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Sun Enterprise Services SSE Field Reference Guide

Sun Enterprise Services SSE Field Reference Guide Sun Microsystems, Inc. 400 Atrium Drive Somerset, NJ 08873

Sun Microsystems, Inc. 400 Atrium Drive Somerset, NJ 08873 USA

Part Number: xx-yyy-zzz Revision 3.1 January, 2006

Send comments about this document to: robert.fox@sun.com

Revision History

January 4, 2006 - Updated StorADE section (6.4). Added section for ilom (1.4). Added section for v40z (11.5).

November 15, 2005 – Reorganized all chapters and renumbered. Set version to 3.0. November 14, 2005 – Added section for cediag, (1.4.2), psradm (1.4.17). Renumbered 1.4.x sections accordingly. November 8, 2005 – Added example of replacing a bad disk w/lvm (4.3.4) November 2, 2005 - Added Sunfire 2900 section (7.7). Added fmthard section (1.4.10). October 20, 2005 - Fixed typo's. September 20, 2005 - Added dhcp troubleshooting section (3.2.5). Updated minnow boxid's (8.3.3). August 10, 2005 - Finally added an index! August 9, 2005 – Reordered chapters for servers (old 6.0, new 7.0), disk arrays (old 7.0, new 8.0), and security (old 8.0, new 6.0). August 8, 2005 – Divided Chapter 6 into: Servers (6.0) and Disk Array's (7.0). Renumbered Security (8.0). Added section for Sun Rays (6.6). July 25, 2005 – Added section for d240 (6.15). Added section for S1 (6.16). Added sections for Disk Array LED's (6.7.1, 6.8.2, 6.10.2,). Added pictures for LED's in all disk array sections. July 11, 2005 - Added section for T3 Battery (6.7.7). Added section for Hitachi Batteries (6.11.11). Added section for Minnow batteries (6.8.7). Added sections for D1000 (6.12), A1000 (6.13), A3x00 (6.14) Renumbered SAN Switches section (6.15). Moved T3/6x20 "dot" commands to Appendix A. June 21, 2005 – Added section on SMF (1.9). June 16, 2005 - Added target info for minnow arrays (6.8.5). Modified Live Upgrade section (1.2.4) June 15, 2005 – Added sections for nis ( 2.6) and nfs (2.8). Restructured chapter 2. June 9, 2005 – Updated LVM section (4.3) June 1, 2005 – Added section on zones (1.8). Added section on Live Upgrade (1.2.4). Added sections for additional solaris commands, dumpadm (1.4.6), eeprom (1.4.7), fsck, (1.4.10), modinfo (1.4.13), volcheck (1.4.22), Added section on StorADE (4.4). Added sections for Sun Cluster (5.2.3, - 5.2.8). Updated section on Indy (6.9). Updated section on Maserati

(6.10).

May 26, 2005 – Added section for accessing svp on 9990 (6.11.10) May 24, 2005 – Added section on printing (1.7) May 18,2005 – Added section for accessing dot commands on T3 and 6x20 arrays (6.7.6, 6.10.2). Added section for script command (1.4.18). May2, 2005 – Added troubleshooting section for Brocade and McData switches (6.12.4) April 19, 2005 – Added sections for flashupdate (6.3.2, 6.4.4) and setchs (6.3.3, 6.4.7). March 23, 2005 – Added sections for DR (1.6), Hitachi Microcode Update (6.11.9), Minnow Disk Replacement (6.8.5), boot(1.4.1), svcadm (1.4.16), & svcs (1.4.17). Trimmed down PCAnywhere and HiTrack sections.

November 30, 2004 – Added procedure to replace cp2140 board on sc (6.4.5) , Added chs section (6.4.6). October 26, 2004 – Added section for SunCluster (5.0). October 21, 2004 – Added scsi-initiator-id procedure, minor corrections to Hitachi section October 11,2004 – Added section for SMS Upgrade procedure. August 17,2004 – Added section fo sccli command reference August 11, 2004 – Added section for power cycling Hitachi Disk Array, removed softrware section. August 9, 2004 – Added section for configuring HiTrack August 1, 2004 – Added section for initial configuration of HDS 9970/9980 Array July 10, 2004 – Added Security Chapter.

SSE Field Reference Guide

Table of Contents

1.0

Lights Out Management Software

11

1.1 Lights Out Management (LOM)

11

 

1.1.1

Command Reference:

11

 

1.2.

Advanced Lights Out Management (ALOM)

12

 

1.2.1

Command Reference:

12

1.2.2.

ALOM Notifications

12

1.2.3.

Configuring the Network Management Port:

14

1.2.4.

Resetting the ALOM Password

15

 

1.3.

Remote Server Console (RSC)

17

 

1.3.1. OBP Commands

17

1.3.2. RSC

Commands

17

1.3.3. How To Configure RSC

18

1.3.4. Forgotten Password

21

 

1.4.

Integrated Lights Out Management (ILOM)

22

 

1.4.1.

Command Reference

22

2.0

Open Boot Prom (OBP)

27

2.1.

Command Reference

27

 

2.1.1. Version 3.x

27

2.1.2. Version 4.17 additions for the boot command:

27

 

2.2.

Working with

nvram

27

 

2.2.1

Selected nvram Parameters

27

2.2.2.

nvramrc

Commands

28

2.2.3.

nvedit Editor Keystroke Commands

28

 

2.3.

Common obp Procedures

29

 

2.3.1. Setting

cpu speed

29

2.3.2. Setting hostid

29

Setting

2.3.3. the Monitor Frequency

29

2.3.4. network transfer speed

Setting

29

2.3.5. Setting scsi-initiator-id

29

2.3.6. Booting a System

31

3.0

Solaris OS

33

 

3.1.

Installation/Configuration

33

 

3.1.1. Jumpstart

33

3.1.2. Flash Archive

34

3.1.3. WANBoot

34

3.1.4. Live Upgrade

39

 

3.2.

Patch Management

49

 

3.2.1. patchadd Error Codes (Solaris 2.6, 7, 8,9)

49

3.2.2. patchrm Error Codes

49

3.2.3. patchdiag

50

 

3.3.

Solaris Selected Command Reference

51

 

3.3.1. cdrw

51

3.3.2. cediag

51

3.3.3. cfgadm

53

3.3.4. cpio

54

3.3.5. cron

54

3.3.6. dd

54

3.3.7. dumpadm

55

3.3.8. eeprom

55

3.3.9. explorer

56

3.3.10. find

57

3.3.11. fmthard

57

3.3.12. fsck

57

3.3.13. installboot

57

3.3.14. kbd

58

3.3.15. modinfo

58

3.3.16. mount

59

SSE Field Reference Guide

 

3.3.17. “p” commands

 

60

3.3.18. psradm

60

3.3.19. script

60

3.3.20. svcadm

61

3.3.21. svcs

61

3.3.22. swap

62

3.3.23. uadmin

62

3.3.24. ufsdump

63

3.3.25. volcheck

63

3.4.

Shell Programming

65

3.4.1.

ksh

65

3.5.

Dynamic Reconfiguration

 

75

3.5.1. Minimum Requirements for DR

75

3.5.2. Install Board Procedure

 

75

3.5.3. Remove Board Procedure

75

3.6.

Printing

 

77

3.6.1.

cups

77

3.7.

Zones

78

3.7.1. Creating a zone

 

78

3.7.2. Administering Zones

79

3.7.3. Removing a Zone

79

3.8.

SMF

81

4.0 Networking

 

85

4.1.

Network Hardware

85

4.1.1. Ethernet Category 5 Wiring Diagram

85

4.1.2. Terminal Servers

 

86

4.2.

Network Configuration

89

4.2.1. NIC's

89

4.2.2. ssh

90

4.2.3. ftp

91

4.2.4. dhcp

93

4.2.5. dns

95

4.2.6. nis

98

4.2.7. ntp

101

4.2.8. nfs

102

4.2.9. tip

103

4.2.10. ipmp

104

4.2.11. tftp

105

4.2.12. Configuring Multiple Gateways

106

4.2.13. Setting up subnets

 

106

4.2.14. Virtual Interfaces

107

4.2.15. Enabling IP Forwarding

107

4.2.16. Routing

 

108

4.2.17. Setting local mac

addresses:

108

4.2.18. Preventing Users From Logging in

109

4.2.19. inetd services

 

109

4.3.

