Sei sulla pagina 1di 79

NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF RWANDA 

FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

 
PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF WATER  
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN RUGERAMIGOZI 

IRRIGATION SCHEME, RWANDA 

By 
 
MUREKASHUNGWE Evergiste 
 
A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the  
Degree of Master of Science  
In Water Resources and Environmental Management 
       
               

            
December, 2007 
ii

 
NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF RWANDA 
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCES 
DEPARTEMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

In collaboration with 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF WATER 

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN RUGERAMIGOZI 

IRRIGATION SCHEME, RWANDA 
By 

MUREKASHUNGWE Evergiste 
 

Supervisors: 

Dr Eng Umaru Garba Wali 
Dr Eng F.O.K. Anyemedu 

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of 
Master of Science in Water Resources and Environmental Management 
 
December, 2007 
iii

Declaration 
 
I,  the  under  signed,  declare  that  this  thesis  is  my  original  work  and  has  not  been 
presented for a degree in any other university, and that all sources of material used 
for the thesis have been duly acknowledged. 
 

Name: MUREKASHUNGWE Evergiste

Signature:
iv

Dedication 

To Almighty God, 
To my mother Ramberta, 
To all my families and friends, 
To my beloved Nyinawinyange Thacienne. 
v

Abstract 

The  rational  utilization  of  irrigation  water  is  a  fundamental  aspect  for  achieving 
sustainable  agriculture  for  food  security  and  poverty  alleviation.  To  achieve  the 
objective  of  sustainable  agriculture  many  factors  are  involved,  and  irrigation  water 
delivery  is  one  of  the  most  important.  Consequently,  its  evaluation  as  well  as  the 
search  for  feasible  solutions  to  problems  detected  during  the  evaluation  could  be  of 
special  interest.  To  help  farmers  in  obtaining  efficient  and  rational  methods  of  water 
uses  and  to  provide  an  adequate  scientific  and  technical  support  to  optimize 
management,  it  is  important  to  conduct  the  evaluation  of  irrigation  system  in  plots. 
This  study  analyzes  the  water  management  performance  of  small  scale  irrigation 
system in Rwanda. ILRI/IWMI water balance and maintenance indicators were used to 
test  Rugeramigozi  irrigation  scheme  as  a  base  for  the  performance  evaluation. 
Necessary  data  were  collected  from  ECOTRA  (the  company  that  made  the  feasibility 
study and the design of the system) and from Byimana Meteorological Station. In the 
field, certain parameters including: type of crop, irrigation water discharge in channel, 
and  field  size  were  measured  and/or  observed  before,  during  and  after  an  irrigation 
event while farmers were conducting their normal irrigation practice. Survey related to 
water availability was also conducted among the farmers. The results showed that the 
source  is  delivering  40.15l.s‐1  while  the  water  requirement  is  114l.s‐1.  The  delivery  is 
only 35.2% of the water requirement. The insufficiency of irrigation water, the type of 
irrigation system in use, the poor maintenance of irrigation structures and the farmer’s 
unawareness  of  irrigation  practices  were  the  main  problems  identified  in  the 
management  and  operations  of  the  scheme.  Some  corrective  measures  have  been 
recommended to improve the system. Among them are the following: (a) the selection 
of crops should be done by taking into account the availability of irrigation water, (b) 
tertiary channels need to be constructed in the scheme to avoid conflict related to water 
distribution, (c) rainwater harvesting systems need to be established in the scheme to 
avoid flooding that are occurring in rainy season and to store water for supplementary 
irrigation  during  the  dry  season,  (d)  awareness  of  irrigation  practices  needs  to  be 
created among farmers. 
 
 
Keywords: Biringanya, Irrigation Channel, crop, Water crop requirement, water balance 
indicators, maintenance indicators, Water management. 
vi

Acknowledgments 

I would like to express my deepest gratitude to my academic supervisors Dr Umaru G. 
Wali and Dr Eng F.O.K. Anyemedu for their support, assistance and guidance, for all 
their sincere, faithful and immense devotion to help me for the accomplishment of this 
thesis work and to bring me here from the start, their unlimited and sweet advice that 
smoothened  my  educational journey,  it  couldn’t  be  otherwise,  is  printed in  my  heart, 
thus, much appreciation is expressed to them.  
Acknowledgment  is  expressed  to  the  staff  of  WREM  Program,  especially  to  Dr  Eng 
Innocent  Nhapi  and  Dr  Eng  Aphrodis  Karangwa  for  their  valuable  support  and 
advices. 
To  the  ECOTRA  staff,  Mr.  Valère  Nzeyimana,  Mrs.  Adoratha,  the  Agronomist  of 
Nyamabuye  Sector,  Eng  Ismael  Ndamukunda,  they  provided  me  professional, 
technical  and  administrative  support.  So  my  appreciation  may  reach  them  all.  I  am 
indebted  to  Biringanya  Scheme  farmers  for  their  honest  information  and  cooperation 
for the accomplishment of this study. 
 
In  addition,  the  generous  support  and  contribution  of  all  my  colleagues,  friends, 
families  and  relatives  are  deeply  acknowledged  and  emphasized  in  all  cases  of  my 
future life. 

MUREKASHUNGWE Evergiste 
vii

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Declaration ............................................................................................................................. iii
Dedication ................................................................................................................................iv
Abstract ..................................................................................................................................... v
Acknowledgments...................................................................................................................vi
TABLE OF CONTENTS ........................................................................................................vii
List of Tables ............................................................................................................................x
List of figures...........................................................................................................................xi
List of appendices ................................................................................................................. xii
List of Acronyms and Abbreviations................................................................................ xiii
Chapter  1. INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1
1.1 Background .........................................................................................................................1
1.2 Statement of the problem..................................................................................................2
1.3 Objectives of the study .....................................................................................................3
Chapter  2. LITERATURE REVIEW......................................................................................4
2.1 Irrigation .............................................................................................................................4
2.2 Perspectives and objectives of irrigation.......................................................................4
2.3 Water Resources and Irrigation Development in Rwanda .........................................5
2.4 Small scale irrigation........................................................................................................6
2.4.1  The problems of small‐scale irrigation........................................................................ 6 
2.4.2  Intervention into small‐scale irrigation ..................................................................... 7 
2.4.3  Farmer Managed Irrigation System (FMIS) and its importance ............................. 7 
2.4.4  Purposes and need for small‐scale irrigation in Rwanda ........................................ 8 
2.5 Performance of an irrigation system ..............................................................................9
2.5.1   How to conduct an irrigation system performance assessment? ............................ 9 
2.5.2   Performance evaluation of small‐scale irrigation................................................... 11 
2.5.3  Indicators for irrigation performance........................................................................ 13 
2.5.4    Water balance indicators............................................................................................. 14 
2.5.4.1 Field application ratio .................................................................................................................. 15
2.5.4.2 Tertiary unit ratio.......................................................................................................................... 15
2.5.4.3 Overall consumed ratio................................................................................................................ 16
2.5.4.4 Conveyance ratio .......................................................................................................................... 16
viii

2.5.4.5 Distribution ratio........................................................................................................................... 17
2.5.4.6 Dependability ................................................................................................................................ 17

2.5.5   Maintenance indicators............................................................................................... 18 


2.5.5.1 General ........................................................................................................................................... 18
2.5.5.2 Sustainability of water level and head‐discharge relationship............................................... 18

2.5.6   Properties of performance indicators......................................................................... 19 


2.5.6.1 Irrigation water use efficiencies .................................................................................................. 20
2.5.6.2  Application efficiency.................................................................................................................. 21
2.5.6.3 Storage efficience .......................................................................................................................... 22
2.5.6.4 Distribution efficiency.................................................................................................................. 23
2.5.6.5 Irrigation scheduling.................................................................................................................... 23

2.6 Methods of irrigation performance ...............................................................................25
2.6.1   Data collection .............................................................................................................. 26 
2.6.1.1 The Rapid appraisal approach .................................................................................................... 26
2.6.1.2 Participatory rural appraisal approach...................................................................................... 27
2.6.1.3 Remote sensing techniques.......................................................................................................... 28

Chapter 3. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY AREA .........................................................29
3.1 Location and Topography ..............................................................................................29
3.2 Rugeramigozi Irrigation scheme ............................................................................................ 30 
3.3 Climate....................................................................................................................................... 31 
3.4 Water sources............................................................................................................................ 31 
Chapter 4. MATERIALS AND METHODS ........................................................................33
4.1 Methodology.....................................................................................................................33
4.1.1   Primary data collection ............................................................................................... 33 
4.1.1.1 Flow measurement ....................................................................................................................... 34
4.1.1.2 Discharge determination.............................................................................................................. 35

4.1.2   Secondary data collection ........................................................................................... 37 


4.1.2.1 Crop water requirements............................................................................................................. 37

4.2 Data analysis techniques ...............................................................................................38
4.2.1   Water delivery performance ........................................................................................ 38 
4.2.2   Performance Indicators................................................................................................ 38 
Chapter  5.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION .......................................................................41
5.1 Analysis of secondary data and visual observations ................................................41
5.3 Water availability...........................................................................................................44
5.4 Water requirement ...........................................................................................................46
5.5 Water measurement.........................................................................................................47
5.5.1   Results ............................................................................................................................ 47 
5.5.2   Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 50 
ix

5.6 Maintenance .....................................................................................................................52
5.6.1   Results ............................................................................................................................ 52 
5.6.2   Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 53 
Chap 6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATION ..................................................54
6.1 Conclusions.......................................................................................................................54
6.2 Recommendations............................................................................................................54
REFERENCES.........................................................................................................................55
APPENDICES.........................................................................................................................59
x

List of Tables 

Table5. 1 Water requirements for Cabbage and Carrots..............................................................46


Table5. 2 Water requirements for Beans dry ...............................................................................47
Table 5. 3 Flow measurement records for day 1 ...................................................................48
Table5. 4 Flow measurement records for day 2 ....................................................................49
Table5. 5 Flow measurement records for day 3 ....................................................................49
Table5. 6 Calculated discharges in different sites .......................................................................50
Table5. 7 Common maximum attainable values of the field application ratio (efficiency)
..............................................................................................................................................51
Table5. 8 Observed structures status ...........................................................................................53
xi

List of figures 

Figure 2. 1 Framework for a performance assessment program of irrigation and drainage


schemes (ICID). ...................................................................................................................10
Figure 2. 2 The setting of irrigation and drainage .......................................................................12

Figure 3. 1 Rwanda administrative map ......................................................................................29


Figure 3. 2 Rugeramigozi marshland topographic map...............................................................29
Figure 3. 3 Biringanya Irrigation System (ECOTRA).................................................................30
Figure 3. 4 Rugeramigozi stream under the dyke ........................................................................31
Figure 3. 5 Head regulator on Rugeramigozi stream...................................................................32

Figure 4. 1 The rectangular sharp-crested weir and its cross section (Bos, 1989). .....................35
Figure 4. 2 Measurement sites .....................................................................................................36
Figure 4. 3 Installation of a weir………………………………………………………………......
Figure 4. 4 Taking measurement…….. .......................................................................................37

Figure 5. 1 Participation in maintenance works…………………………………………………...


Figure 5. 2 Training aspects………………………….................................................................42
Figure 5. 3 Irrigation water availability……………………………………………………… .......
Figure 5. 4 Crops under cultivation………….. ...........................................................................43
Figure 5. 5 Harvest aspects…………………………………………………………………… ......
Figure 5. 6 flooding problems......................................................................................................43
Figure 5. 7 Channel in Rainy season…………………………………………………………. .....
Figure 5. 8 Channel in dry season…………................................................................................44
Figure 5. 9 Rain water availability in the study area (Byimana Weather station) .......................44
Figure 5. 10 Discharge due to rainfall .........................................................................................45
Figure 5. 11 Water demand and supply in the study area (Byimana weather station) ...............46
Figure 5. 12 Problems related to poor maintenance ....................................................................52
xii

List of appendices 

A‐ A.1 QUESTIONNAIRE: 
Table A.2 Rainfall records 
Table A.3 Climatic parameters 
Table A.4 Calculated discharge from rainfall 
Table A.5 Values of Crop factors Kc 
xiii

List of Acronyms and Abbreviations 

CAADP:  Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program 
CIA:  Central Intelligence Agency 
CWR:  Crop Water requirement 
ECOTRA :  Entreprise de Construction des Travaux Publiques et  
  d’Aménagement 
EDPRS:  Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy 
FAO:  Food and Agriculture Organization 
FMIS:  Farmer Managed Irrigation System 
GDP:  Gross Development Product 
IABR:  Impuzamashyirahamwe y’Abahinzi Borozi ba Rugeramigozi 
ICID:  International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage 
ILRI:  International Institute for Land Reclamation and Improvement 
IWMI:  International Water management Institute 
IPTRID:  International Program for Technology and Research in Irrigation  
  and Drainage 
IRW:  Irrigation Water Requirement 
MINAGRI:  Ministère de l’Agriculture et des Ressources Animales 
MINITERE:  Ministère des Terres de l’Eau, des Ressources Naturelles et de  
  l’Environnement 
NGOs:  Non Governmental Organizations 
PRSP:  Poverty Reduction Strategy 
PSAT:  Programme Stratégique pour la Transformation de l’Agriculture 
RPIP:  Research Program on Irrigation Performance 
SSI:  Small‐Scale Irrigation 
TAW:  Total Available Water 
UNWWDR:  United Nations World Water Development Report 
USBR:  United States Bureau of Reclamation 
USDA:  United states Department of Agriculture 
USUSC:  United States Soil Conservation Service 
WREM:  Water Resources and Environmental Management  
WU:  Water Users 
   
   
 
 
 
1

Chapter  1. INTRODUCTION 

1.1 Background 

As  the  world’s  inhabitants  increase,  the  water  use  also  increases  every  where. 
Agriculture  is  the  sector  that  uses  most  water  worldwide.  Currently,  on  a  global 
basis, 69% of all water withdrawn for human use on an annual basis is consumed 
by  agriculture  (mostly  in  the  form  of  irrigation);  industry  accounts  for  23%  and 
domestic use (household, drinking water, sanitation) accounts for about 8%. These 
global  averages  vary  with  considered  regions.  In  Africa,  for  example,  agriculture 
consumes  88%  of  all  water  withdrawn  for  human  use,  while  domestic  use 
accounts for 7% and industry for 5% (UN WWDR, 2003). The same situation is true 
for Rwanda.  
 
Rwanda is a landlocked country with a surface area of 26 338 km2.  The population 
Rwanda is estimated at about 9.9 million inhabitants and the population density of 
about  370  inhabitants/km2  according  to  CIA  World  Fact  Book  in  2007.  Thus  it  is 
regarded  as  one  of  highest  densely  populated  countries  in  Africa.  Rwanda’s 
economy  is  based  on  agriculture.  To  achieve  sustainable  economic  growth  and 
social  development,  leading  to  the  increase  and  diversification  of  household 
incomes and ensuring food security for the entire population, the Government has 
adopted Agriculture to remain the driving engine of the economy for the period of 
Poverty  Reduction  Strategy  (PRSP)  implementation  (2020  Vision).  Agriculture  is 
considered  to  be  the  tradable  sector  in  Rwanda,  ready  to  expand  and  make  an 
impact on poverty reduction through increased incomes for the poor. In order to 
achieve  the  targeted  annual  per  capita  growth  of  4‐5  percent,  the  agricultural 
sector  needed  to  contribute  with  5.3  percent  of  overall  GDP  growth.  Therefore 
investment  in  marshland  development  is  expected  to  increase.  Rwanda  has 
generally  good  rainfalls,  surface  water  (rivers,  lakes  and  other  artificial  water 
reserves),  and  underground  outflows  from  different  aquifer  systems.  However, 
utilization  of  these  water  resources  to  boost  agricultural  productivity  has  been  a 
major challenge (CAADP, 2007).  
 
