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Henry Purcell Songs

Henry Purcell Songs

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Henry Purcell Songs

edited by Peter Wishart and Maureen Lehane

CONTENTS

Book one (ISBN 085249323 I) Lord, what is Man

Sweeter than roses

What shall I do to show how much I love her? Since from my dear

Dear pretty youth

Book two (ISBN 085249324 X) Dido's lament

Ah ! how sweet it is to love . From rosy bow'rs

The fatal hour comes on apace

Hark! how all jhings with one sound rejoice

Book three (ISBN 0 85249 383 5)

I attempt from love's sickness to fly Nymphs and shepherds

Evening hymn

Pious Celinda

Oh solitude!

I'll sail upon the dog-star

This ne .... edition of Purcell's songs coincides with the wnhdrawal o{Twenty Favourite Songs and includes many uf the works contained in that volume.

STAINER & BELL LTD

82 High Road, London N2 9 PW

GALAXY MUSIC CORPORATION

131 West 86 Street, New York, NY 10024

© 1976 Stainer & Bell Ltd

'., ~''''i -,~ -;'-: ;;,: '.,

• ..... : J 'J,." ~ _. !!

5 15 20 25 29

9 12 23 28

4 8 12 19 22 30

INTRODUCTION

A publication like this ought to be unnecessary, at this time. If even a third of Purcell's vocal and other works were easily and cheaply obtainable in a respectably accurate edition (like virtually all the keyboard works of Bach have been for many years, put out by various publishers), there would be less reason for dissatisfaction. As it is, very few of Purcell's songs are so available, with an accompaniment which is not only in his harmonic and contrapuntal style but at all imaginative. Usually they are neither. One recent scholarly publication even gives an altered bass in a famous song. Yet there are few English people, and probably fewer foreign musicians who would make the claim for any other composer to be our greatest.

We have chosen for these three books sixteen varied songs which we like, though we certainly do not claim that these are necessarily the greatest. Several we have omitted because the orchestral prelude is such an important part of the song that to play it on the piano would be point*ss, and would take up far too much space. For similar reasons we have omitted those which require ,i chorus. In short, these are songs suitable for recitals; some are very well known, while others will be new to many singers.

THE TEXT

While we believe the texts are accurate and faithful, no attempt has been made to present an Urtext. The texts of most of the songs have been drawn from Orpheus Britannicus and Harmonia Sacra, though we have consulted other sources where there were obscurities.

REALISATION

In most cases all that we have from Purcell is the voice part and a bass, with occasional figures. Sometimes (as in 'Dido's lament' or 'Hark! how all things with one sound rejoice') Purcell has left us some string parts which give us an authentic harmonisation. Elsewhere we have realised the bass using a familiarity with Purcell's style gained over many years of loving study and performance. It might be said here that a sparsely figured bass does not, as some seem to think, give one the opportunity to use a keyboard style, and indeed a harmonic language, derived from twentieth century practice. There is no longer any need for Purcell's basses and harmony to be altered wholesale, even in the name of imaginative performance. The bass and top

,parts impose their style on the rest, just as much as if Purcell had figured them . completely. Those who have a real knowledge of Purcell's style will, no doubt, simplify or complicate as they think fit. Others should leave well alone, as Purcell's style is extremely idiosyncratic and hard to imitate.

KEYS

Original keys are given in the footnotes where they differ from those chosen, which are, on the whole, those which suit our performance. There is even less virtue in

.,

sticking rigidly to Purcell's keys (except where specific instruments are to be used) than in, say, German Lieder; the composers of the latter were not above altering technical awkwardnesses arising out of transposition, which showed that they expected it. Indeed it was an economic necessity for them.

Accidentals which are editorial suggestions are set small in front of the note.

abbreviations have been used; their interpretation given here is rhythmically approximate.

NOTES ON PERFORMANCE

Recitative In Purcell's time this is not like the later recitativo secco. It should be sung so that the pulse is discernible, though the short notes should hardly ever be exactly equal or rigid. This does not mean that a long stretch of recitative should all be in the same tempo, and we have usually suggested desirable changes.

Changes of time These present some problem to the modern performer as the old methods derived from prolation are now forgotten by most musicians. We have therefore suggested tempo relationships, and the performer can choose an overall tempo which feels comfortable.

Breathing Occasional marks are put in where there seems a need. Otherwise breathing should depend, naturally, on the words.

Phrasing and dynamics One of the most important things in the performance of this music is to try to hear where the rhythmic and phrasing accents are. The terms 'first beat' ('Since from my dear', Book one) and 'second beat' music (parts of 'Hark! how all things with one sound rejoice', Book two) are useful. Very often springing rhythm can be obtained by shortening the note previous to the accent (as suggested in 'Sweeter than roses', Book one, in the accompaniment to bars 35 to 39).