Network Troubleshooting

110

4.3.1.

Troubleshooting Command Reference

110

4.3.2.

TCP States

113

4.3.4.

NFS

113

4.3.5.

DHCP

114

5.0. Performance Tuning

 

117

5.1.

Debugging Tools

117

5.1.1. adb

117

5.1.2. truss

118

5.1.3. Other Tools

119

5.1.4. Data Collection Script

120

5.2.

Performance Tuning

121

5.2.1.

System Analysis

121

SSE Field Reference Guide

 

5.2.2. Tuning the system

122

5.2.3. Cache Scrubber Tuning

122

6.0.

Storage Software

123

6.1.

Solaris General Procedures

123

6.1.1. Rebuilding Devices

123

6.1.2. Rebuilding

/etc/path_to_inst

123

6.2.

Veritas Volume Manager

124

6.2.1. Unencapsulating Root

124

6.2.2. Moving A Disk Array

126

6.2.3. Replacing Bad Root Disk w/Mirror

127

6.2.4. VM Command Line Reference

129

6.3.

Logical Volume Manager

133

6.3.1. LVM Volume Creation

133

6.3.2. LVM

Mirroring of

root

134

6.3.3. Unencapsulating

Root

135

6.3.4. Replacing a bad disk

138

6.3.5. Command Line Procedures

142

6.3.6. Command

Reference

143

6.4.

StorADE

144

6.4.1 Installation

144

6.4.2 Accessing StorADE

144

7.0.

SunCluster

145

7.1.

SunCluster 2.x

145

7.1.1. Command Reference

145

7.1.2. Cluster 2.x Files:

146

7.2.

SunCluster 3.x

147

7.2.1.

Command Reference:

147

7.2.2.

Agent Configuration

148

7.2.3.

Recovering a

node after OS Crash

153

7.2.4.

Add a Disk to the Sun Cluster Environment

154

7.2.5.

Recovering root on RAC/CVM node

157

7.2.6.

Reconfiguring Cluster Interconnects

157

7.2.7.

Changing the Oracle Fault Monitor Password

160

7.2.8.

Veritas Upgrade Proecdure

161

8.0.

Security

163

8.1.

Securing Network Services

163

8.1.1. inetd

163

8.1.2. rpc

164

8.1.3. Securing the TCP Stack

164

8.1.4. ARP attacks

166

8.1.5. Securing IP

166

8.1.6. ipfilter

166

8.1.7. PortSentry

167

8.1.8. nfs Services

167

8.1.9. TCP Wrappers

167

8.1.10.

sudo

170

8.2.

Other Security Measures

174

8.2.1. Solaris Banners

174

8.2.2. Logs

175

8.2.3. Securing the console

176

8.2.4. Adjusting File Permissions

176

8.2.5. Securing Mount Options

176

8.2.6. Account Management

177

8.2.7. Restricting cron,at and batch

177

8.2.8. Role Based Access Control

177

8.2.9. Using a Restrictive umask

178

8.2.10. Preventing Attempts to Execute Code on Stacks

178

8.2.11. Access Warning Messages

179

8.2.12. Restricting Console Access

179

SSE Field Reference Guide

 

8.2.13.

Hardening Passwords

179

9.0. High End Servers

 

182

9.1. Starcat Servers (F12K/F15K/E20K/E25K)

182

 

9.1.1. Command Reference

182

9.1.2. SMS File System Layout

183

9.1.3. MAN Network

184

9.1.4. Firmware

184

9.1.5. SMS Upgrade Procedure

185

9.1.6. Replacing a cp2140 on the System Controller

187

9.1.7. Component Health Status (setchs)

189

9.1.8. Rebuilding a System Controller

192

10.0.

Midrange Servers

196

10.1

Serengeti (3x00/4x00/6x00)

196

 

10.1.1. Command Reference

196

10.1.2. Updating Firmware

197

10.1.3. Component Health Status

197

10.1.4. Forgotten password

198

10.2

Sunfire 1280/2900

 

199

 

10.2.1. Powering on a 2900

199

10.2.2. flashupdate

199

10.2.3. lom command reference

199

10.2.4. Resetting lom pasword

200

10.2.5. Reprogramming the System Configuration Card (SCC)

201

11.0.

Entry Level Servers

206

11.1.

v880

 

206

 

11.1.1

Automatic System Recovery

206

11.2.

280r

 

208

 

11.2.1

nvalias issues

208

11.3.

SunRay

 

209

 

11.3.1. Command Reference

209

11.3.2. Managing Sun Ray Services

211

11.4.

x4100/x4200

 

212

 

11.4.1.

Navigation

212

11.5.

v40z

 

212

 

11.5.1.

Resetting the SP Password:

212

12.0.

EOL'd Servers

214

12.1.

Ultra Enterprise 10000 (Starfire)

214

 

12.1.1. Command

Reference

214

12.1.2. Tilde Commands

215

12.1.3. SSP File System Layout

215

12.1.4. Daemons

216

12.1.5. cpu decoding table

216

12.1.6. sbus decoding table

217

12.1.7. redx Dump Analyzer

218

12.1.8. hpost

219

12.1.9. DIMM Table

219

12.1.10. Configuration Rules

219

12.1.11. Component Numbering Scheme

220

12.1.12. Blacklisting

223

12.1.13. Power up/down platform

224

12.2.

Old “Sunfire” Enterprise Servers (3000/3500-6000/6500)

227

 

12.2.1. Power on self test (POST)

227

12.2.2. LED Codes

227

12.2.3. OBP Commands

227

13.0.

Disk Arrays

228

13.1.

D240 Media Tray

 

228

 

13.1.1. LED's

228

13.1.2. Replacing a disk drive

229

13.1.3. SCSI Target ID's

230

SSE Field Reference Guide

13.1.4.

Configuration Switch

 

230

13.2.

S1 Disk Array

231

13.2.1. LED's

 

231

13.2.2. Binary SCSI ID LEDs

232

13.2.3. Rear Panel LEDs

233

13.2.4. System Power and System Summary Fault LEDs

233

13.2.5. Auto-termination Indication LEDs

233

13.2.6. Storage Subsystem Manager

233

13.2.7. Disk Replacement

 

237

13.3.

3x10 (Minnow) Disk Array

238

13.3.1. Hardware Overview

 

238

13.3.2. LED's

239

13.3.3. Configuration Menu

Sub-System

242

13.3.4. Installing ssconsole on your system

244

13.3.5. sccli

Commands

 

245

13.3.6. Disk Replacement Procedures

248

13.3.7. Forgotten Password

 

251

13.3.8. Battery Status

252

13.4.

39x0, 69x0 (Indy) Disk Array

254

13.4.1. How to power on an INDY

 

254

13.4.2. Building the Service

Processor

254

13.4.3. Configuration

256

13.4.4. Troubleshooting

258

13.5.

99xx (Hitachi) Disk Array

259

13.5.1. Hardware

 

259

13.5.2. Power Cycle Procedures

259

13.5.3. Licenses

260

13.5.4. Passwords

260

13.5.5. Configuring HiTrack

260

13.5.6. How to replace a failed disk

261

13.5.7. HiCommand Database Recovery

261

13.5.8. Microcode Upgrade Procedure

263

13.5.9. Accessing SVP on 9990

 

264

13.5.10. Battery Information

265

14.0 EOL'd Disk Arrays

266

14.1.

D1000 (Dilbert) Disk Array

266

14.1.1. LED's

 

266

14.1.2. Cabling the Sun StorEdge D1000 Array

267

14.1.3. Setting the Target Address

 

267

14.1.4. Determining Connectivity

267

14.1.5. Disk Replacement

268

14.2.

A1000 (Dilbert w/RAID) Disk Array

269

14.2.1. LED's

 

269

14.2.2. Disk Replacement

270

14.2.3. Controller Replacement

270

14.2.4. Battery Replacement Procedure

274

14.2.5. Command Reference

 

276

14.3.

A3x00 (Sonoma) Disk Array

280

14.3.1.

LED's

 

280

14.3.2.

Battery Replacement Procedure

282

14.3.3

Disk Replacement

 

283

14.4.

A5x00 (Photon) Disk Array

284

14.4.1

LED's

 

284

14.4.1.

luxadm command reference

285

14.4.2.

Minimum Configuration

 

287

14.4.3.

Addressing

287

14.4.4.

