovpyqrov KaTaXei^eLev.


dXeKpQJSios, ov, 6, ^dXelipa), ^los)

Ant.
B.

17, 1, 1.

an attendant
Philon

at

Si.a.nvos, ov,

{SXas) of

salt.

Clem. A.
36.

I,

1000

the palaestra.

Hence, poor.
1 7

TI, 5S7,

23.

Hes.

'

AXfi.(po^iovs, izivryras.

(Compare
Ov-

^XaTiov, ov, TO, ^z: aXas.


aXaT6p.r)Tos,
ov,

Aet.
not

3,

Bekker. 382,

'AXeitpoi^iov, tov Trcpl n-oXai-

(XaTopea)

apud Clem. A. I, 980 B. Jos. Hymnog. 1021 C.


aXaxavos,
ov,

hewn. Herm. Prod. CP. 709 B.

(TTpav avao'Tpetpop.evov nal vTrrjperovvTa.

Tas

'

ApL(rT0<l)dvris.)

aXeiffxa,

to

smear, anoint.

Classical.

Pseud-

Qi.axavov'}

destitute

of
I,

pot-lierhs.

Ignat.

572

A M^
3,

dXei(f)e(rde

Sva-aSlav t^s

Greg. Naz. HI, 29 A.

^tdacrKoXias rov apxovros rov alcovos tovtov.

"AX^a,

as,

ri.

Alba.
TO,

Dion. H.

166, 8. 12.

l_Sept.

Num.

^Xet/ijuei/ot.

Aquil. Ps. 83,

168, 17.

^AXPavov, oi,
El's

mons Albanus.
fj,

Nicol.

D. 93

'AX/Sarav to opof.

AX^avoTToXif, ems,
polis.

{'AX^avos, jroXif) Albano3, 13.

Sext 652, 30 fjXcmrai for dXjjXiTTTai, condemned.] SXeKTo, 6, Macedonian, dXeKrcop. Orig. Vil, 232 D *0 dXeKT(op to opveov trap T}filv (tois
10
riXeififievos.

Ptolem. Geogr.
7),

''

AKe^avhpevfTLV^ aXcKTa Xeyerai.


Greg.

'AX^avds,
13.

6v,
6,

Albanus.

Diosc.

5, 10, olvos.

dXcKTopeios, ov, (dXe/cT(Bp) cock's, hen's.

'AX^avos, ov,
3,

dX/3aToi,

an Albanian. Ptolem. Geogr. Atlal. 9. Due. 223. a>v, ol, the albati of the Circus. Lyd.

Xaz. IH, 1164


like cocks.

KoKKufer' dXeicropeiov, crow

Synes. 1340 B, ud.


oXeKTopiov,
ov, to,

dXcKTopiv,

for

cockerel.

65, 20.

dXpivovs,

(Compare Dion C. 61, the Latin a 1 b i n u s


,

=
,

6, 3.)

Theoph. 437, 13.


dXeKTopicTKos,
ov,
6,
little

yva(pdXiov.

diXeKTap,

cockerel.

Diosc.

3,

122 (132).

Babr.

5, 1.

'AXI3tcov, oDvos, 6,

aX^oXov, Gallic, yXfjxav. Diosc. aXpos, a, ov, the Latin a 1 b u s


ao'TTpos.

Albion.

Marcian. 145.

3,

33 (36).
XevKos,
:z^ ol

aXexTopopavTcia, as, fj, (aXeierap, /rnvreia) divination by means of a cock. Cedr. I, 548, 15.
dXcKTopo(j>a>via, as,
rj, {aXiicrwp, (fxavrj) the crowing of a cock. Hence, cock-crow, cock-crowing, early morning. Strab. 7, Frag. 35, p.

Mai. 176 T6 aX^ov

fiepos,

oXffaToi.

Digitized

by Microsoft

a\6T0?
83,
24.

113
Orig.
I,

a\r)doTTotta)
(dXc'ci))

Marc.

13,

35.

825 B.

oKcTos, ov,
25.

6, I,

Const. Apost. 5, 18 Trjv /xevroi rrapaa'KcvfjV Koi TO (ra^fioTov oKoieKripov vrjcrreiKTare, off Sui/afus

Plut.

Eudoc. M.
aXiTpis, l8os,

937 B. 35 -Tos.

a grinding. II, 289 F.


oKrjBovtra.

2.

Diosc.

1,

Flour.

Ttpoaccm TOiavrr], nc'x/"* oKeKTopot^wviai vvKTOS. 5, 19 'AttA i<rjr(pas emr aXeKTopot^o)rias

f),

r)

Classical.

dypuTiToCiTES.

8,

34

Ev^as fViTeXeire
(cdi

opSpov Koi TpiTJ]

&pa

Koi eKTT] Koi evvdrri

2. In the plural dXerpiSes, the maidens loho prepared the flour for the sacrificial cakes, at Athens. Eudoc. M. 35.
dXerai', S>vos, 6, mill.

emrepa Koi dXeKTopo^ojj/ia.


aXfKTor,
Sept.
13,
ov,

Athen.

6, 82.

(XcKTos)
3,

that

cannot
1.

be

told.

*dKeipivos, ov, of oKevpov.


I,

Dieuch. apud Orib.

Mace.

4,
I,

as v.
9.

PoZj/6.

30,

280,

1.

12.

Philon

104,

605, 38.

Sext.

dXcupopavTfloj', ov, to, {akevpopavns) divination

740, 22.
flXf/trpuow's, I'Sos, ^,

by flour.

=:

aKKTpvo(j>wvioVj ov, TO,

Achmet. 294. r=r a\eicTopo(^c^vLa. Did.


oKcKTopis.
apvr^triv

oKevpopxivTis,

flour.

Oenom. apud Eus. Ill, 376 D. ea>s, 6, {oKevpov, pdvns) diviner by Clem. A. I, 69 A. Eudoc. M. 9.
es,

A. 920
Uirpov.

Tiji'

Trpo dKeKrpvo<liaviov

oKcvpahris,

{oKevpov} mealy, like flour.

Galen.

akeKTpvaStjs, fs, (oiKfKTpvav) cock-like.


94,

Eunap.