The  total  country  cultivated  area  cover  approximately  46%  of  the  surface  of  the 
country divided into low‐size farms. More than half of Rwanda’s total marshland 
area  is  under  cultivation,  but  the  vast  majority  is  being  used  without  any 
intensification or sustainable management of infrastructure. The marshes occupy a 
surface estimated at 165,000 ha including 112,000 ha of small marshes (less 200ha) 
2

and  53,000ha  of  the  large  marshes.  The  exploited  total  surface  is  only 
approximately  94,000ha,  that  is  to  say  57%  of  the  surface  of  the  marshes  of  the 
country. Only appropriately developed marshlands surface is around 11,000 ha in 
2006  (MINAGRI,  2004a).  In  the  vision  to  ensure  food  security,  marshlands 
appropriately developed are supposed to increase from around 11,000 ha in 2006 
to 20,000 ha in 2011 (CAADP, 2007). This means that high investments will have to 
be given in the agricultural sector. Consequently, reliable water use methods have 
to  be  established  because  without  improvement  in  water  management,  irrigation 
demand  will  continue  to  increase  but  with  low  productivity,  water  supplies  will 
diminish and conflict may come out between different water users, and the effort, 
and  investments  made  in  this  sector  would  become  meaningless.  Hence, 
monitoring  has  to  be  conducted  so  that  problems  within  the  irrigated  systems 
could get identified before failure occurs and possible solutions to these problems 
can  get  proposed  and  implemented.  Diagnostic  assessments  also  have  to  be 
carried out to identify the origin of different problems identified through routine 
monitoring,  or  when  stakeholders  are  not  satisfied  with  the  existing  levels  of 
performance  achieved  and  desire  a  change.  Through  systematic  observation, 
documentation  and  interpretation  of  the  management  of  a  project  with  the 
objective  of  ensuring  that  the  input  of  resources,  water  delivery  schedules, 
intended outputs and required actions proceed as planned. Diagnostic assessment 
supports both operational performance monitoring and strategic planning because 
weaknesses in planning and implementation (P&I) have been identified as one of 
the main reasons for the disappointing results of agricultural water development 
and management projects (Bos et al., 2005).  
 
To achieve sustainable production from irrigated agriculture it is obvious that the 
utilization of the important resources in irrigated agriculture, i.e. water and land, 
must  be  improved.  The  question  of  how  is  irrigated  agriculture  performing  with 
limited water and land resources has to be satisfactorily answered. In this optic, a 
study  on  irrigated  systems  performance  was  conducted  in  Rugeramigozi 
Marshland  with  an  overall  purpose  to  assess  its  performance  and  to  propose  the 
practical ways of improving performance related to planning and implementation 
and thereby enhancing the returns on investments in agricultural water. 

1.2 Statement of the problem 

Rwanda  is a  mountainous  country  and  68%  of  its  marshes  are classified  as  small 
scale with area of less than 200 ha. In all these marshes there is no reliable data that 
may  be  used  for  proper  management.  Access  to  sufficient  and  efficient  irrigation 
3

technologies is one  of the most  important  aspects that can  lead to increase  in the 


agricultural  productivity  for  small‐scale  irrigation  systems.  However,  this  aspect 
has  been  given  little  or  no  attention  at  all.  Recently,  small‐scale  irrigation 
developments have been gradually expanded through the initiative of NGOs and 
farmer cooperatives. For improvement in achieving the Millennium Development 
Goals and Vision improving food security and poverty reduction for the country’s 
welfare, one particularly pressing resource management challenge to Rwanda is to 
improve  the  performance  of  small‐scale  irrigation  systems.  This  implies  the 
efficient  management  and  rational  use  of  available  agricultural  water.  The 
management  of  agricultural  water  should  be  accompanied  with  daily  water 
distribution measurement so  that irrigation service can get improved. The lack of 
records  in  a  scheme is  a  problem  since  one  cannot  be  sure  of  the  performance  of 
the  system,  whether  or  not  water  is  equally  distributed  between  users.  Without 
these records available, we cannot improve services, allocation procedure is almost 
impossible, no account for losses is done and so far no strategic future planning is 
possible. This situation has also  an impact  on crop growth and  also on the yield. 
To  assess  agricultural  water  management  capabilities  through  irrigation  and 
drainage  projects  with  a  view  to  improving  the  efficiency  with  which  available 
resources  are  used  is  the  aim  of  this  study  that  was  curried  out  in  Rugeramigozi 
Marshland  and  precisely  in  Biringanya  branch.  With  this  study  two  of  the 
following problems have to be answered: 
a) What are the water‐related constraints to on‐farm productivity? 
b) How can overall productivity be improved? 
 

1.3 Objectives of the study 
 
The  overall  aim  of  this  study  is  to  evaluate  the  performance  of  Rugeramigozi 
Marshland irrigation scheme. The specific objectives of this study are: 
a) To evaluate the performance of Rugeramigozi irrigation scheme using water 
balance  indicators  (application,  conveyance  and  overall  consumed 
efficiencies); and 
b) To  evaluate  the  performance  of  Rugeramigozi  irrigation  scheme  using 
Maintenance  indicators  (effectiveness  of  infrastructures  and  the  discharge 
efficiency). 
4

Chapter  2. LITERATURE REVIEW 

2.1 Irrigation 

Irrigation  is  the  supply  of  water  to  crops  by  artificial  means,  designed  to  permit 
farming  in  arid  regions  and  to  offset  the  effect  of  drought  in  semi‐arid  regions. 
Even  in  areas  where  total  seasonal  rainfall  is  adequate  on  average,  it  may  be 
poorly  distributed  during  the  year  and  variable  from  year  to  year.  Where 
traditional rain‐fed farming is a high‐risk enterprise, irrigation can help to ensure 
stable agricultural production (FAO, 1997). Hence, irrigation is treated as a major 
component  in  an  integrated  agricultural  production  scheme  in  which  crop  yields 
and or profits are maximized by considering the influence of crop variety, planting 
density, soil aeration, and other management practices on crop yields (Hargreaves 
and Merkley, 1998). 

2.2 Perspectives and objectives of irrigation 

A reliable and suitable irrigation water supply can result in vast improvements in 
agricultural  production  and  assure  the  economic  vitality  of  the  region.  Many 
civilizations have been dependent on irrigated agriculture to provide the basis of 
their society and enhance the security of their people. Some have estimated that as 
little  as  15‐20  percent  of  the  worldwide  total  cultivated  area  is  irrigated.  Judging 
from irrigated and non‐irrigated yields in some areas, this relatively small fraction 
of agriculture may be contributing as much as 30‐40% of gross agricultural output 
(FAO, 1989). According to Jurriens et al. (2001), many countries depend on surface 
irrigation  to  grow  crops  for  food  and  fiber.  Without  surface  irrigation  their 
agricultural  production  would  be  drastically  lower  and  problems  of  unreliable 
food supply, insufficient rural income and unemployment would be widespread.  
 
According  to  Hargreaves  and  Merkley  (1998),  estimation  of  surface  irrigation 
accounts  for  95  percent  of  the  total  260  million  hectares  of  irrigated  land 
worldwide,  mainly  in  developing  countries  in  the  tropics  and  sub‐tropics,  where 
hundreds of millions of farmers depend on surface irrigation to grow their crops. 
The method, frequency and duration of irrigations have significant effects on crop 
yield and farm productivity. For instance, annual crops may not germinate when 
the  surface  is  inundated  causing  a  crust  over  the  seedbed.  After  emergence, 
5

inadequate  soil  moisture  can  often  reduce  yields,  particularly  if  the  stress  occurs 
during critical periods. Even though the most important objective of irrigation is to 
maintain  the  soil  moisture  reservoir,  how  this  is  accomplished  is  an  important 
consideration. The technology of irrigation is more complex than many appreciate. 
It  is  important  that  the  scope  of  irrigation  science  is  not  limited  to  diversion  and 
conveyance  systems,  nor  solely  to  the  irrigated  field,  or  only  to  the  drainage 
pathways. 
 
Irrigation  is  a  system  extending  across  many  technical  and  non‐technical 
disciplines. It only works efficiently and continually when all the components are 
integrated  smoothly  (FAO,  1989).  FAO  (1989)  outlined  the  problems  irrigated 
agriculture may face in the future. One of the major concerns is the generally poor 
efficiency  with  which  water  resources  have  been  used  for  irrigation.  A  relatively 
safe  estimate  is  that  40  percent  or  more  of  the  water  diverted  for  irrigation  is 
wasted  at  the  farm  level  through  either  deep  percolation  or  surface  runoff. 
Irrigation  in  arid  areas  of  the  world  provides  two  essential  agricultural 
requirements:  (a)  a  moisture  supply  for  plant  growth  which  also  transports 
essential  nutrients;  and  (b)  a  flow  of  water  to  leach  or  dilute  salts  in  the  soil. 
Irrigation  also  benefits  croplands  through  cooling  the  soil  and  the  atmosphere  to 
create a more favorable environment for plant growth (FAO, 1989). 

2.3 Water Resources and Irrigation Development in Rwanda 

Rwanda  possesses  a  dense  hydrographical  network.  Lakes  occupy  of  128,190  ha, 
rivers cover an area of 7,260 ha and waters in wetlands and valleys a total of 77,000 
ha.  The  country  is  divided  by  water  divide  line  called  Congo‐Nile  Ridge.  To  the 
West  of  this  line  lies  the  Congo  River  Basin  which  covers  33%  of  the  national 
territory and which receives 10% of the total national waters. To the East lies the 
Nile  River  Basin,  whose  area  covering  67%  of  the  territory,  delivers  90%  of  the 
national  waters.  The  annual  rainfall  varies  from  700  mm  to  1400  mm  in  the  East 
and  in  lowlands  of  the  West,  from  1200  mm  to  1400  mm  in  central  plateau  and 
from 1300 mm to 2000 mm in the high altitude region with an average of 1200 mm 
per year (MINITERE, 2004).  
 
Nowadays  the  climate  of  the  country  is  characterized  by  irregular  precipitations 
which  are  in  somehow  the  causes  of  low  production  in  the  zones  of  rain‐fed 
agriculture.  To  satisfy  the  food  needs  for  the  country’s  increasing  population, 
irrigation  is  seen  as  an  essential  and  privileged  way  of  agricultural  development 
and  to  increase  profits  from  agriculture.  Thus,  the  Government  of  Rwanda  has 
6

adopted  to  make  irrigated  agriculture  and  notably  small‐scale  irrigation,  since 
small  marshes  occupies  about  68%  of  the  marshes  surfaces  area  of  Rwanda,  the 
driving engine to eradicate hunger and to promote small farmer income (CAADP, 
2007). 

2.4 Small scale irrigation 

The term small requires some clarification as it means different things to different 
people.  In  fact  what  is  seen  as  large  for  some  may  be  seen  as  small  for  others. 
Irrigation systems can be classified according to size, source of water, management 
style,  degree  of  water  control,  source  of  innovation,  landscape  niche  or  type  of 
technology.  Dessalegn  (1999)  gives  the  three‐scale  classification  adopted  during 
the  Derg  in  Ethiopia  as  follows:  Large‐scale  irrigation  schemes  are  those  which 
have over 3000 hectares of area. Medium‐ scale schemes cover an area of 200‐3000 
hectares while small‐scale irrigation schemes involve those with total area of up to 
200 hectares. According to Ian and Rod (1999) small‐scale irrigation can be defined 
as  irrigation,  usually  on  small  plots,  in  which  small  farmers  have  the  controlling 
influence,  using  a  level  of  technology  which  they  can  operate  and  maintain 
effectively.  Small‐scale  irrigation  is,  therefore,  farmer‐managed:  farmers  must  be 
involved in the design process and, in particular, with decisions about boundaries, 
the layout of the canals, and the position of outlets and bridges.  
 
In Rwanda small‐scale irrigation is defined according to the size and is considered 
as having a surface area under 200 hectares (MINAGRI, 2004b). Small‐scale can be 
defined  also  according  to  its  management  aspects.  Here,  we  can  talk  of 
smallholder irrigation scheme. 

2.4.1 The problems of small‐scale irrigation 

Although small‐scale irrigation may have several advantages, it is never immune 
from  problems.  The  problems  have  become  more  critical  in  drought  prone  areas 
where small‐scale irrigation is expected to solve problems of declining agricultural 
productivity.  Small‐scale  irrigation  in  drought‐prone  areas  has  two  sets  of 
problems.  The  first  category  includes  problems  that  are  associated  with  the 
specific environmental characteristics of the agro‐ecosystem. The second category 
includes common problems that drought‐prone and degraded areas share with all 
other  small‐scale  irrigation  systems,  irrespective  of  their  agro‐ecological  context. 
These are: 
7

a) Problems  related  to  the  physical  nature  of  the  irrigation  systems,  e.g.  loss  of 
water through seepage; 
b) Problems  related  to  the  application  of  irrigation  water,  e.g.  upstream  users 
abstracting too much water; 
c)  Problems related to marketing produce, e.g. transportation issues; 
d) policy‐related problems, e.g. security of land tenure; 
e) engineering‐related  problems  e.g.  lack  of  experience  in  planning  and 
designing irrigation systems; 
f) Problems related to the irrigation economy, e.g. competition between rain‐fed 
and irrigated agriculture; and 
g) Community issues, e.g. levels of farmer participation, (Aberra, 2004). 

2.4.2 Intervention into small‐scale irrigation 

Interventions  into  existing  small‐scale  irrigation  systems  cannot  be  done 


successfully  unless  the  existing  farming  system  is  taken  into  consideration.  If 
small‐scale irrigation is to make a substantial and positive contribution for people, 
it is essential that it fits into their livelihood systems. Experiences of countries that 
have had successful small‐scale irrigation show that such systems have very often 
developed as part of the indigenous farming system (Carter, 1989).

2.4.3 Farmer Managed Irrigation System (FMIS) and its importance 

Irrigation  has been practiced for more than 5,000 years in Egypt  and China, 4000 


years in India and the Tigris‐Euphrates basin and 2,500 years in the central Andes. 
Large‐scale  systems  were  developed  under  state  or  royal  patronage  where  there 
were  well‐organized  social  systems  and  long‐term  stability  prevailed.  But  small‐
scale  irrigation  must  be  even  older.  In  more  recent  times,  major  schemes  were 
developed in India in the late 19th century, followed by other parts of Asia, Egypt 
and Sudan (Kedir, 2004). The large irrigation schemes in Egypt and the Sudan are 
smallholder schemes. These schemes are large in terms of area but they are made 
up of many small farms (often less than 2 ha). They are designed and constructed 
by  government  agencies  that  then  take  over  the  responsibility  for  managing  the 
water  supply  system.  They  are  often  described  as  formal  or  large‐scale  irrigation 
schemes  and  have  borne  the  brunt  of  much  of  the  criticism  of  irrigation 
development in sub‐Saharan Africa in the 1970s.  
 
8

Government  management  characterizes  formal  irrigation  rather  than  size.  For 


example, a 50 ha irrigation scheme with 500 smallholders each with 0.1 ha where 
the  water  supply  is  managed  by  a  government  agency  might  be  thought  of  as  a 
smallholder scheme. However, it would have all the characteristics of a `formalʹ or 
`largeʹ  irrigation  scheme  because  of  the  way  in  which  water  and  other  key 
agricultural services are organized independently of the  farmers whereas A 50 ha 
irrigation  scheme  having  500  smallholders  each  with  0.1  ha  managed  by  the 
farmers  themselves  without  government  support  could  equally  be  called  a 
smallholder scheme (IPTRID, 2001). Despite the lack of available statistic, there is 
no doubt about the importance of  small‐scale irrigation (SSI) in many developing 
countries. Irrigated fields are usually valued very highly.  
 
There  is  much  evidence  that  farmer‐controlled  small‐scale  irrigation  has  better 
performance  than  government‐controlled  small‐scale  systems.  The  substantial 
farmer‐controlled  small‐scale  irrigation  sector  that  exists  in  many  countries  in 
Africa,  often  without  government  support,  indicates  that  these  systems  are 
economically viable. Areas under farmer‐controlled small‐scale irrigation systems 
have  grown  rapidly  over  the  past  decades,  and  account  for  large  and  growing 
share  of  irrigated  area  in  Sub  Saharan  Africa  (McCornick  et  al.,  2003).  In  general, 
according to McCornick et al. (2003) all small‐scale systems may have advantages 
over large‐scale systems. These advantages include that small‐scale technology can 
be  based  on  farmers  existing  knowledge;  local  technical,  managerial  and 
entrepreneurial skills can be used; migration or resettlement of labor is not usually 
required;  planning  can  be  more  flexible;  social  infrastructure  requirements  are 
reduced; and external input requirements are lower.

2.4.4 Purposes and need for small‐scale irrigation in Rwanda 

Rwanda’s  economy  is  mainly  based  on  agriculture.  With  a  rapidly  growing 
number  of  population,  rural  community  is  increasing  putting  unsustainable 
pressure  on  natural  resources  leading  to  land  and  water  depletion  and 
degradation and/or ‘forced’ migrations to urban areas. In addition, the absence of 
off‐farm income in rural areas has also contributed to the high population pressure 
on arable land, which leads to fast deterioration of natural resources. To avoid the 
food  crisis  the  Government  of  Rwanda  adopted  to  increase  investment  in 
agriculture  sector  to  make  it  to  remain  a  driving  engine  of  the  economy  under 
some  programs  such  as  PSAT,  PRSP,  EDPRS  (CAADP,  2007).  Hence,  small 
marshlands  are  the  one  focused  the  more  since  they  are  about  68%  of  the  whole 
9

marshland’s  surface  area  (MINAGRI,  2004b).  Therefore  sustainable  farmed 


marshland areas have to be increased from 11,105 ha to 20,000 ha for year‐ round 
utilization  to  produce  high‐value  crops,  particularly  rice,  and  the  share  of  area 
under irrigation from 1 percent to about 5 percent and to increase the area under 
hillside irrigation from 130 ha to 3,200 ha (CAADP, 2007). 
 
