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rampant imperial ipa is brewed by new belgium brewing fort collins co

GET RAMPANT WITH 85 IBUS AND 8.5 ABV


A burly and bitter Imperial IPA, Rampant pours a pure copper and carries the
sheen of a rightly hopped beer. The Mosaic and Calypso hops bring stonefruit
to the front seat, and the addition of Centennials nod towards citrus for a
well-rounded aroma. The taste expands these hops with heavy peach tones
and a profoundly bitter bite. There is some malt sweetness
to stand this beer up, and Rampants finish is bone-dry.
Locate Rampant IPA, join Grand Cru and discover whats
brewing at NewBelgium.com/Hops

Wild Goose Canning hand-builds every


system at our facility in Boulder, Colorado,
using American-made parts. Our custom canning
solutions are tailored to meet each of our customers

individual needs, from our precision


engineering to our on-call, customer care
team. And we do it all with a commitment to
honesty and integrity, Trust your brew to our good hands.

Wild Goose: World Class Canning.


Give us a ring to talk about your craft brew at 720-406-7442.

wildgoosecanning.com

| CONTENTS: AUG/SEPT 2015 |


FEATURES

57

Finders Keepers

In todays craft-brewing culture, the concept


of terroir is growing more and more important. We set out to explore how several craft
brewers in Los Angeles are adding that sense
of place to their beers in unexpected ways.

69

Fresh Hops

Page 69

Each year, brewers have a several-week


window of time in which to brew special
beers that take advantage of flavors not
available to them year-round

70 | Taste the Freshness


Stan Hieronymus shares the three
keys to brewing successfully with
wet hops and the four rules of
hops that you should understand.

74 | The Last Seasonal


Wet hops are a flavorful argument
against having everything, all the
time. Dave Carpenter gets the lowdown on how professional brewers
get the best results with freshly
harvested hops.

79

Pumpkin Season
80 | Pumpkin, Spice, and
Everything Nice

57

80

As pumpkin-flavored beers continue to grow in popularity, brewers experiment with a variety of


ingredients and techniques to make
these most culinary of beers.

84 | Brewing the Perfect


Pumpkin Ale
Mark Pasquinellis quest, now more
than ten years old, to brew the perfect
pumpkin ale has led him to a robust
version that brims with maltiness,
packs tons of pumpkin flavor, and
sports an assertive spice profile.

91 | Pumpkin Beer Reviews


Our blind-tasting panel sampled
through forty-three different beers
brewed with pumpkin and/or
pumpkin-pie spices.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

|3

| CONTENTS |
THE MASH

11 | Stats, Reserve Societies, Beer


Slanging, and Whalez Bro
20 | Homebrew Gear (Sponsored
Content)
TRAVEL

21 | Love Handles
30 | Beercation: Tampa, Florida
COOKING WITH BEER

36 | IPA in the Kitchen


At the height of summer, what better
than an IPA to quench your thirst?
We challenged Chef Christopher
Cina to create a meal prepared with
Americas most popular beer style.

23

47

IN THE CELLAR

42 | Worth the Wait: Vintage Beer


& Food Pairings
Consider these vintage beer and
food pairings the next time youre
thinking of pulling a bottle from
your cellar or splurging on a vintage offering at a restaurant.
BREAKOUT BREWERS: FORAGED BEERS

47 | Scratch Brewing
50 | Earth Eagle Brewings
54 | Plan Bee Farm Brewery
PICK SIX

64 | Patrick Rue, founder of Californias

The Bruery, chooses an international


and intensely flavorful six-pack.

HOMEBREWING

23 | Brew Test: Electric Brew


Systems

50
30

36

72 | Growing Your Own Hops


76 | Wet-Hops Homebrew Recipes
88 | Pumpkin-Beer Homebrew
Recipes
104 | Ask the Experts: Harvesting
Your Homegrown Hops
MORE

108 | Glossary & Techniques


113 | CB&B Marketplace
116 | CB&B Retail Shop Directory
120 | Chill Plate

4|

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine (print ISSN 2334-119X; online ISSN 2334-1203) is published bimonthly in February, April,
June, August, October, and December for $29.99 per year (six issues) by Unfiltered Media Group, LLC at 214 S. College Ave., #3,
Fort Collins, CO 80524; Phone 888.875.8708 x0; customerservice@beerandbrewing.com. Periodical postage paid at Fort Collins,
CO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine, PO Box 681, Stow,
MA 01775. Customer Service: For subscription orders, call 888.875.8708 x0. For subscription orders and address changes contact Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine, PO Box 681, Stow, MA 01775, subscriptions@beerandbrewing.com. Foreign orders must be
paid in U.S. dollars plus postage. The print subscription rate for outside the United States and Canada is $39.99 U.S.

| RECIPES IN THIS ISSUE |

FRESH HOPS RECIPES


Comrade Brewings Fresh Hops Superpower IPA
Page 76

Crazy Mountains Sticky Fingers Harvest Ale


Page 76

Fort Georges Fresh IPA


Page 76

Jacks Abbys Mom & Pops Wet Hops Lager


Page 77

PUMPKIN BEER RECIPES


Perfect Pumpkin Ale
Page 86

Elysians Punkuccino
Page 88

Jolly Pumpkins La Parcela


Page 88

Odells Oh My Gourd Smoked Pumpkin Brown Ale


Page 88

Averys Pump[KY]n
Page 89

Averys Rumpkin
Page 89

Redhooks Out of Your Gourd Pumpkin Porter


Page 89

FORAGED BEER RECIPES


Dead Leaves and Carrots English Bitter
Page 48

Dandeliasion Farmhouse Ale


Page 55

Stan Hieronymus has


been writing about beer
for more than twenty
years, including three
books popular with
homebrewersFor the
Love of Hops, Brew Like
a Monk, and Brewing
With Wheat.

6|

Mark Pasquinelli is a
twenty-year homebrewing veteran and
freelance beer writer.
Hes known as The Brew
Dude in his craft-beer
newspaper column,
and his homebrewing
articles have appeared
in Zymurgy and Brew
Your Own. He lives in
Elysburg, Pennsylvania,
with his very understanding wife, Karol,
and their five cats.

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Emily Hutto is a
Colorado-born travel
writer with an affinity for
fermented beverages.
Shes the author of
Colorados Top Brewers
and a contributor at
many craft-beer and
food-centric publications.
Find her ethnography at
emilyhutto.com.

John Verive is a Southern California native


and freelance writer
dedicated to growing the
craft-beer scene in L.A.
Hes the founder of Beer
of Tomorrow (BeerofTo
morrow.com) and the
editor of Beer Paper
LA (a monthly print
newspaper). He covers
the beer beat for the Los
Angeles Times and is a
Certified Cicerone.

Norman Miller has been


writing the Beer Nut
column and blog for the
MetroWest Daily News in
Framingham, Massachusetts, and the Gatehouse Media family of
newspapers, since 2006.
He has also authored
two books: Boston Beer:
A History of Brewing in
the Hub and Beer Lovers
New England.

Tom Wilmes is a beer


drinker with a writing
habit. He lives in Boulder, Colorado, where
hes the craft-beer
columnist for theDaily
Cameranewspaper and
contributes articles for
numerous publications.
His beer fridge is usually
stocked with a wide variety of local craft brews.