A5000 Target ID assignments

287

14.5.

T3 (Purple) Disk Array

288

14.5.1.

LED's

 

288

SSE Field Reference Guide

14.5.2. Command Reference

290

14.5.3. Firmware upgrading

291

14.5.4. TFTP Boot Procedure

292

14.5.5. Forgotten password

292

14.5.6. Rebuilding the sysarea

292

14.5.7. Accessing “dot” commands

295

14.5.8. Battery Status

296

14.6.

6x20 (Maserati) Disk Array

298

14.6.1. logins, passwords and roles

298

14.6.2. LED's

298

14.6.3. Terminology

303

14.6.4. sscs Commands

304

14.6.5. Forgotten Password

308

15.0 Storage Area Networks (SAN)

311

15.1.

SAN Switches

311

15.1.1. Default Passwords

311

15.1.2. SAN Quick Command Reference

311

15.1.3. Configuration Procedures

311

15.1.4. Troubleshooting

316

Appendix A - T3 & 6x20 “dot” Commands

326

Alphabetical Index

340

SSE Field Reference Guide

SSE Field Reference Guide

SSE Field Reference Guide

1.0 Lights Out Management Software

1.0 Lights Out Management Software

LOM Sun Fire V100 Sun Fire V120 Sun Fire E2900 Sun Fire V1280

Netra 120 Netra t 1405 Netra t 1400 Netra X1 Netra T1 model 105 Netra T1 model 100 Netra T1 DC200 Netra T1 AC200 Netra 20

ALOM Sun Fire V210 Sun Fire V240 Sun Fire V250 Sun Fire V440

RSC Sun Fire V890 Sun Fire V490 Sun Fire V880 Sun Fire V480 Sun Fire 280R Sun Enterprise 250

ILOM Sun Fire x4100 Sun Fire x4200

1.1 Lights Out Management (LOM)

1.1.1 Command Reference:

alarmon [n] alarmoff [n] check console environment faulton faultoff help poweron poweroff reset [-x] shutdown show [eventlog] [escape] version set break bootmode [-u] [normal|forth|reset_nvram|diag|skip_diag] loghistory [index +/-n] [pause x] [level y] showlogs consolehistory chist date showdate logout userpassword [username] useradd [username] userdel [username] userperm [username] [c] [u] [a] [r] [-] usershow lom>

SSE Field Reference Guide

1.0 Lights Out Management Software

1.2. Advanced Lights Out Management (ALOM)

1.2.1 Command Reference:

poweron {FRU} poweroff [-y] [-f] removefru [-y] {FRU} reset [-y] [-x] break [-y] bootmode [normal|reset_nvram|diag|skip_diag|bootscript="string"] console [-f] consolehistory [-b lines|-e lines] [-g lines] [-v] [boot|run] showlogs [-b lines|-e lines] [-g lines] [-v] setlocator [on|off] showlocator showenvironment showfru showplatform [-v] showsc [-v] [param] shownetwork [-v] setsc [param] [value] setupsc showdate setdate [[mmdd]HHMM | mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS] resetsc [-y] flashupdate [-s IPaddr -f pathname] [-v] setdefaults [-y] [-a] useradd <username> userdel [-y] <username> usershow [username] userpassword <username> userperm <username> [c][u][a][r] password showusers [-g lines] logout help [command] sc>

Common Navigation Commands are:

sc>console - to go to the system console from ALOM

#.

- to go to ALOM from the system console

sc>break

- similar to the old L1-A

1.2.2. ALOM Notifications

Configuring the ALOM Notification Variables will allow varying levels of ALOM alerts to be sent automatically to specified email addresses.

Setting Alerts

sc> showsc

Advanced Lights Out Manager v1.0

parameter

value

---------

-----

if_network

true

if_modem

false

SSE Field Reference Guide

1.0 Lights Out Management Software

if_snmp

false

if_emailalerts

false

sys_autorestart

xir

netsc_tpelinktest

false

netsc_dhcp

false

netsc_ipaddr

129.148.173.27

netsc_ipnetmask

255.255.255.0

netsc_ipgateway

129.148.173.253

mgt_mailhost

mgt_mailalert

sc_customerinfo

sc_escapechars

#.

sc_powerondelay

false

sc_clipasswdecho

true

sc_cliprompt

sc

sc_clitimeout

0

sc_clieventlevel

2

sys_eventlevel

2

ser_baudrate

9600

ser_parity

none

ser_stopbits

1

ser_data

8

netsc_enetaddr

00:03:ba:29:5e:34

sys_hostname

abcd

sys_enetaddr

00:03:ba:29:5e:2b

sc> setsc if_emailalerts true - this command enables the mail alerts to be sent

sc> setsc mgt_mailhost 129.148.9.16 - this command sets the IP address of the mail server to which ALOM delivers the mail alerts, if two addresses are specified they must be seperated by a single space

sc> setsc mgt_mailalert john.doe@sun.com 1 - this command sets who will be sent the email with the alerts and what level alerts will be sent. The possible settings are:

1 (critical),

2 (critical and major) and

3 (critical, major and minor)

sc> setsc mgt_mailalert test.alom@nowhwere.com 3 - this command shows the configuration of an additional email address to receive level 3 alerts.

Removing Alerts

To remove an email address from the configuration so that alerts are no longer sent to it we use the same command as when we added it but without the alert level number:

sc> setsc mgt_mailalert test.alom@nowhwere.com

ALOM or Solaris

The same configuration can be done through the use of the Solaris based scadm command:

# scadm set if_emailalerts true

# scadm set mgt_mailhost 129.148.9.16

# scadm set mgt_mailalert john.doe@sun.com 1

# scadm show

if_network="true"

if_modem="false"

if_snmp="false"

SSE Field Reference Guide

1.0 Lights Out Management Software

if_emailalerts="true" sys_autorestart="xir" netsc_tpelinktest="true" netsc_dhcp="false"

netsc_ipaddr="129.148.173.27"

netsc_ipnetmask="255.255.255.0"

netsc_ipgateway="129.148.173.253"

mgt_mailhost="129.148.9.16"

mgt_mailalert="john.doe@sun.com 1" sc_customerinfo="" sc_escapechars="#." sc_powerondelay="false" sc_servicemode="false" sc_clipasswdecho="true" sc_cliprompt="sc"

sc_clitimeout="0"

sc_clieventlevel="2"

sc_ssqamode="false"

sys_eventlevel="2"

1.2.3. Configuring the Network Management Port:

The parameters that need to be configured to make the NET MGT port functional are:

if_network

true

netsc_tpelinktest

true

netsc_dhcp

false

netsc_ipaddr

0.0.0.0

netsc_ipnetmask

255.255.255.0

netsc_ipgateway

0.0.0.0

Use the "setsc"command to set the needed parameters

sc> setsc if_network true

- this command enables the port

sc> setsc netsc_tpelinktest false - this command enable/disables the link integrity test, please check with your network admin to see if the network hardware(hubs etc.) support this functionality.

sc> setsc netsc_dhcp false

network configuration, which is not part of this example

- this command should be set to false unless you want DHCP to obtain your

sc> setsc netsc_ipaddr 129.148.173.27 - this command sets the the unique IP address for the NET MGT port, please see your network admin to get this address

sc> setsc netsc_ipnetmask 255.255.255.0 - this command sets the netmask and will depend on the class of network.

sc> setsc netsc_ipgateway 129.148.173.253 - this command sets the IP address of the gateway or router.

If you have made a change to the "netsc_tpelinktest" variable, it will not change until after the next ALOM reset but is otherwise not needed.

sc> resetsc -y

You can now verify the settings with the "shownetwork" command

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sc> shownetwork

SC network configuration is:

IP Address: 129.148.173.27 Gateway address: 129.148.173.253 Netmask: 255.255.255.0 Ethernet address: 00:03:ba:29:5e:34

The ALOM NET MGT port should now be functional!!!

The next steps will show how to do the same configuration but with the Solaris based "scadm" command.