 

2.5 Performance of an irrigation system 

2.5.1 How to conduct an irrigation system performance assessment? 

Performance assessment is carried out according to the guidelines given by ICID 
as stated by Rien (2000) and presented on Figure 2.1. 
10

Who is the performance assessment for?


Purpose and strategy

From who’s viewpoint will the performance assessment be carried out?

Who will carry out the performance assessment?

What is the purpose of the performance assessment?

What are the boundary conditions of the irrigation and drainage schemes?

What is the design for the performance assessment program?


• What criteria are to be used?
Design of the program

• What indicators are to be used?


• What data is required?
• By whom, how and when the data will be measured or collected?
• Where will the indicators be applied?
• What will be the form of output?
Implementation
• Data measurement and collection
• Data processing
• Data analysis
• Presentation of results (reporting)

What will be done with the results?


Application of

• Nothing
• Take corrective action (s) to improve performance
output

• Look for cause of level of performance


• Make comparison with other schemes
Further action

Do we need to revise the performance assessment strategy and program?

Figure 2. 1 Framework for a performance assessment program of irrigation and drainage schemes (ICID).
11

2.5.2 Performance evaluation of small‐scale irrigation 

Sawa  and  Karen  (2002)  defined  evaluation  as  a  process  of  determining 
systematically and objectively the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness and impact of 
activities  in  the  light  of  their  objectives.  It  is  an  organizational  process  for 
improving  activities  still  in  progress  and  for  aiding  management  in  future 
planning,  programming  and  decision‐making  (Casley  and  Kumar,  1990). 
According to Bos et al. (2005) performance evaluation of irrigation and drainage, is 
the systematic observation, documentation and interpretation  of the management 
of an irrigation and drainage system, with the objective of ensuring that the input 
of  resources,  operational  schedules,  intended  outputs  and  required  actions 
proceed  as  planned.  Rien  (2000)  defined  Performance  as  the  degree  to  which  the 
products  and  services  of  institution  respond  to  the  needs  of  their  customers  or 
users, and the efficiency with which the institution uses or customers can use the 
resources  at  its  disposal.  The  ultimate  purpose  of  performance  evaluation  is  to 
achieve  efficient  and  effective  irrigation  and  drainage  performance  by  providing 
relevant  feedback  to  management  at  all  levels.  Performance  evaluation  is  an 
activity  that  supports  the  planning  and  implementation  process  (Bos  et  al.,  2005). 
As  such  it  may  assist  management  or  policy  maker  in  determining  whether 
performance is satisfactory and, if not, which corrective actions need to be taken in 
order to remedy the situation (Rien, 2000). 
 
According  to  Rien  (2000)  the  wider  objectives  of  performance  evaluation  are:  to 
upgrade management capabilities  in both public and private sector irrigation and 
drainage  projects  with  a  view  to  improving  the  efficiency  with  which  available 
resources  are  used.  In  this  context  resources  are  not  limited  to  the  ‘classical’ 
resource  water,  but  also  to  resources  which  can  be  influenced  by  management. 
These resources also include land, funds and labor (skills). The principal objective 
of  evaluating  surface  irrigation  systems  is  to  identify  management  practices  and 
systems  that  can  be  effectively  implemented  to  improve  the  irrigation  efficiency. 
Evaluations are useful in a number of analyses and operations, particularly those 
that  are  essential  to  improve  management  and  control.  Evaluation  data  can  be 
collected periodically from the system to refine management practices and identify 
the changes in the field that occur over the irrigation season or from year to year 
(FAO, 1989).  Performance should be assessed from the related disciplines, but the 
performance  of  irrigation  and  drainage  heavily  depends  on  the  ‘water 
institutions’. Together with the ‘boundary conditions’ of irrigated agriculture these 
institutions determine its level of performance. Without a sound knowledge of the 
boundary conditions and the water institutions a diagnostic analysis of irrigation 
12

and drainage is meaningless (FAO, 2000). Small and Svendsen (1992) identify four 
different interrelated purposes of performance evaluation: 
a) Operational 
b) Accountability 
c)  Intervention 
d) sustainability 
Operational  performance  evaluation  relates  to  the  day‐to‐day,  season‐to‐season 
monitoring and evaluation of system or scheme performance.  
Accountability performance evaluation is carried out to assess the performance of 
those  responsible  for  managing  a  system  or  scheme.  Intervention  assessment  is 
carried  out  to  study  the  performance  of  the  scheme  or  system  and,  generally,  to 
look  for  ways  to  enhance  that  performance.  Performance  evaluation  associated 
with  sustainability  looks  at  the  longer  term  resource  use  and  scheme  or  system 
impacts. But, so far the four purposes cannot be separated from each other. 
The  extent  of  the  performance  evaluation  needs  to  be  identified  and  the 
boundaries  defined.  The  extent/boundaries  can  be  categorized  into  two  key 
dimensions: 
a) space 
b) time 
Space  relates  to  the  area  covered  (is  it  limited  to  one  secondary  canal  within  a 
system, to one system, or to several systems), time looks at whether the evaluation 
covers one season, or several years. One season may be the time horizon of special 
diagnostic  study.  A  common  performance  programme,  however,  should  be  a 
routine  part  of  the  management  process.  Defining  the  extent  of  the  performance 
assessment programme in these terms defines the boundaries of the work required 
as presented on figure 2.2.
  Water institutions 
  • Water policy 
  Boundary conditions  • Water low 
  • Political system  • Water administration 
  • Legal system 
  • Demography 
  • Economic system 
Performance of 
  • Resources 
Irrigation and Drainage 
  • Environment  
• Water balance 
 
• Environment 
 
• Operation & Maintenance 
  • Economics 
Figure 2. 2 The setting of irrigation and drainage
13

The  evaluation  of  surface  irrigation  at  field  level  is  an  important  aspect  of  both 
management  and  design  of  the  system.  Field  measurements  are  necessary  to 
characterize  the  irrigation  system  in  terms  of  its  most  important  parameters,  to 
identify problems in its function, and to develop alternative means for improving 
the system (FAO, 1989). 

2.5.3 Indicators for irrigation performance 

It  is  useful  to  consider  an  irrigation  system  in  the  context  of  nested  systems  to 
describe different types and uses of performance indicators (Small and Svendsen, 
1992).  According  to  Sawa  and  Karen  (2002),  indicators  are  a  way  of  measuring 
progress  towards  the  achievement  of  the  goal,  i.e.  the  targets  or  standards  to  be 
met  at  each  stage.  They  provide  an  objective  basis  for  monitoring  progress  and 
evaluation of final achievements. An irrigation system is nested within an irrigated 
agricultural  system,  which  in  turn  can  be  considered  part  of  an  agricultural 
economic  system.  For  each  of  the  systems,  process,  output,  and  impact  measures 
can be considered. Process measures refer to the processes internal to the system 
that lead to the ultimate output, whereas output measures describe the quality and 
quantity  of  the  outputs  where  they  become  available  to  the  next  higher  system 
(Molden et al., 1998). 
 
An  irrigation  system,  consisting  of  a  water  delivery  and  a  water  use  subsystems, 
can be conceptualized to have two sets of objectives. One set relates to the outputs 
from its irrigated area, and the second set relates to the performance characteristics 
of its water delivery system (Oad and Sampath, 1995).  
 
Bos (1997) summarizes the performance indicators currently used in the Research 
Program  on  Irrigation  Performance  (RPIP).  Within  this  program  field  data  are 
measured  and  collected  to  quantify  and  test  about  40  multidisciplinary 
performance  indicators  set  out  by  IWMI.  These  indicators  cover  water  delivery, 
water  use  efficiency,  maintenance  and  sustainability  of  irrigation,  environmental 
aspects,  socio‐economics  and  management.  He  also  noted  that  it  is  not 
recommended to use all described indicators under all circumstances. The number 
of indicators you should use depends on the level of detail with which one needs 
to  quantify  (e.g.,  research,  management,  information  to  the  public)  performance 
and  on  the  number  of  disciplines with  which  one  needs  to  look  at  irrigation  and 
drainage  (water  balance,  economics,  environment,  management).  Thus,  FAO 
(2000), Bos et al. (2005) defined the four groups of indicators to evaluate irrigation 
14

and  drainage  performance  of  an  irrigation  system  as  drawn  by  ILRI/IWMI 
research  program  on  irrigation  performance  from  the  list  of  40  indicators  for 
irrigation performance assessment of IWMI. The four groups resumed below:  
a) Water  balance,  water  service  and  maintenance.  The  indicators  in  this  group 
refer  to  the  primary  function  of  irrigation  and  drainage;  the  provision  of  a 
water service to users. 
b) Environment. Both irrigation and drainage are man‐made interventions in the 
environment  to  facilitate  the  growth  of  crops.  The  non‐intentional  (mostly 
negative) effects of this intervention are considered in this group. 
c) Economics.  This  group  contains  indicators  that  quantify  crop  yield  and  the 
related funds (generated) to manage the system. 
d) Emerging indicators. This group gives four indicators that contain parameters 
which  need  to  be  measured  by  use  of  satellite  remote  sensing.  This  emerging 
technology enables very cost‐effective measurement of data. 
 

2.5.4 Water balance indicators 

Water  balance  performance  indicators  are  concerned  with  the  assessment  of  the 
water  supply  function  of  the  irrigation  system.  They  cover  the  volumetric 
component that is primarily concerned with matching water supplies to irrigation 
water demand, as well as the rather more subjective concept of reliability that may 
affect  the  users’  capacity  to  manage  water  efficiently,  and  the  socially  oriented 
aspects  of  equity.  These  three  aspects  all  represent  facets  of  the  concept  of  the 
Level of Service being provided to water users (WU’s). This focuses on the “core 
business”  of  the  organization  managing  the  irrigation  system;  the  diversion  and 
conveyance of water to the WU’s in the irrigation system; The primary task of the 
managers of the ‘Irrigation System’, and of the managers of the sub‐systems is to 
deliver water in accordance with a plan (as intended). Indicators in this section are 
therefore those that guide managers in respect to water delivery performance. For 
such  kind  of  evaluation  to  take  effect,  water  balance  ratios  have  to  be  used.  In 
general,  the  water  balance  indicators  deal  with  the  volume  of  water  delivered 
3
within a set time period (in m /period), rather than the instantaneous flow rate (in 
3
m /s).  The  ratios  quantify  components  of  the  water  balance  in  a  spatial  context 
over  a  specific  time  period.  As  such,  the  same  data  on  flow  rates  are  needed  as 
above. 
 
15

2.5.4.1 Field application ratio 

The ICID (1978) standard definition for the field application ratio (efficiency) is: 
V
Field application ratio = m                   (2- 1)                                           
Vf

Vm  is  the  volume  of  irrigation  water  needed,  and  made  available,  to  avoid 
undesirable stress in the crops throughout (considered part of) the growing cycle; 
Vf is the volume of irrigation water delivered to the fields during the considered 
period. The value of Vm is difficult to establish on a real time  basis  because many 
complicated  field  measurements  would  be  needed.  The  method  which  is  used  to 
quantify Vm, however, is not so very important provided that the same (realistic) 
method is used for all command areas (lateral or tertiary units) within the irrigated 
area.  

For practical purposes we may assume that Vm equals the evapo‐transpiration by 
the irrigated crop minus the effective part of the precipitation: ETp –Pe. The value 
of ETp –Pe can be calculated by use of models like CRIWAR (Bos et al. 1996) and 
CROPWAT (Smith et al. 1991). 

ET p − Pe
Thus,  Field application ratio =     (2- 2) 
Volume of water deliverd at field (s )

The  target  water  requirement  at  the  field  inlet  then  equals 
V f ,t arg et = Ra ,t arg et x (ET p − Pe ). The target value of the field application ratio depends 
on the level of technology used to apply water, on the climate, and on whether you 
grow dry‐foot crops or ponded rice (Bos et al. 1996). 

2.5.4.2 Tertiary unit ratio 

The irrigation water requirement at the intake of a tertiary unit depends on the 
crop irrigation water requirements (ETp –Pe) in the unit, on the water delivery 
performance in the unit, on canal seepage, and on the (average) value of the above 
field application ratio (ICID, 1978). Hence, the tertiary unit ratio is: 
V + V3
Tertiary unit ratio = m  .                                                                             (2- 3) 
Vd

For  practical  purposes  we  may  replace  Vm  by  ETp  –Pe,  and  assume  negligible 
non‐irrigation water deliveries from the distribution system (V3 = 0). 
16

2.5.4.3 Overall consumed ratio 

The overall (or project) consumed ratio, quantifies the fraction of irrigation water 
evapo‐transpirated by the crops in the water balance of the irrigated area (Bos and 
Nugteren 1974; Willardson et al. 1994). Assuming negligible non‐irrigation water 
deliveries, it is defined as (Bos & Nugteren 1974):                                                                             
ET p − Pe
Overall Consummed Ratio =             (2- 4) 
Vc + V1

Vc  is  volume  of  irrigation  water  diverted  or  pumped  from  the  river  or  reservoir; 
V1 is inflow from other sources to the conveyance system. The value of (ETp –Pe) 
for  the  irrigated  area  is  entirely  determined  by  the  crop,  the  climate  and  the 
interval  between  water  applications.  Hence,  the  actual  value  of  the  overall 
consumed  ratio  varies  with  the  actual  values  of  Vc  and  V1  being  the  volume  of 
irrigation  water  delivered  to  the  sub‐command  area.  Because  the  inflows  Vc  and 
V1  are  among  the  very  first  values  that  should  be  measured,  together  with  the 
cropped area, the cropping pattern and climatological data, the overall consumed 
ratio is the first water balance indicator that should be available for each irrigated 
area. For water management within an existing irrigated area is recommended to 
set a  target value, and to measure the actual overall consumed ratio at a monthly 
and annual basis. 

2.5.4.4 Conveyance ratio 

The  conveyance  ratio  quantifies  the  water  balance  of  the  main,  lateral  and  sub‐
lateral canals, including related structures, of the irrigation system. It is defined as:  

Vd + V2
Conveyance Ratio =                      (2- 5)                                                       
Vc + V1
Vc is the volume of irrigation water diverted or pumped from the river or reservoir 
(source of surface water), Vd is the volume of water actually delivered to the 
distribution system, V1 is inflow from other sources to the conveyance system, V2 
is non‐irrigation deliveries from the conveyance system. The conveyance ratio 
should be calculated over a short (week, month) and a long (season) period. The 
rate of change of the ratio is an indicator for e.g. the need of maintenance. For 
large irrigation systems it is common to consider the conveyance ratio of parts of 
the system. Hence, we consider (a) the conveyance ratio of the upstream part of 
the system as managed by the Irrigation Authority and (b) of the WU’s managed 
canal. 
17

2.5.4.5 Distribution ratio 

The distribution ratio quantifies the water balance of the canal system downstream 
from  the  conveyance  system  up  to  the  inlet  of  the  fields.  It  thus,  quantifies  the 
water  balance  of  the  canal  system  at  tertiary  unit  level.  The  distribution  ratio  is 
defined as:                         

V f + V3
Distribution Ratio = (2- 6)
Vd

If  the  distribution  ratio  is  determined  for  all  tertiary  units  within  the  considered 
irrigated area, the uniformity of water delivery can be expressed by the standard 
deviation of the distribution ration values. If all tertiary units receive a (color) code 
for a given subdivision of ratio, the values of this uniformity of water supply can 
be visualized on a map. 

2.5.4.6 Dependability 

The pattern in which water is delivered over time, is directly related to the overall 
consumed  ratio  of  the  delivered  water,  and  hence  has  a  direct  impact  on  crop 
production. 

The rationale for this is that water users may apply more irrigation water if there is 
an unpredictable variation in volume or timing of delivered water, and they may 
not  use  other  inputs  such  as  fertilizer  in  optimal  quantities  if  they  are  more 
concerned with crop survival than crop production. 

