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Cholla Academy ELA Grade 11 CURRICULUM MAP

Course: ELA Grade 11 (Westland)


UNIT 1 TITLE: Gathering Voices: Literature of Early America (Beginning to 1750) (6 Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to identify the influences of Native American oral tradition in
literature.
2. Students will be able to identify influences of Puritanism and Rationalism in the early
writings of American settlers and Founding Fathers.
3. Students will be able to analyze texts for rhetorical effectiveness and utilize those
rhetorical strategies in their own editorial work.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis.
conventions of standard English grammar and
RL.11.6 Analyze a case in which grasping
usage.
point of view requires distinguishing what is
L.11.1a Apply the understanding that usage
directly stated in a text from what is really
can change over time.
meant.
L11.3 Apply knowledge of language to
RI.11.5 Analyze and evaluate the
understand how language functions in different
effectiveness of the structure on author uses in contexts.
his or her argument.
L.11.3a Vary syntax for effect
RI.11.6 Determine an authors point of view L.11.4a Use context as a clue to the meaning
or purpose in a text.
of a word or phrase.
RI.11.8 Delineate and evaluate the reasoning L.11.5b Analyze nuances in the meaning of
in seminal U.S. texts.
words with similar denotations.
RI.11.9 Analyze 17th, 18th and 19th century
foundational U.S. documents.
W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.
SL.11.4 Present information, findings, and
W.11.1f Use specific rhetorical devices to
supporting evidence.
support assertions.
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
W.11.7 Conduct short as well as more
sustained research projects to answer a
question or solve a problem.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Belief systems can foster radical change within society and within
the individual.
1. What happens when two different belief systems collide?
2. How can belief systems be used as tools of persuasion?
3. Can controversial actions be justified by ones belief system?
4. Whose belief system should dictate the rules of society?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social
influence of a historical period; analyze archetypes, plain style, allusions, the sonnet,
aphorisms, figures of speech, persuasion, parallelism; analyze and compare political
points of view on a topic.
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

Reading Skills: Analyze cultural characteristics, the use of inversion, chronological order;
inferences about a writers beliefs, modes and persuasion; compare main ideas across
texts
Vocabulary Skills: Understand synonyms, prefixes and suffixes, the etymology of words
used in political science and history; use context clues.
Writing Skills: Develop, write, and revise an editorial
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate a persuasive speech
CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience
Onondaga Myth. The Earth on Turtles Back pg. 18
Modoc Myth. When Grizzles Walked Upright pg. 21
Navajo Legend. From The Navajo Origin Legend pg. 26
Iroquois. From The Iroquois Constitution pg. 26
Columbus, Christopher. From Journal of the First Voyages to America. Pg. 60
Edwards, Jonathan. From Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. Pgs. 46-48.
Bradstreet, Anne. Here Follow Some Versus upon the Burning of Our House, July 10,
1666 (handout), To My Dear and Loving Husband. Pg. 96.
Bradford, William. From of Plymouth Plantation. Pg. 76.
Extended Works Choose one:
Miller, Arthur, The Crucible
Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlett letter
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar Nunez. A Journey through Texas pg. 42
Lopez de Cardenas, Garcia. Boulders Taller than the Great Tower of Seville pg. 47
Bradstreet, Anne. Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10,
1666. (handout)
Jean de Crevecoeur, Michel-Guillaume. From Letters from an American Farmer. Pg. 220
Wheatley, Phillis. A Hymn to the Evening, To His Excellency, General Washington.
Pg. 182-184.
De la Cruz, Sor Juana Ines, World, in hounding me Pg. 33.
Paine, Thomas. From The Crisis, No. 1. (handout).
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Editorial Essay and Persuasive Speech
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:
GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Parts of Speech
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Activities
3. Cloze Reading Methods
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