# /usr/platform/SUNW,Sun-Fire-V240/sbin/scadm help

COMMAND DETAILS

# scadm help => this message

# scadm date [-s] | [[mmdd]HHMM | mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS] => print or set date

# scadm set <variable> <value> => set variable to value

# scadm show [variable] => show variable(s)

# scadm resetrsc [-s] => reset SC (-s soft reset)

# scadm download [boot] <file> => program firmware or [boot] monitor

# scadm send_event [-c] "message" => send message as event (-c CRITICAL)

# scadm modem_setup => connect to modem port

# scadm useradd <username> => add SC user account

# scadm userdel <username> => delete SC user account

# scadm usershow [username] => show user details

# scadm userpassword <username> => set user password

# scadm userperm <username> [cuar] => set user permissions

# scadm shownetwork => show network configuration

# scadm loghistory => show SC event log

# scadm version [-v] => show SC version (-v verbose)

Use the "scadm set" command to set the same variables as described above

# scadm set if_network true

# scadm set netsc_tpelinktest false

# scadm set netsc_dhcp false

# scadm set netsc_ipaddr 129.148.173.27

# scadm set netsc_ipnetmask 255.255.255.0

# scadm set netsc_ipgateway 129.148.173.253

# scadm shownetwork

IP Address: 129.148.173.27 Gateway address: 129.148.173.253 Netmask: 255.255.255.0 Ethernet address: 00:03:ba:29:5e:34

Note - There is also an interactive configuration process possible through the use of the "setupsc" command, which is beyond the scope of this document.

1.2.4. Resetting the ALOM Password

To overide the ALOM password on the system you will need to:

1) Attach console to Serial Management Port

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2) Power on the server via the front power button. Once POST has completed,you will need to wait 1 to 2 minutes for a timeout to occur and the system to drop to the "ok>" prompt.

If you do not get the "Please login:" prompt (you will likely see the SC prompt) then you must power the system off remove the battery from the LOM board, wait a minute, and re-install everything).

Below is an example of what you might see on the console:

Please login:

SC Alert: Host System has Reset [wait one two minutes] Serial line login timeout, returns to console stream. ok>

3) Boot the system to the OS level. If Solaris is not currently installed on the server, you will need to install it at this point.

4) Use the scadm command to reset the admin password:

server# cd /usr/platform/`uname -i`/sbin server# ./scadm userpassword admin

5) Use the escape sequence "#." to get system back to the ALOM login prompt.

6) You can now log into the admin account using the password “admin” that you just set.

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1.3. Remote Server Console (RSC)

1.3.1. OBP Commands

rsc-hard-reset Performs a hard reset of RSC; this is the same as using the command rscadm resetrsc. rsc-soft-reset Performs a soft reset of RSC; this is the same as using the command rscadm resetrsc -s. diag-output-to rsc*|rsc-console**|ttya Directs POST output to either RSC (1) or ttya (0). This command takes effect after the next server reset. (E250 only) diag-console rsc*|rsc-console**|ttya This command directs power-on self-test (POST) output to either RSC (1) or ttya (0). This command takes effect after the next server reset. (Not available for the 250) rsc-mac-update Updates the RSC Ethernet address from the contents of the server ID PROM. Use this command after replacing the server NVRAM module. .rsc Displays RSC information, including the diag-output-to setting and the RSC POST status word.

*Available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers only. For other supported workgroup servers, you must set input-device and output-device to rsc-console, not rsc.

**For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, you must set input-device and output-device to rsc, not rsc-console.

1.3.2. RSC Commands

environment Displays current environmental information showenvironment (The showenvironment command is not available on Sun Enterprise[TM] 250 servers.) shownetwork Displays the current network configuration console Connects you to the server console break Puts the server in debug mode xir Generates an externally initiated reset to the server bootmode Controls server firmware behavior, if followed by a server reset within 10 minutes (similar to L1- key combinations on Sun keyboards)

· -u - Force the server to direct the console to RSC; the -u option must precede any boot_mode you specify; requires server reset

· normal - Normal boot; server runs low-level diagnostics; requires server reset

· forth - Enter Forth interpreter as soon as possible (equivalent to L1-F on keyboard); requires server reset

· reset_nvram - Reset all NVRAM variables to default values (equivalent to L1-N on keyboard); requires server reset

· diag - Force the server to run full diagnostics (equivalent to L1-D on keyboard); requires server power-off and power-on

· skip_diag - Force the server to skip diagnostics (equivalent to L1-S on the keyboard); requires server power-off and power-on reset Resets the server immediately poweroff Powers off the server poweron Powers on the server loghistory Displays the history of all events logged in the RSC event buffer consolehistory Displays the history of all console messages logged in the buffer consolerestart Makes the current boot and run console logs "original" set Sets a configuration variable show Displays one or more configuration variables date Displays or sets the current time and date password Changes your RSC password useradd Adds an RSC user account userdel Deletes an RSC user account usershow Shows characteristics of an RSC user account userpassword Sets or changes a user's password userperm Sets the authorization for a user resetrsc Resets RSC immediately help Displays a list of RSC shell commands and a brief description of each version Displays the RSC firmware version

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showsc (The showsc command is not available on Sun Enterprise 250 servers.) logout Ends your current RSC shell session setlocator Turn the system locator LED on or off (Sun Fire[TM] V480 servers only). showlocator Show the state of the system locator LED (Sun Fire V480 servers only). showdate Same as the date command without arguments. (Not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers.) setdate Same as the date command with arguments. (Not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers.) rscadm subcommands help Displays a list of rscadm commands and brief descriptions for each date Displays or sets the current time and date set Sets a configuration variable show Displays one or more configuration variables shownetwork Shows current RSC card network configuration (RSC 2.0 and above) loghistory Returns the most recent log entries (RSC 2.0 and above) resetrsc Resets RSC immediately download Downloads firmware to the RSC flash PROM send_event Logs an event; can also send an alert message modem_setup Changes configuration of the modem connected to the RSC serial port useradd Adds an RSC user account userdel Deletes an RSC user account usershow Shows characteristics of an RSC user account userpassword Sets or changes a user's password userperm Sets the authorization for a user version Reports the RSC version on the host (RSC 2.0 and above) status Same as the version -v command. (RSC 2.0 and above)

1.3.3. How To Configure RSC

This document is applicable to the Sun Fire[TM] 280R, V480, and V880 servers.

When using RSC, the system administrator has the option to redirect the console to RSC. This allows the RSC user to enter and exit the system console mode from the RSC shell.

The following parameters must be set for the redirection to take effect:

ok> setenv diag-out-console true ok> setenv input-device rsc-console ok> setenv output-device rsc-console

These commands will take effect after the next server reset.

If you want to redirect the console server back to TTYA , you can do the following:

ok> setenv diag-out-console false ok> setenv input-device keyboard ok> setenv output-device screen

If the RSC console is the console and RSC has not been fully configured, the RSC card can be pulled from the machine in order to temporarily reset the output to the TTYA port. Once OBP has been started, the parameters will need to be reset appropriately to go to another device until the RSC card has been configured.

The RSC software download for Solaris contains the following packages:

· SUNWrsc

· SUNWrscj

· SUNWrscd

Step 1: Checking to see if RSC is already installed. Any previous version of RSC installed on a supported Solaris platform should be removed. Do the following to determine if RSC is already installed.

1. Make sure you are logged in as superuser.

2. Perform the pkginfo command to check for RSC. Type the following command at the superuser prompt and

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press Return (do not type the #):

# /usr/bin/pkginfo | grep SUNWrsc

3. If the output of this command lists any RSC packages, you need to remove them. Before you do this, save the

current configuration information. First, you need to know the platform name for your system. Type the following

command:

# uname -i

The system returns a message similar to the following:

SUNW,Sun-Fire-V490

In this example, the platform name is SUNW,Sun-Fire-V490.

4. Type the following to save the current configuration information :

# /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rscadm show >/var/tmp/rsc_config_info.txt

Save this file. If desired, you can also use the rscadm usershow command to display information on the users, and then save that information to a file. This information can be used to reconfigure RSC if the need arises at some time in the future.

5. Remove the RSC packages. Using the output from Step 2, type the following command to specify the installed

packages you want to remove:

# /usr/sbin/pkgrm SUNWrsc SUNWrscj SUNWrscd

Step 2: Downloading and Installing the RSC Software for Solaris You can find the RSC software in these locations:

· on the Solaris Supplemental CD (RSC_#.#)

· on the Sun software download site:

For important information specific to your version of RSC software, refer to the README file that is included in the dowloaded files. Follow these steps to install the RSC software on Solaris:

1. Make sure you are logged in as superuser.

2. Place the compressed file (for example, rsc_packages*.zip) in a temporary directory (for example, /tmp).

3. Use unzip (/usr/bin/unzip) to extract the Sun packages from the zip file. From your temporary directory, type the following command at the superuser prompt and press Return (do not type the #):

# /usr/bin/unzip rsc_packages*.zip

4. Type the following command to install the Solaris packages using the pkgadd command:

# /usr/sbin/pkgadd -d .

Step 3: Downloading and Adding a Patch This section describes how to download and install a patch for your version of Solaris and your hardware platform.