22 IIpoj 8e fjSovas dXEKvpumSi/r {Phot. Ill,

260 E. Sept. SKecl), dSn, the name of the letter N. Thren. 1, 1 et seq. Epiph. Ill, 280 D. See
also aX<^.

Xm,

245

dXexTpuoj/ajfij/s).
fj,

'AXeldvSpeia, as,
in the

Alexandria, the second city

aXem,

to

grind.

Diosc.
[1,

2,

113

Trjs aKrjkea-pevrjs

being the first. Diod. 17, 52. Philon Sept. Mace. 3, 3, 1. n, 523, 31. Jos. B. J. 4, 11, 5. Herodn. 4, In the latter part of the fourth cen3, 15. tury it was the third city in the empire, Rome being the first, and Constantinople Greg. JSfaz. I, 1201 B. 11, 280 the second.
empire,
B.
ov,

Roman

Rome

eh Xenrov
685 E.

fetar.

38 rjke(Tpevos.^
carrying
salt.

oKrjyos, ov, {SKs, ayat)

Plut.

II,

971 B.
ov,

oKrjddpyrjTos,

(Krjdapyos}
p-vripr).

not

forgetting.

Macar. 837 A,
dkrideca, as,
6ei,av
r),

truth.
irotrja-et,

Sept. Esai. 26, 10 'AXij-

ov
5,

pr)

he

ivill

not learn truth.

Diod.
{'AXe^dvSpeia)
Inscr. S0G9, dpyvpiov.

67 npos

dKridetav, in reality.

Philon
the

'"'AKe^dvSpews' a,
drian.
tively,

TO

'

2. SubstanAXf^dvSpem, games in honor of


Sirab. 14,
S>v,

Alexan-

I,

222, 19.
as,
fj,

'AXfideia,

Alethia, a female Aeon,

counterpart of NoSs.
aKrjdelStv for aKr)9elbiov,

Iren. 448 A.
to,

Alexander.
'fiXe^avSptavd,

1,

31.

dXrjdivov, true

to,

Alexandriana, in Assyria.
'AXi^avSpos.

purple, not imitated.


dXridetSLv.

Chron. 614 STrjBdpiv


Sext.

Simoc. 219,
oKe^avSpi^m,
6,

2.

'urta,

to be like

Athen.

d\r]deva-i.s, eas,

fj,

{dXr/Bevai) the being true.

58.
r),

276, 16.
ov,

hXe^avhplvos,

Polyb. 34,
28, 11.

8, 7.

Alexandrian, of Alexandria. Strab. 13, 1, 36. Luc. Act.


Diog.
7,

oKqdevTrfs, ov,

6,

speaker of truth.
Sept.

Max.
'Ett'

Tyr.

85, 22, \6ya>v.


dXrjdrjS,
es,

27, 6.

18.

true.

Dan.

2,

47

nXrjdei

'AXe^avSpis, ISos,

i),

Alexandrian.

Philon H,

:=: 'E?r' dXriSeias.


dXrjBivoXoyia, as,
fj,

521, 13, vavs.


.rfiKf^avhpuTTrjs, ov, 6,

(dXij^ivos,

\eya) truthfulness.

(ake^avbpi^ai) a partisan
I,

Poll. 2, 124.

of Alexander.

Plut.

678 C.

akqdivtmlirepos,

ov,

{nlnep, niwept) pepper-col'?

aKi^ap, TO, Arabic, =:; TO Seikivov, the afternoon.

ored

having the color of red pepper


'AXriBivon-iirepoi Kwves.

Meet. Byz. 776


Ske^ii, ems,
fj,

{Koran, cap. 103).


Aristid.
I,

Theoph. Cont. 141


60, 18.
*d\ri6i.v6s, n, ov, true

(dXc'lm) help.

purple, dyed with the genu-

Et.

M.
I,

59, 23.
(Xffft's)

ine purple, not imitated.

Xen. Oecon.
10,
79.

10,

SKems,

without scales, as a

fish.

Phi-

3,

TTop^vpis.

Tsendo-Jacob.
Act.
7,
ex.

mpcpipa.
33,^

lon II, 352, 14.


akcTTiO'Tos, ov,

{\em((o)

not shelled.

Schol. Arist. Lys. 735, not hackled.


SiKcpos, ov,
6,

armaros, not husked, Erotian. SS. Geopon. 10,11,1.


Hes. 'AXfpov,

Dioclet. C. 3, 27.

Mai.

11

To

e'l

dpxns dvabeix6ev
(TX^lpa

t^e KoyxiXr^s iXr)-

divov

^ao-iKiKOv

e(j)6pea-av.
4.,

413,

14,

(TTTiedpiov.

Theoph. 48i,

T^ayyia.
72,

Porph.
irdp-

or dXcpoi', dung.

Cer. 80, 17, crayia.


Siica.

Adm.

Seppdna

umpov.
Skeins, ems,
32, 1.
aKea-pios, ov, 6,
fi,

(dXem) a grinding.

Geopon.

2,

i/oO,

dXrieoyvcoiTta,

Hes. Kiwd^api, elSos xP">i^'^^ "^1^'-' (See also 6Xd/3i;poi/.) 6 Xiyerai kokkivov. yvS,<ris oKriBeias, knowlas, i],

dXrjtrpds.

Jos. Ant. 3, 10, 5

as V.

1.

edge of truth. Paphl. 28 C.


d\r,doTroiea,
i}<r(o,

Pseudo-Dion. 873 A.

Nicet.

aKevTcov
Poll.

=^ 8
226.

dKe'iv,

grind.

Diosc.

5,

103.

aKr,Bi,

tto.S.

Nicet. Byz.

1,

737 A.
lb

Digitized

by Microsoft

dKrfdoTrji;
oKrjBikrjs, rjtos,

114
SXI.IM1S,

'A\KaiKO<!
ov,

Philon I, 111, 656 A. aXri'ia-Tos, ov, (Xijffw) that cannot he plundered. Greg. Naz. HI, 1533 A. ah]KnK6s, ij, 6v, {oKriKros) that does not come to pass?? Si/nes. 1300 A.
r/,

nXrj^eia.

(Xi/Ms) relieving hunger.