Where dynamics are concerned so much depends on the room, the singer, and the individual conception that we have put in a minimum of marks. All such marks, phrasing and speed indications are our suggestions and the performer is free to go his own way with due regard to style. Occasionally, however, some indications are printed in bold roman type, and these distinguish Purcell's own marks.

Dotted notes For much longer than many people realise, a dot after a note signified an unspecified lengthening. No double dot existed in Purcell's day and the use of a triplet mark over two notes of a triolet (actual compound time apart) is so rare that it is almost an impossibility. Therefore considerable freedom is permitted, and the jerky double-dotting often heard in Purcell performance (in the name of correct style) is sometimes not only unmusical but unstylistic to boot. These dotted note runs are, as often as not, a notation in a simple time for triplet groups. The performer must also realise that a dotted crotchet, in a passage containing dotted quavers, will probably need to be lengthened to fit the general rhythm.

Sometimes rhythmic alterations are put above the stave; these, of course, are editorial suggestions.

Written: .....
I~ .... .w- "\
J) J liS II J) I J II Jd r II D Ir II
Performed: :1
14 Jj j J 3 3.!lJ II j1 1m]. II j1ljfJ· II D 18 II Pianoforte and harpsichord Until there is a harpsichord (let alone a chamber organ) in every place where people perform, and a cellist in addition to the harpsichord in rooms of any size at all (particularly remembering that the accompanying harpsichords of Purcell's day had even less bass than most modern instruments, and certainly had no 16' stops), the pianoforte .'will continue to be used as an accompaniment to Purcell's songs. These are piano accompaniments, but can be transferred to the harpsichord or organ easily enough; experience or experiment will guide the player to adapt where necessary. It will sometimes be found that a large modern piano will serve best.if the lid is shut down and the desk placed on top. Held bass notes intended for the organ (e.g. 'Lord, what is man', Book one) which cannot sound long enough on a piano, may have to be repeated.

It is worth reiterating, however, that the two things which Purcell left are the voice and the bass parts, and they should both be heard, so that harpsichord without a bass to match the voice and no cello (viola da gamba or whatever) is an insult to Purcell's art.

Introductions In those songs where there is no introduction (the majority), a simple tonic chord is the best beginning, though sometimes the last line of the song will do.

Sex of singers In Purcell's day people were indifferent to the sex of the singer, and many of Purcell's most passionate men's songs (as far as the words tell us) would have been sung by women or, indeed, boys. So ladies need not feel bashful about performing these.

We hope that experienced professional singers who may use this volume will not be offended by our simple directions for performance. They will surely know that beginners are often frightened off composers like Purcell because they have simply no idea where to start in the interpretation of them.

, They may-however find the collection useful in other ways.

PETER WISHART

MAUREEN LEHANE

Ornamentation This is a difficult question, and on the whole we have not added any ornamentation except in repeated passages. It ought to be said however that the notion of performing music as it stands on the page is a very modern one and certainly would have been thought odd in the late seventeenth century. The following

Frome, Somerset, 1976.

'0

4

I ATTEMPT FROM LOVE'S SICKNESS TO FLY

Sir Robert Howard

Henry Purcell

Allegretto (feel I in a bar)

VOICE

1I_Il ~ ~
tJ
I at - tempt from love's.L, sick - ness to fly
1111 ~ , ---r--
~ ~ ~ -
:
.i-> 5

"'"
tJ
in __ vain, Since I am my - self my own
II II
! ~ '""~ .. ~ , .. __,- -'-- .. .. _,/
_l_ 1""'"""1 -
-- - 10

II
tJ .
fe - ver, since I am my - self my own fe - ver __ and __
11_" ,---- I ~ /"" :::--, ~
tJ __ ~ - r I - I Lr
<::» -~ ..... _./' ,...._ -- Notes The words are apparently serious, but the music belies this and it would not surprise us if the young man was not as passionately in love as he suggests, but indulging in a little seventeenth-century posturing; so do likewise. The essence of the song is elegance and if the odd affectation creeps in, let it.

Sources The Indian Queen and Orpheus Bntannicus: Original key A major.

@COpyright 1976 Stainer &. Bell Ltd

5

II
tJ
pain; No more now, no more now fond ___
_!j_J,l_------ , I____"'--
I tJ -rJ ..... [_... .. "I( _,

...... --.... ~ -...... ..
.__/ ._ 15

_fj__,._
tJ
heart with pride, no more • swell, Thou can'st not_ raise.c.;
II I ======-=- , ,--
tJ r r - U r .~ 1I-
. .. -
:
-- -r: 20

II
tJ
for - ces, thou can'st not_ raise.L, for - ces e - nough to re -
tt_,._ -- ~ ~.
tJ I lIr r 'T - r i+r I
----=- .- .-
:
-- _.. ~- ~ "---~ 25

II ..-- ~
tJt from love's __ sick to
- bel. I at - tempt - ness
_/j_J,l_ ~ ~----===---I _l
tJ r - r
-
-6}- __... ..