To download the patch, perform the following steps:

1. Refer to the table of software versions to determine the correct minimum patch ID number for your Solaris version and RSC version. For example, the patch for Sun Fire V880 hardware running Solaris 8, Update 5

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is 111416-05. If the patch is already included in the packages you have installed you do not need to re- install it, but see the note below about checking for other or later patches.

2. Point your Web browser to http://sunsolve.sun.com and click the Patches link in the left column.

3. Type the ID number for the patch you want in the Enter a Patch ID field and click Find Patch.

4. Follow the instructions on the page to download the patch. NOTE: Other patches or later patch versions may also exist; search http://sunsolve.sun.com for more information.

To add the patch, follow these steps:

1. Log in as superuser, if you have not already done so.

2. At the system prompt, type the following command:

# patchadd patch-ID

where patch-ID is the ID number of the patch you downloaded (for example, patchadd 111416-05).

3. The system returns messages similar to the following:

# patchadd 111416-05

Checking installed patches Verifying sufficient filesystem capacity (dry run method) Installing patch packages

Patch number 111416-05 has been successfully installed. See /var/sadm/patch/111416-05/log for details

This step installs the following packages:

· SUNWrsc

· SUNWrscj

Step 4: What To Do Next

If you are upgrading from a previous version of RSC, you need to flash the new firmware and reconfigure RSC. If you are installing RSC for the first time, you need to run the rsc-config script on the server.

Flashing the New Firmware

1. Before you flash the firmware, you need to know the platform name for your system. Type the following command:

# uname -i

The system returns a message similar to the following:

SUNW,Sun-Fire-280R

2. Type the following command to flash the firmware and update the GUI files:

# /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rscadm download /usr/platform/platform-name/lib/images/rscfw

where platform-name is the name you obtained when you typed uname -i in the previous step. For example, if your system is a Sun Fire 280R, you would type:

# /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rscadm download /usr/platform/SUNW,Sun-Fire-

280R/lib/images/rscfw

In this example, the platform name is SUNW, Sun-280R.

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Running the rsc-config Script on the Server

On the server systems only, type the following command to configure the new firmware image:

# /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rsc-config

1.3.4. Forgotten Password

1. Login to the system as root to create a new RSC user: If successful, then proceed to Step 2

If root can not access system remotely, and RSC is currently the active console, then the only other way to gain

access to the system

system's output and input devices back to their default settings. Setting these defaults can be accomplished by using one of the following two methods:

console would be through ttya, but because RSC is configured, we need to change the

Method 1:

After turning on the power to your system, watch the front panel wrench LED for rapid flashing during the boot process.

Press the front panel Power button twice (with a short, one-second delay in between presses).

This sets all nvram parameters to their default settings. These changes are temporary and the original values will be restored after the next hardware or software reset.

Method 2:

Remove RSC card. By removing the RSC card the output and input devices will forced to ttya.

2. Execute the following 3 commands in order to create a new RSC user with full permissions:

# /usr/platform/`uname -i`/rsc/rscadm useradd <username>

# /usr/platform/`uname -i`/rsc/rscadm userperm <username> cuar

# /usr/platform/`uname -i`/rsc/rscadm userpassword <username>

Note: You may need to delete an RSC user if there are 4 existing users defined. If you did not remove the RSC card, please proceed to step 3.

3. Reinstall RSC card. For information on How to install the RSC card please refer to your Server's Owner's Guide.

4. Reboot the RSC card.

5. Log into RSC using the login and password created in Step 2.

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1.4. Integrated Lights Out Management (ILOM)

1.4.1. Command Reference

General Commands

Description

Command

Show all valid targets.

help targets

Log out of the service processor CLI.

exit

Display the version of the ILOM firmware running on the service processor.

version

Display service processor clock information.

show /SP/clock

Display all of the CLI commands.

show /SP/cli/commands

Display the active service processor sessions.

show /SP/sessions

Display information about commands and targets.

help

Display information about a specific command.

help create

Update the service processor and BIOS firmware.

load -source tftp://newSPimage

Display a list of the service processor event logs.

show /SP/logs/event/list

User Commands

Description

Command

Add a local user.

create /SP/users/user1 password=password role=administrator| operator

Delete a local user.

delete /SP/users/user1

Change user's properties.

set /SP/users/user1 role=operator

Display information about all local users.

show -display [targets|properties|all] -level [value|all] /SP/users

Display information about LDAP settings.

show /SP/clients/ldap

Change LDAP settings.

set /SP/clients/ldap binddn=proxyuser bindpw=proxyuserpassword defaultrole=administrator|operator

ipaddress=ipaddress

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Network and Serial Port Setting Commands

Description

Command

Display network configuration information.

show /SP/network

Change network properties for the service processor. Changing certain network properties, like the IP address, will disconnect your active session.

set /SP/network pendingipaddress=ipaddress pendingipdiscovery=dchp|static pendingipgateway=ipgateway pendingipnetmask=ipnetmask commitpending=true

Display information about the external serial port.

show /SP/serial/external

Change the external serial port configuration.

set /SP/serial/external pendingspeed=integer commitpending=true

Display information about the serial connection to the host.

show /SP/serial/host

Change the host serial port configuration.

 

Note: This speed setting must match the speed setting for serial port 0, COM1 or /dev/ttyS0 on the host operating system.

set /SP/serial/host pendingspeed=integer commitpending=true

Alert Commands

Description

Command

 

Display information about PET alerts. You can configure up to 15 alerts.

show /SP/alert/rules/1

15

 

set /SP/alert/rules/1

15

destination=ipaddress

Change alert configuration.

level=down|critical|major|minor

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System Management Access Commands

Description

Command

Display information about HTTP settings.

show /SP/services/http

Change HTTP settings, such as enabling automatic redirection to HTTPS.

set /SP/services/http port=portnumber secureredirect enabled|disabled

servicestate=enabled|disabled

Display information about HTTPS access.

show /SP/services/https

Change HTTPS settings.

set /SP/services/https port=portnumber servicestate=enabled|disabled

Display SSH DSA key settings.

show /SP/services/ssh/keys/dsa

Display SSH RSA key settings.

show /SP/services/ssh/keys/rsa

SNMP Commands

Description

Command

Display information about SNMP settings. By default, the SNMP port is 161 and v3 is enabled.

show /SP/services/snmp engineid=snmpengineid port=snmpportnumber sets=enabled|disabled v1=enabled|disabled v2c=enabled|disabled

v3=enabled|disabled

Display SNMP users.

show /SP/services/snmp/users

Add an SNMP user.

create /SP/services/snmp/users/snmpusername authenticationpassword=password authenticationprotocol=MD5|SHA permissions=rw|ro privacypassword=password privacyprotocol=none|DES

Delete and SNMP user.

delete /SP/services/snmp/users/snmpusername

Display information about SNMP public (read-only) communities.

show /SP/services/snmp/communities/public

Add this device to an SNMP public community.

create /SP/services/snmp/communities/public/comm1

Delete this device from an SNMP public community.

delete /SP/services/snmp/communities/public/comm1

Display information about SNMP private

show /SP/services/snmp/communities/private

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Description

Command

(read-write) communities.