RECIPE PHOTO: MATT GRAVES; CONTRIBUTOR PHOTOS: COURTESY STAN HIERONYMUS; COURTESY MARK PASQUINELLI;
COURTESY EMILY HUTTO; COURTESY JOHN VERIVE; COURTESY NORMAN MILLER; COURTESY TOM WILMES

| CONTRIBUTORS IN THIS ISSUE |

With 127 years of brewing expertise, we know


how to make complex, nuanced beer awards
and medals attest to that. But our will to make
the next batch even better is what were most
proud of. Take our 2014 gold medal winning
Single Malt Scotch Ale we updated it this
year, using bourbon barrels and a reimagined
recipe showcasing the flavors these barrels
impart. Raising the bar... big time.
Because to us, its more than beer...
Its Saranac.

| EDITORS NOTE |

Editorial Director Jamie Bogner


Managing Editor Trish Faubion
Editorial Consigliere Stephen Koenig
Contributing Editors Dave Carpenter, Emily Hutto
Writers Stan Hieronymus, Patrick Dawson,
Tom Wilmes, Norman Miller, Haydn Strauss,
Christopher Cina, John Verive, Mark Pasquinelli
Photographers Matt Graves, Christopher Cina,
Erin Prawoko
Illustrator Brian Devine, Ansis Purins
Tasting Panel Cy Bevenger, Kyle Byerly,
Taylor Caron, Jesse Clark, Neil Fisher, Jester Goldman,
Janna Kregoski, Ted Manahan, Greg Simonds,
Anne Simpson
Brew Lab Advisor Chris Kregoski

Lets start off with an apology. As much as we did not want to


contribute to accelerating the passing of summer and the coming
of fall (i.e., pumpkin-beer season), were constrained by the
unavoidable truth that beer takes time to brew, ferment, and condition. In order to have that pumpkin beer in October, you have to
brew it in August or September, and that means the issue in your
hands now (our August-September issue) is the right place to talk
about it. Forgive us, but there really is no other way.
As an act of penance, weve chosen to augment this issue with a
focus on fresh-hops beers (page 69). Fall is not only about pumpkins,
its also the time of year when Northern-Hemisphere hops farms
harvest those little green cones that make all the difference in the
beer we drink. If youre brewing with fresh hops, Stan Hieronymus
has the tips you need (page 70), and if you were wondering about
the hows and whys of commercially brewing fresh-hops beers, Dave
Carpenter has you covered (page 74).
Our third focus for this issue plays on the growing locavore trend
with a spotlight on foraged and indigenous beer. For much of history,
beer was a local product made with ingredients immediately on hand.
But the growth of agribusiness and efficient transportation has led to
some commodification in beer, where any beer can be brewed anywhere. While we love what this means for consistency and our ability
to get great beer wherever we are in the world, theres still something
to be said for that experience of beer that comes from the place its
made, and we explore that through a focus on three brewers using
foraged ingredients in their beer (page 47) as well as in John Verives
profile of three urban brewers in Los Angeles who forage ingredients
in the most unlikely of urban environs (page 57).
Whether youre pumped for pumpkin-beer season, planning a
fresh-hops brew, or searching for inspired local ingredients, we hope
you enjoy this issue. We made it for you.
John, Jamie & Steve
Cofounders
Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine

Publisher John Bolton


Sales and Marketing Director Mary KinCannon
Sales Manager Alex Johnson
FOR MEDIA SALES INQUIRIES, please call 888.875.8708 x2 or
email advertising@beerandbrewing.com

Retail Sales Manager Rachel Szado


RETAILERS: If you are interested in selling Craft Beer &
Brewing Magazine in your shop or brewery please contact us at
sales@beerandbrewing.com or 888-875-8708 x705.

Digital Media Director Haydn Strauss


Marketing & Social Media Austin Grippin
Find us:
Web: beerandbrewing.com
Twitter: @craftbeerbrew
Facebook: facebook.com/craftbeerandbrewing
Instagram: craftbeerbrew
Pinterest: pinterest.com/craftbeerbrew
Editorial and sales office:
214 S. College Ave, #3, Fort Collins, CO 80524
888.875.8708
Subscription Inquiries:
Craft Beer and Brewing Magazine
PO Box 681, Stow, MA 01775
subscriptions@beerandbrewing.com
888-875-8708 x0
Customer Service:
customerservice@beerandbrewing.com or
888-875-8708 x0
We invite previously unpublished manuscripts and materials,
but Unfiltered Media Group, LLC accepts no responsibility for
unsolicited manuscripts and other materials submitted for
review. The editorial team reserves the right to edit or modify
any material submitted.
Contents copyright 2015 Unfiltered Media Group, LLC, All
rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced
in whole or in part in print or electronically without the written
consent of Unfiltered Media Group, LLC. All items submitted
to Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine become the sole property of
Unfiltered Media Group, LLC. The opinions and claims of the
contributors and advertisers in Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine
are not necessarily those of the Publisher or Unfiltered Media
Group, LLC. Printed in the U.S.A.

Unfiltered
Media Group, LLC
Cofounder & CEO John P. Bolton, Esq.
Unfiltered
Cofounder
& CCO Jamie Bogner
Cofounder
MediaStephen
Group,Koenig
LLC

8|

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

UNFIL
TERED

MEDIA
GROUP, LLC

UNFIL
TERED

MEDIA

PHOTO: MATT GRAVES

Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine is published by:

Introducing a beer
for arborists,
LUMBERJACKS
and ANYONE WHO
LOVES AN IPA.
Piney
Spruce
Distinct Bitterness

Find Pinedrops IPA near you with our


beer Finder at Deschutesbrewery.com

| THE MASH |

Fest-O-Rama

Estimated
Size of Event
Number of Sessions
5,000 PEOPLE
ANCHORAGE, AK

GREAT ALASKA
BEER & BARLEY
WINE FESTIVAL

The start of summer signals certain things in a beer drinkers mind: crisp lagers,
patio drinking, andof coursebeer fests. As the craft-beer drinking audience
continues to grow, so does the number of festivals, but a few have managed to
rise above the crowd and achieve iconic status. Heres a quick visual guide to
some of the most prominent beer festivals and how they stack up in regards to
size, number of sessions, breweries in attendance, and unique beers served.

85,000 PEOPLE
PORTLAND, OR

6,000 PEOPLE

PORTLAND, OR

OREGON BREWERS
FESTIVAL

GREAT TASTE OF
THE MIDWEST

MADISON, WI

AMERICAN CRAFT
BEER FESTIVAL

BOSTON, MA

13,500 PEOPLE
49,000 PEOPLE
DENVER, CO

4,000 PEOPLE

GREAT AMERICAN
BEER FESTIVAL

WASHINGTON D.C.

SAVOR

10,000+ PEOPLE
SAN DIEGO, CA

SAN DEIGO
INTERNATIONAL
BEER FESTIVAL

2,000 PEOPLE
TAMPA, FL

CIGAR CITY BREWING


HUNAHPUS DAY

Breweries Represented
Unique Beers Available
Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine is launching our first beer festival this October in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Participating breweries include Avery Brewing, Jester King,
The Bruery, Crooked Stave Artisan Beer Project, Perennial Artisan Ales, and more. Visit wisconsincraftbeerfestival.com for more information.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 11

| THE MASH |

fill an entire beer festival solely from the


ranks of their members. The highest tier on
their program is the Hoarders Society, but
you wont find much public information
about it, as its an invite-only tier for the
biggest-spending Reserve Society members.
Price: $58.50/quarter (plus shipping) for the
Preservation Society, $300/year for the Reserve Society, $700/year for the Hoarders
Society
Duration: Calendar year
Benefits: Exclusive bottles included, access
to purchase exclusive bottles, discounts on
all purchases, exclusive pours in the tasting
room, merchandise, access to anniversary
festival tickets, shipping within California for
additional cost