The primary indicators proposed for use in measuring dependability of water 
deliveries are concerned with the duration of water delivery compared to the plan, 
and the time between deliveries compared to the plan. They are: 
Actual Duration of Water Delivery
Dependability of Duration =  
Intended Duration of Water Delivery

and 
Intended Duration of Water Delivery
Dependability of Irrigation Interval =  
Actual Irrigation Interval
In  addition  to  dependability  in  terms  of  timing,  it  is  strongly  recommended  that 
18

the predictability of the flow rate or the (canal) water level be included in this part 
of the assessment. For many irrigation activities the flow rate (or water level) must 
be  near  the  intended  value  for  water  use  to  be  effective  (Clemmens  &  Bos  1990). 
The  simplest  method  to  assess  predictability  of  flow  rate  (or  flow  rate  times 
duration  of  flow)  is  to  determine  the  standard  deviation  of  the  water  delivery 
performance  ratio.  The  period  over  which  observations  are  compared  in  this 
analysis  will  vary  depending  on  the  type  of  water  delivery  pattern  adopted.  In 
most irrigated areas, monthly or bi‐weekly data appear to give a good indication 
of whether the discharge is more or less predictable. 
 

2.5.5 Maintenance indicators 

2.5.5.1 General 

Maintenance  is  designed  to  accomplish  three  main  purposes:  safety,  keeping 
canals in sufficiently good condition to minimize seepage and sustain canal water 
levels  and  designed  discharge‐head  relationship,  and  keeping  water  control 
infrastructure  in  working  condition.  In  irrigation  systems  the  conveyance 
efficiency  provides  the  best  way  of  assessing  whether  canal  maintenance  is 
required. By tracking the change in conveyance efficiencies over time it should be 
possible to establish criteria that will indicate when canal cleaning or reshaping is 
necessary.  In  many  systems  this  is  undertaken  subjectively  on  appearance  rather 
than using a more analytical approach.  

2.5.5.2 Sustainability of water level and head‐discharge relationship 

During the design of a canal system, a design discharge and related water level is 
determined  for  each  canal  reach.  The  hydraulic  performance  of  a  canal  system 
depends  greatly  on  the  degree  to  which  these  design  values  are  maintained.  For 
example,  higher  water  levels  increase  seepage  and  the  danger  of  overtopping  of 
the  embankment.  Both,  lower  and  higher  water  levels  alter  the  intended  water 
division  at  canal  bifurcation  structures.  The  magnitude  of  this  alteration  of  the 
water  distribution  depends  on  the  hydraulic  flexibility  of  the  division  structures 
(Bos  1976).  This  change  of  head  (level)  over  structures  in  irrigation  canals  is  the 
single  most  important  factor  disrupting  the  intended  delivery  of  irrigation  water 
(Bos 1976; Murray‐Rust & Van der Velde 1994). 
 
An indicator that gives practical information on the sustainability of the intended 
19

Change of Level
water level (or head) is:  Re lative Change of Water Level =                                                  
Intended Level
For  closed  irrigation  and  drainage  pipes  (visual)  inspection  of  heads  (pressure 
levels) is complicated. The functioning of a conduit, however, should be quantified 
by  the  measured  discharge  under  a  measured  head‐differential  between  the 
upstream and downstream end of the considered conduit (as used in the original 
design), versus the theoretical discharge under the same head differential. Hence, 
conduit performance can be quantified by the ratio:            
Actually Measured Disch arg e
Disch arg e Ratio =                                                                
Design Disch arg e
The  same  discharge  ratio  can  be  used  to  quantify  the  effective  functioning  of 
structures  in  the  canal  system.  Depending  on  the  type  of  structure,  the  actual 
discharge  then  must  be  measured  under  the  same  (design)  differential  head 
(submerged gates, culverts, etc.) or under the same upstream sill‐referenced head 
(free  flowing  gates,  weirs,  flumes,  etc.).  Generally,  a  deviation  of  more  than  5% 
would  signal  the  need  for  maintenance  or  rehabilitation  for  flow  control 
structures. 
 
As mentioned above, maintenance is needed to keep the system in operational 
conditions. For this to occur, (control) structures must be operational as intended. 
Hence, maintenance performance can be quantified by the following ratio: 
Number of Functioning Structures
Effectiveness of Infrastructure =                                  
Total Number of Structures
The  above  three  ratios  immediately  indicate  the  extent  to  which  the  manager  is 
able  to  control  water.  For  the  analysis  to  be  effective,  however,  it  must  divide 
structures  up  into  their  hierarchical  importance  (Main,  Lateral,  Tertiary  and 
Quarternary) and the analysis completed for each level. 

2.5.6 Properties of performance indicators 

 
A true performance indicator includes both an actual value and an intended value 
that enables the assessment of the amount of deviation. It further should contain 
information that allows the manager to determine if the deviation is acceptable. It 
is therefore desirable wherever possible to express indicators in the form of a ratio 
of the actually measured versus the intended situation.                                                                               
Actual Value of Key Aspect
Hence, Performance IndicatorValue =   
Intended (or critical ) Value of Key Aspect
(Rien, 2000). 
20

A good indicator can be  used in two distinct ways. It tells a manager what current 
performance is in the system, and, in conjunction with other indicators, may help 
him  to  identify  the  correct  course  of  action  to  improve  performance  within  that 
system: in this sense the use of the same indicator over time is important because it 
assists  in  identifying  trends  that  may  need  to  be  reversed  before  the  remedial 
measures become too expensive or too complex (Bos, 1997). Some of the desirable 
attributes of performance indicators suggested by Bos (1997) are: 
Scientific  basis:  the  indicator  should  be  based  on  an  empirically  quantified, 
statistically  tested  causal  model  of  that  part  of  the  irrigation  process  it  describes. 
The  indicators  must  be  quantifiable:  the  data  needed  to  quantify  the  indicator 
must  be  available  or  obtainable  (measurable)  with  available  technology.  The 
measurement must be reproducible. 
 
Reference  to  a  target  value:  this  is,  of  course,  obvious  from  the  definition  of  a 
performance indicator. It implies that relevance and appropriateness of the target 
values and tolerances can be established for the indicator. These target values and 
their  margin  of  deviation  should  be  related  to  the  level  of  technology  and 
management  (Bos  et  al.,  1991).  Provide  information  without  bias:  ideally, 
performance  indicators  should  not  be  formulated  from  a  narrow  ethical 
perspective.  This  is,  in  reality,  extremely  difficult  as  even  technical  measures 
contain  value  judgments.  Ease  of  use  and  cost  effectiveness:  particularly  for 
routine  management,  performance  indicators  should  be  technically  feasible,  and 
easily  used  by  agency  staff  given  their  level  of  skill  and  motivation.  Further,  the 
cost  of  using  indicators  in  terms  of  finances,  equipment,  and  commitment  of 
human  resources,  should  be  well  within  the  agency’s  resources.  In  irrigation 
sector, the performance of the agricultural production and marketing processes are 
central  to  the  performance  evaluation  and  sustainability  of  the  process.  Farmer’s 
activities influence the performance of an irrigation system. Most surface irrigation 
systems are designed‐in capacity constraints, which mean that they cannot run on 
demand. Thus, different parameters need to be evaluated at different levels of the 
system to characterise and regulate performance. Among those parameters we can 
say: 

2.5.6.1 Irrigation water use efficiencies 

Irrigation efficiency is the ratio between the volume used by plants throughout the 
evapotranspiration  process  and  the  volume  that  reaches  the  irrigation  plots  and 
indicates  how  efficiently  the  available  water  supply  is  being  used,  based  on 
21

different  methods  of  evaluation  (Michael,  1997).  According  to  James  (1988),  the 
performance  of  a  farm  irrigation  system  is  determined  by  the  efficiency  with 
which  water  is  diverted,  conveyed,  and  applied,  and  by  the  adequacy  and 
uniformity of application in each field on the farm. Mishra and Ahmed (1990) also 
said that irrigation efficiency indicates how efficiently the available water supply 
is  being  used,  based  on  different  methods  of  evaluation.  The  objective  of  these 
efficiency concepts is to show where improvements can be made, which will result 
in more efficient irrigation. Among the factors used to judge the performance of an 
irrigation  system  or  its  management,  the  most  common  are  efficiency  and 
uniformity  (FAO,  1989).  The  designs  of  the  irrigation  system,  the  degree  of  land 
preparation,  and  the  skill  and  care  of  the  irrigator  are  the  principal  factors 
influencing  irrigation  efficiency.  Efficiency  in  the  use  of  water  for  irrigation 
consists  of  various  components  and  takes  into  account  losses  during  storage, 
conveyance  and  application  to  irrigation  plots.  Irrigation  efficiency  can  be 
measured  in  many  ways  and  also  varies  in  time  and  management  (Roger  et  al., 
1997). For instance, where water is very short, efficiency may be measured as crop 
yield  per  cubic  meter  of  water  used,  or  profit  per  millimeter  of  irrigation.  It 
depends  on  what  you  want  to  know.  Identifying  the  various  components  and 
knowing  what  improvements  can  be  made  is  essential  to  making  the  most 
effective  use  of  this  vital  but  scarce  resource.  There  are  several  publications 
describing the methods and procedures for evaluating surface irrigation systems, 
but the data analysis depends somewhat on the data collected and the information 
to be derived. 

2.5.6.2  Application efficiency 

According  to  Jurriens  et  al  (2001),  application  efficiency  is  a  common  measure  of 
relative  irrigation  losses  and  this  definition  is  valid  for  all  situations  and  all 
irrigation methods. Losses from the field occur as deep percolation and as field tail 
water or runoff and reduce the application efficiency. To compute the application 
efficiency  it  is  necessary  to  identify  at  least  one  of  these  losses  as  well  as  the 
amount of water stored in the root zone. This implies that the difference between 
the  total  amount  of  root  zone  storage  capacity  available  at  the  time  of  irrigation 
and  the  actual  water  stored  due  to  irrigation  be  separated,  i.e.  the  amount  of 
under‐irrigation in the soil profile must be determined as well as the losses (FAO, 
1989).  According  to  Roger  et  al.  (1997),  methods  of  determining  application 
efficiency  of  a  specific  irrigation  system  is  generally  time  consuming  and  often 
22

difficult  because  it  may  vary  in  time  due  to  changing  soil,  crop  and  climatic 
condition. 
 
Application  efficiency  does  not  show  if  the  crop  has  been  under‐irrigated. 
However  according  to  Roger  et  al.  (1997),  it  is  possible  to  have  high  application 
efficiency and 50‐90% can be used for general system type comparison. FAO (1989) 
reported that the attainable application efficiency according to the US (SCS) ranges 
from 55%‐70% while in ICID/ILRI this value is about 57%. Lesley (2002) suggested 
that  it  could  be  in  the  range  of  50‐80%.  In  general,  according  to  Michael  (1997) 
water application efficiency decreases as the amount of water applied during each 
irrigations increase. 

2.5.6.3   Storage efficiency 

Water stored in the root zone is not 100% effective (FAO, 1992). Evaporation losses 
may  remain  fairly  high  due  to  the  movement  of  soil  water  by  capillary  action 
towards the soil surface. Water lost from the root zone by deep percolation where 
groundwater  is  deep.  Deep  percolation  can  still  persist  after  attaining  field 
capacity.  Depending  on  weather,  type  of  soil  and  time  span  considered, 
effectiveness  of  stored  soil  water  might  be  as  high  as  90%  or  as  low  as  40%. 
Theoretically,  the  adequacy  of  irrigation  depends  on  how  much  water  is  stored 
within the crop root zone, losses percolating below the root zone, losses occurring 
as  surface  runoff  or  tail  water  the  uniformity  of  the  applied  water,  and  the 
remaining deficit or under‐irrigation within the soil profile following an irrigation 
practice.  The  requirement  efficiency  is  an  indicator  of  how  well  the  irrigation 
meets  its  objective  of  refilling  the  root  zone.  The  value  of  water  requirement 
efficiency  is  important  when  either  the  irrigation  tend  to  leave  major  portions  of 
the  field  under‐irrigated  or  where  under‐irrigation  is  purposely  practiced  to  use 
precipitation  as  it  occurs  and  storage  efficiency  become  important  when  water 
supplies  are  limited  (FAO,  1989).  The  adequacy  of  irrigation  turn  in  terms  of 
storage  efficiency  and  the  purpose  of  an  irrigation  turn  is  to  meet  at  least  the 
required water depth over the entire length of the field (Jurriens et al., 2001). The 
water storage efficiency refers how completely the water needed prior to irrigation 
has been stored in the root zone during irrigation. 
23

2.5.6.4  Distribution efficiency 

According  to  Jurriens  et  al.  (2001)  distribution  uniformity  can  be  defined  as  the 
average  infiltrated  depth  in  the  low  quarter  of  the  field  divided  by  the  average 
infiltrated depth over the whole field. When a field with a uniform slope, soil and 
crop density receives steady flow at its upper end, a waterfront will advance at a 
monotonically  decreasing  rate  until  it  reaches  the  end  of  the  field  (FAO,  1989). 
Irrigation  water  lost  to  percolation  below  the  root  zone  due  to  non‐uniform 
application  or  over‐application  water  run  off  from  the  field  all  reduces  irrigation 
efficiency.  To  get  a  complete  picture  of  an  irrigation  performance  you  need  to 
know more indicators than just discussed above, because these are averages taken 
over the entire length of the field or furrows (Roger et al., 1997). 
Although  different  cases  might  produce  the  same  results  for  application  and 
storage  efficiencies,  their  distribution  patterns  could  be  different.  One  indicator 
used to represent the pattern of the infiltrated depths along the field length is the 
distribution uniformity. 
 

2.5.6.5  Irrigation scheduling 

Irrigation scheduling is the process of determining when to irrigate and how much 
water to apply per irrigation. Proper scheduling is essential for the efficient use of 
water, energy and other production inputs, such as fertilizer. It allows irrigations 
to be coordinated with other farming activities including cultivation and chemical 
applications.  Among  the  benefits  of  proper  irrigation  scheduling  are:  improved 
crop  yield  and/or  quality,  water  and  energy  conservation,  and  lower  production 
costs (James, 1988). The purpose of irrigation scheduling is to determine the exact 
amount of water to apply to  the field and the exact timing for application.  There 
are several methods for deciding when to irrigate and how much water to apply. 
Many  farmers  use  an  irrigation  frequency  based  on  experience,  and  usually 
somewhat more water is applied than that required to bring the soil water content 
to the field capacity. 
 
If  water  is available  by  turns  or  rotation,  the  frequency  of  water availability  may 
determine  the  schedule.  When  water  is  available  on  demand,  some  form  of  soil 
water status monitoring can be used to determine when to irrigate. The amount of 
water depleted from the crop root zone provides a guide for the depth of irrigation 
to  applied  (Hargreaves  and  Merkley,  1998).  When  surface  irrigation  methods  are 
used, however, it is not very practical to vary the irrigation depth and frequency 
24

too  much.  In  surface  irrigation,  variations  in  irrigation  depth  are  only  possible 
within  limits.  It  is  also  very  confusing  for  the  farmers  to  change  the  schedule  all 
the  time.  Therefore,  it  is  often  sufficient  to  estimate  or  roughly  calculate  the 
irrigation  schedule  and  to  fix  the  most  suitable  depth  and  interval:  to  keep  the 
irrigation  depth  and  the  interval  constant  over  the  growing  season  (FAO,  1989). 
Water  budget  method  is  more  commonly  applied  these  days  to  determine 
irrigation  scheduling.  According  to  Hargreaves  and  Merkley  (1998)  this  method 
requires  estimates  of  the  daily  crop  evapotranspiration  or  for  other  suitable  time 
periods.  This  approach  requires  knowledge  of  or  an  estimation  of  the  amount  of 
water available from rainfall and or shallow water tables. In some situations some 
of the supply can be contributed by fog or dew. The required amount not supplied 
by  these  sources  must  be  applied  by  irrigation.  Irrigation  are  scheduled  from 
estimates  of  the  following:  (a)  crop  evapotranspiration;  (b)  field  capacity  of  the 
soil;  (c)  the  allowable  soil  water  depletion;  (d)  the  effective  crop  root  depth;  (e) 
requirement for reaching; and (f) allowances that need to be made for uniformity 
and efficiency of irrigation application. How much water to apply is depending on 
the irrigator’s strategy.  
 