6

II J.I -
tJ vain, Since I
fly in __ am my -
" J.I --.... ~ ~I
I tJ __..,[ r _ .. ..:..___:...... #- ..
_l ~
- _;: 30

" J.I - _l""""""i 1"':"':i ~
tJ U
-self my own fe - ver, since 1_ -am_ my - self my_ own_
..l 1-- ~
" J.I _,.,.- ~ 1
tJ .. #- ... 1:61 .. r
:
<, ./ ......_. -~ ... .t ___ T 35

"
-4!,) -
fe - ver_ and_ pain; For love has more_ pow'r, and less
" .. -1 t--- ,
"""iT ,. U ~ _ !'!!' ~~R
_l _ -
- ___ - - - 40

" ,. --
-4!,) than fate, To make us_ seek L, ru - in, ta_
mer - cy
II J.I (--'I 1"""""- <, 1"""----", ~ r::=:-
-4!,) 'L - lV f- "- L_[ J

_.J ..I J
:
-..__../ ____..., .....____ 7

45

II -
tJ . ~ .... .. '"
make_ us_ seek_ ru - in, and_ love those., that.L, hate. I at -
A<I - --- -
) ~ -- .. Ilf l!r ':: ..- ~ i
--..;; -- --::..._:_ .. ,. -77
AJ.I ~ ~ ...I"!!!!!!Oo
tJ '---I - -
- tempt.; from love's.c, sick - ness to fly • in_
A I ..l~1 .> .....
~
tJ ~......._ ,. ___ 1--" ~~r I r

,.......- --..... .
:
, - ____ ........_ --- 50

A
tJ .
vain, Since I am_ my - self_ my_ own_ fe - ver, since

~--.. ___ . ::::::-.., -> ~ _r---
tJ ::: I" .... - I~ $ ... 14 -
- -
:
........__ ___ -- ___ . ~ 55

IlJ.l , ~ I'J
tJ -'~ ----
I ___ am __ my - self my __ own_' _ fe - ver_ and_ pain.
A _l I----- .--;-- 1 I --
tJ I .. ,. .. ~
~.t •. T __ ---- 8

NYMPHS AND SHEPHERDS

Thomas Shadwell

Henry Purcell

Not too quick

VOICE

A -
er - .
Nymphs and shep - herds corne_ a - way, come a - way,
A ".--... ~. --
er 7I Ur r _[ I I", •
pocof -. ~. r-J I
:
'-......_ r I. KEYBOARD

II " ~
tJ -- •
nymphs and shep - herds corne- a - way, come a - way, come,
A ... ~. ...--........ ~ .::-: r::=----.
tJ ; ________ r r .. r r I'
-- ---
:
I -- --- A -
er
come.i, come, comec; a - way, In the groves, in the groves let's sport.i, and
A ----- /'" _ ...... --I ~ I~
tJ L J r r"tt. r I I I 'I Ir~_J 1 I
...__ _,,-- 1.;"'- ~.
- --- ,,--.
:
,,----,J Not.. Try to forget those awful pompty-pom school day versions of this; it's not jolly, it's elegant and poetic. Despite this, you should use a certain amount of staccato, or anyway marcato, for instance on the first syllable or 'away' in bar 6. On the 'now, now' in bars 35 to 37 the basic feeling is of a light legato. Paint that word 'ease'. Purcell has done most of it for you.

Sources The Libertine and Orpheus Britannicus:

(£>Copyright 1976 Stainer &. BcU Ltd

9

II
~ -- • .
play, let's sport_ and play, let's sport_ and play, For
II >I .::::::::=:--.. ./ <, ezr-, .e: ~
~ I 1 I 1 I r T r . X
r:» ---- -. ......---...,_
:
- __ . 15

A...o!. - -
~
this, this is Ao - ra's ho - Ii - day, this is Ao - ra's ho - Ii -
II " '~I ~ ~ ~I
~ ,X ~~ If -~ I '~I
«>: I~' .fL-""__ s>, I~~ ..
: 20

II >I
~
- day, this is Ao - ra's ho - Ii - day; Sa - ered to
II r-""I 1--"" ,;;;;;;:;;----. ·1 I , -; -
~ I r I' T I r ~
-fL~ ------....... - p j_ j_
~. ....... 25

II >I
o
ease and hap - py love, To
II ,- .- ..- -
~ .d ______ 7§ ~ <. .~ r II!· ~ --- .11:.
"hI I I~
:
1 "