As brewers fill increasingly smaller niches in the craft-beer world, one way to
engage consumers and guarantee consistent revenue is to form a membership
club or society. For craft-beer enthusiasts, its a great way to get your hands on
limited or exclusive beers, and for the breweries, its upfront revenue to fund
the expensive art of barrel-aging. Weve assembled a list of our favorite of these
societies so you can start planning your 2016 beer purchases now.
The Bruery Preservation Society,
Reserve Society, Hoarders Society
With the largest brewery membership club
in the United States, The Bruery has created a blueprint that many other breweries
now follow. The program is structured in
three tiers and starts with the Preservation Society, which is an auto-renewing
subscription service where members are
automatically shipped three beers (determined by The Bruery) each quarter. These
quarterly allocations typically include one
highly regarded sour or stoutthink Black

12 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Tuesday or Chocolate Rainand two more


common bottles with it. The next tier is
the Reserve Society, with a $300 price tag
that gets you nine bottles of beers such as
Mocha Wednesday, Barrel-Aged 7 Swans A
Swimming, and Black Tuesday plus exclusive merchandise, discounts on purchases,
and the ability to purchase approximately
twenty exclusive bottle releases throughout
the year. Membership also gets you access
to tickets for The Bruerys anniversary beer
festival, and its a testament to the scale of
their membership program that they could

Price: $150/year
Duration: Flexible, based on bottle-release
schedule
Benefits: Online ordering, 5 exclusive
bottles, glassware, discounts, opportunity to
buy additional bottles, first access to Hunahpus Day tickets
De Garde Brewing Keepers Society
With a cleverly named dig on beer traders
and two different options for those interested in their wild ales or their Berliner
Weisses, De Gardes Keepers Society is a
must for PNW sour beer fans. We profiled
the small Tillamook, Oregon, brewery in
our Fall 2014 issue, and their reputation
continues to fire on all cylinders with a
nonstop succession of highly-sought-after
fruited sours. Each membership includes
eight beers, with two released each quarter.
Price: $155/year for wild ales, $125/year for
Berliner Weisses
Duration: Calendar year
Benefits: 8 exclusive bottles per membership, custom glassware, members-only party

PHOTOS: JAMIE BOGNER

Join The
(Beer) Club

Cigar City El Catador Club


If youre dying to get your hands on tickets
to the yearly Hunahpus Day event, and
five exclusive bottles of such beers as
barrel-aged Marshall Zhukovs Imperial
Stout sound appealing, the $150 per year
membership to Cigar Citys El Catador
Club is a worthwhile investment. Theres
no set end date to the current membership
cycle or hint about the beginning of the
next; it simply ends after the final bottle is
released. Cigar City thankfully puts locals
first with sign-ups for any available spots
on sale in the tasting room, limiting the
number of out-of-state beer hoarders in the
club, so keep an eye out this fall for news of
the next edition of the club.

| THE MASH |
The Rare Barrel Ambassadors of Sour
The brewers at The Rare Barrel started
brewing eleven months before they
opened the door of their taproom because
sour beer takes time in barrels to mature.
With that much investment on the line
and so much beer brewed and aging
patiently, its no wonder theyve launched
a club membership with exclusive bottles
in exchange for an upfront fee. They
make the $300 membership worthwhile
by including ten exclusive bottles (two
each of five different beers) plus the typical lineup of glassware and growlers, and
if youre a California resident its an even
sweeter deal since you can have your
bottles shipped in-state.
Price: $300/year
Duration: Calendar year
Benefits: 10 exclusive bottles, online
ordering of regular releases, discounts,
custom growler, two pieces of glassware,
option to pick up or ship
Fifty Fifty Brewers Intent
Tucked up in the Sierra Nevadas in the
mountain town of Truckee, Fifty Fifty
Brewing is best known for Eclipse BarrelAged Imperial Stout. To build a larger
audience for their creative barrel projects,
they launched the Brewers Intent program
where, for $175 per year, members are
guaranteed six bottles, most exclusive and
not distributed, plus a growler, merchandise, and discounts on additional purchas-

es. Beers available through this program,


such as their Cognac Barrel-aged Masterpiece, make the price a veritable steal.
Price: $175/year
Duration: Calendar year
Benefits: 6 bottles, growler, merchandise,
discounts, access to purchase additional
exclusive bottles
Schramms Mead Mazer Club
If mead is more your speed, Schramms
Mazer Club is the best way to get ahold of
their highly coveted bottles such as Heart
of Darkness and Statement Reserve. No
bottles are included in the $100 membership, but membership does give you
discounts on purchases and the right to
reserve those hot releases before they open
to the public. For the truly hardcore mead
fan, $750 will buy you membership for life.
Price: $100/year first year, $75/year to
renew, $750 for lifetime membership
Duration: Calendar year
Benefits: Guaranteed access to purchase
limited bottles, discounts on purchases,
access to exclusive events tickets
Perennial Artisan Ales Societe du
Chene
Perennials 2015 club was so popular it
required a lottery to decide who could
buy in. Lucky members paid $240 to
receive ten bottles of Perennials sour and
mixed-fermentation barrel-aged beer, a
custom glass, discounts in the tasting
room, and access to a members-only party. As the only way to get bottles of beers
such as their delicious Funky Wit series
(pictured, at left) or their Solera-aged Brett
Pale Anniversaria, the society is worth
the price of admission. While they dont
promise it, the membership details do
mention the possibility of purchasing
spirits-aged beers such as Barrel-Aged
Abraxas, Sump, or 17 if they mature
during the membership period, making
the membership all the more valuable.
Price: $240/year
Duration: Calendar year
Benefits: 10 bottles, custom glass,
discounts, access to exclusive party and
additional bottles
Many of these membership club programs
change from year to year, so watch each
brewerys social media accounts for up-todate information about 2016 programs.
Enrollment for the following year typically
begins each fall, but the details and timelines for each brewerys program are as
diverse as the breweries themselves.

14 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

TRENDING ONLINE

Subscribe and
get access!
Were adding more of our great magazine
content to the beerandbrewing.com website, letting you read and share stories through
social channels. Access to this premium content
is free for subscribers or available separately
for a few dollars per month. Youll also find
great content such as technique articles to
help you make your best beer, unique and
tested original beer recipes, revolutionary
online craft-beer and brewing education,
plus a free eNewsletter that will deliver tips,
techinques, news, and special offers. Here
are a few of the most popular stories on
beerandbrewing.com:
Top Stories
Breakout Brewer: Tree House Brewing
If you want to find some of the best IPAs being
brewed today, head to the Pioneer Valley and
Monson, Massachusetts. When you drink a
Tree House IPA, youll notice that the aroma
flows from the glass as you put your nose to it,
and the flavor bursts when it hits your tongue.
The keyother than the ingredients and the
brewingis freshness, says Head Brewer and
Cofounder Nathan Lanier.
What Makes a Saison a Saison?
Polling craft-beer artisans about what makes a
saison a saison, Emily Hutto received diverse
responsesRyan Greenhagen of Mystic Brewing discussed local ingredients; Jason Yester
of Trinity Brewing showed her paintings by
impressionist artists; Gordon Schuck of Funkwerks elaborated on the aromatic possibilities
of Opal hops; and Chase Healey of Prairie
Artisan Ales talked about the weather. In their
varied approaches to saison, these brewers
demonstrate just how versatile the style is.
Homebrewing Technique
The Great Kegs versus Bottles Showdown
Its often said that carbon dioxide is carbon
dioxide, whether created by yeast in a bottle
or delivered from a tank of high-pressure gas.
Kegging your beer makes it easier to package
and quicker to drink. but maybe you should
consider bottle conditioning certain beers that
you want to age? Check out a completely subjective list of considerations when youre trying
to decide whether to keg or bottle.
Top Recipes
La Cumbre Elevated IPA
Heres the recipe for this 2011 GABF goldmedal IPA (scaled for homebrewing).

| THE MASH |

GEAR TEST

Breathalyzers!