A critical element is accurate  measurement of the volume of water applied or the 
depth  of  application.  A  farmer  cannot  manage  water  to  maximum  efficiency 
without  knowing  how  much  water  applied.  Also,  uniform  water  distribution 
across  the  field  is  important  to  derive  the  maximum  benefits  from  irrigation 
scheduling and management. Accurate water application prevents over‐or under‐
irrigation. According to FAO (1989), the total available water (TAW), for plant use 
in  the  root  zone  is  commonly  defined  as  the  range  of  soil  moisture  held  at  a 
negative  apparent  pressure  of  0.1  to  0.33  bar  (a  soil  moisture  level  called  ʹfield 
capacityʹ)  and  15  bars  (called  the  ʹpermanent  wilting  pointʹ).  The  TAW  will  vary 
from 25 cm/m for silty loams to as low as 6 cm/m for sandy soils. The net quantity 
of  water  to  be  applied  depends  on  magnitude  of  moisture  deficit  in  the  soil, 
leaching  requirement  and  expectancy  of  rainfall.  When  no  rainfall  is  likely  to  be 
received and soil is not saline, net quantity of water to be applied is equal to the 
moisture  deficit  in  the  soil,  i.e.  the  quantity  required  to  fill  the  root  zone  to  field 
capacity. 
 
The moisture deficit in the effective root zone is found out by determining the field 
capacity moisture contents and bulk densities of each layers of the soil (Mishra and 
Ahmed, 1990). According to Jurriens et al. (2001), the required depth is not usually 
the  same  as  the  applied  depth,  which  is  equal  to  the  applied  volume  divided  by 
the  area.  If  the  applied  depth  infiltrates  the  field  area  entirely,  the  applied  depth 
equals the average infiltrated depth. Jurriens et al. (2001) further discussed on that, 
25

the  average  depth  of  water  that  is  actually  stored  in  the  target  root  zone  is  the 
storage depth. When the target zone is entirely filled, the storage depth will equal 
the target root zone depth. If the storage root zone depth is less that the target root 
zone  depth,  then  there  is  under‐irrigation  and  if  the  storage  root  zone  depth  is 
greater than the target root zone depth, then there is deep‐percolation. 

2.6 Methods of irrigation performance 

Two  key  factors  affecting  irrigation  and  drainage  service  delivery  are  the 
configuration  of  the  physical  infrastructure  and  the  management  processes,  both 
of which effect control over the processes involved. Control needs to be exerted in 
some areas such us infrastructures, water delivery and management, maintenance, 
and income generation, to provide a reliable, adequate and timely irrigation water 
supply  and  effective  drainage,  and  the  potential  benefits  of  such  control.  The 
management  of  the  physical  infrastructure  leads  to  the  provision  of  water  for 
irrigation and drainage of excess water; this in turn leads to improved agricultural 
crop production and farmer income, some of which can then be used to pay for the 
service  provided  or  contribute  to  maintenance  services.  Within  the  internal 
processes  of  the  service  provider,  financial,  operation  and  maintenance  control 
systems are required to support the delivery of the service (Bos et al., 2005). 
 
The  level  of  physical  control  and  measurement  built  into  the  irrigation  and 
drainage  system  design  has  a  fundamental  impact  on  the  level  and  type  of 
operational  performance  evaluation  that  is:  (i)  required  and  (ii)  possible.  In 
general, the need for operational performance monitoring increases as the level of 
control  and  measurement  increases.  Monitoring  and  evaluation  of  scheme 
performance  is  carried  out  during  the  cropping  season  or  year,  and  can  be  of  a 
strategic  (‘Am  I  doing  the  right  thing?’)  or  an  operational  (‘Am  I  doing  things 
right?’)  nature.  Strategic  performance  evaluation  is  typically  done  at  longer 
intervals  and  looks  at  criteria  of  productivity,  profitability,  sustainability  and 
environmental  impact.  It  may  also  be  required  in  response  to  changes  in  the 
external environment, such as is the case with governments reducing the funding 
available  for  supporting  irrigated  agriculture  and  transferring  responsibility  for 
management, operation and maintenance to water users. Operational performance 
assessment  carried  out  during  the  season  supports  a  pre‐season  plan  which  in 
general  is  drawn  up  in  the  commencement  of  the  irrigation  season  and  that  is 
covering key aspects of the management, operation or maintenance of the system. 
It of course depends on the type of irrigation and drainage scheme, this planning 
and  adjustment  process.  The  flows  in  the  canal  network  are  regulated  in 
26

accordance  with  the  implementation  schedule  and  the  discharges  (and  for  some 
schemes, the crop areas) monitored as the season progresses. The performance of 
the  system  in  relation  to  the  seasonal  plan  is  monitored  during  the  season,  and 
evaluated  at  the  end  of  the  season.  The  evaluation  measures  the  performance 
against  the  seasonal  plan,  but  may  also  measure  the  performance  against  the 
strategic objectives. 

2.6.1 Data collection 

There  are  two  common  approaches  to  understand  system  performance  and 
diagnose problems. The first approach is to collect as much information as possible 
about the system and explain the functioning of the system through analysis. The 
second approach is to focus on and trace key cause–effect relationships. While the 
first approach can yield a broad understanding of irrigated agriculture, it is often 
expensive  to  collect  measure  and  handle  data  on  performance,  and  that  is  one 
reason why irrigation managers do not routinely do performance assessment (Bos 
et  al.,  2005).  A  specific  methodology  for  assessing  and  understanding  the 
performance  of  an  irrigated  agricultural  system  has  evolved  since  the  1980s  and 
has  been  applied  to  many  irrigated  areas  (Lowdermilk  et  al.,  1983;  Clyma  and 
Lowdermilk, 1988; Dedrick et al., 2000). The performance evaluation is taken from 
a  variety  of  viewpoints,  including  the  farmer’s,  the  irrigation  manager’s  and 
society’s. The experience and examples of performance evaluation have yielded a 
variety of specific methodologies crossing disciplines that are quite useful within 
and  outside  the  context  of  this  evaluation  such  as  Rapid  appraisal,  participatory 
rural  appraisal and  remote  sensing techniques (Oad  and  McCornick,  1989;  Bos  et 
al., 2005). 

 
2.6.1.1 The Rapid appraisal approach 

This  method  is  used  to  give  a  quick  overview  of  system  performance.  This  is 
typically used in the initial steps of performing diagnostic analysis. As a result of a 
rapid  appraisal,  an  initial  hypothesis  can  be  developed.  At  times,  an  overview 
based  on  a  rapid  appraisal  can  shed  sufficient  light  on  an  irrigated  area  for 
decisions  to  be  made.  Rapid  appraisal  techniques  rely  on  field  observations  plus 
the collection and review of available data and information. The following sources 
of  information  are  useful:  review  of  secondary  data,  interviews  with  individuals 
27

and  groups,  and  observations  of  various  parts  of  the  system.  A  rapid  appraisal 
should provide key information to form a profile of the system, information on a 
few  key  indicators  and  other  explanatory  information  to  form  the  basis  for  key 
hypotheses.  Rapid  appraisals  can  sometimes  quickly  trace  the  origin  of 
malfunction,  allowing  for  application  of  corrective  actions  and  sometimes 
eliminating  the  need  for  a  detailed  diagnostic  analysis.  The  advantages  of  rapid 
appraisal lie in the ability to quickly form an idea about the system’s functioning. 
Rapid  appraisal  can  point  swiftly  to  the  origin  of  the  malfunction,  allowing  for 
rapid  corrective  action,  and  minimizing  the  time  and  effort  for  detailed 
diagnostics. The disadvantages are that it relies on the skills of the assessor. 

2.6.1.2 Participatory rural appraisal approach 

This  approach  relies  on  the  information  delivered  by  people  in  the  vicinity  of  an 
irrigated scheme. Locally, irrigation communities possess tremendous knowledge 
about  the  operation  and  performance  of  irrigation.  This  is  an  extremely  valuable 
source  of  information,  even  for  irrigation  management  agencies,  in  assessing 
irrigation  performance.  Participatory  rural  appraisal  relies  on  local  knowledge  to 
identify  problems  and  develop  interventions.  Participatory  rural  appraisal  (PRA) 
is  a  family  of  approaches  and  methods  to  enable  local  people  to  share,  enhance 
and  analyze  their  knowledge  of  life  and  conditions,  and  to  plan  and  act 
(Chambers,  1994).  PRA  is  related  to  and  evolved  from  the  rapid  rural  appraisal 
techniques  (Chambers  and  Carruthers,  1985;  Yoder  and  Martin,  1985;  Pradhan  et 
al., 1988; Grosselink and Thompson, 1997).  
 
The  local  community  participates  in  the  research  by  developing  sketches  and 
maps, transects showing resource use patterns, seasonal calendars, trend analysis 
and daily activity profiles. Through PRA, information that would have otherwise 
gone unnoticed is tapped. By involving stakeholders in research and development, 
there is more likelihood of better acceptance of interventions.  
 
A  disadvantage  is  that  the  quantitative  base  of  information  may  be  weak.  For 
example, this would not be used to generate data on water resources, although it 
could  be  helpful  in  developing  a  feel  for  the  magnitude  of  flows  when  data  are 
missing.  While  it  is  an  excellent  tool  for  deriving  local  knowledge,  placing  this 
knowledge in the context of broader issues such as basin‐wide water use may be 
missing.  Similar  to  the  rapid  appraisal  techniques,  this  technique  also  relies 
heavily on the skills of the assessor. PRA can be an excellent complement to other 
28

tools  when  assessing  performance.  PRA  techniques  are  ideally  suited  for 
developing and improving service arrangements between the providers and users. 
For  diagnosis,  PRA  can  be  used  both  in  initial  screening  and  for  a  more  detailed 
data collection (Bos et al, 2005). 

2.6.1.3 Remote sensing techniques 

These  techniques  are  increasingly  being  utilized  in  performance  evaluation  and 
are in many situations quite useful for diagnostic assessments. The use of remote 
sensing  has  several  distinct  advantages  over  traditional  ground  data  collection. 
Remote  sensing  can  be  used  to  gather  information  over  an  entire  area,  while 
ground  data  collection  relies  on  sample  areas.  Data  collection  by  remote  sensing 
does  not  intrude  into  the  day‐to‐day  life  of  those  in  the  irrigation  community. 
Often, the presence of observers changes the behaviour of those being observed, so 
the information collected does not reflect normal operating conditions. Data can be 
disaggregated to the resolution of the image, or aggregated up to useful units such 
as various service areas within an irrigation system. Because satellite images have 
been available since 1982, development trends can be established looking 20 years 
back. The cost of obtaining remotely sensed data is often cited as a constraint to its 
use.  Prices  are  decreasing  rapidly,  and  the  quality  and  resolution  of  images  are 
improving. For certain types of data like irrigated area, or land‐use cover, the cost 
of  data  collection  is  less  than  25%  of  conventional  data  collection  programmes. 
Nevertheless, remote sensing cannot substitute for local field‐level knowledge and 
experience and is applicable to a limited set of problems that may occur (Bos et al., 
2005). 

 
29

Chapter 3. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY AREA 

3.1 Location and Topography  

Rugeramigozi marshland complex presented on figure 3.2 with its sub‐marshes is 
situated the southern province of Rwanda precisely in Muhanga District as shown 
on figure 3.1.  

Figure 3. 1 Rwanda administrative map

Figure 3. 2 Rugeramigozi marshland topographic map


30

3.2 Rugeramigozi Irrigation scheme 

Prior  to  the  development  of  the  Rugeramigozi  irrigation  project,  farmers  in  the 
vicinity  depended  on  rain  fed  agriculture.  The  agricultural  production  was  poor 
due to insufficient rainfall during dry seasons and occurrence flooding in the rainy 
seasons.  In  2001,  NGO,  GERMANY  AGRO  ACTION  established  an  irrigation 
project that cover an area of about 250ha with the aim of improving food security 
and  poverty  reduction  in  the  area  of  Muhanga  District.  The  project  comprises  of 
three sub‐marshes which are: Rugeramigozi I, 67.72ha, Rugeramigozi II, 121.65ha, 
and  Biringanya  63.53ha.  This  study  was  conducted  in  Biringanya  marshland 
Figure  3.3  which  has  about  950  farmers.  At  the  beginning  of  the  project  every 
farmer managed his own plot separately. This created disputes among farmers. To 
settle the dispute, Rugeramigozi farmer’s association was established. 

Figure 3. 3 Biringanya Irrigation System (ECOTRA)


31

3.3 Climate 

Like everywhere else in Rwanda, the climatic conditions of the area comprises of 
four  seasons  which  are  two  rainy  seasons  (March  to  June  and  October  to 
December) and two dry seasons (July to September and January to February). This 
study  was  carried  out  in  the  dry  season  especially  between  June  and  August. 
According to the record of the nearest weather station (Byimana weather station) 
the  mean  annual  rainfall  in  the  area  ranges  from  1200  mm  to  1300  mm,  with  the 
highest amount falling between March and June. The potential evapotranspiration 
of the area is about 1250 mm per year. The mean annual temperature ranges from 
17ºC to 20ºC. 

3.4 Water sources  

Rugeramigozi  stream  is  the  main  source  of  irrigation  water  to  this  project.  The 
stream  is  also  used  for  domestic  water  supply  for  the  area.  This  stream  passes 
under  the  dyke  of  the  Kigali‐Butare  road  through  two  culverts  to  Biringanya 
scheme on the right  hand of the  road as shown by figure 3.4. Figure 3.5 shows a 
diversion  head  work  in  the  form  of  head  regulators  for  diversion  of  water  to  the 
off‐taking  channels  for  irrigation  purpose,  constructed  in  40  meters  downstream 
the dyke. 
 

 
Figure 3. 4 Rugeramigozi stream under the dyke
32

Figure 3. 5 Head regulator on Rugeramigozi stream

 
33

Chapter 4. MATERIALS AND METHODS 

4.1 Methodology  

For this study a rapid appraisal approach has been used to evaluate the scheme’s 
internal performance, temporal and spatial information at on‐farm level have been 
collected. Data gathering was conducted in June, July and August 2007. These are 
the  dry  months  in  which  farmers  were  expected  to  be  irrigating  their  crops  after 
the  harvesting  of  rain‐fed  crops  was  over.  The  field  research  used  the  following 
data collection instruments: 
a) Field  observation  and  photography:  the  newly  introduced  irrigation  system 
was visited. Notes were taken from the conversations held with the farmers at 
the  irrigation  sites.  Photographs  of  various  characteristics  of  the  physical 
systems of irrigation were taken. 
b) Interviews  with  key  informants:  detailed  interviews  were  conducted  with 
officials (The Sector Agronomist, The farmers’ Association representative and 
The Company that designed the irrigation system). 
c) Archives: information was obtained from the files of ECOTRA. The contents of 
key correspondence and reports pertaining to irrigation in the study area were 
examined. 

4.1.1 Primary data collection 

Primary field data collection activities included: 
a) Frequent  field  observations  that  were  conducted  to  observe  and  investigate 
the method of water applications, and practices related to water management 
techniques,  the  water  delivery  structures  status  and  channels  status  in  the 
whole scheme. Here we visited every structure constructed in the scheme and 
we noted its status to see the number of ones that are functioning adequately 
and the ones which are not functioning adequately. 
 
b) Measurements  of  water  flow  at  the  main  source.  Based  on  this  average 
discharge coupled with the total flow time, the total volume of water diverted 
by the irrigation scheme was estimated. 
 
c) Household  survey,  interview  with  both  irrigation  scheme  managers  and 
farmers  to  get  their  different  point  of  views  on  how  irrigation  activities  are 
34

conducted  and  how  the  practices  are  understood.  For  the  survey,  a 
questionnaire  was  administrated  to  a  randomly  composed  sample  of  63 
farmers. It took place in on‐farm level where questions were asked to farmers 
during  their  daily  activities  in  the  marshland.  The  questionnaire 
administrated  to  the  farmers  is  presented  in  the  appendix  A‐A.1.  Note  that 
only  questions  that  may  have  a  direct  influence  on  the  performance  of  the 
irrigation system were analysed in this work. 
   
d) Wooden  weirs  were  constructed  and  installed  at  the  entrance  of  the  selected 
secondary  canal  to  measure  the  water  flow  entering  the  field  and  the 
discharge in the primary canal. Water level was forced to rise so that it could 
flow  over  the  weir.  When  water  got  stabilized  we  took  three  successive 
readings  to  make  sure  that  the  head  recorded  is  correct  and  when  we found 
difference  between  readings  we  made  an  average.  The  weir  reading  activity 
was conducted twice a day, in the morning between 8h00’ and 10h00’ and in 
the afternoon between 15h00’ and 17h00’ during irrigation event. 

4.1.1.1 Flow measurement 

Without  knowledge  of  flow  rates  it  is  usually  difficult  to  quantify  deliveries  to 
water  users,  which  significantly  impedes  the  ability  to  evaluate  water 
management practices. Hence, Irrigation Water management does not exist in the 
absence of flow measurement. 
 