Plut.

II,

18.

Sexi. 389, 21.

Orig.

I,

157 D. F.
dXivha,
rj,

Porphyr. V. Pyth. 66. n species of plant. Fseudo-Plut.


(a>^s> vfixoi^ai)

II,

1158 B.
dXivTjxns,

swimming

in the sea.

Philipp. 22.
dXi|, iKos, 6, the

Sibyll. 3,

482.

aKrjTTTostOv, impregnable.

233.
Jirds,

2.

Strab. 12, G, 5.
;

Muson.
X?;-

Incomprehensible

opposed to

halec, hallec,
Diosc. 4,

KaTa\i]7rr6s.

Dion. H. VI, 1037, 13.


Plut. II, 700 B.
Irreprehensible.
Sext.
Just.

Latin alex, halex, alec, a kind of fish-sauce. 148 (150). Athen. 14, 57 TiWtm.
Charis. 32, 8 Aliallec,

Diosc. lobol. p. 49.

217,11. 325,30.

3.

8e e| aXiKos a-ov^irvXXos.

cum

et

alice,

aXi|.

Hoc
548, 12

Apol.

1, 3.

lx6vs Tapix^v6p,evos.
Chri/s.
I,

aXKi],

IxBvs rera-

dXijTTTms, adv. irreprehensibly.

239 C.
Ignat.
1.

pixevfievos.
Jl/erf.

Hes. 'AXtjtitw?, aKaTayvaaTcos.


ahjo-ixos,
oO,
6,

175.

Genpon. 20, 46, 2. 3. [Apparently connected

Zeo
with.

(akrjda>)
11,

grinding.

dXlKo'j.]
aXitraprjS,
II,
es,

692

(apud Bus.
ov,

289

as v.

for

ov or

/iij

Xmapfjs.

Cyrill.

A.

aXe(r/i(5ff).

136 C.
ef,

dXijo-TeuTor,

(Xtja-Teva}

unpillaged, unplun-

dXim7r,
4, 1.

(XiVof) not fat, not fatty.

Strab. 4,

dered.

Jos.

Ant.

18, 9, 4.

Epict. 4,

1,

93.
I,

i)Josc. 1, 77, p. 79.

Galen. VI, 390 D.-

aXrja-ros, ov,

(XavBava) unforgotten.
334, 23.
ov,

Philon

320, 29.
aXrjTiKos,
rj,

(dX^TTjs)

wandering,

roving.

Aret. 20 B. SXmopos, ov, (dXs, Treipco) pierced by (he sea. Lucian. Ill, 64G StKeXor avXiav aKvrropov 8ia
tj^dyos.

Greg. Ngss.
aXrjTos,
Tj,

Ill,

457 C.
ground, pounded,
II,

ov,

(dXcta, dXij^ffl)

dXuryfo),.

jytro),

(0

pollute.

Sept.

Sir. 40,

29.

fine.

Archigen. apud Orib.


rj,

oKBeia, as,
SKla, as,

153, 11.

Mai.

1, 7.

12.
^

Dan.

1, 8.

Hes.

'AXuryr/dfi,
fiial-

oKdaia.

7],

-^

aXicia, d\(ia.

Leo Med. 111. Greg. Naz. IV,


washed by
the sea.

trvveoTuiBrj.

AXiayoiJVTes,

fMoXvvovres,

VOVTS.
aKi(Tyrjp,a,

11 A.
dXtPpeKTOs,
ov, (SKs, /Spej^to)

otos, to, (dXicrye'co) pollution.

Act. 15, 20, referring to elScoXoBvra.


'AXttryrjfmTiov,
ttjs
/ieTaXiy\//"f(aff

Luc. Hes.

Anthol. n,

(^Perses).

twv fiiapav

dXiyevrjs, cs, {y'lyvofiai) sea-born,

an epithet of

6v(TlU)V.

Aphrodite.
dXieiSijf,

Plut.

II,

685 E.
Dion. P. 908.
to
color.

SXio-Kofiai,

Skihivr)s, is, (Stvrf) sea-tossed.


es,

(EIAQ) sea -like, as Numen. apud Athen. 7, 71. 117.


(dXtewta)

he convicted of a capital crime. 552 D'Aj- dXa BavaTov. Z. To he enamored of. Philostr. 696 'AXmvai avrov Basil. Sel, 521 C 'EdXiu tcard Kpaipaadrjvai.
to

Plut.

II,

dXUviMU, aros, to,


Strab. 11, 2, 4.
dXtfur, as,
T],

draught of fishes.
Plut. II,

TOS

TfjS Koprjs.

akiap.a, aros, to,

fisher, a fish so called.

Diosc.
SXurros,

3,
rj,

a1is 159 (169).

ma

a species of herb.
Strab. 4, 4,
21.

978.
dXieuTjjj, ov, 6,

ov,

(dXifoi) salted.

3,

(dXifuco) fisherman.

Eus. VI,
salt.

p. 308, 16.

Artem. 100.
Diod.

Palladas
3,
3.

544 B.
*dXif<,

Theod. IV, 956 A.


(SKs)
to salt, to

dXiTfVTjs, es, (dXs, Teivco) stretching to the sea, ex-

i-(Ta>,

season with
2,

tending into the sea.


shallow, low.
Cic. Epist.
SKiTevei,
3,

44.

2.

Flat,
4, 18.

Philon B. 86.

Sept. Lev.

13

ndy hmpov
5,

Polyh. 4, 39,

Diod.

Ova-las vnatv dXi dXtfrBrja-eraL.

Xenocr.

74.
9,

Diosc.
liar

2,

86.

Metaphorically.
mipl
dkia-drja-cTai.

^latt.

13.

Marc.

49

yap

19.

ad Attic. 14, 13, 1 Ambulatione a walk on level ground. Strab. 7, App. 481, 34. n, 291, 82. Hes. 'AXiramivov.

Ignat. 672

'AXia-drjTe iv aiir^.

TevES, irapdXtov,

dXifcoKor, ov, (Catvrf) sea-girt.

Antip. S. 83.
Antyll.

aXirqpa, aTos, to, (dXiToiW) offence, sin, crime.

oKiBoKoKKrfTOS,

ov,

not
9.