We all love drinking beer, but knowing when to say when is as important as
deciding which bottle to open next. We tested three pocket breathalyzers, each
designed to help you make the right choice.

Alcomate
Revo

BACtrack
Mobile Pro

NOTES: Testers liked


the standalone design
of the Alcomate Revo.
Compared to the
other two units tested,
the Revo is larger
in size but doesnt
require connection to
a smartphone app in
order to function, so if
you drain your phone
battery checking in
beers at the bar, youre
not at risk. Functionally, they found the
Alcomate to be very,
very sensitive to false
high readings if they
recently had a drink
and tested sooner
than recommended,
and the blood alcohol
reading at times
dropped as much as
.05 over the course
of minutes. However,
the second, later reading was very accurate
and confirmed by
results from other
units.

NOTES: Testers liked


the small size of the
BACtrack Mobile
Proit was roughly
2/3 the size of the
Alcomate, but does
require the smartphone app to function. The app itself
is intuitive and easy
to use with no trainingthe unit paired
flawlessly through
Bluetooth with
various phones, and
the app even predicts
the time at which the
user should achieve
complete sobriety.
Test results were very
consistent with the
Alcomate (within
.002) although the
BACtrack showed
less sensitivity to
recent drinks and
tended to give accurate readings more
quickly. For the price,
this unit is very, very
hard to beat.

$99.99

Breathometer
$49.99

NOTES: We cannot recommend the


Breathometer at this time. We purchased
two separate units and attempted to use
them on multiple devices, but the first unit
produced consistently incorrect results (it
registered a .02 on every test no matter how
much the tester had consumed), and the
second unit failed to be recognized by the
app on any smartphone we tried.

PHOTOS: JAMIE BOGNER

$249.95

EDITORS PICKS

Beer
Books!
The cream of the crop of new books
about brewing, beer history, and beer
packaging. Pour yourself a beer and
settle in for a good read.

16 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

OH BEAUTIFUL BEER

THE BEER BIBLE

BY HARVEY SHEPARD, THE COUNTRYMAN PRESS, 2015

BY JEFF ALLWORTH, WORKMAN, 2015

Were big fans of Shepards Oh Beautiful


Beer blog, so when the pre-release preview
of his first book arrived, we took notice. The
book is much like the bloga little bit of context and a lot of eye candybut the slightly
arbitrary organization of the book is quickly
forgiven as designers (and beer collectors)
drink in the gorgeous photos of meticulously
curated beer packaging. Jamie Bogner

Allworth packs a lifetime of beer knowledge


into The Beer Bible, a style-by-style guide to
beer history and contemporary brewing.
What makes the book special, however, is the
deep history and anecdotes from hundreds
of top brewers. Allworth gets his history firsthand from the brewers themselves, giving
readers a clear picture of the spirit behind the
styles. A must-read. Jamie Bogner

| THE MASH |

Whalez, Bro.

By Ansis Purins

BEERSLANGING

Language
for Beer
Geeks
A quick and humorous key to
deciphering the slang terms
thrown around in the world of
Beer Geekdom.

>> Cart

[kahrt], noun
Slang for the basket or vessel used to
cradle and pour sour beers, lambics, etc.
Usually made from wicker, wood, or wire,
the cart is intended to disrupt the yeast in
the bottom of the bottle as little as possible. I wasnt going to pour the entire bottle
at once, so I put it in the cart so it wouldnt
cloud up.

>> Whale Slayer

[weyl sley-er], noun


Slang for a high-end or hand-crafted bottle
opener, typically brought out only on special occasions to open rare or exceptional
beers (whalez). Were bustin out a bottle
of Barrel-Aged Abraxas, so were also
bustin out the whale slayer.

>> Kill Shot

[kil shot], noun


A photo taken of the boneyard or
graveyard that results after a long session
of drinking. During bottle shares, participants often line up the empty bottles in
an impressive display of excess. Photos of
such a line-up are kill shots. I posted my
kill shot from last nights bottle share to
Instagram and got 123 likes! #whalezbro

>> Thoroughbred

[thuhr-oh-bred], noun
A brewery or beer that achieves cult
status within a short time of opening.
While some take years to make an
impact on the scene, thoroughbreds are
immediately noticed and highly sought
after. Dude, did you read that new review
on dontdrinkbeer.com? Oak Theory from
Casey Brewing and Blending is such a
thoroughbred.

>> Waffles

[wof-uh lz] noun, plural


Poorly made Belgian beers. Man, I went
to Brussels for the loons but ended up
drinking a ton of waffles, too.
For many more picayune beer terms,
visit beerandbrewing.com and search for
beerslanging.

18 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

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20 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

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We all love keeping track of
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Todd English The


Bayou
Salt Lake City, Utah
P.U.B.
An unexpected beervana offers
Las Vegas, Nevada

The Beer
Trappe
Lexington, Kentucky

You cant lose at this Vegas gastropub.

This small shop offers great beers and a


neighborly vibe.

FROM LEFT: LINDSAY DAWSON, JAMIE BOGNER, THE BEER TRAPPE

WHAT IT IS: Opening in 2010, Todd English P.U.B. (Public Urban Bar) was the
first, and is still one of the best, places on
the Las Vegas Strip to imbibe top-notch
craft beer. With more than fifty taps to
accompany the menu formulated by the
four-time James Beard Awardwinning
chef, this place is a jackpot in a sea of
macrobrew-only duds.
WHY ITS GREAT: Be it for a bachelor
party, a conference, or a fondness for
losing money, millions of visitors find
themselves on the Las Vegas Strip every
year. Up until a few years ago, a beer geek
would be lucky to score a Fat Tire, but
places such as Todd English have changed
all that. Draft beers are their strong suit,
and there are always four cask options
available. Regular tap standbys such as
St. Bernardus 12, Saison Dupont, and
Firestone Walker Double Jack sit side by
side with more limited releases such as
Ballast Point Grapefruit Sculpin and J.W.
Lees Harvest Ale. Like everything on the
Strip, the beers are pricey (about $13 each),
but you can score a relative bargain during
their two happy hours (3 p.m.6 p.m. and
10 p.m.close) when all drafts are half
price. And its Vegas, so dont forget you
can pop in and take that St. Bernie to go.
Patrick Dawson
Details
Hours: 11 a.m.close MondayFriday, 9:30
a.m.close Saturday & Sunday
Address: 3720 Las Vegas Blvd. S., Las Vegas, NV
Web: toddenglishpub.com

fantastic beers (bottle-only over 3.2 percent ABW!) in Salt Lake City.