In  this  study  we  used  Rectangular  Sharp‐crested  Weirs  for  Water  flow 
measurement due to their advantages that are presented below: 
a) are capable of accurately measuring a wide range of flow rates; 
b) tend to provide more accurate discharge ratings than flumes and orifices; 
c) are relatively easy to construct; and 
d)    allow floating debris to pass over the structure during measurement event.  
(Hargreaves and Merkley, 1998). 
 
The  model  of  a  rectangular  sharp‐crested  weir  used  in  this  study  is  shown  on 
figure 4.1. 
 
35

Figure 4. 1 The rectangular sharp-crested weir and its cross section (Bos, 1989).

4.1.1.2 Discharge determination 

The  figure 4.2  shows  locations  at  which  weirs  were  installed  in  the  channels  and 
the  respective  sites  in  which  measurements  were  taken,  MS  being  the  site  of 
measurement in the main source which is Rugeramigozi stream, and S1, S2, S3, S4, 
S5  the  different  sites  in  which  measurements  were  taken  through  the  irrigation 
primary  canals.  To  determine  the  discharge  of  water  flowing  in  the  channel,  a 
rectangular  weir  as  shown  by  figure  4.3  was  installed  at  the  entrance  of  each 
second  channel  and  frequent  readings  were  taken.  During  measurement,  the 
average irrigation water depth passing over the weir to the field were recorded by 
reading on the graduated staff placed in the upstream side of the weir as shown on 
figure 4.4.  
36

S3

S2

S1

Direction of
flow
MS

S4

S5

Figure 4. 2 Measurement sites

The discharges of water flowing into the channels were calculated using equation 
(4‐1) as formulated by Kindsvater and Carter (1957). The formula uses the 
principle of head‐discharge over a rectangular sharp‐crested weir. 
2 3
Q = Ce 2 g be h1 2                        (4- 1) 
3
Q: the discharge in (m3/s) 
Ce: the effective coefficient of discharge  
g: the gravity acceleration (9.81m/s2) 
be: effective length of the weir crest (m) 
h1: head on the weir (m) 
L
be = b + k b  kb is a correction factor to obtain a weir effective length,  k b = . (4- 2) 
B
he = h + k h  with h the measured head over the weir. 

Practically, for Suppressed rectangular sharp‐crested weirs:   
h1
he = h + 0.001 m  and  C e = 0.602 + 0.075            (4- 3)  
p
where p1 is the height of the weir from the bottom of the channel, and P the head 
of water on the upstream side of the weir measured from the bottom of the 
channel (Bos, 1989).
37

Figure 4. 3 Installation of a weir Figure 4. 4 Taking measurement

4.1.2 Secondary data collection 

Secondary data collection was carried out by visiting organizations related to the 
agriculture sector to gather further information through documents that they keep. 
This  information  include  the  marshland  surface  area,  yields,  irrigated  area, 
irrigable  area,  and  design  discharge,  volume  of  water  designed,  meteorological 
data  and  agronomic  documents  on  different  crops.  Organizations  visited  are 
GERMAN  AGRO  ACTION  (GAA)  Which  is  the  NGO  that  financed  the 
development  of  this  marshland,  ECOTRA  the  Company  that  design  the 
development plan of the scheme, BYIMANA Meteorological Station the nearest to 
the study area, NYAMABUYE SECTOR as representative of Local Authority and 
IABR  as  the  main  Association  for  the  farmers  in  the  entire  marshland.  Many 
secondary data from the above mentioned organization were collected. Interviews 
were conducted using questionnaire in order to get the perception of the farmers 
about the water distribution within the project. Much effort was given to review of 
different  documents  at  different  places  to  check  the  reliability  and  consistency  of 
these data collected. 

4.1.2.1 Crop water requirements 

To  estimate  the  crop  water  requirements  (CWR),  irrigation  scheduling  and 
irrigation  water  requirement  (IWR)  of  the  irrigated  crops  at  field  levels  and  the 
irrigation  project  as  a  whole  the  CropWat  for  windows  (CropWat  4  Windows 
Version  4.2)  was  used.  This  program  uses  the  FAO  (1992)  Penman‐Monteith 
equation  for  calculating  reference  crop  evapotranspiration.  The  determination  of 
the  CWR  by  this  model  depends  on  the  determination  of  the  reference 
38

evapotranspiration values using the available climatic data. The determination of 
IWR  was  carried  out  after  estimation  of  effective  rainfall  using  USDA  soil 
conservation  service  method.    The  water  requirements  were  estimated  according 
the  FAO  method  which  consists  of  comparing  rainfall  with  the  crop’s  evapo‐
transpiration.  Sets  of  monthly  rainfall  data  were  used  to  establish  these  water 
requirements.  The  maximum  crop  evapo‐transpiration  (ETM)  was  expressed  in 
millimeters per month (mm/month) and then converted into continuous fictitious 
flow in liters per second per hectare (l.s‐1/ha) and this equals the part which can be 
used for irrigating the crops. 

4.2 Data analysis techniques 

4.2.1 Water delivery performance 

The  simplest,  and  yet  probably  the  most  important,  hydraulic  performance 
indicator is (Clemmens & Bos 1990; Bos et al. 1991): 

Actually delivered volume of water


Water delivery performance =                                                      
Intended volume of delivered water
This measure enables an irrigated scheme water manager to determine the extent 
to which water is  delivered as intended during  a selected period (may range from 
second to year) and at any location in the system. The primary utility of the Water 
Delivery Performance ratio is that it allows for checking of whether the flow at any 
location in the system is more or less than intended (Bos, 1997). Total water supply 
is Surface diversions plus net groundwater plus rainfall. 
 

4.2.2 Performance Indicators 

The  performance  indicators’  testing  depends  on  the  availability  of  data.  Getting 
complete  data  required  to  calculate  all  the  internal  (the  nine  indicators)  for  each 
small‐scale irrigation project was very difficult. The types of data recorded in this 
irrigation project have different natures and limited the application of all the nine 
parameters  used  in  the  performance  indicators  developed  by  IWMI  for  the  same 
cropping season of an irrigation project. Hence, the analysis of performance of an 
irrigation  project,  minimum  sets  of  internal  indicators  were  applied  with  the 
available  information  gathered  and  analysis  was  made  within  and  across  the 
irrigation  project.  Based  on  the  minimum  set  of  performance  indicators,  the 
39

scheme  performance  evaluation  and  its  trend  were  studied.  The  water  balance 
indicators  and  maintenance  indicators  were  used  to  evaluate  the  performance  of 
Rugeramigozi irrigation scheme.  

Water balance indicators:   

   

Field application ratio :  ET p − Pe
 
Vf
 

Overall consummed ratio :  ETp − Pe
 
Vc + V1
 
Vd + V2
Conveyance ratio :   
Vc + V1
 
 
Maintenance indicators: 
 
 
 
Discharge ratio: 
Actually Measured Disch arg e
 
  Design Disch arg e
   
Effectiveness of infrastructures:  Number of Functioning Structures
 
Total Number of Structures

 
With:

ETp:  the evapo‐transpiration by the irrigated crop;

Pe:  the effective part of the precipitation;

V1:  the inflow from other sources to the conveyance system;

V2:  the non‐irrigation deliveries from the conveyance system;

V3:  the non‐irrigation water deliveries from the distribution system;

Vc:  the volume of irrigation water diverted or pumped from the river or reservoir;
40

Vd :  the volume of water actually delivered to the distribution system;

Vf :  the volume of irrigation water delivered to the fields during the considered 

Vm : period;

the volume of irrigation water needed, and made available, to avoid 

undesirable stress in the crops throughout (considered part of) the growing 

cycle;
For practical reasons Vm = ETp – Pe and V3 is negligible and hence was taken equal to
zero.
41

Chapter  5.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

5.1 Analysis of secondary data and visual observations  

Originally  the  project  was  designed  by  ECOTRA  under  the  sponsor  of  German 
Agro Action. The structures during the study were clearly poorly maintained, but 
still existing. Both primary and secondary canals are unlined earthen canals. There 
are  a  number  of  division  boxes  “intakes”  and  in  some  areas  “intakes  combined 
with  chutes”  along  the  primary  canals  that  are  used  to  divert  the  water  into  the 
secondary canals. All farmers were using border cascaded irrigation system under 
small  plots  having  an  average  length  of  16  meters  to  25  meters  width. 
Prefabricated  metal  gates  are  the  equipments  used  to  open  and  close  the  intakes 
while they are irrigating their crops, whereas weeds and clay are used to close the 
water way from one plot to another. During the reallocation of the farm fields to 
the members, each farmer on average has got 0.04 hectares of land. In general the 
scheme  developed  area  is  63.53  hectares,  but  the  irrigable  land  is  58.38  hectares. 
The  main  crops  grown  in  the  irrigation  project  area  are  rice,  cabbage,  tomato, 
maize,  and  sorghum.  Among  the  mentioned  crops,  rice  was  the  dominant  crop 
grown  covering  around  66.8%  of  the  irrigable  land.  During  the  study  “dry 
season”,  the  dominant  crops  were  Cabbage  and  Tomato  which  were  covering 
about  33.2%  of  the  irrigable  land.  Rice,  maize  and  sorghum  were grown  in  rainy 
season and Vegetables are grown in dry season. Rainfall is not sufficient for crops 
to  grown  in  rainy  season  and  irrigation  is  therefore  required  for  supplemental 
water. The farmers themselves, including their family, do all the farming practices 
including maintenance of the irrigation system. According to the responses given 
by the farmers, 87.3% of the sixty three farmers interviewed confirm that they are 
attached  to  the  works  concerning  the  maintenance  of  the  irrigation  system  and 
structures,  whereas  only  12.3%  said  that  they  never  participate  in  these 
maintenance works as shown of figure 5.1. The reasons that a number of farmers 
are not participating may due to the fact that most of them did not get training on 
good  cultivating  practices  and  irrigation  practices.    As  it  is  shown  on  figure  5.2, 
77.8% of interviewed farmers said that they have never had training as farmers. 
42

100 60

50
80
Percentage of farmers

Percentage of farmers
40
60

30

40
20

20
10

0 0
Yes No yes non don't know

Do you prticipate in maintanance works? have you ever had any training ?
 

Figure 5. 1 Participation in maintenance works Figure 5. 2 Training aspects

5.2 Crop cultivated and water availability  

The dominant crop of the area grown under irrigation is rice, but other crops are 
cultivated according to land conditions. In not adequately dominated land, maize 
and  sorghum  are  cultivated.  During  the  three  consecutive  agricultural  seasons, 
rice’s farmers confirmed that they did not get required harvest. Some of them said 
that the situation is due to the water shortage and other said that it may be due to 
the crop types. According to the responses given by interviewed farmers, 44.4% of 
them  confirmed  that  irrigation  water  is  sometimes  sufficient  whereas  55.6% 
confirmed  that  irrigation  water  is  not  at  all  sufficient  as  illustrated  by  figure  5.3. 
The  observation  made  on  field  made  us  to  say  that  the  ones  that  confirm  this 
sufficiency  of  water  are  the  ones  whose  plots  are  situated  in  the  head  part  of 
irrigation  system.  Among  interviewed  farmers,  76.2%  have  cultivated  rice  and 
23.8% had cultivated other crops such as maize and sorghum the last rainy season 
as shown by figure 5.4.  
 
 
 
43

60 80

50

60

Percentage of farmers
Percentage of farmers

40

30 40

20

20

10

0 0
sometimes Not at all Rice Others

Is available irrigation water sufficient? What type of crops have you been croping?

Figure 5. 3 Irrigation water availability Figure 5. 4 Crops under cultivation

 
The analysis of the questionnaire that was administrated to farmers, showed that 
3.2%  of  them  confirmed  that  harvest  was  a  bit  sufficient,  20.6%  confirmed  that 
harvest was sufficient anywhere, so far 76.2% confirmed that harvest was not at all 
sufficient,  figure  5.5.  The  analysis  showed  that  all  of  rice  crop farmers  confirmed 
that harvest was not at all sufficient whereas other crops’ farmers confirmed that 
harvest was sufficient anyhow.  
 
100
60

80 50
Percentage of farmers

Percentage of farmers

40
60

30

40

20

20
10

0 0
Sufficient Abit Not at all sometimes Never

Is there any increase in harvest with this project? Do you get floding problems in this scheme?

Figure 5. 5 Harvest aspects Figure 5. 6 flooding problems 


44

5.3 Water availability  

As more farmers confirmed that the lack of productivity is due to the shortage of 
water,  we  have  done  the  rainfall  analysis.  As  shown  on  figure  5.9,  the  highest 
rainfall  occurs  in  April  (206.4mm  per  month)  whereas  the  minimum  is  in  July 
(21.8mm). In  rainfall  season  we have  full  flow  in  channels,  Figure  5.7  whereas  in 
dry  season  some  of  the  irrigation  channels  are  dry  (no  water  is  flowing  in  the 
canal) Figure 5.8. Among the farmers interviewed, 55.6% confirmed that they have 
sometimes  flooding  problems  (mainly  in  April)  whereas  44.4%  said  that  they 
never have such problems as shown by figure 5.6. 
 

Figure 5. 7 Channel in Rainy season Figure 5. 8 Channel in dry season

225
210
195
Precipitation & Runoff (mm)

180
165
150
135
120
105
90
75
60
45
30
15
0
Jul
Jan

Feb

Jun

Oct
Mar

May

Nov

Dec
Sept
Aug
Apr

Precipitation
Month Runoff

Figure 5. 9 Rain water availability in the study area (Byimana Weather station)
45

 
Using this rainfall information which was available in Byimana weather station for 
about 31 years we have calculated the volume of the reservoir required to supply 
the  irrigation  requirement  in  water  shortage  periods.  From  the  curve  of  the 
precipitation versus the evapo‐transpiration as represented on figure 5.11 we have 
estimated  the  volume  of  the  reservoir  to  be  3.1  x  106  m3.  We  have  also  estimated 
the water requirement for crops that can be cultivated in the dry season since it is 
the one in which the situation is seriously uncomfortable. As we were interested in 
runoff,  after  calculations  the  figure  5.4  shows  the  monthly  precipitation  and  its 
resultant  runoff  in  millimeters,  whereas  figure  5.10  shows  the  runoff  resultant 
discharge (Qr) in liters per second. 

180.0
165.0
150.0
135.0
120.0
105.0
Qr (l/s)

90.0
75.0
60.0
45.0
30.0
15.0
0.0
Jul
Jan

Feb

Jun

Oct
Mar

May

Nov

Dec
Sept
Aug
Apr

Month

Figure 5. 10 Discharge due to rainfall


46

Evapotranspiration Precipitation

1400.0
Precipitation and Evapotranspiration

1200.0

1000.0

800.0
(mm)

600.0

400.0

200.0

0.0
Month Jan Feb Marc Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

Figure 5. 11 Water demand and supply in the study area (Byimana weather station)

5.4 Water requirement  

Using  rainfall  data  and  the  crop  factor  for  cabbage  which  was  grown  in  the  dry 
season,  we  have  calculated  the  water  requirement  for  these  crops.  The  results 
obtained  shows  that  in  the  third  stage  of  its  development  which  is  the  one  in 
which  more  water  is  required,  the  cabbage  needs  26  liters  per  second  and  is  less 
than  the  available  water  due  to  the  precipitations  (34.9  liters  per  second).  This 
shows that vegetables may be cultivated in the scheme without any stress problem 
in  the  crops.  Table  5.1  shows  the  computation  made  for  cabbage  water 
requirement  in  the  dray  season,  using  available  rainfall  records  available  at 
Byimana weather station. 

Table5. 1 Water requirements for Cabbage and Carrots

Month P R ETP Kc ETM m3/month/ha Need (l/s)


June 35,6 28,8 91,0 0,45 41,0 409,50 9,2
July 21,8 17,7 94,7 0,75 71,0 710,25 16,0
August 42,3 34,3 111,9 1,05 117,5 1174,95 26,5
September 88,7 71,8 114,8 0,90 103,3 1033,20 23,3
47

With:

P: the precipitation (in millimeters); 
R: the runoff (in millimeters); 
ETP:
the evapotranspiration given by the meteorogical data (in millimeters); 
Kc:
ETM: the crop factor used to determine ETM; 
the crop evapotranspiration (in millimeters). 

 
With  the  same  procedure  we  have  determined  the  bean  dry  water  requirement 
since  this  crop  is  the  one  that  have  been  chosen  to  be  cultivated  during  the  first 
agricultural  season.  Computations  made  shows  that  in  the  third  development 
stage in which it requires more water to avoid stress, the crop will  need 26.5 l.s‐1, 
whereas  the  available  water  from  precipitation  is  estimated  to  be  about  90.8  l.s‐1. 
This shows that we will use less than what is available and this made us to suggest 
the construction of reservoirs to collect this excess of rain water to be used in the 
water  shortage  period.  Table  5.2  below  shows  the  computation  made  for 
determination of water requirement for the bean dry crop. 