XidoKoWrjTos.

Agath. Epigr.
dXiTo/iT/Kos, ov,

apud

Orib. II, 308,


ov,
to,

1 7, 5.
rjXLT6p.r)vos.

Theol. Arithm.

aXiKaKa^ov,

^z:
2,

dvayaXkis,
209.
4,

arpv^vov,
73.
75.

55.

dopvKvwv.

Diosc.

72.

aXiTpo^ios, ov, (dXiTpdj, /Sioy)

livit^g

wickedly.
12,

Galen. VI, 357


dXiKos,
ij

r),

ov,

=
i

E
,

okuKaKafiov.

dXvKus.

2.

Greg. Naz. HI, 1288 A.


Substantively,
Charts. 33, 23.
72.

Nonn. Dion.
judging

dXiKr], s

a1

na

salt-works.

aXiTpoSiKris,

ov,

6,

(SUrf)

wickedly.

dXiKv/iav,

ov,,
2.

(kv/ui)

surrounded

by

waves.

Method. 104 C.

Clinag.

akifiOKTovov, ov, TO, (aXip.ov, KTeiva)

AXkoMs,
noTafio-

Tj,

6v,

('AXKaioy)
10, 8.

Alcaicus,

Alcaic.

Heph.
Kov,

7,

10.

14, 5. 6

Merpov 'AXkoIAlcaic verse,

yuTav
p. 593.

(Tcpos, a plant.

Diosc. 4, 99 (101),

metrum Alcaicum,
1.

Diomed. 509, 32. 510,

Digitized

by Microsoft

a\Ka
aKxea, as,
rj,

115
Diosc.
3,

aWaaao)

alee a,

it,

plant.

154

(164).^2.
3,

synonyme of oXicr/ia.

Dionc.

159 (169).
rjs,

vwvova-iv, oi 8c eyprjyopaia-iv, Kal nvras e'vaXXd<Ta-ovTas dXXijXouff ^LyXeieiv.') SXXaypa, aros, to, (dXXda-a-ui) mutation, change,
vicissitude.

akioj,

^,

alee, apparently the elk.


9,

Pans.

Sept. Sir.

2, 4.

2.
;

Exchange,

5, 12, 1.

21, 3.
6,

'A^KtjSidSjjs, ov,

Alcibiades,

a religious im-

giving one thing for another price. Sept. Lev. 27, 10. Deut. 23, 18, kvvos. Rep,-. 2, 24,

postor.

Hij>pol. 462, 49.


17,

470, 76.

24 as

V.

1.

3, 10,

SkKkapla, as,
pla

apparently ineorrect for dp<c\aPseud -yl/n'c. 100 A "Oa-a apicka.

oKKdypaTi,.
5. 12, bribe.

Esai. 43, 3.

28 ''EXdplSavov Thren. Mel. 58.

c'k

OeKove

5, 4.

Amos

yoCv if rats oikKKapims KexoKairrai Kal Kelrai


iv Tois UpoZs /3ao"t\etots.

'AXKpaviKos,

T),

6v,

('AXk/uii')

Alcmanius,
(179).
'

cXXd^ipov, ov or aros, to, (aXXdo-o-ia) full dress, holiday dress. Porph. Cer. 157, 14 Td dXXa^ipara avT&v rd aa-Trpa. 441. 779 'EKreXeirai
rj

Alcmanic.
Gr.

Lesbon.
7

169

Herodn.

rrpoeXeva'i.s

perd aXXa^iparos.

'O
II,

raj/ dXofficer

Schem. 606,
^figure, in

S^^/*" AXkp^ivikov, Alcas 2i-

Xd^ipav, also 6

em rav
137.

dXXa^ipav, the

manic
pocis

Grammar, when two nomi;

who has charge of


Porph. Cer.
aXXaKTeov z=^ Set
7.

the

imperial wardrobe.
Plut.

natives

have the verb in the middle


rjSe

ovp^oKKeTai

^KapavSpos.

HvpicpXe-

dXXd(r<reiv.

53

A Bt'oM

yidav re peovcrt KaKVTOS T. *aXXd for rj, than, after a negative word.

dXXaKTeov erepov, adopt a new course of life.


Horn.
oKKdvTiov, ov, TO, zzz dXXSff.
dXXai'TOctSiJf,
e's,

JMoer. 11.

Od.

3,

375

Oi)

pev yap tis

oS'

aWos

....

aWa

(dXXas,

EIAO)

sausage-like.

Aim

BvyaTqp.

Pohjb. 10; 11, 5


Epict.

O^x

eVepots

Galen. IV, 281 C.


dXXavTonotos,
oii,

Nemes. 704 A.
(dXXds,
TToteoj)

Tia\ ^(papevos diroKoyio'pms, aXK' ols


ireiTstKcbs
Ti tS)v

avTov.

1, 11,

ervyxave 33 Oi^re oKKo

6, 2,

sausage

maker.

Diog.

60.

TOiavTav .... dXX' OToXjjif'etf Ka\ 86-

aXXdpiov, incorrect for SKdpiov.


'AXXd/w^off, ov,
6,

Eneh. 5 Mi/SeVot aXXouy aiTimpfBa, dXX' eavTois. 'AXXa prp/, but, at the beginning of the TrpotrKrp^ts of a syllogism. Plui. Lucian. I, 564 Ei tov nparov to11, 969 B. dXXd pjjv Ka\ Kov Xri^erai, Kal tov Sevrepov apa Kal tov devTepov. TOV irp&TOV Xr/yJAfTai
ypara.

Allarich, the Goth.

Eunap.
Ovk

V.

S. 52 (93).
to

dXXdaa-B),

change.

Sept. Lev. 27, 10

dXXd^fi avTO KaXov Trovrjpa, ovSe irovr)pov KoKm, he shall not change it, a good for a bad or a

Sext. 91, 10.


dXXayij,
'Ett'
ijs,
fj,

622, 20.
regeneration.
Just. Apol. 1, 23

bad for a good. Ps. 105, 20 'HXXd^avro rfiv ho^av avTa>v ev opoicapaTt pofT^pv, into the simdi'ude of a calf. Lesbon. 168 (180) 'AXXda-a^ov ttjv alTianKrjV els SonKrjv.

dWayjj koi enavayayyTJ tov av6p(o7rtvov ye2. Stage oraBpos, a place where xous. Apocr. Act. a relay of horses is taken.