10

flJol
~
danc-ing, to rnu - - - sic, to danc - ing, to
flJol ~'I ,::::;;--- . ...---::: -I -I
~ r - r . r ~ .... .. LJ
- ,...--..... -- . -;,;.....
-
_. 30

fl" ,..."._.,.._
~
rnu - - - - sic and to po - et -ry:
fl -I 1 1 ~. ~ -
~ i'-__.."!" - l- r r IIr'
1!T ~---. - -"' :;
:
»<:» ---- -- 35

fl
~ 1
Your flocks may now, now, now, now, now, now, now, now, now,
,.,--
~ - ....... -<, . _/'
-
«-: ~ <, /' <,
:
.....__.....- 40

fl"
~ <J
now se - cure - ly_ rove, Whilst you ex - press, whilst
,., - -- ~I ~.._
~ . 1 -- 1
»> --...... -
: 11

45

1\ " - -
..J -
you ex - press your
1\ _-. --- ---....
~ 1 Ur 1 If r r r t· U 1--- r ~
r
,,---..
:
,---. ---- __ y 1\ " -
..J jol
- Ii -ty. Nymphsand shep - herds
,." --- ~
_...-- -...... - 1 ~
, ~ ~ I I, I ! , ....___.... 7:f . r.
r -
'r--- .-::- . ~....._.,.. -- _.
;
, marcato

50

,., JoI ,.....,
..J .__ .
cornec; a - way, come a - way, nymphs and shep - herds
,., JoI -
e:r T---I 1---1 r ~ r r r r
-- .
-_ 55

1\ -
-eJ'I ....... • .
comec; a - way, come a - way, come, come.L corne.corne., a - way.
1\ - ~--------
I 1 1
..J r r r' r r Ur H
---..... - ----.
_,. .............. _y _/-
<, 12

EVENING HYMN

William Fuller

Henry Purcell

Slow

VOICE

A
·eJ
I'J --- ,...--..
./" -.......
eJ _. _ r I r r T r r
:
~ KEYBOARD

A -
-tJ Now, that the hath
now sun
A ~ -
eJ r U I r _. _. "0". c; r r r
:
<, 5

10

"
eJ
veil'd his __ light, And bid the __ world ___ good -
1\
-eJ u ~....._ ~- ~ ~r J' ~
- -

:
-- ~ , Not.. This and perhaps '0 Solitude', of the whole collection, are the songs which most require pure singing. There is no action, no coloratura. Beautiful, quiet radiant tone - and a few good breathing exercises - are the sole requirements. If the singer prefers, adaptations into triplet movement can be made at various places in the piece, .. indicated above bars 98 and 99.

Source Harmonia SacfrL Original key G major.

o Copyright 1976 Stainer" Bdl Ltd

13

15

A
tJ -night; To the
soft bed, to the soft, __ the
" - - .--- i'--. ./" ~
I eJ ~r 061- l_r___-f _
... -& ...
I : »: --....._
20

A . L
tJ
soft __ bed ___ my bo.- dy I ___ dis -pose, But
1\ - -
tJ _. . ----- ff 41- I' r <.
J~' r
. J ..l
:
-- -.... - ~ ---- I'J 25
tJ where,
where shall my soul __ re - pose? Dear, __
" -
tJ --61- ... .. I r u r r .6J. r
r r r r",
:
- --- fI ..--
-
~H ,
dear God, __ 8 - Yen in thy arms, ev'n __
-
" »: " .>: , ........... , -1""'----
./" <, --
tJ "'" I ... I J/~ r r r I 1/
1 J 1 1 I I 1
<; ~I ~I - 14

30

1\
..
tJ And can there be a - ny so
in_ thy_ arms,
- ~-,. -
II ~J "'""" -, -,.....- I
tJ .......!_ L,r 1 ...
r=>-:
- .e:
:
- ........ / 35

II
tJ se - cu - - ri - ty, can there
sweet
II ~- -, ~I 17--- --
~ ~, ... r 1 ~"J J J/ -- IrJ
- - --
1 '_ ~ --l... 40

fI
tJ -- ""
be a - ny so sweet, so sweet_ se -
-I --.... C"
II ~ --;-.
tJ . - - -.r. J r r

:
......_ /- <z.:» ~ 45

II
tJ ~. ... --
- cu - - ri - ty! Then to thy rest
II ~ -.....---....., ",...-::::: ~
~~J r.r ~ - .. ... ~ - I .... *~T~ ..
............. ~
.i:»> 15

II
tJ - soul!
O __ my
fI -
tJ ~*"~~u.' I~"'~ ...... <c: _.-/ - .. .. _.-/

- o 4 :::--- "-....2__/1 I. I J fI 50 - -
tJ - .r
then to thy rest, 0_ my_ soul! and smg-

II ~ ---.. ___,- -"""'1
~ ~ ..
*~----- F .: r r 1* .. rrr :~ .. r
~
~
I, r J ~ 55