WHAT IT IS: Youd never expect 300+


beers in a state with such strict drinking
laws, let alone a beer menu boasting
raresometimes even exoticbeers that
are hard to find in most beer towns. But
at The Bayou, if beer geeks can dream
it, theyve probably got it. Its hardly Salt
Lake Citys best-kept secret given its long
list of best of awards and national media
recognitions, but its cozy, cloistered ambiance makes you feel as if youve spotted a
beer-loving unicorn.
WHY ITS GREAT: Beyond The Bayous
twenty-seven taps (all 3.2 percent ABW or
below) and stellar bottle selection (with
rarities such as Pelican Brewerys Mother
of All Storms), this must-hit bar on State
Street features a Cajun- and Creole-inspired
menu with some seriously unexpected
items. The savory alligator cheesecake
(yes, it is made with alligator sausage)
and gumbolaya (jambalaya smothered in
gumbo) are two surprising and creative
dishes youll never forget. Add weekly live
music by local bands to The Bayous food
and beer offerings for the perfect trifecta
of weekend bliss. Emily Hutto
Details
Hours: 11 a.m.12 a.m. Monday, 11 a.m.1 a.m.
TuesdayFriday, 5 p.m.1 a.m. Saturday, 5
p.m.12 a.m. Sunday
Address: 645 S. State St., Salt Lake City, UT
Web: utahbayou.com

WHAT IT IS: A bottle shop with more


than 500 specialty selections and a small
yet highly curated draft lineup, The Beer
Trappe is the go-to spot for local beer lovers.
Thanks to top ratings and recognition from
national and international press, its also
become a destination for visiting beer geeks
in the five years since opening. Beer-related
travels with his father inspired Owner Brett
Behr to open up shop and also influenced
the dcor, with elements from British pubs,
Belgian beer bars, and California taprooms.
The beer selection leans heavily toward
American craft, with a healthy representation of Belgian and other imports.
WHY ITS GREAT: Lexingtons friendly
Southern vibe extends to The Beer Trappe.
Belly up to the bar and strike up a conversation with a bartender or one of the many
regulars, and youll instantly feel as if youre
at a bottle share with like-minded friends.
The draft selection changes constantly,
with thoughtful descriptions for each beer
updated on the draft list and website. Recent
offerings included North Coasts 2011 Old
Stock Cellar Reserve, Bells The Wild One,
and Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale and
Our Finest Regards from the gypsy brewers
at Pretty Things Beer and Ale Project. Stop
by for Beer School on Sundays when, for
$10, you can enjoy a themed flight with
commentary from a Cicerone-certified
bartender. Tom Wilmes
Details
Hours: 4 p.m.10 p.m. Monday, 11 a.m.12 a.m.
TuesdaySaturday, 1 p.m.10 p.m. Sunday
Address: 811 Euclid Ave., Lexington, KY
Web: thebeertrappe.com
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 21

22 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MATT GRAVES; JAMIE BOGNER; MATT GRAVES (2)

BREW TEST

Electric All-In-One
Brewing Systems
An electric revolution is underway in the brewing world, with small, efficient systems at accessible
price points attracting more and more brewers. How do these competing systems stack up?
We took four systems into our brew lab and put them to the test to help you decide whether an
electric turnkey system is for you. By Jamie Bogner, Haydn Strauss, and Stephen Koenig
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 23

| BREW TEST: ELECTRIC BREWING SYSTEMS |

The Grainfather
An all-in-one electric homebrew system with a surprisingly deep feature set
(recirculating mash), moderate power requirements (runs on standard 120v
household current), and an integrated control system to maintain temperatures, all at a very aggressive price point.
Test lab notes
PROS: The Grainfather is compact, easy to

use, and thanks to the built-in pump and


recirculating mash provides the ability to
brew all-grain recipes almost as convincingly as a system with dedicated vessels.
The temperature and pump controller are
simple and straightforward making it easy
to set your temperature and walk away,
but the system still requires hands-on participation in the brewing process making
you feel as if you are actually brewing and
not just pushing buttons. The included
counterflow wort chiller is very effective
at dropping the wort temperature quickly
as long as your tap water is cool enough.
While we have 240 volt, 50 amp power in
our brew lab to power our custom-built
electic test system, we didnt need it for
the Grainfatherit uses standard 120 volt
household power.
CONS: If youre looking for a bombproof
system, this is not quite it. The fit and
finish reminded us of a 30-cup coffee
percolator with relatively thin walls and
less expensive fittings (which is understandable at this price point). While
we didnt encounter any issues as a
result of this, if youre hard on your
equipment, its a consideration. In use,
we experienced significant temperature
fluctuation as a result of the on/off
heating element (more sophisticated
systems use variable power elements).
Some water and wort have the potential
to overheat until the recirculation pump
kicks in, and the unit will overshoot your
temperature goal before settling back.
An upgrade for the next version of this
system would be a smarter temperature
controller that could compensate for
this and cycle the element on and off

in a more predictive way. In addition, wed


love to see slightly more intuitive controls
on the temperature controllerwhen we
set it to boil, it completely ignored the
actual temperature we set.
We chose to brew a test recipe with a
large grain bill as well as flaked corn and
flaked wheat and did have to monitor the
pump closely to clear out clogs as they
occurred. For more reasonable recipes
this should not be an issue.
As with all units that use exposed
heating elements directly below the grain
bed, there is some risk of scorching while
you mash. We didnt note any off flavors
from this in our finished brew, but it is
something to be aware of.
This unit took the longest to hit strike temp
of all the units we tested (about an hour).

Additional gear youll need


If you need to add heated sparge water to
hit your gravity, youll need a pot and stove
to heat it. You also need hoses to attach to
the water inlet and outlet of the counterflow
chiller, so youll need a brewing space that
gives you access to a sink with a threaded
faucet. A fermentor is not included with the
system, but the company does sell a stainless steel fermentor for use with the system.

Verdict
The Grainfather is ideal for price-conscious
folks who live in apartments or small
homes and need an inexpensive all-in-one
system thats capable of brewing indoors.
If youre not into tinkering, the Grainfather
is a great choice, since it requires minimal
assembly and no knowledge of electrical
wiring. Hardcore DIYers may not be as excited with the unit since the all-in-one system takes some of the work out of brewing.
But if youre also interested in distilling, the
alembic pot still attachment makes this unit
more attractive. There is no other product
competitive at this low price point, and we
found the Grainfather to be a good value for
the price.

Price
$890 for the basic unit and wort chiller.
$359 for alembic pot still attachment.

24 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

LEFT: JAMIE BOGNER; OPPOSITE: MATT GRAVES

The Grainfather is
ideal for priceconscious folks who
live in apartments
or small homes and
need an inexpensive
all-in-one system
thats capable of
brewing indoors.

Brew Boss
An electric brewing system with app-based control, modular add-ons to
allow further automation, and a burly power unit that pushes two separate
heating elements allowing it to plug in to standard home outlets.

Test lab notes


PROS: We tested the 120v system with two

heating elements that require separate


circuits for each element. If you dont have
accessible 240v power, this dual-element
approach gives you more power and heat
to achieve strike temp and boil faster. The
electrical control unit is built tough with a
tough plastic casing and large heat sink. The
system ships with a standard 7-inch Android
tablet and custom software to control each
element in the system (heating elements,
recirculating pump, and additional modular
elements). This software was easy to use
and relatively intuitive, with convenient voice
prompts at various stages of the brewing
process.
We found setup to be very easy and had the
entire system assembled in about ten minutes. The system is very compact and stores
in a very small footprint. The included pump
is very powerful and performed flawlessly.
CONS: The Brew Boss system as a whole
lacks the same level of integration and polish as some of the other systems we tested
and feels like what it isstock parts repurposed into a complete system. This value
unit is limited to brew-in-a-bag (BIAB)
brewing only, although more expensive
units have a recirculating infusion mash
system that employs a straining container
inside the kettle to hold the grains.
Out of the box, the temperature sensor
jack required remounting (it was not
sturdy enough to withstand shipping), but
once remounted, it worked correctly.
We noticed small issues with temperature calibration while using the systemthe temperature gauge consistently
read 8F (4C) higher than the two other
thermometers we checked it against.

The Android app is a smart way to automate the brewing process, but the interface
for the app feels like a 90s website and could
benefit from a more modern UI design. In
addition, some testers found it difficult to
use a water-sensitive device while brewing.

Additional gear youll need


A wort chiller is sold separately, as is fermentation equipment.

Verdict
If you live in a small space, and the batch
size of the other integrated systems isnt
large enough for you, the Brew Boss offers
a 10-gallon kettle for not much more than
competing systems 5-gallon capacity.
But the BIAB system is limiting, and the
upgrade to their COFI mash system puts
the system into a higher pricing tier.