Mai. 388

Atd TO
says he,

Toiiff

depas,

(j)rja-lv,

dXXd|ai, in order,

Joann. 6 ''EXdovratv odv avTOiv


\jnxeiv Kal
Eu^it.

els ttjv 7rpa)TTjv

to change the air; for a change of air. Theoph. 198 'HtTi7a-aTo tov ^aa-CKia em ttjv

dXXayfjv copas dpiaTOv ovayjs eheovTO aiirov ev-

dvaToXrjV diveXBelv Sid to tovs depas dXXd^ai,

Xa^ovra apTOv <7vv avTols eaBieiv. 531, 20 At de ItTToplai (TTa6povs otfiao"*


e'lT

Xeyeiv Kai raff inpinpevas


evohiovs

oZv TCTaypevas
ImrevfTiv,
e'lre

2. To change one's for a change of air. Sept. Gen. 35, 2 'AXXdapparel to put on. 41, 14 "HXXa^av -rfv loTE rds o-ToXdff vpaiv.
;

dvairavXas

rots

e'lre

ire^obpopois, as Kcu

oKKayas eXeyov

rcves.

(TToXrjV avTOv.

Judic. 14, 13 TprnKOvra dXXaa--

a-opevas a-ToXds ipaTtav, thirty change of gar-

3.

Per.

Premium on coin. M. Er. 49 "Ep^ov

Also, dkcount.

Arr.
369,

aXKayriv kcu imKepSeidv

Tiva irpos TO evTontov vopttrpu.


17.

4.

Cedr.
suit

II,

Reg. 2, 12, 20 "HXXa|e rd i;adTta ments. Plui. I, 647 avTov, he changed his apparel. C "HXXa|e rd ipdria. Porph. Cer. 22, 14
'

Vil.

Change of raiment, Ml. Jun. 65 A.


-qs,
rj,

of

clothes.

AXXaa-a-ovTwv rd eavrav
rijff

Si/SjJTijo-ta

ev

ra

Koi-

T&vt
Sibyll.
2,

Ad<pvris.

86,

'HXXay/ieVoi

dwo

oKKayir),

Ionic

^=.

dXXayTj.

XevKS>v

xXai'tSicDj',

clolhed toith white cloaks.


01

157.

161, 19 "HXXao-o-oj'

d^iapariKol els to kov-

dXXdyiov, ovjTo, (dXXa-y^)

exchange of prisoners.
Theopli.

a-UTTotpiov xXaviSia XevKO.

Theoph. Cont. 28,


656, 12

Genes. 63, 19.

Porph. Cer. 570, 14.

10

'iSitirou a-xni^ dXXdcra-ea-dai.

T^

rmv KpaTovpeviov alxpaXa>Ta>v. Leo Gram. 282, 1 7. (Compare Petr. Sic. 1241 B 'H 8e SovXeia 2. 1 diTjpmv alxpaXamov fjv viroKKayf}.) vlnon or body of troops; guard. Porph.
Cont. 419, 16 Ilot^trat diKKdyiov

Curop. 67, eiravpiov Xoicras rjXXa^ev avTov. 18 'AXXdo-o-ovo-ii' aia-avTais Kal oi apxovres rd
a-vvrjBr]

tovtosv

dXXdypara.

Damasc.

Ill,

Adm.
ywv.

126, 16.

Attcd. 149, 21 Tijx avroii (rov

Toif ^ovvevpois ervTrrov avTov em toreircrapas, o-ovTOV, mo-re aXXdiai avTov fvydsthey they put on him four pairs of thongs,

1285

15

^twiXea>s^ polpav, t6 Xeyopevov avvrjdas dXXd-

Pack. 1,S10. 11,407,19.


. . . .

(Compare
Iva oi pev

changed the thongs four times during the {Eunap. V. S. 11 (20) ^eraXXabeating.
Xeiv, 2 aor.]

Leo. Tact. 14, 34 ^uupelv

Digitized

by Microsoft

aXKa')(66ev

116
dppV0K0i.Tia.

aWr]Xo(j>dopeco
f),

oKXaxodev (oXXof), adv. from another place. Joann. 10, 1. PseudoSept. Esth. 4, 14. Ael. Jos. Mace. 1. Plut. II, 29 C, et alibi. 2. Fro7n another cause. V. H. 6, 2.

aSXriXoPaa-ta, as,

Clem. A.
17,

(dWrjXwv, aiva>) I, 504 B.

mutual
Conf.

dXXrjXoyafiia, as,

(yap.eai) incest.

Max.

Sohol. 169

D.
rj,

Porphtjr. Abst. 2 GO.


aXKaxoa-e,
24.

dXXiyXoyoi/ia, as,

(yiyvofuu) mutual generation

adv.

aWaxov.

Just.

Apol.

1,

or production.

Oreg. Nyss. 11,205 C. Nemes.

573 B.
dXXijXo/CTOj'ia,

dWenaWijXos, ov, {aSXos, JTd\Xr]Xos') successive. Theod. Ill, Schol. Heph. 2, 1, p. 18, (f>opi. 1176 D. Apophth. 372 dXXij aXX;?, allah allah, a shout.
B.
aWTjyopeai,
Strab.
r)(Tw,

as,

f/,

{aKhjKoKTovos)
I,

slaughter.

Dion. H.
as,

226, 14.

mutual Philon H,
fight.

567,

3.
rj,

dXXrjKopxixIa,

(fmxopm)

mutual

Schol. Horn. L. 3, 443.

(oXXoE, ayopeva) to allegorize.

dXXijXojrd^em,

as,

(jradelv)

mutual

suffering.

1, 2, 7.

PUlon

I,

67, 27.

68,

87 Oi-

Diod.