II
tJ - - ing, praise The mer- cy that_
- - -
II »: -........- ....---. - -
~ ~ -
-- GF -- i r ~ "'!
-- 'U'
--=
-= 60

Il .....
tJ f
_ pro - longs thy days.
=-:::c:: 1 f
_/'l_ - - I
t ~ ~ r r r r .... I r .... r I r ~
f
-- I
-----.:_ -----
- c, 16

65

II
tJ ~
Hal _ Ie - lu - jah, hal-Ie-
II -- I • -- ......-=-:--, ~
tJ 1 r I"", ~d <'T
frIf
~ ~ J 1 J .,sI- 1 , .....--..,
:
- .J_...----" - /I
tJ -6 ...
-Iu - - - jah, hal - - - le-Ju -
/I - ---= - 1 -- .--- -
tJ r; r; .. "* .. r;
...-.., ...
:
I___./' -- - --- - 70

/I
tJ Ie -Iu
_jah, hal - - - - - -
/I ..--... I I ~I
tJ -d -'---- or; ..__ ..7 I. l---f
- 75

/I
tJ -6 -6
-jah. Hal- Ie - lu - jah, hal - Ie - lu - - - jah, hal -
/I ,.......---::::- ( .. ::::-.. /---.... ~
tJ =-p~ e f --- r
..... -- ,----t-., 1 ...
I I - - 17

~ 80

/I
.
tJ _. r r
- - - le-Iu - jah, hal - - -
/I I 1 -
tJ r f "z_:__ V "'..__ ~4 ij I~ :d
- /" <,
:
- - 85

/I L
tJ jah.
- - - Ie -Iu -
/I - ......-.- ----
! ~ ~ '! • ,;J -& ~ -&~J.
-u
11
-- --......____:_ ,I /I
tJ Hal - Ie - lu jah, hal Ie Iu jah,
- - - -
11 I~ ~I ~ ---...
~ 1 II "" rJ~ - .. -0'
f ,J
( . - I
,--""I I, A -----I ....... _ ~.

, J

90

/I L
tJ,t hal • " le-
- - - - - -
-
/I _...-;:;::;:::;_...... ~~ ~ ............ _",,_ ---
i tJ -& r I r r f r r !r f F~
.-:...._ __.... 18

95

II --
eJ ..
-Iu - jah, hal - Ie -Iu - jah, hal - Ie - lu - jah, hal - Ie - lu - jah, hal -
_" ........-;: """" .>: ~ »: - ~
eJ~ .... "--' .. ~I
j J
'_../ <, ,.../' ~I I I I
- " l_ etc. 100 •
eJ -
- - - - - -
X ~ Tn .Tn rn etc.
II I ~!""'I .... .... --
eJ I , --- -~. .. • .
)I "
- ~ I I 105

A
eJ ..
- - - le-Iu - - iah, hal - - -
" - =:.- ~ ~
..
eJ ... - - -. - ... IT~~~Y." I - rJ~
~ I I I I ,,--
:
I I --- <, _., . ......._ fI
eJ .. '
- - - - le- lu - - jah!
_Il J~ ~
eJ ~~ ~~ '" Lr'Li #:
---- r-,
~I I. .I ~ . 19

PIOUS CELINDA

William Congreve

Henry Purcell

1'1 Gently
VOICE
eJ ..
Pi - - ous Ce
KEYBOARD ~ ~i
eJ ~
... -

lin - da __ goes__ to __

--

5

l'Ii . -
~ I ,
prayers If 1- but_ ask.L; if_ 1-- but_ ask __ the
/'Ii _l 1 I 1'--"1 ...----...... ~
.--
~ ~ ------- ~I , f r - f ..
r
...--..., .> - -;--....._
:
I -... ~ ... ____..... ~ "-
~ ._,_,.
fa - Your, And yet the ten - der, ten - der fool's_ in __
1'1 ..--:;--... ......--- -
eJ :g: J~l J~ --::.
, , J _hj) _~ b_.J_ • J l
:
- Notes Can't you just see this dallying gallant in hi. quandary: plenty of rueful humour here. Very legato, almost hymnlike, to begin with: but then make those dotted notes in the second half, 'or else had hopes' and 'or I of her', posuively quirklsh.

Source Orpheus Btitannicus: Original key 0 minor.

@)CoPyrighl L 976 Stairn:[ &.1kU Ltd

t,

20

10

I!
tJ -
tears When_ she_ be - lieves.i, when.; she_ be - lieves..; I'!I_
I! ..--.... ~, _-
~
tJ ~ I r' p ,- I r ""_ - r u
"'--"'1
~ ~ 1'- -- "

leave

her.