Table5. 2 Water requirements for Beans dry

Month P R ETP Kc ETM m3/month/ha Need (l/s)


June 101,4 22,3 108,8 0,35 38,1 380,8 8,6
July 142,3 31,3 103,4 0,70 72,4 723,8 16,3
August 110,0 24,2 102,0 1,10 112,2 1122,0 25,3
September 104,2 22,9 107,3 0,30 32,2 321,9 7,3

These data made us to conclude that available water sufficient for bean dry crop to 
be grown in good conditions during the first agricultural season. 

5.5 Water measurement 

5.5.1 Results 

The  discharge  in  the  canals  is  controlled  by  manually  operated  gates.  The 
discharge of the main canals varies from time  to time, along with the main source, 
Rugeramigozi  stream  that  is  also  being  controlled  by  a  diversion  weir.  On  the 
primary  canals  are  constructed  different  structures  such  as  chute,  intake  and 
48

intake  combined  with  chutes.  The  following  tables  contain  records  for  water 
measurement made in Biringanya scheme respectively on 22, 24 and 29 of August 
in 2007, with weirs installed in the primary canals. 
 
Table 5. 3 Flow measurement records for day 1 

August 22, 2007 
 
Site Time p (cm) P (cm) h (cm) he (cm) l=be (cm) h/p ce Q (l/s)
S1 a.m 32,0 36,7 4,7
p.m 32,0 37,1 5,1
4,9 4,90 88 0,1531 0,6135 17,30
S2 a.m 56,5 60,5 4,0
p.m 56,5 60,8 4,3
4,2 4,15 88 0,0735 0,6075 13,59
S3 a.m 46,5 50,0 3,5
p.m 46,5 50,6 4,1
3,8 3,80 88 0,0817 0,6081 11,71
S4 a.m 46,5 50,8 4,3
p.m 46,5 50,7 4,2
4,3 4,25 88 0,0914 0,6089 14,11
S5 a.m 32,0 35,6 3,6
p.m 32,0 35,8 3,8
3,7 3,70 88 0,1156 0,6107 11,30
MS a.m 12,0 19,4 7,4
p.m 12,0 19,6 7,6
7,5 7,50 102 0,6250 0,6489 40,15
 
49

Table5. 4 Flow measurement records for day 2 

August 24, 2007

Site Time p (cm) P (cm) h (cm) he (cm) l=be (cm) h/p ce Q (l/s)
S1 a.m 32,0 36,4 4,4
p.m 32,0 37,0 5,0
4,7 4,70 88 0,1469 102,0952 16,24
S2 a.m 56,5 60,8 4,3
p.m 56,5 61,4 4,9
4,6 4,20 88 0,0814 102,0528 13,72
S3 a.m 46,5 50,4 3,9
p.m 46,5 51,2 4,7
4,3 3,80 88 0,0925 102,0599 11,71
S4 a.m 46,5 51,0 4,5
p.m 46,5 50,7 4,2
4,4 4,30 88 0,0935 102,0606 14,11
S5 a.m 32,0 36,0 4,0
p.m 32,0 36,3 4,3
4,2 3,70 88 0,1297 102,0840 11,30
MS a.m 12,0 19,5 7,5
p.m 12,0 19,9 7,9
7,7 7,50 102 0,6417 102,4157 40,14

Table5. 5 Flow measurement records for day 3

August 29, 2007

Site Time p (cm) P (cm) h (cm) he (cm) l=be (cm) h/p ce Q (l/s)
S1 a.m 32,0 36,5 4,5
p.m 32,0 37,7 5,7
5,1 5,10 88 0,1594 102,0996 18,35
S2 a.m 56,5 60,1 3,6
p.m 56,5 61,2 4,7
4,2 4,17 88 0,0738 102,0461 13,46
S3 a.m 46,5 50,1 3,6
p.m 46,5 50,5 4,0
3,8 3,80 88 0,0817 102,0511 11,72
S4 a.m 46,5 48,5 2,0
p.m 46,5 53,8 7,3
avg 4,7 4,66 88 0,1002 102,0626 15,89
S5 a.m 32,0 35,3 3,3
p.m 32,0 36,1 4,1
3,7 3,70 88 0,1156 102,0723 11,30
MS a.m 12,0 19,0 7,0
p.m 12,0 20,6 8,6
7,8 7,78 102 0,6479 102,4049 43,16
 
50

 
p: height of the weir
P: head of water upstream side of the weir measured from the bottom of the canal
h: head of water above the weir
he: effective head
l: width of the weir
be: effective width of the weir
ce: effective coefficient of discharge
Q: the discharge

Table5. 6 Calculated discharges in different sites


                      

Site  he (Cm)  l (cm)  Qavg (l/s) 


MS  7,5  102  40,15 
S1  4,9  88  17,30 
S2  4,2  88  13,59 
S3  3,8  88  11,71 
S4  4,3  88  14,71 
S5  3,7  88  11,30 
 
 
5.5.2 Discussion 

 
 The  measurement  made  in  this  stream  during  the  dry  season  in  August  have 
shown  that  the  discharge  within  the  stream lies  in  the  range  of  36  and  44.3  liters 
per  second  with  an  average  discharge  of  40.15  liters  per  second  whereas  it  was 
designed to be 114liters per second for rice cultivation to be grown  in the normal 
conditions. The stream  is used not only for irrigation, but it is also a source for a 
Drinking  water  pumping  station.  The  pumping  station  in  dry  season  is  taking 
about  23.5  l.s‐1  according  to  the  report  delivered  by  the  Gihuma  Electrogaz 
pumping  station.  In  primary  canal  was  supposed  to  be  circulating  about  57  l.s‐1 
and now measurements show that in the left canal there is about 17.40 l.s‐1 which is 
30.35% of its capacity and in the  right  one  there is 14.11  l.s‐1  that are about 24.75% 
of  its capacity. The difference is due to the linkages in the gates and the situation 
implies that the pumping station cannot get the volume it needs.  
 
The  field  application  ratio  was  0.54.  Rien  (2000)  stated  that  for  surface  irrigation 
this ratio should be between 0.60 and 0.92  according to  the irrigation system used 
whereas  Jurriens  et  al.  (2001)  said  that  it  should  be  0.70  for  surface  border  strip 
51

irrigation  system  which  is  the  one  which  was  applied  in  this  scheme.  In  Adada 
scheme this ratio was  found varying between 0.43 and 0.86 with mean value of 0.6 
which  falls  within  the  acceptable  range  (Zerihun and Ketema, 2006).  The  value 
obtained  for  the  application  ratio  is  far  below  the  recommended  one,  this  shows 
that irrigation water is not adequately applied in the field.
 
Table5. 7 Common maximum attainable values of the field application ratio (efficiency)  
(Jurriens  et al., 2001). 

 
Irrigation water application method  Maximum attainable ratio (efficiency) 

Surface irrigation   

Furrows, laser leveling  0.70 

other quality levelling methods  0.60 

Border strip, laser leveling  0.70 

other quality levelling methods  0.60 

Level basins, laser leveling  0.92 

other quality levelling methods  0.80 

 
Tertiary  ratio  was  not  determined  since  in  our  system  there  are  no  tertiary 
channels available and therefore we cannot determine how water is distributed in 
the field from the tertiary channels. 
 
The  Overall  consumed  ratio  was  determined  to  be  0.47,  which  is  so  far  from  the 
half of the ideal ratio, which is one. This shows that the available fraction of water 
even if not sufficient is not also used to irrigate crop. The situation is clear because 
we know that apart from the irrigation practices, the water made available in the 
scheme is also used to supply the drinking water pumping station. 
 
The ratio of 0.70 for the conveyance indicates a value near to one, which indicates 
the  capacity  of  the  main  canal  to  meet  peak  crop  demand.  In  general  this  shows 
that  if  water  is  available  the  channel  is  able  to  convey  it  from  the  source  to  the 
fields. 
52

Note  that  all  of  the  indicators  were  not  tested  since  it  was  the  dry  season  and 
farmers were using buckets to water the cropped vegetables. Therefore we cannot 
know exactly all of the field water delivery related ratios. 
 

5.6 Maintenance 

5.6.1 Results 

The observation conducted in the scheme showed that even if farmers confirmed 
that they participate in maintenance works, the maintenance of the irrigation 
structures was still very poor. Figure 5.12 shows problems related to poor 
maintenance.  

Figure 5. 12 Problems related to poor maintenance 

The  irrigation  structures  also  were  not  in  good  status  as  shown  by  the  number 
contained  in  table  5.8  which  shows  each  type  of  structure  and  the  number  of 
structures that are functioning properly. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
53

 
Table5. 8 Observed structures status

              
Type  Nr of Struct Part. Funct F. funct  (%) funct
Intake  11 8 3  27,3
Chute  5 0 5  100,0
Intake & chute  5 4 1  20,0
Diversion weir  2 0 2  100,0
Offtake  2 1 1  50,0
Culvert  3 1 2  66,7
Inlet  2 0 2  100,0
Siphon  2 0 2  100,0
Total  32 14 18  56,3
 
         
 
 
5.6.2 Discussion 

Canal  capacity  can  indicate  problems  related  to  sediment  deposits,  erosion, 
vegetation, or possibly inadequate capacity of some structures. The discharge ratio 
quantifies the effective functioning of structures in the canal system.  
 
Measurements  made  have  shown  that  the  discharge  ratio  was  0.3.  The  discharge 
ratio is the actual capacity for the selected canal, divided by its designed capacity 
and  the  ideal  one  would  be  1.  This  ratio  varies  between  0.47  and  0.99  in  Adada 
scheme  with  mean  value  of  0.75.  The  value  of  0.3  confirms  that  the  canal  is 
carrying less than half of its design capacity, which confirms that irrigation water 
is not sufficient. 
  
The  effectiveness  of  infrastructure  is  the  number  of  structures  in  good  condition, 
divided by the total number of structures. Poor can be defined as not functioning 
adequately, or at risk of failing. Ideally, this ratio should be one. Surveys made in 
the scheme from June to August showed that this ratio was 0.56, which shows that 
structures were still existing but not functioning adequately or poorly maintained. 
 
 
 
54

Chap 6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

6.1 Conclusions 

The  ability  of  the  irrigation  system  to  supply  water  according  to  the  intended 
supply  has  been  evaluated  using  the  delivery  performance  ratios.  The  results 
obtained  for  the  Biringanya  Irrigation  System  reveal  both  the  inability  of  the 
system to supply the water with respect to the amount of intended water and the 
inability  of  the  system  to  deliver  according  to  the  crop  water  requirement.  The 
values  of  the  indicators  reveal  that  the  overall  performance  of  the  irrigation 
scheme is poor.  
 
a) The  evaluation  using  water  balance  indicators  shows  that,  the  conveyance 
efficiency  is  good  with  a  conveyance  ratio  of  0.7,  however,  the  overall 
consume  ratio  and  application  efficiency  ratio  are  poor  with  value  of  0.47 
and 0.54 respectively. 
 
b) The  maintenance  indicators  are  all  poor  with  the  value  of  0.56  and  0.3  for 
effectiveness of the infrastructure and discharge ratio respectively. 

6.2 Recommendations 

a) It is recommended that a reservoir be constructed to store excess runoff for 
use during water shortage periods.  
 
b) It is also recommended that awareness be created among the farmers within 
the  water  users  association  to  facilitate  their  participation  in  the 
maintenance of the scheme. 
 
55

REFERENCES 
 
Aberra  Y.,  2002.  Problems  of  the  solution:  intervention  into  small‐scale  irrigation  for 
drought proofing in the Mekele Plateau of northern Ethiopia. The Geographical Journal, 
Vol. 170, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 226 –237. 
 
Bos  M.  G.,  1989.  Discharge  measurement  structures.  Publication  20.  International 
Institute for Land Reclamation/ ILRI.Wageningen, the Netherlands. 
 
Bos  M.G.  1997.  Performance  indicators  for  irrigation  and  drainage.  Irrigation  and 
Drainage Systems, 11: 119–137, 1997. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 
 
Bos  M.G,  M.A.  Burton,  and  D.J.  Molden.2005.    Irrigation  and  drainage  performance 
assessment: Practical guidelines, Colombo, Sri Lanka. 
 
Bos  M.  G.,  Wolters  W.,  Drovandi,  A.  and  Morabito  J.  A.  1991.  The  Viejo  Retamo 
secondary canal‐performance evaluation (case study) Mendoza, Argentina. Irrigation and 
Drainage Systems, 5: 77‐88. 
 
CAADP, 2007. Long‐term framework for the implementation of the Comprehensive Africa 
Agriculture Development Program in Rwanda. NEPAD and the Republic of Rwanda. 
Kigali, Rwanda. 
 
Carter R., 1989, NGO casebook on small‐scale irrigation in Africa. AGL Miscellaneous 
papers No. 15. 
 
Casley, D.J. and Kumar K, 1987. Project Monitoring and Evaluation in Agriculture and 
Rural Development Projects. Johns Hopkins University Press. 
 
Clyma,  W.  and  Lowdermilk  M.,  1988.  Improving  the  Management  of  Irrigated 
Agriculture:  a  Methodology  for  Diagnostic  Analysis.  Colorado  State  University,  Fort 
Collins, Colorado. 
 
Dedrick, A.R., Bautista, E., Clyma, W., Levine, D.B., Rish, S.A. and Clemmens, A.J., 
2000. Diagnostic analysis of the Maricopa‐Stanfield Irrigation and Drainage District area. 
Irrigation and Drainage Systems 14, 41–67. 
 
Dessalegn  R.,  1999.  Water  Resource  Management  in  Ethiopia:  Issues  of  Sustainability 
and Participation. Dessalegn Rahmato and FSS. Addis Ababa. 
56

 
ECOTRA,  2005.  Etudes  d’Aménagement  Hydroagricole  et  Protection  des  Bassins 
Versants  pour  les  Marais  de  Rugeramigozi  amont,  Biringanya  et  Kiryango.  Gitarama, 
Rwanda. 
 
FAO,  1986.  Irrigation water management: irrigation water needs (by Brouer c. and
Heibloem M.). Rome, Italy.
 
FAO,  1989.  Guidelines  for  Designing  and  Evaluating  Surface  Irrigation  System: 
Irrigation and Drainage Paper. No. 45. FAO, Rome 
 
FAO,  1992.  Cropwat:  A  Computer  Program  for  Irrigation  Planning  and  Management: 
Irrigation and Drainage Paper. No. 45. FAO, Rome. 
 
FAO, 1997. Irrigation Potential in Africa: A Basin Approach: Land and Water Bulletin 
FAO, Rome. 
 
FAO,  2000.  Benchmarking  for  irrigation  systems:  experiences  and  possibilities,  (by 
Gonzalez F.), Rome, Italy. 
 
Hargreaves  H.George  and  Merkley  P.  Gary,  1998.  Irrigation  Fundamentals,  Water 
Resources Publications, LLC, Colorado. 
 
IPTRID, 2001. Guidelines for Benchmarking Performance in the Irrigation and Drainage 
Sector (Malano H. and Burton M.), Rome, Italy. 
 
Ian  S.  and  Rod  S.  (1999).  Small‐scale  irrigation  design,  Bulletin  42.  WEDC 
Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU. UK 
 
James  L.  G.,  1988.  Principles  of  Farm  Irrigation  System  Design.  John  Wiley  &  Sons, 
Inc. New York. 
 
Jurriens M., Zerihun D., Boonstra, J. and Feyen J. 2001. SURDEV: Surface Irrigation 
Software. Publication 59, ILRI, Wageningen. 
 
Lesley  W.  2002.  Irrigation  Efficiency.  Irrigation  Efficiency  Enhancement  Report  No 
4452/16a, March 2002 Prepared for LandWISE Hawke’s Bay. Lincoln Environment. 
USA. 
57

Kedir  Y.,  2004.  Assessment  of  small  scale  irrigation  using  comparative  performance 
indicators  on  two  selected  schemes  in  upper  awash  river  valley.  Alemaya  Univerity, 
Ethiopia 
 
Lowdermilk, M.K., Clyma, W., Dunn, L.E., Haider, M.T., Laitos, W.R., Nelson, L.J., 
Sunada,  D.K.,  Podmore,  C.A.  and  Podmore,  T.H.  (1983)  Diagnostic  Analysis  of 
Irrigation Systems, Volume 1: Concepts and Methodology. Colorado State University, 
Fort Collins, Colorado. 
 