If you live in a small


space, and the batch
size of the other integrated systems isnt
large enough for you,
the Brew Boss offers
a 10-gallon kettle for
not much more than
competing systems
5-gallon capacity.

Price
$1,299 as tested.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 25

| BREW TEST: ELECTRIC BREWING SYSTEMS |

Blichmann Brew Easy


The Rolls-Royce of turnkey electric brew systems offers tight integration,
sophisticated polish, the best electric element in the business, and modular
upgrade ability for a price.

The Brew Easy is


ideal for qualityminded brewers
who want the ease
of use of a two pot
system without
sacrificing the beer
quality of a RIMS
system.

Test lab notes


PROS: With the best fit and finish of any

of the systems we tested, Blichmann lives


up to its reputation for quality with the
Brew Easy system. While its available in
different sizes, we tested the 5-gallon version with a 240v BoilCoil electric heating
element. That heating element clearly
requires more power than the competing
systems and would at minimum require
most home users to purchase a 240v extension cord, but the benefit of that power
was immediately apparentthe system
reached strike temp twice as fast as the
next fastest system. In addition, the stacked
coil design of the heating element created a
natural convection current in the kettle.
A primary differentiating factor to Blichmann system is just how upgradeable it
is. If you decide to move from a 5-gallon to
a 15-gallon system, the same 240v Tower of
Power electric controller can operate both.
Same with the included KettleCart.

When it comes to electric operation,


Blichmann has considered safety with the
low-level float switch that shuts down the
BoilCoil if its at risk of running dry.
In addition, the auto-sparge system is
well-thought-out with a floating stainless ball
that closes the inlet valve when it reaches a
certain point, so as not to overflow the pot.
Finally, as homebrewers, we appreciate
systems that feel like were homebrewing,
and not simply operating a home appliance. The Brew Easy strikes a nice balance
between automation and participation,
and lets you feel as if youre brewing despite the convenience of automation.
CONS: The Brew Easy system was significantly more difficult than the other systems
to set up. The build took us about an hour
and a half, and at one point involved wiring
the pump into the power box. The modular
nature of the system, while convenient for
potential upgraders, is also a drawback in
that there is not a single setup guide as
with other systemsit does require knowledge on the part of the user and could be
intimidating for less experienced users.
The modified RIMS system works well
and produced clear wort, but the location
of the temperature gauge in the pump
means that it must be running to get a
temperature reading.

Additional gear youll need


A wort chiller. While Blichmann provided
us with a Therminator wort chiller, its not
included in the standard turnkey package.
When testing, our immediate thought was
that we should have opted for a 10-gallon
system instead of the 5-gallon. For only 10
percent greater cost, the same power circuit
requirement, and a marginal difference in
size, we would double the amount of beer
we could brew in a single batch, and $2,000
is a bit more than we would budget for a
5-gallon system. This system is ideal for
quality-minded brewers who have some
experience brewing all-grain but want the
ease of use of a two pot system without sacrificing the beer quality of a RIMS system.

Price
$2,025 for the turnkey 5-gallon system.
$199 for the Therminator wort chiller.

26 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

LEFT: JAMIE BOGNER; OPPOSITE: MATT GRAVES

Verdict

Picobrew Zymatic
Could brewing beer be as simple as operating a microwave? The Picobrew
Zymatic aims to simplify and automate the brewing and cleanup process,
and (surprisingly?), it makes great beer.

Test lab notes


PROS: This 120v system heats very rapidly

compared to other 120v systems, achieving a


56F (31C) temperature gain in 30 minutes.
The system is, by far, the easiest turnkey
homebrew system weve tested, requiring
less than 15 minutes to start brewing and
not requiring any further action or attention
until its time to chill the wort.
Because the hot side brewing all happens in a closed-loop environment, repeatability is much easier to attain, and there
are no variables to manually control.
The system makes it easy to keep brew
logs, and recipes can be automatically
loaded into the unit from the welldesigned web interface, making sharing
or tweaking very straightforward.
Elaborate mash regimens can be automated with up to fifteen different mash steps.
Compared to most homebrew systems,
clean-up is a breezethe plastic trays
disassemble and can be washed in a
dishwasher.
The systems clever use of the external
multi-use keg (the same keg can be used
for brewing, fermentation, carbonation, and
consumption) is highly efficient and minimizes additional equipment purchases. This
is the most compact system weve tested.

CONS: Batch size is the biggest drawback as


the system can handle less than 5 gallons
of starting water and yields typical batches
of 2.5 gallons. In addition, those who enjoy
the hands-on process of brewing may not
enjoy the fully-automated nature of the
Zymatic.
Finally, the price is a significant barrier
to entry for a unit that produces such
small batches.

Additional gear youll need


A second ball lock keg to move the beer off
the yeast for carbonation and serving. A
cooling bucket to place the keg into for the
chilling cycle.

The Zymatic is
perfect for brewers
focused on dialing in
recipes, where
volume isnt a
concern but time and
attention are. If you
have no romantic
feelings about cleaning out a mash tun,
the Zymatic is a good
(albeit pricey) option.

Verdict
We were skeptical of the Zymatic going into
the test, but found it easy to brew very good
beer. The Zymatic is perfect for brewers
focused on dialing in recipes, where volume
isnt a concern but time and attention are.
If youre more focused on the end product
than the process and have no romantic
feelings about cleaning out a mash tun, the
Zymatic is a good (albeit pricey) option.

Price
$1,999 as tested.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 27

| BREW TEST: ELECTRIC BREWING SYSTEMS |

Final Thoughts
Anyone moving
from a single-burner
propane system and
insulated-cooler
mash tun will likely
see improvements
in wort clarity,
mash temperature
consistency, and
general efficiency.
In addition, these
systems offer
convenience and
ergonomic benefits
they can be used
safely indoors and
are much quieter
than propane-based
systems.

For our testers, it was challenging


to brew on these one- and two- vessel
systems after growing accustomed to
brewing on three-vessel systems with
a separate HLT. While we dont recommend these electric turnkey systems
for more experienced all-grain brewers,
anyone moving from a single-burner propane system and insulated-cooler mash
tun will likely see improvements in wort
clarity, mash temperature consistency,
and general efficiency. In addition, these
systems offer convenience and ergonomic
benefitsthey can be used safely indoors
and are much quieter than propane-based
systems.
With an investment of this scale, the
ability to upgrade is a typical consideration
for many buyers. Although the fullyintegrated Picobrew is not upgradeable
(by design), the Grainfathers temperature
and pump controller modular nature
leaves the potential for upgrades in the future (wed love to see a digital integration
component for this system that allows
more precise control). The Brew Boss
system was slightly less upgradeable than
we initially hopedthe app is designed
for a specific workflow, and the single
temperature sensor input limited our
ability to expand the systembut the 240v
system with 15-gallon kettle is available
and less expensive than the 120v system
with 10-gallon kettle. If you foresee a need
to increase your batch size in the future,

consider buying the larger version at the


outset and save money on the system at
the same time.
The Blichmann Brew Easy is, by far, the
most upgradeable of the systems we tested. Adding a dedicated HLT or boil kettle
is as simple as purchasing the new vessel
and the Tower of Power controller to control it. Adding a dedicated RIMS system
is equally simple. Moving to larger kettles
can pose an issue since the Boil Coil
elements are sized for specific kettles, so
again it pays to predict your future needs
when investing in your brewing gear.
When choosing a system, consider your
available power supply. If its possible to
use 240v power, we highly recommend it
time is the one resource we do not have in
great supply, and hitting strike temp in half
the time it takes a 120v system to reach it
is worth the hassle of having an electrician
install the larger circuit.
Finally, consider your intended use. While
a system such as the Picobrew might not
offer the extensibility of other systems, its
set-and-forget simplicity makes it a compelling choice even for commercial brewers
who might want to test recipes but lack the
time to brew a dozen separate test batches.
No matter which system you choose,
these electric all-in-one systems are an
impressive step forward for the craft
of homebrewing and offer significant
improvements in ease-of-use over more
traditional propane systems.