UNIT 2 TITLE: A Nation Is Born (Early National Literature) (1750 - 1800) (3 Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to articulate the influence of Reason and Revolution in society.
2. Students will be able to articulate the conflict between the Puritan and Reason
ideology.
3. Students will be able to cite textual evidence in support of literary analysis.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard conventions of
RL.11.2 Determine two or more themes or
standard English grammar and usage.
central ideas of a text.
L.11.1a Apply the understanding that usage
RL.11.6 Analyze a case in which grasping
can change over time.
point of view requires distinguishing what is
L.11.2 Demonstrate command of the
directly stated in a text from what is really
conventions of standard English
meant.
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
th
RL.11.9 Demonstrate knowledge of 18 ,
writing.
19th, and early 20th century foundational
L.11.3 Apply knowledge of language to
works of American literature.
understand how language functions in
RI.11.4 Determine the meaning of words
different contexts.
and phrases as they are used in a text.
L.11.3a Vary syntax for effect
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively
L.11.5a Interpret figures of speech in
in a range of collaborative discussions.
context.
W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.
W.11.4 Produce clear and coherent writing.
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
W.11.9 Draw evidence from literary or
informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Change is necessary for growth
How do belief systems change as new generations develop their own identities?
How is change a necessary part of our national identity?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social
influence of a historical period; analyze archetypes, plain style, allusions, the sonnet,
aphorisms, figures of speech, persuasion, parallelism; analyze and compare political
points of view on a topic.
Reading Skills: Make predictions and inferences; recognize inverted sentences and
persuasive techniques; monitor reading by identifying main ideas and paraphrasing;
make generalizations about a writers beliefs.
Vocabulary Skills: Use context clues; analyze word analogies, create etymology maps;
understand archaic words; use Latin, Greek, and Anglo-Saxon affixes
Writing Skills: Develop, write, and revise a short story.
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate a persuasive speech
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience


Franklin, Benjamin. From The Autobiography pg. 142
Equiano, Olaudah. From The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano. Pg.
160
Jefferson, Thomas. The Declaration of Independence pg. 170
Wheatley, Phillis. An Hymn to the Evening, To His Excellency, General
Washington pg. 182
Henry, Patrick. Speech in the Virginia Convention pg. 202
Adams, Abigail. Letter to Her Daughter from the New While House pg. 216
Jean de Crevecoeur, Michel-Guillaume. From Letters an American Farmer. Pg. 220
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Franklin, Benjamin. Speech in the Convention pg. 207
Franklin, Benjamin. From Poor Richards Almanack pg. 148
Paine, Thomas. From The Crisis, Number 1 pg. 174
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Response to literature process essay
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:

GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Review Parts of Speech
2. Parts of a Sentence
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Techniques
3. Cloze Reading Methods

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

UNIT 3 TITLE: A Growing Nation (Nineteenth-Century Literature) (1800 - 1870) (3


Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
4. Students will be able to articulate the influence of American Romanticism on the
literature of the period.
5. Students will be able to cite textual evidence in support of literary analysis.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard conventions of
RL.11.2 Determine two or more themes or
standard English grammar and usage.
central ideas of a text.
L.11.1a Apply the understanding that usage
RL.11.6 Analyze a case in which grasping
can change over time.
point of view requires distinguishing what is
L.11.2 Demonstrate command of the
directly stated in a text from what is really
conventions of standard English
meant.
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
RL.11.9 Demonstrate knowledge of 18th,
writing.
th
th
19 , and early 20 century foundational
L.11.3 Apply knowledge of language to
works of American literature.
understand how language functions in
RI.11.4 Determine the meaning of words
different contexts.
and phrases as they are used in a text.
L.11.3a Vary syntax for effect
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively
L.11.5a Interpret figures of speech in
in a range of collaborative discussions.
context.
W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.
W.11.4 Produce clear and coherent writing.
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
W.11.9 Draw evidence from literary or
informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Change is necessary for growth
How do belief systems change as new generations develop their own identities?
How is change a necessary part of our national identity?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social
influence of a historical period; analyze archetypes, plain style, allusions, the sonnet,
aphorisms, figures of speech, persuasion, parallelism; analyze and compare political
points of view on a topic.
Reading Skills: Make predictions and inferences; recognize inverted sentences and
persuasive techniques; monitor reading by identifying main ideas and paraphrasing;
make generalizations about a writers beliefs.
Vocabulary Skills: Use context clues; analyze word analogies, create etymology maps;
understand archaic words; use Latin, Greek, and Anglo-Saxon affixes
Writing Skills: Develop, write, and revise a short story.
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate a persuasive speech
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience


Irving, Washington. The Devil and Tom Walker pg. 258.
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls pg. 275
Bryant, William Cullen. Thanatopsis pg. 275
Holmes, Oliver Wendell. Old Ironsides pg. 280
Emerson, Ralph Waldo. From Self-Reliance pg. 393
Extended Text
Shelly, Mary Wollstonecraft. Frankenstein.
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Irving, Washington, Sleepy Hollow, Rip Van Winkle (Handout)
Whittier, John Greenleaf. From Snowbound. Pg. 282
Emerson, Ralph Waldo. From Nature. Pg. 390
Thoreau, Henry David. From Walden; From Civil Disobedience. Pg. 406/416
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Compare/Contrast Literary Trends
Narration: Reflective Essay
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:

GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Parts of Speech
2. Parts of the Sentence
3. Introduction to Phrases
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Reading Techniques
2. Morphology Activities
3. Cloze Reading Techniques
4. MLA Handbook

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

UNIT 4 TITLE: Early American Poets (Whitman and Dickinson) (4 Weeks)


OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to analyze poetry of the period to determine the way an author
uses language to evoke emotion and/or make a comment on life.
2. Students will be able to articulate what they have learned about poetry in a variety of
expository and narrative forms.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard English grammar and
RL.11.3 Analyze the impact of the authors usage.
choices regarding how to develop and relate
L.11.3 Apply knowledge of language to
elements of a story or drama.
understand how language functions in
RL.11.5 Analyze how an authors choices
different functions in different contexts.
contribute to its overall structure and
L.11.3a Vary syntax for effect.
meaning.
L.11.4(a-d) Determine for clarify the
th
RL.11.9 Demonstrate knowledge of 18 ,
meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning
19th, and early 20th century foundational
words and phrases.
works of American literature.
L.11.5a Interpret figures of speech in
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively
context.
in a range of collaborative discussions.
L.11.5b Analyze nuances in the meaning of
words with similar denotations.
W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.
W.11.2 Write informative/explanatory texts.
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
W.11.7 Conduct short as well as more
sustained research projects to answer a
question or solve a problem.
W.11.10 Write routinely for a variety of
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Life events and society can change a persons perspective
1. How do works of art capture the essence of society?
2. How do the circumstances of an artists life influence his/her work?
3. How does an authors style and word choice affect the purpose, meaning, and tone of
writing?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate genres and traditions in American literature; analyze catalogs
in poems, free verse, symbolism, exact and slant rhyme, tone, irony, paradox; and
compare works from different literary periods.
Reading Skills: Compare and themes across text; compare and contrast poems;
summarize a text.
Vocabulary Skills: Understand multiple-meaning words.
Writing Skills: Develop, write, and revise a reflective essay
Listening and Speaking Skills: Adapt a reflective essay into an oral presentation
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience


Dickinson, Emily. Because I Could not Stop for Death, I Heard a Fly Buzz When
I Died, Theres a Certain Slant of Light, The Brain Is Wider Than the Sky,
There Is Solitude of Space, Water, Is Taught by Thirst pg. 426f.
Whitman, Walt. From Preface to the 1855 Edition of Leaves of Grass; from Song of
Myself, When I heard the Learnd Astronomer, By the Bivouacs Fitful Flame, I
Hear American Singing, A Noiseless Patient Spider. Pg. 440f.
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Emily Dickinson Biography (handout)
Walt Whitman Biography (handout)
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Comparison Essay on two poets/artists
Mini multi-genre memoir
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:

GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Parts of Speech
2. Parts of the Sentence
3. Phrases
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Activities
3. Cloze Reading Activities
4. MLA Handbook

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

UNIT 4 TITLE: Division, Reconciliation, and Expansion: The Age of Realism) (1850-1914)
(5 Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to analyze the social, political, and economic influences of the
Civil War, slavery and American Realism on literature of the period.
2. Students will be able to write and present a historical research paper using multiple
sources of information and digital media.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard English grammar and
RL.11.3 Analyze the impact of the authors usage.
choices regarding how to develop and relate
L.11.2 Demonstrate command of the
elements of story or drama.
conventions of standard English
RI.11.3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
sequence of events.
writing.
RI.11.5 Analyze and evaluate the
L.11.4(a-d) Determine or clarify the
effectiveness of the structure an author uses
meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning
in his or her argument.
words and phrases.
RI.11.6 Determine an authors point of
L.11.5a Interpret figures of speech in
view or purpose in a text.
context.
RI.11.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple
L.11.5b Analyze nuances in the meaning of
sources of information presented in different
words with similar denotations.
media or formats.
SL.11.4 Present information, findings, and
W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.
supporting evidence.
W.11.2 Write informative/explanatory texts.
SL.11.5 Make strategic use of digital
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
media.
needed.
W.11.6 Use technology, including the
Internet, to produce, publish and update.
W.11.7 Conduct short as well as more
sustained research projects to answer a
question or solve a problem.
W.11.8 Gather relevant information from
multiple authoritative print and digital
sources.
W.11.9 Draw evidence from literary or
informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Conflict forces reflection and change
1. How can the horrors of war change a societys character?
2. How can the horror of slavery change and affect national politics?
3. Is human behavior determined by forces beyond the individuals power?
4. Does conflict bring out the best or the worst in people?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical and social
influences of a historical period; analyze metaphor, internal and external conflict, point
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