II,

513, 65.
mi/,

pavov 5e Kat dypov avvwvvp.ais

KticKTjKev aXXj/-

aKKrjkonporyovoi,

01,

(yrpoyovos or wpoyovos)

P/L I, Paul. Gal. 4, 24. yopmv Tov vovv. Cils. 363 D Kpomv dWrjyopova-i, tov xpovov. apud Orig. I, 1088 A. Clem. A. I, 228 C Orijr. I, 692 A. "Oi/)is aXXT/yopfirat 7;8oj/^. II, 285 C ^'Eav aX\7]yopo3p,ev ravra els ttjv ^vXrjv r)pa>v. I^^, 357 C *E7r' avTTjv avrd dWrjyoAthan. II, 949 A. povvros.
aKXr}yopr)ToSi
a,

correlate step-sons.
cX<ov viov

Antec.

1,

10, 8 Tlpljios

dno TiTias, eXa^e Yipipav irpos ydfiov H Kol k tov exova-av Bvyartpa diro Tariov.
evavTtov, 6 p.ev elx^ dvyarepa,
t}

8e viov.

Ol

TOVTOiv Trdides oi ev

TJj

(Tvvt)Beia Xeyd/ievot dX-

\7)Ko7rp6yovot KaK5>s dXXijXotff iruvdwrovToi.

aXX-qKoa-vpiuixos,

ov,

6,

mutual

a-ufifmxos.

ov,

^=

ov Set dXkijyopeLa-dat.

Syncell. 564, 20.


dXXrjXoTpoipos, ov, Qrpe(f>a>) feeding each other.

C.em. A.

II,

92 A.

Orig. IH, 624 A.

aXKriyoprjrfis, ov, 6,

allegorizer.

Theod.

I,

137

D.
oKkqyopia, as,
fj,

dXXijXoiiia,

Geopon. 20, the

6, 1

as v.

1.

Hebrew TTlSSn,
Apoc.
I,

Hallelujah,

Orator 27. Trop. 271.


Cornut.
9.

Cic. a 1 1 e g o r i a allegory. Tryph. Dion. H. IV, 760, 7.


,

alvciTf TOV 'law.


(titul.), et alibi.
I,

Sept. Tobit 13, 18.


19, 1 seq.

Ps. 104
TertulL

Philon
Plut.

I,

227, 32.

11,

483, 42.

1194 A.

H, 409 D. 19

Ta'is

ndXai

the article,
13.

430 (132). With Sept. Mace. 3, 7, to dXXijXovi'a.


Hieron.
Ill,

pkv VTTovoiats, dWrjyoplaLS 8e vvv Xcyofievats.


Quintil. 9, 2, 46.

Athan.

37 B.

Soz. 1476

'Exdi|/-dX-

20.

Fseudo-Demetr. 47, 9. 14, Tatian. 21 (Metrodorus). Ilpof dXXi;-

crrou erovs d7ra iv Vwp.jj to dXXi^Xouia

Xouo"t Kara Trjv TrpdtTtjv rjp^pav ttjs Truo^oXiou


iopTTJs.

yopiav,

also
I,

Kar

dWrjyoplav,

allegoHcally.

2.

At matins

(SpOpos), the
rjp.1v,

modu-

PUlon
Hisp.

134, 15.
36, 22.
rj,

Men. Rhet.

133,

3.

Isid.

lus &e6s Kvptos Kal 7re(j)avv

cvKoyTjpevos

1,

dWrjyopiKos,

ov,

allegoricus,
Artem.
5.

allegorical.

Philon

I,

677, 35.
9.

311.
7.

PseudoCassian.
I,

Demetr. 115, 725 A.


26.

Longin. 32,
allegorically.

6 ipx6p.fvos iv ovopan Kvplov is chanted immediately after the avvaTrn) succeeding the i^d\jfdKpos but during Lent (Sundays excepted) dXXijXoijVa is chanted instead. Leo Achr. 841 B. Typic. 32. Ptoch. 2, 335
Excirot Seoy Kai Kvpios ^oKKovo'iv KaBrjpepav Hp,ds 8e Xeyouv Srjpfpov \jfdKKcTC dXXijXoui'a, with them (the abbots) it is always a feast-

dWqyopiKas, adv.
Coniaf.
Orig.
9.

609 A. 693 A.

I,

^rtem. 312. 489 D.

Agathar. 119, Cfem. 4. I,

aKkriyopiiTTrjs, ov, 6,

:=

diKKrjyoprjTris.

Eus. U,

dXXi/Xai/c/ii'a,

as,

rj,

(avefios)

day ; but with us (common monks) always a fast-day.


ahXrjKovxia,
rjo-a, (dXXqXovxos') to cohere, to hold one another, to hang or stick together.

dvciiofiaxia.

Lyd. 316, 19.


cXkrjkiyyvov, ov, to, (aXX^Xmi', lyyuos) mutual

Philon n, 417, 23.


69.
dKKr]Xovxi-a,
as,

pledge.

Cedr. U, 456 Tar t5>v dn-oXuXoxmi/


TOiavTrj avvra^LS

I, 464, 26 'Em irapMTWv avp^e^TjKc t5>v T)v(opAvav dXXijXoux""- Nicom.

TaneiVQiv avvTeXelas TeXsio'dai irapa tS>v bvvdtSjv.

KaTcovop.do'Orj Se

rj

dX-

\Tj\eyyvov.
dXXi;Xeyyi(Bs, adv.
Jt/

connection.

r], L. cohaerentia, coherency, Dion. H. V, 170, 12. Diosc. 5,

mutual pledge.

Justinian.

144 (145).
391 D.

Sext. 620,

7.

Novell. 99 El yap tis oKKrjKeyyvms tmevBivovs XdjQot Tivds.


dXXr/Xei/Seros, ov, (^dWrjXtav, eVSeto) tied

or Joined

together.
dXX?;Xif<B)

Method. 384 A,
I'co),

Kpixia.

exa) coherent. JuL Hes. 'AXKrjXovxa, ra dvToreifXeyiiiva. aXXriXo(f)6ovia, as, fj, {(f)d6vos) mutual envy. Dion. H. n, 704, 7.
aXXT;XoO;ifos, ov, {aKKffXiov,

(dXX^Xmx)
(cat

fo /jaue

course (KaKcfUpdrcos).
'AXXj;Xif yap

Clem. A.