Is a Turnkey System
not Enough?
If its not clear already, were big fans of electric brewing. Our in-house test
brewery is an all-electric system built and wired from scratch with 15.5gallon keggles by test lab advisor (and electrical engineer) Chris Kregoski.
But not everyone is comfortable working with complex wiring schematics, so weve found several resources very helpful in building individual
systems.
The first is BrewPi (brewpi.com), a favorite of Digital Media Director
Haydn Strauss. He uses the BrewPi Spark controller as the digital brain
behind his home electric brewing system.
The second is Electric Brewing Supply (ebrewsupply.com), our
source for stainless steel heating elements, probes, and more. Their
online shop is one of the most comprehensive weve found for electric
brewing equipment.
Third is The Electric Brewery (theelectricbrewery.com). Their guide to
building an electric brewery is a vital resource for would-be electric DIYers.

28 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

PHOTO: MATT GRAVES

If an off-the-shelf system doesnt offer what you need


and youre comfortable with electrical work, consider
kits and plans for do-it-yourself electric brewing systems.

www.beercapmaps.com

craft beer. craft art.

TM

German Style Oktoberfest

thirstydog.com Thirsty Dog Brewing Co. 529 Grant Street Akron, Ohio 44311
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 29

| BEERCATION: TAMPA-ST. PETE, FL |


Opposite, clockwise from top: Saint
Somewhere Owner/Brewer
Bob Sylvester launched in
2006 and brews out of an
industrial facility in Tarpon
Springs; Saint Somewheres
open fermentors are
important to Sylvesters focus
on Belgian-style farmhouse
ales; the taps at Dunedin
House of Beer offer a diverse
selection.

Sipping On
Sunshine

Florida is primarily known for beaches, theme parks, and retirees, but
this third most populous state was long a craft-beer backwater. Over the
past few years, that reputation has completely shifted, on the strength of
an intensely creative brewing scene on Floridas west coast.
By Jamie Bogner

BY THE NUMBERS

GABF
MEDALS

HOMEBREW
SHOPS

BREWERIES
& BREWPUBS

29
6
11
30 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

FLORIDA IS WEIRD. From the manufactured reality of its theme parks to the
bizarre news documented daily by the
Florida Man twitter account, the Sunshine
State has a reputation for polarizing
extremes. Maybe the heat and humidity
drive people mad, or maybe the state has
a magnetism that attracts that certain
element, but regardless, Florida has a
well-earned reputation for being weird.
For years, too, Florida lacked great beer.
I was born, reared, and came of drinking
age in Florida, and the options for a
nascent craft-beer lover at the time were
limited, to say the least. Antiquated laws
about bottle size kept anything bottled
in 22-ounce bombers out the state, and
any European imports in standard sizes
(375ml or 750ml) were similarly forbidden
until the law finally changed in 2001.
The 1990s craft-beer boom brought out
a few potential in-state playersYbor City
Brewing Company had a brief run, and the
Hops Grill & Brewery chain brewed some
passable beer at its dozen or so Florida
locations before closing en massebut still
Floridians had to look to out-of-state breweries for most of their craft-beer fix.

Then, in the late 2000s, something


changed. Saint Somewhere Brewing
started producing some interesting saisons
from its humble industrial space in Tarpon
Springs. Cigar City launched with an IPA
and other styles that the entire state could
finally be proud of (and which garnered
national praise and medals). The breweries
grew fast; talented brewers came then left
to start their own ventures in surrounding
towns; great beers won more and more
fans away from macro beer; and in the
space of five or six years, the craft-beer
landscape turned 180 degrees.
Today, that west coast of Floridafrom
Tarpon Springs down to St. Petersburg
and across the bay to Tampais a
brewing hotbed, and any self-respecting
craft-beer drinker would be well-served to
add it to his or her beercation bucket list.
Here are some highlights that should be a
part of any beer-centric itinerary.

Tarpon Springs and Dunedin


Most brewers agree that the contemporary
history of Florida brewing took a turn
when Bob Sylvester launched his Belgian-style-only Saint Somewhere Brewing

PHOTOS: JAMIE BOGNER

TAMPAST. PETE

| BEERCATION: TAMPA-ST. PETE, FL |


From top: Cycle Brewings tap list wall offers everything from
its Fixie session IPA to variants of its coveted RareR DOS imperial
stout; Green Bench Brewing is building a name for itself with its
wood-aged farmhouse ales, but the swimming pool in the brewery
is a nice touch; Rapp Brewing brews a vast array of styles in very
small batches; 7venth Sun is proof that big things come in small
packages.

classics (St. Bernardus 12, St. Louis Framboise) to national heavyweights (Bells
Two Hearted, Ballast Point Sculpin) to
a dozen or more locals. You know craft
beer has reached new heights in Florida
when the bar didnt have Cigar City on tap
because it wasnt local enough.

Company in a remote warehouse in the


vacation town (and sponge-diving capital)
of Tarpon Springs. The current facility is
a nondescript warehouse with the most
modest of brewing and serving equipment (a three-tap keezer provides samples
during the monthly open house nights),
but its kickstarter campaign was successful
in raising funds for a new taproom and
guest house, which will make it more than
worth the drive from Tampa and St. Pete.
From there, shoot south on Highway
595 to Dunedin and make a required visit
to 7venth Sun. The taproom and brewery
are cozy and the 3-barrel brewhouse (open
to the tasting room) will have you wondering how they produce the volume of beer
they do, but the beer is well worth the trip.
If the weather is nice, grab a seat on the
patio and indulge in well-crafted hoppy
beers such as Time Bomb Session IPA or
a refreshing fruited Berliner Weisse (or is
that a Florida Weisse?).
While in Dunedin, walk across the street
to the Dunedin House of Beer for forty
taps that cover everything from European

32 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Continuing south, stop by Willards Tap


House and let one of the knowledgeable
bartenders select something new for you.
The dcor is a bit grungy with a dive feel,
but the beer selection is top notch.
Rapp Brewing is only a few minutes
away, and its diverse approach to brewing
will certainly yield something youd like to
try. Rapp brews in very small batches
with a 55-gallon Blichmann mash tun and
two 75-gallon boil kettles, producing large
volumes of any one beer is out of the questionbut the resulting twenty beers they
typically serve concurrently in the taproom
are one of the widest selections Ive seen.
Five minutes further and youre at Pair
ODice Brewing, where Ken and Julia
Rosenthal (both Anhueser-Busch brewery
alums) pair the efficiency of a larger-scale
brewhouse with a focus on quality execution. Solid core hoppy offerings have a bit of
a West Coast lean, and the taproom features
a wide range of styles from a Belgian-style
white to a big Russian imperial stout.
Downtown St. Petersburg has experienced a renaissance of brewing of late,
with three significant breweries opening
their doors over the past few years. At 3
Daughters, youll find a laid-back open
warehouse vibe and good beer from an
experienced hospitality-industry crew.
The Beach Blonde might be a bit on the
light side for readers of this magazine, but
dont miss wood-aged offerings such as
the Barrel-aged Belgian Quad, if available.
Two blocks from Tropicana Field, Green
Bench Brewing is making waves on the
brewing scene with its mixed-fermentation
farmhouse ales that Shelton Brothers just
recently picked up for national distribution.
While those wild and wood-aged foeder
beers are gaining exposure, dont pass on
its darker beers, as the stouts are equally
accomplished. From the stag head image
on the wall to the upcycled wood wall,
the taproom hits all the hipster cues, but
lounging on the patio under the lights is a
fantastic way to start or end an evening.