10

of view, verbal and situational irony, comic devices, satire, naturalism, motivation,
setting, connotations; analyze political points of view on a topic.
Reading Skills: Compare points of view across text; analyze a writers purpose,
authors styles, and historical context; analyze cause and effect.
Vocabulary Skills: Use context clues; identify synonyms and antonyms, and Greek and
Latin roots; understand noun-forming suffixes; analyze analogies.
Writing Skills: Develop, write, and revise a historical research report.
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate an oral research report.
CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience
Crane, Stephen. An Episode of War pg. 486
Copper, George & Foster, Stephen. Willie Has Gone to War pg. 491
Douglass, Fredrick. From My Bondage and My Freedom. Pg. 506.
Brierce, Ambrose. An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge pg. 518
Lincoln, Abraham. Emancipation Proclamation pg. 541.
Chesnut, Mary. From Mary Chesnuts Civil War. Pg. 550
Truth, Sojourner. An Account of an Experience With Discrimination pg. 561
Harte, Bret. The Outcasts of Poker Flat pg. 592.
Goss, Warren Lee. Recollections of a Private pg. 554
Extended Work
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Mark Twain: The American Bard. Pg. 572.
Twain, Mark. From Life on the Mississippi pg. 576; The Notorious Jumping Frog of
Calaveras County. Pg. 581.
Chief Joseph. I Will Fight No More Forever. Pg. 614.
London, Jack. To Build A Fire pg. 620.
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Research: Research Paper
Critique Persuasive Arguments
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:

GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Parts of Speech
2. Parts of a Sentence
3. Phrases
4. Introduction to Clauses and Sentence Structures
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Activities
3. Cloze Reading Methods
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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4. MLA Handbook

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

12

UNIT 5 TITLE: Disillusion, Defiance, and Discontent: The Modern Age (1914-1946) (6
Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to articulate the influence of Modernism on the literature of the
period, and analyze an authors purpose and style.
2. Students will be able to write an essay using precise language to analyze literature
from the Modern Period.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RI.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard English grammar and
RL.11.2 Determine two or more themes or
usage.
central ideas of a text.
L.11.3 Apply knowledge of language to
RL.11.3 Analyze the impact of the authors understand how language functions in
choices regarding how to develop and relate
different contexts.
elements of a story or drama.
L.11.3a Vary syntax for effect.
RL.11.5 Analyze how an authors choices
L.11.4(a-d) Determine or clarify the
contribute to its overall structure and
meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning
meaning.
words and phrases.
RL.11.6 Analyze a case in which grasping
L.11.5a Interpret figures of speech in
point of view requires distinguishing what is
context.
directly stated in a text from what is really
L.11.5b Analyze nuances in the meaning of
meant.
words with similar denotations.
RI.11.6 Determine an authors point of view
or purpose in a text.
W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively
W.11.4 Produce clear and coherent writing.
in a range of collaborative discussions.
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Change affects both the individual and the whole society
1. How did the forces of change in the early 20th century affect American attitudes?
2. How can changing social values impact individuals as well as the community at large?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social
influences of a historical period; analyze dramatic monologue, antihero, archetype,
motivation, stream of consciousness, ambiguity, parody, sonnets, philosophical ideas,
allusion, narrative poetry, blank verse; compare works from different literary periods.
Reading Skills: Identify main ideas and details about a character; analyze syntax, the
use of sound, and punctuation in poetry.
Vocabulary Skills: Understand synonyms and antonyms and Greek and Latin roots;
analyze connotations and analogies.
Writing Skills: Develop, write and revise an analysis of a novel.
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate an oral response to a literary work.
CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience
OBrien, Tim. Ambush pg. 834
Fitzgerald, Scott F. Winter Dreams pg. 742
Wolfe, Thomas. The Far and the Near pg. 784
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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Hemingway, Earnest. In Another Country pg. 809