Would

would

were,

were

II L -

--

-

21

20

Wou'd she

make

-

of me__ a

cou'd,

wou'd she cou'd

1

I!

-

-~

I

..

..

1L
tJ I
saint Or I of her, or I of her a
~ - -
I! ,.._ "..----...,
tJ 1 .- ~ - _["J
~ ~ . ,,---....._ .J-~ .-------:
:
- - - " 15 25
_ILl
tJ f)
free from this_ res - traint, Or else had sin - ner, Wou'd cou'd, wou'd cou'd,
I! ~ ~ -, IJ ! I -, ---- • ---
.s:
! . J-----:r==r-r=r-; r., .. r ¥._____...., ~ ., r __.-Y ~ =-
J: ~ J .~ +--,


- ~.-/ 'iJ. I!
t:I
hopes, or else had hopes to win her:
1'\ czr-: ~ ~ ~
tJ -r r r L 1 I r [ J rj r ~ ..... ~

.~ - -
:
::::::__., ... ~ 1'\ _._
:
tJt •
oh! wou'd I cou'd make.L, of_ her~ a sin - - nero
II I I -: .::::::,. 1--- I.. r-=;~
t · I r ~~I r ~ r r .. ~
........._ j,1_
"--""1 ~ "..._ ~
-~
~I - I
e, 22

OH SOLITUDE!

Katherine Philips

Henry Purcell

Slow

VOICE

II
f)
Oh
II
f) .g- c; '" _-9

- KEYBOARD!

5

II
f) _._. -#-"9- ~
so - Ii - tude! my sweet - - - est choice!
II -- -
f) ?7-=----#- ~~ IT' -#-' ~
:
-----~ ---- .i-> 10

II
f) Oh - Ii - tude! Oh so - Ii-tude!
so - my
II - 1- 1 I -;----. - - -
f) r I 1 ~ r- ;'i "U" r (_Jr
---
:
- ~ --- - Notes As with so many of PurceU's songs you have to be able to breathe properly to sing this one: long, long phrases always just that much longer than they appear at first! The same beauty of tone is required as in the 'Evening Hymn', but whereas the latter is quietly triumphant, here there is an underlying note of deep sadness.

Source Orpheus Bntannicus (first edition). 'A Song on a Ground'. Original key C minor.

@Copyright 1976 Stainer & Bell Ltd

23

II L
f) -
sweet - - - est, sweet - - est choice!
II ,-I -
....- -
eJ l" c; r t "U" ~ l r r.....______....
----
:
0 -- 15

II
eJ .- IT
Pia -ces de - sert - ed __ to the. night. Re - mote from
II L ----.__ ---- --r-- ~ , 1
eJ ~I l' i i ......._ ,
!
.'
, .., »> - 20

II ,
eJ
tu - rnult, and from noise. How ye my rest - - -
/I L J r-'I 1 I 1-----1 I~'
eJ I '1 I -- , 1 r
II
f) , , 4' .. <i'
- - less thoughts de - light' . 011 so - Ii - tude!
II L 1---", ,- - ~
f) r .... 19 r r r r "U" :~ ::--
1-
-==
__::;--- --- ~
. 24

25

1'1
t) -
Oh so - Ii-tude! my sweet - - -
JI .- I I J I I ~
~ J I .i>:
J
..::.....-' --- 30

1'1
t) est, sweet - est choice! Oh Hea-vens! what con-
-
1'1 ~I I~I J--"" ,-
t) ~ ~ ~ -. ~~ 'J ;~ ~~j
.J - j
:
... -- I -----
r I rr

r ~J. Ij.

- tent is mine, To see those trees, which have ap -
1'1 , ----. ~, /- ~, .> -..
t) ~ r f " r r I I I
~ - 35

fJ
tJ OJ- .. ~- .. - -.
-pear'd from the na-ti-vi - ty of time; And which all
II ...---.... I I " I ,~ ~
tJ r ~ r r r
:
- ... -- 25

40

"
tJ re - ver'd, To look
a - ges have to-day as fresh and green, to look to-
II --.... ,- I J""-.... I I I~I I
e) I I I ~r :::: , I r ~ -
'-:'_ ... -- - 1'1
t)
-day as fresh and green, As ... hen their beau-ties first were
" I~I I I I I
t) I I I r r i' D r r r - ..
....
.
:
~ ... 45

II
tJ
seen, Oh! oh how a -
II .- ,---. - r---- ~I ;--.. .--... ~, ,----
tJ .. -.J -.J~ r I r r r r -.J c; --
:
_.;.- ---- ... 50

"
«r • .. .. -.J
- gree - ab -Ie a sight These hang - -ing_ moun-tains do __ ap -
" ~ ..J~ I~
t) r I I I I
:
.--.:- --- , 26