 

Add this device to an SNMP private community.

create

/SP/services/snmp/communities/private/comm2

Delete this device from an SNMP private community.

delete

/SP/services/snmp/communities/private/comm2

Host System Commands

Description

Command

Start the host system.

start /SYS

Stop the host system.

stop /SYS

Reset the host system.

reset /SYS

Start a session to connect to the host console.

start /SP/console

Stop the session connected to the host console.

stop /SP/console

Clock Settings

Description

Command

Set the service processor clock to synchronize with a primary NTP server.

set /SP/clients/ntp/servers/1 address=ntpIPaddress

Set the service processor clock to synchronize with a secondary NTP server.

set /SP/clients/ntp/servers/2

address=ntpIPaddress2

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2.0 Open Boot Prom (OBP)

2.0 Open Boot Prom (OBP)

2.1. Command Reference

2.1.1. Version 3.x

.version: display the version of the PROM .speed: display the cpu and bus speed banner: display the power on banner message boot <cdrom | disk | tape | net> -a -h -s -v -x:

devalias: identify all current device aliases eject-floppy: eject a floppy diskette firmware-revision: identifies the firmware version password: set PROM password printenv: display all current parameters probe-fcal: identify all fiber devices attached to the i/o bus probe-scsi-all: identify all scsi devices attached to the i/o bus reset-all: recycle the system setenv <parameter> <value>: set a value for a parameter set-default <parameter>: reset the value of a parameter to is mfgr default state set-default: reset all parameters to mfgr default states show-disks: identifys all disk controllers attached to the system show-post-results: display POST results sifting: search obp commands for text string synch: write all file system changes to disk test-all:execute a device's self-test procedure watch-net-all: identify all network devices attached to the system

2.1.2. Version 4.17 additions for the boot command:

boot net:rarp - use rarp to find boot server boot net:dhcp - use dhcp to find boot server boot cdrom -F wanboot – install - install client over WAN boot net:speed=100,duplex=full - set network speed and duplex options

2.2. Working with nvram

2.2.1 Selected nvram Parameters

auto-boot?: if true, boot automatically after POST. (true) boot-command: command to execute if auto-boot? is true. (boot) boot-device: device to use for booting (disk net) boot-file: file to boot (empty string) diag-device: diagnostic boot source (net) diag-file: file from which to boot in diagnostic more (empty string) dial-level: Level of diagnostics to run (min or max) diag-switch?: If true, run in diagnostic mode input-device: input device to use (keyboard) keymap: keyboad map for custom keyboard (no default) nvramrc: NVRAM startup script (empty string) oem-banner: Custom OEM banner (empty string) oem-banner?: If true, use custom OEM banner (false) output-device: Output device to use (screen) sbus-probe-list: Identifies which sbus slots are probed & in what order (01) scsi-initiator-id: SCSI bus address of host adapter (7) security-mode: Firmware security level (none | command | full) security-password: Firmware security password (none)

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use-nvramrc?: If true, execute commands in NVRAMRC during startup sequence (false) watchdog-reboot?: If true, reboot after watchdog reset (false)

2.2.2. nvramrc Commands

nvalias alias <device-path> - Store the command "devalias alias device-path" in NVRAMRC. The alias persists until the nvunalias or set-defaults commands are executed. nvedit - Enter the NVRAMRC editor. If data remains in the temporary buffer from a previous nvedit session, resume editing those previous contents. If not, read the contents of NVRAMRC into the temporary buffer and begin editing them. nvquit -Discard the contents of the temporary buffer, without writing it to NVRAMRC. prompt for confirmation. nvrecover - Recover the contents of NVRAMRC if they have been lost as a result of the execution of set- defaults; then enter the editor as with nvedit. nvrecover fails if nvedit is executed between the time that the NVRAMRC contents were lost and the time that nvrecover is executed. nvrun - Execute the contents of the temporary buffer. nvstore - Copy the contents of the temporary buffer to NVRAMRC; discard the contents of the temporary buffer. nvunalias alias - Delete the corresponding alias from NVRAMRC. Must reset system.

2.2.3. nvedit Editor Keystroke Commands

Control-B - Move backward one character. Control-C - Exit the editor and return to the OpenBoot command interpreter. The temporary buffer is preserved but is not written back to NVRAMRC. (Use nvstore afterwards to write back the temporary buffer.)

Control-F - Move forward one character. Control-K - If at the end of a line, join the next line to the current line (that is, delete the new line). Control-L - List all lines. Control-N - Move to the next line of the NVRAMRC editing buffer. Control-O - Insert a new line at the cursor position and stay on the current line. Control-P - Move to the previous line of the NVRAMRC editing buffer. [Delete] - Delete the previous character. [Return] - Insert a new line at the cursor position and advance to the next line.

Activating nvram:

ok> nvedit <enter commands> Type Control-C to get out of the editor and back to the ok prompt. ok> nvstore ok> setenv use-nvramrc? true ok> reset

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2.0 Open Boot Prom (OBP)

2.3. Common obp Procedures

2.3.1. Setting cpu speed

This procedure lets you increase or decrease the speed of the cpu and the upa bus:

ok> also hidden ok> d# <new-speed> at-speed ok> .speed

Note: cpu speed should be changed in 10% increments. Otherwise, the system may hang.

2.3.2. Setting hostid

This procedure will reprogram the MAC address and the hostid:

ok> 17 0 mkp

ok> 8 0 20 xx yy zz 080020xxyyzz mkpl

note: cursor will disappear press ctl-d press ctl-r ok> banner

(press return key)

(press return)

2.3.3. Setting the Monitor Frequency

This procedure lets you set the monitor frequency from the obp:

ok> output-device=screen:r1024x768x75 ok> boot

2.3.4. Setting network transfer speed

The following procedure forces the interface to 10Mbps:

ok> show-devs (get the full path name of the hme device,

e.g., /iommu@f,e0000000/sbus@f,e0001000/SUNW,hme@3,8c00000)

ok> nvedit 0: probe-all install-console banner 1: apply transfer-speed=10

/iommu@f,e0000000/sbus@f,e0001000/SUNW,hme@3,8c00000

Ctrl-C (to exit the nvedit utility). ok> nvstore ok> setenv use-nvramrc? true ok> boot

Note that the example above sets the speed to 10Mbps. To set the speed to 100Mbps, the value 10 should be replaced with 100.

2.3.5. Setting scsi-initiator-id

PCI based systems

1) To identify the SCSI adaptors with dual-ported disks enter the following from the boot prom:

ok> probe-scsi-all

For example:

ok> probe-scsi-all

/pci@6,4000/scsi@3,1

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/pci@6,4000/scsi@3

Target 2

Unit 0 Disk Target 3

SEAGATE ST32171W SUN2.1G7462

Unit 0

Disk

SEAGATE ST32171W SUN2.1G7462

/pci@6,4000/scsi@2,1

Target 2

Unit 0 Disk Target 3

SEAGATE ST32171W SUN2.1G7462

Unit 0

Disk

SEAGATE ST32171W SUN2.1G7462

Note you may have to first do the following before this command will work. ok> setenv auto-boot? false ok> reset-all

Identify which disks are the dual-hosted disk and note the SCSI adaptors they are attached to. Using the above example, one connection would be "/pci@6,4000/scsi@3" and the other

"/pci@6,4000/scsi@2,1"

2) Update the nvramrc to set the scsi-initiator-id to 6 for these device.

From the boot prom type:

ok> nvedit 0: probe-all install-console banner 1: cd /pci@6,4000/scsi@3 2: 6 " scsi-initiator-id" integer-property (note: there is a space between the " and scsi) 3: device-end 4: cd /pci@6,4000/scsi@2,1 5: 6 " scsi-initiator-id" integer-property 6: device-end <cntrl-c> ok>nvstore ok>nvramrc evaluate ok>setenv use-nvramrc? true ok>reset-all

3) Edit the /etc/system file (on both nodes) to set fast/wide SCSI (disable Ultra SCSI):

set scsi_options=0x3f8

4) Boot both systems and verify that you can see the multi-hosted disks from both nodes.

Sbus based

# init 0 ok> nvedit 0: " /sbus@1f, 0/SUNW, fas@0, 8800000" select-dev 1: 6 encode-int "scsi-initiator-id" property 2: " /sbus@1f, 0/SUNW, fas@1, 880000" select-dev 3: 6 encode-int "scsi-initiator-id" property 4: device-end 5: ^c ok> nvstore ok> setenv use-nvramrc? true ok> reset-all

SSE Field Reference Guide

2.0 Open Boot Prom (OBP)

2.3.6. Booting a System

A. Common boot Syntax

ok> boot [device-specifier] [arguments]

This behavior is found on most OpenBoot [TM] 2.x and 3.x based systems. Note that differences may occur on some platforms.