Anderson, Sherwood. The Corn Planting pg. 815
Welty, Eudora. A Worn Path
Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily pg. 862
Extended Work:
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Porter, Katherine Anne. The Jilting of Granny Weatherall pg. 848.
Steinbeck, John. From The Grapes of Wrath. Pg. 784
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Analytical Essay
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:
GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Parts of Speech
2. Parts of the Sentence
3. Phrases
4. Clauses and Sentence Structure
5. Verb Tenses, Voice, and Mood
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Activities
3. Cloze Reading Techniques
4. MLA Handbook

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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UNIT 6 TITLE: Disillusion, Defiance and Discontent: The Modern Age (Poetry) (1914-1946)
(5 Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to analyze characteristics of subgenres used in poetry.
2. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of subgenres by writing either an
analytical essay or short story.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard English grammar and
RL.11.2 Determine two or more themes or
usage.
central ideas of a text.
L.11.2 Demonstrate command of the
RL.11.3 Analyze the impact of the authors conventions of standard English
choices regarding how to develop and relate
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
elements of a story or drama.
writing.
RL.11.5 Analyze how an authors choices
L.11.5 Demonstrate understanding of
contribute to its overall structure and
figurative language, word relationships, and
meaning.
nuances in word meanings.
RL.11.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of
a story, drama, or poem.
W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively
W.11.3 Write narratives
in a range of collaborative discussions.
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Change can generate additional change
1. How do political, social and economic development shape peoples lives and the whole
of society?
2. How do multiple meanings and multiple worlds reflect the world of a writer?
3. Does reality need to be experienced physically to be fully appreciated?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate traditions in American literature; analyze implied metaphor,
subjective and objective reporting, persuasion, satire, magic realism, dialogue in
nonfiction, personal essay, allusion, poetic devices, figurative language, and
archetypes; analyze and compare political points of view on a topic; compare and
contrast works from different literary periods.
Reading Skills: Analyze an authors credibility, a writers message, historical context;
make inferences about characters; identify main ideas and supporting details; evaluate
an authors argument.
Vocabulary Skills: Understand connotations of synonyms and etymologies of words
used in political science and history; use context clues; recognize synonyms; analyze
word analogies.
Media Skills: Develop, write, and revise a multimedia presentation.
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate an oral recitation of literature.
CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience
Pound, Ezra. A Few Donts, The River-Merchants Wife: A Letter, In A Station of
the Metro. Pg. 727f.
William, William Carols. The Red Wheelbarrow, The Great Figure. Pg. 733f
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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Stevens, Wallace. Of Modern Poetry, Anecdote of the Jar. Pg. 794f.


Sandburg, Carl. Chicago, Grass pg. 840f.
Frost, Robert. Birches, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, Mending Wall,
Out, Out-, The Gift Outright, Acquainted With the Night pg. 882f.
Hughes, Langston. The Negro Speaks of Rivers, I, Too, Dream Variations,
Refugee in America. Pg. 926f.
Cullen, Countee. From The Dark Tower. Pg. 938.
Bontemps, Arna. A Black Man Talks of Reaping pg. 939.
Toomer, Jean. Storm Ending pg. 940.
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Thomas, Dylan. Fern Hill pg. 948
Frost, Robert. The Road Not Taken (handout)
McKay, Claude. The Tropics in New York pg. 932
Cummings, E.E. Old Age Sticks, Anyone Lived in a Pretty How Town. Pg. 774f.
Wolfe, Thomas. The Far and the Near. Pg. 784.
Native American Poetry (handouts)
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Analytical essay / Short story
Research: Multimedia Presentation
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:
GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Parts of Speech
2. Parts of the Sentence
3. Phrases
4. Clauses and Sentence Structure
5. Verb, Tenses, Voice, and Mood
6. Subject-Verb Agreement
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Activities
3. Cloze Reading Methods
4. MLA Handbook
UNIT 7 TITLE: Prosperity and Protest (The Contemporary Period) (1946 - Present) (4
Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to discern authors purpose and point of view based on the
influences of his/her background and circumstances.
2. Students will be able to develop and write and autobiographical narrative using a
variety of techniques to create a clear, cohesive account.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
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RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and


thorough textual evidence to support analysis.
RL.11.6 Analyze a case in which grasping
point of view requires distinguishing what is
directly stated in a text from what is really
meant.
RI.11.5 Analyze and evaluate the
effectiveness of the structure on author uses in
his or her argument.
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively
in a range of collaborative discussions.

