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CHAPTER 1: WHAT IS THE MANAGERS

JOB?
I. LEVELS OF MANAGEMENT
A. TOP-LEVEL MANAGERS
1. Chief of Staff
2. Chief Commercial Officer
3. Chief Privacy Officer
B. MIDDLE-LEVEL MANAGERS

B. ORGANIZING AND STAFFING


3. Organizer
4. Liaison
5. Staffing Coordinator
6. Resource Allocator
7. Task Delegator
C. LEADING

C. FIRST-LEVEL MANAGERS

8. Figurehead

II. TYPES OF MANAGERS

9. Spokesperson

1. Functional Managers

10. Negotiator

2. General Managers

11. Motivator and Coach

3. Administrators

12. Team Builder

4. Entrepreneurs and SmallBusiness Owners

13. Team Player

5. Team Leaders
III. RESOURCES USED BY MANAGERS
1. Human Resources
2. Financial Resources
3. Physical Resources
4. Information Resources
IV. THE FOUR MANAGERIAL
FUNCTIONS

14. Technical Problem Solver


15. Entrepreneur
D. CONTROLLING
16. Monitor
17. Disturbance Handler
VI. FIVE KEY MANAGERIAL SKILLS
1. Technical Skill
2. Interpersonal Skill

1. Planning

3. Conceptual Skill

2. Organizing and Staffing

4. Diagnostic Skill

3. Leading

5. Political Skill

4. Controlling
V. THE SEVENTEEN MANAGERIAL
ROLES
A. PLANNING
1. Strategic Planner
2. Operational Planner

VII. THE EVOLUTION OF MANAGEMENT


THOUGHT
1. The Classical Approach
a. Scientific Management
b. Administrative
Management
2. The Behavioral Approach

3. Quantitative Approaches

3. Local Assembly and Packaging

4. The Systems Perspective

4. Strategic Alliance and Joint


Ventures

5. The Contingency Approach


6. The Information Technology Approach
and Beyond
CHAPTER 2: CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND
INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
I. TRADE AGREEMENTS AMONG
COUNTRIES
1. The North American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA)
2. The Central American Free Trade
Agreement (CAFTA)
3. The European Union (EU)
4. The World Trade Organization
(WTO)
II. CHALLENGES FACING THE GLOBAL
MANAGERIAL WORKER
1. Developing Global Leadership
Skills
2. Currency Fluctuations
3. Balance of Trade Problems
4. Human Rights Violations,
Corruption, and Violence
5. Culture Shock
6. Differences in Negotiating Style

5. Direct Foreign Investment


6. Global Start-up
IV. SUCCESS FACTORS IN THE GLOBAL
MARKETPLACE
1. Think Globally, Act Locally
2. Recruit and Select Talented
Nationals
3. Hire or Develop Multicultural
Workers
4. Research and Assess Potential
Markets
V. ORGANIZATIONAL PRACTICES TO
ENCOURAGE DIVERSITY
1. Corporate Policies Favoring
Diversity
2. Employee Network Groups
3. Diversity Training
CHAPTER 3: PLANNING ESSENTIALS
I. A GENERAL FRAMEWORK FOR
PLANNING
1. Define the Present Situation
2. Establish Goals and Objectives

7. Piracy of Intellectual Property


Rights and Other Merchandise

3. Analyze the Environment to


Forecast Aids and Barriers to Goals
and Objectives

8. Coping with Dangerous and


Defective Products

4. Develop Action Plans to Reach


Goals and Objectives

III. METHODS OF ENTRY INTO WORLD


MARKETS
1. Exporting
2. Licensing and Franchising

5. Develop Budgets
6. Implement the Plans
7. Control the Plans

II. THE NATURE OF BUSINESS


STRATEGY
1. Strategy involves more than
operational effectiveness
2. Strategy rests on unique activities
3. A sustainable strategic position
requires trade-offs
4. Fit drives both competitive
advantage and sustainability
III. FIVE COMPETITIVE FORCES
1. The power of customers to
affect pricing and reduce profit
margins
2. The power of suppliers to
influence the companys pricing
3. The threat of similar or
substitute products to limit market
freedom and reduce prices and thus
profits
4. The level of existing
competition that affects investment
in marketing and research and thus
erodes profits
5. The threat of new market
entrants to intensify competition and
further affect pricing and profitability
IV. TYPES OF BUSINESS STRATEGIES
A. CORPORATE-LEVEL STRATEGIES
1. Strategic Alliances
2. Diversification of Goods and
Services
3. Sticking to Core Competencies
B. BUSINESS-LEVEL STRATEGIES
1. Product Differentiation
2. Focus
3. Cost Leadership