6 appr]v,

mutual interI, 501 A of hyaenas.

aXkrjXoipdopEa),

rjo-ai,

(dXX>)Xo(^flopor) to corrupt

one another IV, 273 A.

(KaKefifjidTtos).

Eus. U, 64 A.

Digitized

by Microsoft

a\X7]\o^9opoi
aK\TiKo(f)66pos, ov, (<j)de[pa>)
other.

117
oKKoioaxni^v,
Sext. 236, 8.

aWos
ov, (a-xfifia)

destroying one anloving

of a

different

form.

Max.
ov,

Tyr. 163, 46.


((^i\c<a)

Diog. 10, 74.


Charis. 80,

oXXt/Xoi^iXos,

friendly to one another.


oXXijXoi^oi'Tat, a>v, ol,

one another, Geopon. 20, 6, 1.

aXXoiOTt'pcas (dXXoios) adv. worse.

17 Sequius, dXXotoTe'pms.
aXXotoT-poffea)

aKKijKo(\)6voi,

murdering

one another.

Just. Apol. 1, 39.

(dXXoidrpoTTos) to change into various form. Galen. I, 83 B "AXXoioTpoTpeirerai. TTOUciXms.

aXhj\o(j>vris, es, ((j)va)

growing out of one an-

TreiT-at,

other.

Plut.

n, 908 E.

dXX7;Xo(/)uiBs,

adv. hy growing out of one another.

aKKowrponia, n, 48 B.
aWoiotpavia,

as,

fj,

mutation, change.

Epiph.

Anast. Sin. 261 C.


dXXijXoxpeot, ai, a, (xp^'os) indebted to
other.

as,

fj,

((pcovrj)

dXXoyXmo-o-i'a.

one an-

Epiph.

I,

221 D.

Amphil. 45 B.

In logic, o fit' dXKrjaWfiXav, of one another. Xap Spas or rpcmos, circle. Nicom. 7.5. Sext.
99, 6.

dXXotd;(poos, ov, (,XP'') 236, 7.


oXXomSo),

of different
change.'

color.

Sext.

wcrm,

to

alter,

Classical.

In

Diog.

9,

89 'O

St' dXXijXcai'

rpmos

crv-

vtaraTcu orav t6 6<j>7Xov tov ^TjTovp^vov npaypjiTos elvm

Sia^e^auanKov

p^pfiav e^^i Trjs

e/c

2. Passive, to be estranged. Sept. Mace. 1, 11, 12 'J3XKota>6ri roC 'AXe^avSpov, forsook.


Sept. Ps. 44,
59, 1
1.

79, 1 'Yn-cp

rmv

aXXoiajft)-

TOV ^rjTOvpJvov irloTeas.

oKXrjvaKKas
trarily.

crofieviov.

Tois

dl\Xoia>6rj(Toiievois.
SjJ,
is

aK\r}v oKKcos, at
I,

random, arbi-

all

these places, D'JtyiK'

t<pon shoshan-

Epiph.

473 B.
Plut.
I,

nim, a musical instrument,

aXif SKKiyape, the Latin alligare. n, 280 A. allium SKKiovp,, the Latin
oXXi;!, see

founded with nJty


34 A.
dXXotwo'ts,
etos,

apparently con-

oKXoLoa.

luthon.

f], ^= davvraKTov (TxrjpM, anacoPseudo-PZM. Vit. Horn. 1098 B.

:=:

irKopoSov.

aiCKoi,ii)Tptas,

incorrect for dXXaiorc'pa>s, which

Diosc. 2, 181 (182).


cXKiTovivTos, for akvravevTos, ov, (Xtrai/cuci)) inexorable.
'AXXo|8iot,

see.

dXXoKBTtKos,

Tj,

OV, alterative.

Galen.

II,

239 B,

Anthol. IV, 256.


01,

medicine.
aXXoicBTos,
r),

fflv,

Allobii,

Indian philosophers.

ov,

(dXXojdco) changeable, mutable.

Clem. A.

I,

780 A.

SKkoyiveSKoi, ov, (fiKkos, yeveSXrj)

aXKoyevfjS.

425 A. dXXoyewjs, es, (aWos, yevoy) of another race, stranger. Sept. Gen. 17, 27, e6vri. Lev. 22, Substantively, 6 dX12, dvrjp, not a Jew. Sept. Ex. 12, 43. 29, 33. Xoyevfis, foreigner.
Greg. Naz. Til,

Nicom. 68. Plut. 11, 882 C. Orig. I, 697 A. 1017 C. Athan. 11, 86 C. 817 C (in the Nicene Creed).
dXXon-d^eia, as,
fj,

(oKKonadfjs)
513, 65.

external influx

ence.

Diod.
is,
;

II,

dXXcwra^^s,

{SKKos, iraOciv) suffering

from

Luc. 17, 18.


dXXoyXmo-o-m, as,

language.
dXXoyi/(B/iiBy,

Jos.
oy,

(aXXdyXaco-os) diversity of Ant. 1, 5. Ptol. Tetrab. (yvajtu)) fickle.


^,

In gramopposed to avroiraBrjs. mar, a pronoun is dXXon-a^^s, when it is not the same as the subject of the verb upon as in Timrto o-e, TviTTeis which it depends Apollon. D. Pron. 316 A. Et. M. 496, fie.
without
;

183.
dXXoSoTnjr,

32.

dXXoSaTrds.

Theod.

II, 1

621 B.
3,

dXXdn-ioTos, ov, (wiVtis)

of another

religion,

dXXoSiKijs, ov, 6, (Sira;)

unrighteous.

SibyU.

a Christian.

Anast. Sin. 780 D.

not Porph.

390.
dXXoSo^i'a, ay, ^,

Adm.
{aXKobo^os) having a wrong Athan. 11, 532 B.

86, 12.

dXXoTTOtds, ov, (TToiem) that

opinion.

dXXdSo|or, ov, (8o|a)

that

is,

more than

one.

makes other things, Prod. Parmen. 569

eTepdSo|oy.

^l^Aara. II,

45 D.
dXXocflwjs,

Genes. 85, 10.


f'r,

(aXXos, eflvos)

foreign.

Sept.

Mace.

3,

of another nation, iVicoZ. D. 86. 4, 6.