B. Common Boot [device-specifier]

disk - Boots from the alias named "disk". You can view the physical device path for the disk alias by typing "devalias disk" at the ok prompt, or, to view all aliases, type "devalias".

cdrom - Specifies to boot from a CD or a DVD. For a system with an older EEPROM (typically OBP versions below 2.x), replace cdrom with sd(0,6,2) to boot from the system's CD-ROM. Systems with proms this old do not support Solaris [TM] versions that are contained on DVD media.

net - Specifies to boot from a network boot image.

url - Specifies the location of the custom JumpStart [TM] configuration files in compressed format. See section F below for the URLs that can be specified, syntax, and examples.

C. Common Boot [arguments]

Below is a list of the most commonly used boot command flags along with a brief explanation. Each command must be entered at the system "OK" prompt level.

Note: This is NOT intended to be a complete listing of all the boot argument options. Please see the appropriate man pages for more details.

Option : Definition

-a Ask the user for configuration information, such as where to find the system file, where to mount root, and even override the name of the kernel itself. Default responses will be contained in square brackets ([]), and the user may simply enter <RETURN> to use the default response. To help repair a damaged /etc/system file, enter /dev/null at the prompt that asks for the pathname of the system configuration file.

-v

-s Boot only to init level 's' Single User Mode. All local file systems are mounted. Only a small set of essential kernel processes are left running. This mode is for administrative tasks such as installing optional utility packages. All files are accessible and no users are logged in on the system.

-x Do not boot in clustered mode.This option only has an effect when a version of Sun Cluster software that supports this option has been installed.

-r Reconfiguration boot. The system will probe all attached hardware devices and assign nodes in the file system to represent only those devices actually found.

-f Causes Autoclient systems to flush and reinitialize the client system's local cache and read all files over the network from the client's file server. This flag is ignored for all non-Autoclient systems.

-D default-file This option allows the default file to be explicitly set and can be useful when booting kadb(1M) since, by default, kadb loads the default-file as exported by the boot program.

-w This option is supposed to mount the root filesystem as read-write during boot process however it is not implemented. The ufs root filesystem is mounted read-only to avoid problems during fsck. After fsck runs, it is remounted read-write.

-m smf_options This boot option is new in Solaris [TM] 10 and works in conjunction with the Solaris [TM] 10 service management facility. See kernel(1m) and smf(5) for more information on these Solaris [TM] 10 specific boot options.

Boot with verbose messages enabled.

SSE Field Reference Guide

2.0 Open Boot Prom (OBP)

D. Network booting background

The boot command syntax for specifying the two methods of network booting are:

boot net:rarp

boot net:dhcp

Effective with Solaris 9 (12/03 release) a wide area network boot option is now available. This option introduces a new command line syntax and new option flags.

E. Network boot syntax

ok> boot cdrom|net - install [[url|ask]] [[dhcp]] [[nowin]]

Below is a list of the most commonly used network boot command flags along with a brief explanation. Each command must be entered at the system "OK" prompt level. Note: This is NOT intended to be a complete listing of all the boot argument options.

ask Specifies that the installation program prompt you to type the location of the compressed configuration file after the system boots and connects to the network.

dhcp Specifies to use a DHCP server to obtain network installation information that is needed to boot the system. If you do not specify to use a DHCP server, the system uses the /etc/bootparams file or the name service bootparams database.

nowin Specifies not to begin the X program. You do not need to use the X program to perform a custom JumpStart installation, so you can reduce the installation time by using the nowin option.

"noauto" and "noautons" Will not automatically retrieve the system identification information from the network or configure the nameservice information. This is useful for performing interactive installations when you want to be prompted for the system identification information.

For example:

ok> boot cdrom – noauto

Will not take the system identification information from the network.

OR

ok> boot cdrom – noautons

Will skip only the name service configuration information.

Note: The "noauto" and "noautons" options are unsupported and may not work for every release of Solaris 8 or above.

F. Example syntax for custom JumpStart [TM] boot commands

ok> boot cdrom - install file://jumpstart_dir_path/compressed_config_file

NFS server: nfs://IP_address/jumpstart_dir_path/compressed_config_file

HTTP server: http://IP_address/jumpstart_dir_path/compressed_config_file&proxy_info

ok> boot net - install nfs://server_name/jumpstart_dir_path/compressed_config_file

Note: If you saved the compressed configuration file on an HTTP server that is behind a firewall, you must use a proxy specifier during boot. You do not need to specify an IP address for the server that contains the file. You must specify an IP address for the proxy server, as in the following example:

SSE Field Reference Guide

3.0 Solaris OS

3.0 Solaris OS

3.1. Installation/Configuration

3.1.1. Jumpstart

3.1.1.1 Creating a Jumpstart Server

If the install server will be on the same net as the client machines, do the following:

# cd /cdrom/sol_9_1203_sparc/s0/Solaris_9/Tools

# setup_install_server /export/install

# add_to_install_server /export/install

3.1.1.2 Creating a Boot Server

If the install server is on a different subnet, set up a boot server. This will copy required kernel architecture

information from the Solaris CD image to the boot server's local disk.

You must have a name service so that you can setup automatic system configuration such as geographic region, time zone, netmask value.

# cd /cdrom/sol_9_1203_sparc/s0/Solaris_9/Tools

# setup_install_server -b /export/install

# add_to_install_server -b /export/install

3.1.1.3 Configuring the Jumpstart Server

Adding clients:

1. Edit /etc/hosts (or the nis host map) - add jumpstart client ip addresses

2. Edit /etc/ethers (or the nis ethers map) - add jumpstart client ethernet addresses

3. Add the clients:

# cd /export/install

# add_install_client <client> sun4u

Removing clients:

# rm_install_client <machine-name>

3.1.1.4 Creating Profiles

Profiles are used to identify the characteristices needed to be passed to sysidconfig. Below is an example of a profile:

install_type initial_install system_type standalone partitioning default

cluster

SUNWCuser

cluster

SUNWCxgl delete

package

SUNWaudmo add

filesys

any 40 swap

filesys

any 50 /opt

3.1.1.5 Creating Rules

# cd /export/jumpstart

# vi rules

# ./check (this creates the rules.ok file)

3.1.1.6 . Jumpstarting the Client

# init 0 ok> boot net – install

SSE Field Reference Guide

3.0 Solaris OS

3.1.2. Flash Archive

3.1.2.1. Model System Setup On the "model" system, create the archive:

# flarcreate -n <archive-name> -c <file-system>/<file-name>

# share -F nfs <file-system>

# dfshares

Note: run dfshares to see if the file system is shared statement and run:

# /etc/init.d/nfs.server start

Example:

If not shared, edit /etc/dfs/dfstab, enter the share

# flarcreate -n u60_03-04-2004 -c /export/home/flash/u60.flar

# share -F nfs /export/home/flash

# dfshares

RESOURCE

SERVER

ACCESS

TRANSPORT

cardassia:/export/home/flash

cardassia -

-

3.1.2.2.Target System Setup On the target system, start the installation procedure:

ok> boot cdrom - install

- select install from flash archive (either http or ftp)

3.1.3. WANBoot

Task 1 - Creating the Flash Archive:

Perform the following steps:

1. Create the directory for the flash archive under what will be he web server's documents directory.

# mkdir -p /var/apache/htdocs/flashdir

2. Create the flash archive

# flarcreate -n <archive_name> -a <archive_author> /var/apache/htdocs/flashdir/solaris.flar

Task 2 - Configuring the Apache Webserver

Perform the following steps to configure and start the Apache web server:

1. Update the Apache webserver's primary configuration file. Set the Servername option to the correct name for

your environment.

# vi /etc/apache/httpd.conf

Edit the line that reads:

#Servername new.host.name

Remove the pound sign (#) and change it to the correct server name for your environment:

Servername WANBootserv

SSE Field Reference Guide

3.0 Solaris OS

2. Start the webserver

# /usr/apache/bin/apachectl start

NOTE: WanBoot support started in Solaris 9 12/03. If using Solaris 9 4/04, the WanBoot client must have 256mb memory or higher. If you are using Solaris 10 WanBoot, WanBoot client must have 512mb memory or higher. This is because Wanboot actually loads a "miniroot" to memory, and Solaris 10 miniroot is much larger than Solaris 9.

Task 3 - Configuring the WANBoot and JumpStart files

Perform the following steps to configure the WANBoot and Jumpstart server files.