C. FUNCTIONAL-LEVEL STRATEGIES
1. Find and Retain the Best People
2. High Speed
V. MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES
1. Establishing organizational goals
2. Establishing unit objectives
3. Reviewing group members
proposals
4. Negotiating or agreeing
5. Creating action plans to achieve
objectives
6. Reviewing performance
CHAPTER 4: DECISION MAKING AND
PROBLEM SOLVING
I. STEPS IN PROBLEM SOLVING AND
DECISION MAKING
1. Identify and Diagnose the
Problem
2. Develop Alternative Solutions
3. Evaluate Alternative Solutions
4. Choose One Alternative Solution
5. Implement the Decision
6. Evaluate and Control
II. BOUNDED RATIONALITY AND
INFLUENCES ON DECISION MAKING
1. Intuition
2. Personality and Cognitive
Intelligence
3. Emotional Intelligence
a. Self-awareness
b. Self-management
c. Social awareness

d. Relationship management
4. Quality and Accessibility of
Information
5. Political Considerations
6. Degree of Certainty
7. Crisis and Conflict
8. Procrastination
9. Decision-Making Styles
a. Decisive (one option, less
information)
b. Flexible (many options,
less information)
c. Hierarchic (one option,
more information)
d. Integrative (many options,
more information)
III. CONDITIONS NECESSARY FOR
CREATIVITY
1. Expertise, Creative-Thinking
Skills, and Internal Motivation
2. Environmental Need Plus Conflict
and Tension
3. Encouragement from Others
IV. THE CREATIVE AND INNOVATIVE
ORGANIZATION

V. ORGANIZATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR


IMPROVING CREATIVITY AND
INNOVATION
1. Creativity Training
2. Brainstorming
3. Systematically Gathering Ideas
4. Appropriate Physical
Surroundings
VI. SELF-HELP TECHNIQUES FOR
IMPROVING CREATIVITY
1. Six Specific Creativity-Building
Strategies
2. Play the Roles of Explorer, Artist,
Judge, and Lawyer
3. Engage in Appropriate Physical
Exercise
CHAPTER 5: WORK SCHEDULES AND
JOB DESIGN
I. FOUR MAJOR DIMENSIONS OF JOB
DESIGN
A. TASK CHARACTERISTICS
1. Work-scheduling autonomy
2. Decision-making autonomy
3. Work-methods autonomy
4. Task variety

1. Challenge

5. Task significance

2. Freedom

6. Task identity

3. Resources

7. Feedback from the job

4. Rewards and recognition for


innovative ideas
5. Allocating time for innovative
thinking
6. Building on the ideas of others
7. Greater diversity in groups

B. KNOWLEDGE CHARACTERISTICS
1. Job complexity
2. Information processing
3. Problem solving
4. Skill variety

5. Specialization
C. SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS
1. Social support
2. Initiated interdependence
3. Received interdependence
4. Interaction outside organization
5. Feedback from others
D. CONTEXTUAL CHARACTERISTICS
1. Ergonomics
2. Physical demands
3. Work conditions
4. Equipment use
II. CHARACTERISTICS OF AN ENRICHED
JOB
1. Direct feedback
2. Client relationships
3. New learning
4. Control over method
5. Control over scheduling
6. Unique experience
7. Control over resources
8. Direct communication authority
9. Personal accountability
III. ERGONOMIC PROBLEMS
1. Musculoskeletal Disorders
including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
2. Back Problems
3. Noise Problems
CHAPTER 6: STRUCTURE, CULTURE,
AND CHANGE IN ORGANIZATIONS

I. PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIZATION IN A
BUREAUCRACY
1. Hierarchy of Authority
2. Unity of Command
3. Task Specialization
4. Responsibilities and Job
Description
5. Line and staff functions
II. DEPARTMENTALIZATION
1. Functional Departmentalization
2. Geographic Departmentalization
3. Product-Service
Departmentalization/Customer
Departmentalization
III. MODIFICATIONS OF THE
BUREAUCRATIC ORGANIZATION
1. The Project and Matrix
Organization
2. Flat Structures, Downsizing, and
Outsourcing
3. The Horizontal Structure
(Organization by Team and Process)
4. Informal Structures and
Communication Networks
IV. KEY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE
SELECTION OF AN ORGANIZATION
STRUCTURE
1. Strategy and goals
2. Technology
3. Size
4. Financial condition of the firm
5. Environmental stability
V. DIMENSIONS OF ORGANIZATIONAL
CULTURE

1. Values
2. Relative diversity
3. Resource allocations and rewards
4. Degree of change
5. A sense of ownership
6. Strength of the culture
VI. MANAGING CHANGE/FIVE
COMPONENTS OF THE CONCEPT OF
CHANGE MANAGEMENT
1. [Creating] Change at the
Individual Versus Organizational
Level

2. A Model of the Change Process


(The Unfreezing-ChangingRefreezing Model of Change)
3. Resistance to Change
4. Gaining Support for Change
5. Six Sigma and Planned Change
(Bringing about Planned Change
through Six Sigma)