McCornick  P.G.,  Kamara  A.B.  and  Girma  Tadesse.  2003.  Integrated  water  and  land 
management  research  and  capacity  building  priorities  for  Ethiopia.  Proceedings  of  a 
MoWR/EARO/IWMI/ILRI  international  workshop  held  at  ILRI,  Addis  Ababa, 
Ethiopia,  2–4  December  2002.  IWMI  (International  Water  Management  Institute), 
Colombo, Sri Lanka, and ILRI (International Livestock Research Institute), Nairobi, 
Kenya. 
 
Michael  A.  M.  1997.  Irrigation  Theory  and  Practice.  Evaluating  Land  for  Irrigation 
Commands. Reprinted Edition, Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, India. 
 
MINITERE (Ministry of Water, Land, Natural Resources and Environment), 2004. 
Sectorial Policy on Water and Sanitation. Kigali, Rwanda. 
 
MINAGRI (Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Resources), 2004a. Plan Stratégique 
de Transformation de l’Agriculture au Rwanda. Gestion et Utilisation de l’Eau et des 
Sols (Ngarambe V. & GECAD). Kigali, Rwanda. 
 
MINAGRI (Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Resources), 2004b. Plan Stratégique 
de Transformation de l’Agriculture au Rwanda. Infrastructure et emploi (Mugenga J.), 
Kigali, Rwanda. 
 
Mishra,  R.D.,  M.  Ahmed.  1990.  Manual  on  Irrigation  Agronomy.  Oxford  and  IBH 
Publishing Co. PVT. LTd. New Delhi, Bombay, Calcutta. 
 
Molden  D.  J.,  Sakthivadivel  R.,  Perry  C.  J.,  and  Charlotte  de  Fraiture.  1998. 
Indicators  for  Comparing  Performance  of  Irrigated  Agricultural  Systems.  Research 
Report 20. International Water Management Institute. Colombo, Sri Lanka 
 
Murray‐Rust,  D.  Hammond  and  W.  Bart  Snellen.  1993.  Irrigation  System 
Performance  Assessment  and  Diagnosis.  International  Irrigation  Management 
Institute, Sri Lanka. 
58

 
Nelson D. E., 2002. Performance Indicators for Irrigation canal system managers or water 
users  associations  (updated  version  of a  presentation  at  the  18th  International 
Congress on Irrigation and Drainage, Montreal Canada). 
 
Oad, R. and Mccornick, P.G., 1989. Methodology for assessing the performance of 
irrigated agriculture. ICID Bulletin 38, 42–53. 
 
Oad  R.  and  Sampath  R.  K.  1995.  Performance  measure  for  improving  irrigation 
management. Irrigation and Drainage Systems, 9:357‐370. 
 
Rien  B.,  2000.  ICID  Guidelines  on  Performance  Assessment  (Working  Group  on 
Performance  Indicators  and  Benchmarking,  Report  on  a  Workshop  3  and  4 
August). Rome, Italy. 
 
Roger D. H., Lamm F. R., Mahbub A., Trooien T. P., Clark G. A. Barnes P. L. and 
Kyle  M.  1997.  Efficiencies  and  Water  Losses  of  Irrigation  System.  Irrigation 
Management Series. Kansas. 
 
Samad  Sanaee‐Jahromi,  Herman  Depeweg  and  Jan  Feyen,  2000.  Water  delivery 
performance  in  the  Doroodzan  Irrigation  Scheme,  Iran.  Irrigation  and  Drainage 
Systems 14: 207–222, 2000. (Accepted 4 May 2000). 
 
Small L. E. and M. Svendsen. 1992. A Framework for Assessing Irrigation Performance. 
International  Food  Policy  Research  Institute  Working  Papers  on  Irrigation 
Performance No.1 International Food Policy Research Institute. Washington, D. C. 
 
Sawa P. A. and Karen F., 2002.  Monitoring the Technical and Financial Performance of 
an Irrigation Scheme, Harare, Zimbabwe. 
 
UNWWDR, 2003. Facts and Figures: The different water users. 
 
USBR, 2001. Water measurement manual. 
 
Zerihun  Bekele  and  Ketema  Tilahun,  2006.  On‐farm  performance  evaluation  of 
improved  traditional  small‐scale  irrigation  practices:  A  case  study  from  Dire  Dawa  area, 
Ethiopia: Irrigation and Drainage Systems (2006) 20: 83–98; Springer 2006. 
 
http://www.airninja.com/worldfacts/countries/Rwanda.htm. 
59

  APPENDICES 

A‐A.1 QUESTIONNAIRE 

FARMER’S POINT OF VIEW ON WATER USE, DISTRIBUTION, AND


MAINTENANCE OF IRRIGATION SCHEMES

Date:
Sector:

Land and Crops

1. What types of crops were you used to cultivate before this project?
………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………
2. How many times were you cropping a year?.........................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………
3. Is there increase in cultivable land after the construction of this irrigation project?
Yes No
4. Is the increase in the harvest?
Yes No
a) If Yes what according to you is the main reason?................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………
b) If No what is the main reasons?.................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………
5. How many times are you cultivate per year after the construction of this irrigation
project?
One Two times Three times
a) If One why?....................................................................................................
………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………
b) If Two why?......................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………
c) If three why?.....................................................
………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………
6. What types of crop do you cultivate each season?
a) Season A…………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………….
b) Season B………………………………………………………………….
………………………………………………………………….
c) Season C ………………………………………………………………….
60

………………………………………………………………….

7. Are these crops your own choice?


Yes No
8. If Yes why did you choose to grow it?.....................................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………
9. If No who makes the choice for you?
a) The government
b) The association
c) The donor (NGOs)

10. Are you working in associations?


Yes No
11. If No what are the reasons?...................................................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………
12. If Yes what are the conditions to be approved as a member of an association?
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………
13. What are your interests of working in associations?.................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………
14. How many plots do you have?..................................................................................
15. Who has allocated you your plot(s)?
a) The Government
b) The association
c) The donor (NGOs)
d) My father
16. What are the conditions for allocation a plot?.........................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………
17. Is the way in which plots are allocated fair?
Yes No
18. If No what should be done?......................................................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………

Water distribution and maintenance

19. Apart from irrigation water, which other purposes is this water source used for?
a) Drinking water
b) Usage in earthenware (e.g brick making)
c) Washing
d) Uncontrolled livestock feeding on irrigated crops
61

If any other purpose specify it……………………………………………..


……………………………………………………………………………..
20. Does the use of this stream in livestock watering have any negative (if it is there)
impact to the scheme?
Yes No

If yes what are they?

a) They eat up the irrigated crops


b) They damage irrigation canals
c) They damage irrigation structures
d) They reduce amount of water for irrigation
e) They cause land degradation
Others/specify………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………
21. Do you have any personal water storage facility in your farm?
Yes No
22. If yes where is it located?.........................................................................................
…………………………………………………………………………………........
23. How is the maintenance of the irrigation scheme done?
a) By members of associations
b) By the government
c) Using community work (Umuganda)
d) By donors
Others/ specify ……………………………………………………………..
………………………………………………………………………………

24. Have you ever participated in maintenance of the irrigation scheme?


Yes No
25. If No why?.................................................................................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………
26. If yes how many times a month?...............................................................................
27. Do you use water for supplementary irrigation (During the rainy season)?
Yes No
28. If No why?.................................................................................................................
………………………………………………………………………………………
29. If yes, is the available water sufficient for cultivation during the rainy season?
Yes No
30. Is the available water enough for cultivation during the dry season?
62

Yes No

31. If No what do you think should be done to increase it?............................................


………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………
32. Do you have problems of flooding in this scheme?
Yes No

33. What are you benefiting from these terraces made in the hilly side of this
marshland?................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................
34. What are canals related problems that your crops are facing?
a) Water exceeds in rainy season and causes flooding
b) Some of them are destroyed
c) Some of them do not conduct water to the crops
35. Does water flow reach your plot sufficiently when it is available?
Yes No
36. If No what do you think should be done?.................................................................
……………………………………………………………………………………
37. Do you have any particular wish related to water use and distribution in this
marshland?
Yes No
38. If yes say it…………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………
39. Have you ever had any training on irrigation as farmers in the marshland?
Yes No
40. If yes who trains you?
The government institution
The association
The Donors

a) What subjects did they insist on?.


………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………..
b) What did you benefit from it?............................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………..
41. What do you think your training should emphasized on?................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………

Thank you very much

 
63

Table A.2 Rainfall records  

Meteorological Station of Byimana 1960 – 1990


Geographic coordinates: 29°44’E, 2°11’S
Altitude :1750m
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec P(mm)
1960 112.2 97.6 137.3 273.7 39 1.6 3.5 25.2 52.5 110.2 71.7 45.2 969.7
1961 69.3 121.2 150.9 96.5 99.2 2.1 7 0.8 120.7 144.6 222.2 199.3 1233.8
1962 168.5 31.4 130.4 123.2 199.3 15.5 18.4 93.4 104.4 272.4 124.2 131.1 1412.2
1963 167.4 99.9 80.2 205.7 408.4 47.5 0 43.8 146.7 33.7 110.8 205.9 1550
1964 83.4 162.5 106.5 272 68.7 42.3 66 22.1 44.5 134.8 144.6 70.4 1227.8
1965 87.9 69 102.4 282.9 141 8 0 42.5 103.7 111.5 146.4 48.1 1143.4
1966 30.7 164.5 163 179.8 61.9 22.7 0 100.8 72.2 65.2 136.4 65.2 1062.4
1967 40 63 111.3 169.3 283.6 47.4 24 7.8 130 30.9 143.4 193.9 1244.6
1968 128.1 171.8 213.8 187.8 91.6 67.8 8.8 0.2 36.7 65.4 170.6 96.1 1238.7
1969 88.9 85.7 123.1 131.7 135.4 1.4 0.3 0 65.5 65.3 106.9 44.2 838.4
1970 265.2 152.7 170.9 232 56.3 19.7 17.3 56.2 56.8 103 169.2 64.4 1363.7
1971 103.7 132.3 80.8 193.3 197.6 0 16.8 126.6 51.6 42.9 115.2 121.2 1182
1972 63.3 225.2 68.3 84 103.2 115.5 0 35 52.2 106.9 223.4 83.4 1160.4
1973 85.5 104.2 84 258.9 232.7 4.7 0 38.4 204.8 105.3 189.5 73.1 1379.1
1974 88.5 32.6 276.5 173.3 202.4 105.9 87.9 7.8 84.7 34.5 121.7 55.4 1252.2
1975 136.5 82.6 73.9 231.8 142.7 3.4 52.4 14.6 136.2 151.1 92 160.5 1276.7
1976 84.9 99.6 113.9 118.5 143.6 31.5 0 82.6 90 94.6 74.3 82.5 1016
1977 116.3 87.2 105.4 237.4 98.6 7.2 5.5 66.3 119.3 121.7 161.6 109.2 1235.7
1978 125.2 85.1 237.1 173 127.8 22 0 39.5 37.1 55.4 106.1 106.9 1115.2
1979 210.1 150.3 36.3 186.6 234.7 52.3 0 21.5 5.5 28.8 140.9 129.9 1196.9
1980 81.9 96.9 86.2 204.5 160.1 3.8 0 8.9 153.6 110.4 182.9 122.5 1211.7
1981 62.2 69.7 150.2 186.9 174.2 0.2 0 148.8 107.5 79.7 82.4 77.4 1119.2
1982 68.2 83.3 45.3 247.5 224.6 41.3 0 6.1 89.9 89.1 183.6 240.9 1299.8
1983 12 200.7 131.4 283.7 70.5 3.3 18.6 36.7 46.4 124.7 177.4 151.4 1266.8
1984 78 88 97.5 181.5 26 0.2 65.9 42.2 24.9 171.6 149.1 68.9 993.8
1985 83 126.7 163.7 263.9 65.8 30.6 0 0.2 181.8 116.5 157.9 143.3 1333.4
1986 169.6 155.4 128 412.8 183.6 51.2 0 25.1 43.1 145.5 97.5 130.1 1541.9
1987 153.1 226.6 111.5 190.5 220.7 87.4 0 32.8 167.7 163.3 344.3 80.8 1778.7
1988 70.3 172.3 216.6 218.4 113.1 4.6 0.3 105.4 91.7 97.4 102.9 56.1 1249.1
1989 143.5 160.5 190.5 220.4 153.5 53.9 21.1 57.9 38.9 76.9 65.2 143.4 1325.7
1990 65.9 120.9 191.3 187.2 59.2 0 0 24.4 88.9 90.8 136.5 110.3 1075.4
Average 104.2 120 131.6 206.4 146.8 35.6 21.8 42.3 88.7 101.4 142.3 110 1235
64

Table A.3 Climatic parameters 

BYIMANA meteorological station


Altitude : 1750 m
Coordinate : 29° 44’ E, 2° 08’ S

Month Temp. Relative Wind Sunshine ETP Precip. P. effic. P.eff - ETP
(°C) Moisture Speed Km/h hr/d mens. (mm) (K=0.81) (mm)
(mm)
%
January 19 77 5.6 107.3 105 85 -22.3
February 19.2 78 5.6 92.5 119.9 97.1 4.6
March 19.1 79 5.5 111.2 131.6 106.6 -4.6
April 18.8 82 3.8 96.1 206.4 167.2 71.7
May 18.5 80 5 86.5 145.6 117.9 31.4
June 17.9 68 7.2 91 35.6 28.8 -62.2
July 17.8 61 7 94.7 21.8 17.6 -77.1
August 18.7 59 6.8 111.9 42.3 34.3 -77.6
September 19.1 66 6.4 114.8 88.6 71.8 -43
October 18.9 72 6.1 108.8 101.1 81.9 -26.9
November 18.5 81 5.2 103.4 142.3 115.3 11.9
December 18.5 79 5.5 102 111 89.9 -12.1

YEAR 18.7 73 5-6 1220.2 1251.2 1013.4 -206.8

 
65

 
Table A.4 Calculated discharge from rainfall  

Month P (mm) R (mm) Peff (mm) Vp (m3) Vr (m3) Qr (l/s)


Jan 104,2 22,9 84,4 1012824 222821,3 86,0
Feb 120,0 26,4 97,2 1166400 256608,0 99,0
Mar 131,6 29,0 106,6 1279152 281413,4 108,6
Apr 206,4 45,4 167,2 2006208 441365,8 170,3

May 146,4 32,2 118,6 1423008 313061,8 120,8

Jun 35,6 7,8 28,8 346032 76127,0 29,4


Jul 21,8 4,8 17,7 211896 46617,1 18,0
Aug 42,3 9,3 34,3 411156 90454,3 34,9

Sept 88,7 19,5 71,8 862164 189676,1 73,2

Oct 101,4 22,3 82,1 985608 216833,8 83,7

Nov 142,3 31,3 115,3 1383156 304294,3 117,4

Dec 110,0 24,2 89,1 1069200 235224,0 90,8

 
66

Table A.5 Values of the Crop factor (Kc) for various crops and growth stages  
 
Crop Initial Crop dev. Mid-season Late season
stage stage stage stage
Barley/Oats/Wheat 0.35 0.75 1.15 0.45
Bean, green 0.35 0.70 1.10 0.90
Bean, dry 0.35 0.70 1.10 0.30
Cabbage/Carrot 0.45 0.75 1.05 0.90
Cotton/Flax 0.45 0.75 1.15 0.75
Cucumber/Squash 0.45 0.70 0.90 0.75
Eggplant/Tomato 0.45 0.75 1.15 0.80
Grain/small 0.35 0.75 1.10 0.65
Lentil/Pulses 0.45 0.75 1.10 0.50
Lettuce/Spinach 0.45 0.60 1.00 0.90
Maize, sweet 0.40 0.80 1.15 1.00
Maize, grain 0.40 0.80 1.15 0.70
Melon 0.45 0.75 1.00 0.75
Millet 0.35 0.70 1.10 0.65
Onion, green 0.50 0.70 1.00 1.00
Onion, dry 0.50 0.75 1.05 0.85
Peanut/Groundnut 0.45 0.75 1.05 0.70
Pea, fresh 0.45 0.80 1.15 1.05
Pepper, fresh 0.35 0.70 1.05 0.90
Potato 0.45 0.75 1.15 0.85
Radish 0.45 0.60 0.90 0.90
Sorghum 0.35 0.75 1.10 0.65
Soybean 0.35 0.75 1.10 0.60
Sugar beet 0.45 0.80 1.15 0.80
Sunflower 0.35 0.75 1.15 0.55
Tobacco 0.35 0.75 1.10 0.90

Source: (FAO, 1986)