L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the


conventions of standard English grammar and
usage.
L.11.2 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
writing.
L11.3 Apply knowledge of language to
understand how language functions in
different contexts.
L.11.5a Interpret figures of speech in
context.
L.11.5b Analyze nuances in the meaning of
words with similar denotations.

W.11.3 Write narratives.


W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Power may be used or abused
1. What lesson should society learn from the past?
2. Should those who abuse their authority and privilege be stripped of their power?
3. How can those who are not born into privilege reach a position of power?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate traditions in American literature; analyze implied metaphor,
subjective and objective reporting, persuasion, satire, magic realism, dialogue in
nonfiction, personal essay, allusion, poetic devices, figurative language, and
archetypes; analyze and compare political points of view on a topic; compare and
contrast works from different literary periods.
Reading Skills: Analyze an authors credibility, a writers message, historical context;
make inferences about characters; identify main ideas and supporting details; evaluate
an authors argument.
Vocabulary Skills: Understand connotations of synonyms and etymologies of words
used in political science and history; use context clues; recognize synonyms; analyze
word analogies.
Media Skills: Develop, write, and revise a multimedia presentation.
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate an oral recitation of literature.
CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience
OConnor, Flannery. The Life You Save May Be Your Own pg. 983
Roethke, Theodore. The Light Comes Brighter. Pg. 1052
Stafford, William. Traveling Through the Dark. Pg. 1053
Momaday, Scott N. From The Names. Pg. 1076
Shihab Nye, Naomi. Mint Snowball. Pg. 1081
Harjo, Joy. Suspended. Pg. 1083
Walker, Alice. Everyday Use Pg. 1090
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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Kingston, Maxine Hong. From The Woman Warrior pg. 1116


SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Safire, William. Onomatopoeia pg. 1146
Frazier, Ian. Coyote v. Acme pg. 1148
McCullers, Carson. LonelinessAn American Malady pg. 1156
Baldwin, James. The Rockpile pg. 1184
Hersy, John. From Hiroshima pg. 1198
Jarrell, Randall. Losses, The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner. Pg. 1210
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Autobiographical narrative
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:
GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Parts of Speech
2. Parts of the Sentence
3. Phrases
4. Clauses and Sentence Structure
5. Verb Tenses, Voice, and Mood
6. Subject-Verb Agreement
7. Using Pronouns Correctly
RESOURCES:
1. MLA Handbook
2. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
3. Morphology Activities
4. Cloze Reading Methods
UNIT 7 TITLE: Contemporary Literature: Fiction, Drama, & Poetry (1939-Present) (5
Weeks)
OBJECTIVES
3. Students will be able to analyze characteristics of subgenres used in poetry, prose,
prose, plays, novels, short stories, essays, and other games.
4. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of subgenres by writing either an
analytical essay or short story.
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard English grammar and
RL.11.2 Determine two or more themes or
usage.
central ideas of a text.
L.11.2 Demonstrate command of the
RL.11.3 Analyze the impact of the authors conventions of standard English
choices regarding how to develop and relate
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
elements of a story or drama.
writing.
RL.11.5 Analyze how an authors choices
L.11.5 Demonstrate understanding of
contribute to its overall structure and
figurative language, word relationships, and
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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meaning.
RL.11.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of
a story, drama, or poem.
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively
in a range of collaborative discussions.

nuances in word meanings.

W.11.1 Write arguments to support claims.


W.11.3 Write narratives
W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
needed.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Change can generate additional change
4. How do political, social and economic development shape peoples lives and the whole
of society?
5. How do multiple meanings and multiple worlds reflect the world of a writer?
6. Does reality need to be experienced physically to be fully appreciated?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Evaluate traditions in American literature; analyze implied metaphor,
subjective and objective reporting, persuasion, satire, magic realism, dialogue in
nonfiction, personal essay, allusion, poetic devices, figurative language, and
archetypes; analyze and compare political points of view on a topic; compare and
contrast works from different literary periods.
Reading Skills: Analyze an authors credibility, a writers message, historical context;
make inferences about characters; identify main ideas and supporting details; evaluate
an authors argument.
Vocabulary Skills: Understand connotations of synonyms and etymologies of words
used in political science and history; use context clues; recognize synonyms; analyze
word analogies.
Media Skills: Develop, write, and revise a multimedia presentation.
Listening and Speaking Skills: Present and evaluate an oral recitation of literature.
CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience
Kennedy, John F. Inaugural Address. Pg. 1228
King, Martin Luther, Jr. From Letter from Birmingham City Jail pg. 1232
McElroy, Colleen. From My Children pg. 1240
Erdrich, Louise. Bidwell, Ghost pg. 1243
Komunyakaa, Yusef. Camouflaging the Chimera. Pg. 1245
Extended Works Choose One:
Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. Pg. 1257
SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men
Hansberry, Lorraine. A Raisin in the Sun
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Analytical essay / Short story
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:

GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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1. Parts of Speech
2. Parts of a Sentence
3. Phrases
4. Clauses and Sentence Structure
5. Verb Tenses, Voice, and Mood
6. Subject-Verb Agreement
7. Using Pronouns Correctly
8. Using Modifiers Correctly
9. Capitalization/Punctuation
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Activities

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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UNIT 8 TITLE: Do I Dare? (Personal Philosophy) (3 Weeks)


OBJECTIVES
1. Students will be able to analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts to identify
beliefs and the influencing factors.
2. Students will be able to reflect on an produce a written personal philosophy
ELA STANDARDS:
LANGUAGE / WRITING FOCUS:
RL.11.1 and RI.11.1 Cite strong and
L.11.1 Demonstrate command of the
thorough textual evidence to support analysis. conventions of standard English grammar
RL.11.2 Determine and analyze two or more and usage.
themes or central ideas of a text.
L.11.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of
RL.11.4 Determine the meaning of words
unknown and multiple-meaning words and
and phrases as they are used in a text.
phrases.
RI.11.3 Analyze and explain how specific
L.11.5 Demonstrate understanding of
individuals, ideas, or events interact and
figurative language, word relationships, and
develop over the course of the text.
nuances in word meanings.
RI.11.6 Determine an authors point of view L.11.6 Acquire and use accurately general
or purpose in a text.
academic and domain-specific words and
RL.11.10 and RI.11.10 By the end of grade phrases.
11, read and comprehend complex grade level
text proficiently.
W.11.3 Write narratives
SL.11.1 Initiate and participate effectively in W.11.5 Develop and strengthen writing as
a range of collaborative discussions.
needed.
W.11.7 Write routinely for a variety of
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S): Your personal philosophy guides your life choices.
1. What influences beliefs?
2. How do beliefs affect thoughts and actions?
3. How do belief systems shape individuals?
4. What is my personal philosophy?
SKILLS:
Literary Skills: Analyze theme; compare universal themes; compare and contrast
themes across genres; analyze characteristics of fiction and non-fiction genres.
Reading Skills: Evaluate the credibility of opposing arguments; generate research
questions and evaluate sources; synthesize information from several sources on a
single topic.
Writing Skills: Develop, write and revise a personal belief statement. Compose a
technical writing portfolio.
Speaking and Listening Skills: present a small presentation about a personal belief
statement.
CORE TEXTS: Prentice Hall Literature: An American Experience
Sacchetti, Maria. Daughter Aims High, Hits Target. https://www.google.com/search?
q=Daughter+Aims+High%2C+Hits+Target&oq=Daughter+Aims+High
%2C+Hits+Target&aqs=chrome.0.69i59.5529j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8;
http://www.sausd.us/cms/lib5/CA01000471/Centricity/Domain/106/Do%20I%20Dare
%20ELA%20Grade%2011-12%20Unit%20of%20Study.pdf;
ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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Eliot, T.S. The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufock. http://edsitement.neh.gov/lessonplan/navigating-modernism-j-alfred-prufrock; http://ed.psu.edu/englishpds/1011/veres/Sample_Lesson_Plans_files/Prufrock%20LP.pdf;


SUGGESTED TEXTS:
Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men
ASSESSMENT / EVIDENCE
Reflective essay
Podcast (if technology available)
Power Point presentation
Weekly reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary quizzes
Cloze reading method activities
ACTIVITIES / LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:

GRAMMAR INTEGRATION:
1. Grammar Final Exam
2. Final Writing Portfolio
RESOURCES:
1. Rhetorical Writing Techniques
2. Morphology Reading Activities

ELA Curriculum Map Grade 11

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