1. Insert the Solaris[TM] 10 Software CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.

2. Create the Jumpstart configuration directory under the webserver's documents directory.

# mkdir /var/apache/htdocs/config

3. Change to the jumpstart sample directory on the CD-ROM

# cd /cdrom/cdrom0/s0/Solaris_10/Misc/jumpstart_sample

4. Copy the directory contents to the /var/apache/htdocs/config directory.

# cp -r * /var/apache/htdocs/config

5. Copy the wanboot binary to a directory under the webserver's documents directory.

# cp /cdrom/cdrom0/s0/Solaris_10/Tools/Boot/platform/sun4u/wanboot \ /var/apache/htdocs/wanboot

6. Copy the WAN Boot CGI programs to the webserver's cgi-bin directory.

# cp /usr/lib/inet/wanboot/*-cgi /var/apache/cgi-bin

7. Edit the configuration file specifying the clients sysidcfg file and custom jumpstart files.

# mkdir /etc/netboot

# vi /etc/netboot/system.conf

Insert the following two lines. Use the correct server name for your environment.

8. Copy and edit the configuration file containing the WANBoot specific parameters.

# cp /etc/inet/wanboot.conf.sample /etc/netboot/wanboot.conf

# vi /etc/netboot/wanboot.conf

Edit the file to contain following lines. Use the correct server name for your environment.

bootfile=/wanboot10/wanboot

root-file=/wanboot10/wpath/miniroot

encryption_type=

signature_type=

server_authentication=no

client_authentication=no

SSE Field Reference Guide

3.0 Solaris OS

resolve_hosts=

root_server=

system_conf=system.conf

9. Create the miniroot filesytem under the webserver's documents directory.

# /cdrom/cdrom0/s0/Solaris_10/Tools/setup_install_server -w \

/var/apache/htdocs/wanboot10/wpath /var/apache/htdocs/wanboot10/ipath

#cp /var/apache/htdocs/wanboot10/wpath/miniroot

/var/apache/htdocs/wanboot10/miniroot

10. Check the integrity of the wanboot.conf file.

# /usr/sbin/bootconfchk /etc/netboot/wanboot.conf

11. Edit the jumpstart configuration files.

# cd /var/apache/htdocs/config

a. Edit the sysidcfg file

# vi /var/apache/htdocs/config/sysidcfg

Edit the file to contain following lines. Use the correct server name for your environment.

network_interface=eri1 { primary hostname=WANBootclient1 ip_address=a.b.c.d netmask=255.255.255.0 default_route=none protocol_ipv6=no } timezone=US/Central system_locale=C terminal=dtterm timeserver=localhost name_service=none security_policy=none

NOTE: Please use this same order. We found some oddities if we changed the order, errors like: Invalid entry on line x.

b. Edit the profile file

# vi /var/apache/htdocs/config/profile

Edit the file to contain following lines.

install_type flash_install archive_location partitioning explicit filesys c0t0d0s1 512 swap filesys c0t0d0s0 free /

c. Edit the rules file

# cd /var/apache/htdocs

# vi rules

SSE Field Reference Guide

3.0 Solaris OS

Run a check on the rules file

# ./check

Edit the file to contain following line:

Hostname WANBootclient1 - profile -

Task 4 - Configure the WAN Boot Client

Perform the following steps on the WAN boot client to boot and install the client. (Verify your eeprom version, if it is at version 4.17 proceed to steps 1 and 2, else proceed with step 2a)

NOTE: As of this edit, not all system proms have a patch to upgrade the system prom to 4.17. Until the 4.17 prom is available for your system, you can only utilize Wanboot via cdrom.

NOTE: Systems supported for Wanboot (as of 05/2005):

.

SunBlade 100/150

.

SunBlade 1000/2000

.

SunFire 280R

.

Netra 20

.

SunFire 880

.

SunFire V890

.

SunFire V480

.

SunFire V490

.

SunFire V440

.

Netra 440

.

SunBlade 2500

.

SunBlade 1500

.

SunFire V210/V240

.

Netra 240

.

SunFire V250

.

Sun_Fire_B1600

.

Sun Java W2500s

.

Sun Java W1500s

.

SunFire 15K

1. Set network boot argument variables for WANBootclient1 at the ok prompt.

ok> setenv network-boot-arguments host-ip=a.b.c.d, router-ip=a.b.c.1,

subnet-mask=255.255.255.0,hostname=WANBootclient1,file=

cgi-bin/wanboot-cgi

2. Boot the client.

ok> boot net install

2a. If firmware is below 4.17, then Install a Solaris 10 CD into the client and run wanboot.

ok> boot cdrom -o prompt -F wanboot - install Resetting

Sun Blade 100 (UltraSPARC-IIe), No Keyboard Copyright 1998-2003 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved. OpenBoot 4.10.1, 256 MB memory installed, Serial #50645368. [pt pt-10usb #1] Ethernet address 0:3:ba:4:c9:78, Host ID: 8304c978.

Rebooting with command: boot cdrom -o prompt -F wanboot - install Boot device: /pci@1f,0/ide@d/cdrom@1,0:f File and args: -o prompt -F wanboot - install

SSE Field Reference Guide

3.0 Solaris OS

<time unavailable> wanboot info: WAN boot messages->console <time unavailable> wanboot info: Default net-config-strategy: manual

3. Follow prompts to set the environment:

boot> prompt host-ip? Client_IP subnet-mask? 255.255.255.0 router-ip? router_IP hostname? Name-of-host http-proxy? client-id? aes?

3des?

sha1?

bootserver? http://Bootserver_IP/cgi-bin/wanboot-cgi Unknown variable '/Bootserver_IP/cgi-bin/wanboot-cgi'; ignored (ignore this) boot> boot> list host-ip: Client_IP subnet-mask: 255.255.255.0 router-ip: UNSET hostname: datacomms http-proxy: UNSET client-id: UNSET aes: *HIDDEN* 3des: *HIDDEN* sha1: *HIDDEN* bootserver: http://Bootserver_IP/cgi-bin/wanboot-cgi

boot> go

<time unavailable> wanboot progress: wanbootfs: Read 128 of 128 kB (100%) <time unavailable> wanboot info: wanbootfs: Download complete Mon Aug 23 19:45:25 wanboot info: WAN boot messages->129.148.192.83:80

SunOS Release 5.10 Version s10_58 64-bit Copyright 1983-2004 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms. Configuring devices

---- Cut short for brevity -----

Trouble-shooting tips/log files:

If the Wanboot fails to boot/install and it drops you to a shell prompt, you can run the installation in debug mode to aquire more information on the failure.

Run the following after it fails and drops you to a shell prompt:

# pfinstall -x 10 /tmp/install_config/<profile name>

Where <profile name> is the name of your jumpstart profile.

Log files to check:

/var/apache/logs/access_log

/var/apache/logs/error_log

SSE Field Reference Guide

3.0 Solaris OS

3.1.4. Live Upgrade

SECTION A - Overview

Disk Space Requirements

Typically, each boot environment requires a minimum of 350 to 800 Mbytes of disk space, depending on your system software configuration. Utilities that are used by the Solaris Live Upgrade user interface determine your resource requirements.

To estimate the file system size that is needed to create a boot environment, start the creation of a new boot environment. The size is calculated and you can then abort the process.

You can create a boot environment only on a disk that can serve as a boot device. Some systems restrict which disks can serve as a boot device. Refer to your system's documentation to determine if any boot restrictions apply.

Guidelines for selecting a slice for the root (/) file system

Must be a slice from which the system can boot. Must meet the recommended minimum size. Cannot be a Veritas VxVM volume or a Solstice DiskSuite(TM) metadevice. Can be on different physical disks or the same disk as the active root file system.

Guidelines for Selecting a Slice for a /swap File System

The swap slice cannot be in use by any boot environment except the current boot environment or if the -s option is used, the source boot environment. The boot environment creation fails if the swap slice is being used by any other boot environment whether the slice contains a swap, ufs, or any other file system.

Guidelines for Terminal Type

Using Live Upgrade From a Remote System When viewing the character interface remotely, such as over a tip line, you might need to set the TERM environment variable to VT220. Also, when using CDE , set the value of the TERM variable to dtterm, rather than xterm.

Required Packages

Check your current operating environment for the packages in the following table, which are required to use Solaris Live Upgrade. If packages in the column for your release are missing, use the pkgadd command to add these.

Solaris 2.6 Release SUNWadmap SUNWadmfw SUNWadmc SUNWmfrun SUNWlocSUNWlibC

Solaris 7 Release