,.,
tJ
- pear, Which th'un- hap - pywouJd ___ in - vite, To fi- rush
,., 1 - .--- ~ -;--. 1- ~
eJ r ~ .. .. r r 1 1 1 1 r
:
~ -- - 55

It
tJ ... CI ... -';1 1
all their sor - - rows here; When their hard,_ their hard
,., -:---... I~I -I >C"""'L - >-------
tJ u 1 r ~[ <, r .I !--r
1
:
... -- l

60

It _...;..;
tJ fate makes them
en - dure, Such.L; woes, such
,., . .----... .- ~ I__--'__
tJ r -.::J" If ~ T ~··U .. <,
-
:
u -- -- 65

,., 1
tJ c; #. u
woes as on - - Iydeath can L, cure.
It ,- -I 1- - I~ -I -I
tJ r 1 1 r: ~J ~J j 1 _I _I III J'J 1
---JJ r: fm - -
:
- u ·1 - 27

70

1\
-tJ Oh! oh how I
so - Ii -
1\ .......--;--.. 1----1 I ,"i""1 -, ,~
e:r 1 I, _L...J......l... ~ ----...T 1--=- " I.....__...I

~ -- ---...!: - l

,.,
""J
- tude a - - dore! Oh! oh __ how I
,., --...___ 1 -I 1 ~ -
"'iT 'I~ I--.J_J_ r -~( r LF "'~
.
, u --- ---..!. 75

1\
tJ
so - - Ii - tude a - dore, That e - le-ment of
,., ,- 1
"'iT ~ ~/ 1
---~------J ,.---- 10 J J. J-
:
u -- ----.!. ---- 80

1\
d -, 4- "7 ..
nob - - lest wit, Where. I have Iearn'd, where I have learn'd A-
,., I J b,.) J r4" I"""T""'I" ---- ,~
"'iT 1 1 1 - - "4- : -,;- 1"0' -
:
- u -- -=:::::::::::: - ..

28

85

" ~
~ -1'
-pol-Io's love, With - out the pains, the pains __ to stu _ dy it:
" ~, ,~ -- -
:
~ , I r r ~. "T.g "0" -9
r--- "I "
:
.., -- - 90

"
-~ ~.
For thy sake I in love am grown, With what thy
1"'--1
" .., - ,----
-
~ ~r r r f ........ ~S I~ i r II U r
:
..... -- "
-~ 1
fan - cy, thy fan -cy does.L, pur - sue; But when I
II 1'-----"--""',
~ E r---r r r r 11'----tlJ I· r l- f
--
- .., -- 95

II
-~
think up-on my own, I hate it, I hate it for __
II I---T ............. "... - .......... ~
) ~ ~r U' r r~/ ~.: ... r r

u ---- - 29

100

II
-~ ""
that_ rea - son too; Be - causeit needs must hin - derme From
II ~, ~ <, ,..-.._ ----. ~ ,~
~ I 1 r T r T 1 1 I r r r <, _r__....----

u i:= - -
- 105

II .....---.....
~
see - ing, from see - ing, and from __ serv- ing thee.
II --;-- , 1 , -,.......
~ __./I - lf --- L r r r ___ "0" r

:
u ----- - - II .- .........
~ Oh - Ii -tude! Oh
so -
II ._..----j I I J ,J~
eJ r r r r I I .J.-.-' '--.l._J_ r r' r r f"

:
- u --- - IlO

II ---...
eJ ,
-- how I so - - Ii - tude a - dore!
II ~ ...--..... ---- -.......
~ ~. - - - 1-...l._J_ r r_r_ _"0"'
--..J I I j J .1 n] - T

- u -- 30

I'LL SAIL UPON THE DOG-STAR

Thomas Durfey

Henry Purcell

Quick

/I
~
I'll sail up-on the dog - star, I'll
/I .. --- ~ <,
~ --., " ... 1~7f~ ~.__..,
f r=:» ,......,
-
:
_. .. .. --- VOICE

~YOOAAD !

5

/I --
~ ..
sail up-on the dog - star And then pur- sue the mom - ing, and then pur-sue.and then pur-sue., the
/I ~r--I3~'~ ~ --------
! . ~7f '!' -:.:___ ... -,J "J ~ br II 7 7 ........ ====
- --- .- """" . ~---....

- --., ~ __ . ,_,.___,. I'Il chase __ thec. moon till it be noon, I'll

-.

-.

Not.. nus song requires a fairly rumbustious treatment with each note marked, but please no extraneous 'h's' in the more florid passages. Coloratura should always be legato except for very special effects.

Sources A Fool's Pretemrenr and Orpheus Brirannicw., Original key C major.