IV, 2003.
Philon
5, 4.
II,

(161). aXkonros, ov, (opda) Caesarius 1052.


oXAos,
T),

of diverse appearance.
Sept. Josu. 4, 9
65, 4 'A/cap-

o,

other, another.

Dion.

IT. I,

402. n, 853, 15. 1145.

Slrab. 2, 1, 31, p. 128, 21.


44, not

a Jew.
Jos.
fj,

/os.

Ant. 11,
7, 3.

SubDiod.
2,

572,

"AXXovs 8eaSa Xidovs. Polyb. 2, vdvav SKKovs toctovtovs. 3, 95,


vavs

2 TpiaKovra

KM

stantively, 6 dXXoefli/^r, foreigner.


37.
2,

11, 49.

SfKa Trpoa-jreirXripioKms SXKas. Diod. Matt. 4, 21 "AXXous dvo d8e\(f>ovs,


Diosc.
1,

48.

Ant. 19,

other two brothers.


fjjj.ipas.

32"AXXas

okto)

oKKofBvia, as,

the being aXXoedvris, difference


1, 2.

of nation.
aXXotw'a, as,
fj,

Strab. 12,

(aXXos, ohos) the mixing of wines.

Lucian. II, 558 "PJCKov ha <T<i)iaiv 'nrma (^((Teai. Clem. A- I, 745 C "AXXos e's, Eust. Ant. 628 B "AXXjjy 8e. another one.
p.iav

Plut.

n, 661 D.
(aTpo(i>rj)

wapaSelyiiaTos eUova.

"AXXa dvr aXXav


Clementin. 316 A.
^Xvdpels..

dXXotdoTpoc^os, ov,
strophas.

not having anti-

Xfyeiv, to talk at

random.

Heph. Poem.

9, 3.

408

'AXXa yap dvr cDCKav opi^av

Digitized

by Microsoft

aXkoTpia^o}

118
crarcs fioi

aXfio7roTi<;
ov,

Adam. 1740
rfj

B.

Apoptli. 328 B Ti

dK\oTpwx<opos,
stranger.

(x^pa) of another country,


3,

aXXfi

the other day.

Jos. Ant.

12, 3.

8, 7, 5.

aXKoTptdto) (dWoVpiOf)

dWoTpiais

ex^i-v,

a\-

manner. dXKorplais (dXXoTpios), adv. in a hostile


'AXXoTpiais ex""' '" 8'K"<^^'"'-' ^ Stareerjvai, Polyb. 3, 67, 8 Xlpof airoiis dXto he hostile.
Xorpio)? hiMKupevmv.

\oTpias hiaKcia-dai, L. alieno animo alienated, estranged, or disaffected,


tile

esse, to he
to

he hos-

to

any one.

Polyb. 15, 22,


6, (ydfios)

aWorpiayaiios, on,
I,

1.

Diod. 11, 64, ex"'^"


'

p.oixos.

Theod.
a husy-

TTpos Toiis haKcbaipovLovs.

16, 62, diaKei/ievovs


del Sif-

1248 A.
6,

Tols YLepa-ais.

17,

101

AXKoTpiarepov
:

oKKoTpioema-Konos, ov,

(ima-Kovos)
Petr.

ridr] Tvpos avTOV.

body
Ant.

in other

men's matters.

1, 4, 15.

dXKoTpiaa-is,

ecos,

fj,

estrangement

hostility.

d\\oTpioKdp.aTos, ov, (xdiiaTos) toiling for others.

Sept. Jer. 17, 17


triv.

M^

yevqBfjs poi els dXXoT-pim-

Mon. 1476 D.
rjira,,

Xehem.
Tiji/ rrjs

13, 30, strangers.

Diod.

II,

602,

aK\oTpto\oyea>,

(Xeym)

to

speak irrelevantly.

76
a-iv.

KXeoTrdrpas irpbs avrov oKKoTpiaI,

Strab. 1, 4,-1, p. 96, 12. aXXorpiOToof, or, {voos your) essentially

Philon

46, 26.

358, 12.

439, 11 'H
572, 10

dK-

Trpoy rjSovfiv dWorpioKTiS.

H,

74, 8.

Xo8o|o9, eVspoSogos, in the sense of heretical,

Et

TLS ecTTtv

avra

Trpos to 'lovhaltov yevos oKKo-

dim. 1116 D, Xoyour.


aXXoTpiooi;a-ior, ov,

of another

oicria.

Athan. U,

801 A, dWfiXcov. dXKorpimrpayia (TTpdcra-a), to be an intermeddler, to meddle with other people's business. Hence, to excite commotions, to create disturbances.
Polyb.
5,

App. II, 409, 60 Tr}v re T^f ^ovXfjs rpiams. Basil. I, 645 A s TOV Kalaapa aKKoTpitatriv. T^f dXXoT-ptmo-ecar tov jwvoyevovs irpos tov
irarepa.

dXXoTpoTrms (TpoTToy), adv. in another manner.


Stud. 1701 C.
oKkov^itov,
(ovos,
f),

41, 8.
fj,

the

Latin

a11uv
j]

tiKKoTpionpayia, as,

an intermeddling. Plut. U,
(^aXKorpioTrpdyfimv)

Antec.

2, 1,

19

^v(riKrj KTrjcris iari Kai


rj

Trjs

57 D.

Pseudo-D/on. 897 A.
i]<ra>,

aXKoTpiowpayiJiOveto,

=
who

oKKov^ioiVos
(Tis
rj

dXXov/StoJV 5e ioTiv

irpoaicKv-

irpoo'xi^a'ts.

dXKoTpicnrpayia).

Simplic. Enchir.

419 (264

Xov/3t<uv09 r(5
oSfj,

yap fjperepa dypa 6


Oirep

8td

t^s

dX-

irorapxts irpoSetrffo-

A).
*aXXoTpior,
a, ov, hostile, rebellious.

(pvaiKa vopco r^s fifierepas yiveToi

Inscr. 4697,

Telas.

19

Tmv dWorpia

tppovrjcrdvTODv,

of

those

dKKo<^po(rvvq,

r)s, rj,

(tftpifv')

a thinking

otherwise.

rebelled agains