@Copyri8ht 1976 Stainer & Bell Ltd

31

10

till it be noon.But I'Ilmake.I'Il make her., leave. her hom· ing;

______ .

15

/I ~ -
u -.
I'll climb the frost .y moun- tain, I'll climb the frost-y moun - tain And there I'll coin the
II ,--... ~
tJ ~ ! i LJ· .. ~ r" ]1 r' "! .. bf
..:,., --- - ___ ,
:
r:J ~ . II - ~ ~
tJ r -
wea-ther, I'll tear the.rainbow from the sky, I'll tear the.c,
~ c=: ~ >;:::=,; >;--...
II ,.... -
tJ ~ L!f.j 1 U ,- , ~ ~ .
-== ~
....._. -
"*!" ..._.~ '--~ ~ *. r ~ •• "~_;J 20

to - ge - ther.

32

" .. _.. -
eJ -
The stars pluck from theirorbs too, the stars pluck from theirorbs tooAnd
" --... ~ - . __ ,;;;;;;;::; -....... -- ,..--..
eJ I > .." "!' .___.. . ~W r ~ .... ! ... .
- ~ ~
:
- v- - ~ '--,f .......... ~ '--<If '--<1f ~. 25

" .. ..
eJ -
crowd them in my bud-get, And whe-ther I'm a_ roar - -
/I_ r--. .. ~ri~ .~ I J. ~
~ ~.,::.... U* ~ ~ - V
~ ...___...,
.~ . ,,~ ;--...... ~ .;. ~
:
....._-. ing boy,

1'1 L
eJ -
_ let_ all_ the _ na - - tion judge it.
" ......._ I~- I ,......--....._ - ..
eJ ... ~ tJl...J Ll r"~ ~ .. -,;- r ·U""· r
-- .:»:
......-.
:
~ ~ THE ENGLISH SONG SERIES

THOMAS ARNE: Songs for High Voice I THOMAS ARNE: Songs for High Voice II JOHN BLOW: Ten Songs

WILLIAM BOYCE: Ten Songs for High Voice FRANK BRIDGE: Four Songs

GEORGE BUTTERWORTH: Folk Songs from Sussex & other Songs GEORGE BUTTERWORTH: Eleven Songs from 'A Shropshire Lad' SONGS OF THE LlNLEYS

JOHN DOWLAND: Fifty Songs Book I (High Voice) JOHN DOWLAND: Fifty Songs Book I (Low Voice) JOHN DOWLAND: Fifty Songs Book II (High Voice) JOHN DOWLAND: Fifty Songs Book II (Low Voice) EARLY GEORGIAN SONGS I

EARLY GEORGIAN SONGS II

PETER WARLOCK: Thirteen Songs

JOHN ECCLES: Eight Songs

IVOR GURNEY: Ludlow and Teme

IVOR GURNEY: The Western Playland

JAMES HOOK: Eight Songs for High Voice CHARLES ST ANFOiD: Six Songs for Medium Voice STEPHEN STORACE: Seven Songs for High 'V oice FREDERICK DELIUS: Ten Songs

GUSTAV HOLST: Twelve Humbert Wolfe Songs

JOHN IRELAND: The.Land of Lost Content and other Songs JOHN IRELAND: EleverreSongs

NICHOLAS LANIER: Six Songs

HENRY PURCELL: Vocal Duets I

HENRY PURCELL: Vocal Duets II

HENRY PURCELL: Songs I

HENRY PURCELL: Songs II

HENRY PURCELL: Songs III

C. HUBERT PARRY: Seven Songs for High Voice ROMANTIC SONGS I

ROMANTIC SONGS II'

ROMANTIC SONGS nt

SYDNEY CARTER: In the Present Tense I SYDNEY CARTER: In the Present Tense II SYDNEY CARTER: In the Present Tense III SYDNEY CARTER: In the Present Tense IV SYDNEY CARTER: In the Present Tense V

The Songs of TONY BIGGIN and ALEC DAVISON LESLIE EAST: Three Betjeman Songs

BERNARD STEVENS: Four John Donne Songs RESTORATION DUETS Book I

GEOFi'REY BUSH: Eight Songs for Medium Voice FOLK SONGS FOR VOICE AND HARP RESTORATION DUETS Book II

ARTHUR SULLIVAN: Songs Book I

CYRIL B. ROOTHAM: Songs Book I

ARTHUR SULLIVAN: Songs Book II

ERIC THIMAN: Thirteen Songs

ARTHUR SULLIVAN: Songs Book III

MARTIN SHAW: Seven Songs

..

ST AINER & BELL LIMITED

B461 B462 B547 B493 B319 B332 B333 B569 X5A X5B X6A X6B

B459 B460 B060 B463 B502 B501 B494 B526 B510 B161 B030 B320 B040 B448

R4129 4130 B323 B324 B383 B525 B578 B579 B580

25068 25075 25078

B098 B500 B504 B623 B627 B629 B630 B637 B636 B655 B653 B666 B665 B682 B767

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