PHOTOS FROM TOP: JAMIE BOGNER; COURTESY GREEN BENCH BREWING; JAMIE BOGNER (2)

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Tampa and Ybor City


From top: Cigar City Cider
& Mead in Ybor City is a new
home for the brewerys foray
into non-beer craft beverages;
the gleaming new 50barrel brewhouse at Coppertail Brewing sits opposite the
20-gallon homebrew system
used for pilot batches.

34 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Across the bay, Tampa and Ybor City are


hotbeds of Florida brewing, with new
breweries launching at a rapid rate. Its
strange to consider a brewery launched
seven years ago a classic or standby,
but thats exactly what Cigar City Brewing
has become in its relatively recent history.
The praise is well earned, however, as
Brewmaster Wayne Wambles and Founder
Joey Redner have remained focused on
producing consistently great beer despite

Brewers in other beer hubs around the


country may have had a decade or more
head start on Florida brewers, but theres
an undeniable energy at work in Floridas
west-coast brewing scene. While Florida
doesnt need any help drawing vacationers, these creative brewers are adding
another reason to make the trip.

PHOTOS: JAMIE BOGNER

Cycle Brewing, another brewery founded by a former Cigar City alum, made the
jump last year from the back of Pegs Cantina to a very cool urban space on Central.
Although it is known nationally for its
trader-favorite RareR DOS and Nooner
series of stouts, its Crank IPA and Fixie
session IPA are some of the best weve
had in the state and echo those bright,
soft, and citrusy IPAs from New England.
Its a must-visit for any self-respecting
craft-beer fan in the area.

the meteoric growth the company has


experienced. The demand for its beer has
sideline benefitsits almost impossible
to buy an out-of-date six pack of Jai Alai
IPA on store shelves because it sells as
quickly as the brewery can make it.
A visit to the brewery off Dale Mabry is
a pilgrimage for Florida beer fans, and the
vast tap list (and special brewery-only bottle
sales) make it a necessary stop. Further
north, the Cigar City Brewpub also merits
a visit if youre in the mood for Cubaninspired cuisine along with fantastic beer
(and some brewpub-exclusive brews).
Continuing the Cigar City theme, the recently opened Cigar City Cider & Mead in
Ybor City is the first of its kind in Florida,
with a wide list that ranges from watermelon or pineapple cider to elderflower
and cactus cider to show meads (along
with a couple of Cigar City and guest taps
for good measure). Its a great spot to visit
with friends or family who might not be as
enthusiastic about beer as you are.
While in Ybor, hop down to newly
opened Coppertail Brewing. We made
the visit last New Years Eve, two months
after it opened, and found a friendly Zeus
Cordeiro more than happy to give us a tour
of the sprawling complex. Most striking is
the showpiece 50-barrel brewery that feeds
150-barrel fermentorsa major capital investment for a brand new brewery. Founder Kent Bailey and Brewmaster Casey
Hughes (formerly head brewer of Flying
Fish in New Jersey) have made a bold statement about the future they envision for the
brewery, but if the beer theyve brewed so
far is any indication, its a safe bet.
Up in Seminole Heights, Angry Chair
Brewing has been open less than a year
yet several fellow Tampa brewers recommended it. Floridians love their tart wheat
beers and their flavored stouts, and Angry
Chair does both well.
If rare European bottles are your thing,
then the drive up to Mr. Dunderbaks is
well worth it. If the German cuisine and
extensive on-site bottle list with standouts
from Belgian masters such as Cantillon and
Drie Fonteinen dont excite you, then surely
something on the fifty-two draft taps will.

| COOKING WITH BEER |

IPA in the
Kitchen
At the height of summer, what could be
better than an IPA to quench your thirst?
We challenged Chef Christopher Cina to
create a meal prepared with Americas
most popular beer style.

36 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

IPA amplifies the heat in this


grilled cobia with roasted
tomatillo IPA puree.

Shrimp poached in IPA get


an extra kick from curried
mayonnaise.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 37

| COOKING WITH BEER |

IPA-Poached
Shrimp with Curried
Mayo Sauce

Jalapeo and IPA


Battered Corn Dogs

Grilled Cobia with


Roasted Tomatillo
IPA Puree

Active preparation time: 5 minutes


Total time: 20 minutes
Serves: 4

Active preparation time: 10 minutes


Total time: 20 minutes
Makes: 12 corn dogs

Active preparation time: 15 minutes


Total time: 60 minutes
Serves: 4

Beer-Poached Shrimp
2 qt (64 fl oz/1.9 l) water
2 cup (16 fl oz/473 ml) IPA
lemon
2 Tbs salt
2 lb (907 g) shrimp

1 cup yellow cornmeal


1 cup all-purpose flour
tsp salt
1/8 tsp black pepper
cup white sugar
1 Tbs onion powder
4 tsp baking powder
1 egg
cup (2 fl oz/59 ml) IPA
cup (6 fl oz/177 ml) milk
1 jalapeo, seeded and minced
1 qt (32 fl oz/946 ml) canola oil
12 hot dogs (beef, pork, turkey, or bison)
Skewers

Roasted Tomatillo Puree


1 lb (454 g) tomatillos, cleaned
1 jalapeo, halved
cup garlic cloves, peeled
1 white onion, diced
2 Tbs (1 fl oz/30 ml) olive oil
cup (4 fl oz/118 ml) IPA
cup cilantro
Juice of 1 lime
1 Tbs kosher salt

In a large pot, bring the water, beer,


and lemon to a boil. Add the salt, then
the shrimp. Cook the shrimp until just
opaque in the center, about 2 minutes.
Drain and rinse under cold running
water to cool. Peel and devein the shrimp,
leaving the tails intact, if desired. Store
covered in the refrigerator until ready to
serve.
Curried Mayo
1 shallot, minced
1 cup (8 fl oz/237 ml) mayonnaise
1 Tbs curry powder
Juice of 1 lime
2 tsp salt
Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and
mix well. Spoon into a small serving bowl
and serve with the chilled Beer-Poached
Shrimp.
Beer Suggestions: Try an English IPA
such as Great Lakes Commodore Perry
IPA (Cleveland, OH), Left Hand 400
Pound Monkey (Longmont, CO), Yards
IPA (Philadelphia, PA), Samuel Smiths
India Ale (Tadcaster, U.K.).

In a medium bowl, combine the cornmeal, flour, salt, pepper, sugar, onion
powder, and baking powder. In a separate
bowl, combine the egg, beer, milk, and
jalapeo and mix well.
In a large saut pan over medium heat,
heat the canola oil to 350F (177C). Skewer each of the dogs, then dip the dogs in
the batter and fry until dark golden brown
(23 minutes).
Beer Suggestions: A dry West Coaststyle IPA is best, such as Ballast Point
Sculpin (San Diego, CA), Russian River
Blind Pig (Santa Rosa, CA), Alesmith IPA
(San Diego, CA).

Preheat the oven to 450F (232C). Toss


the tomatillos, jalapeo, garlic, and onions
in the olive oil. Place in a pan and roast
in the oven until the onions brown and
the tomatillos begin to release their liquid
(about 25 minutes).
Remove the tomatillo mixture from the
oven and deglaze the pan with the beer.
Place the deglazed mixture in a blender
with the cilantro and lime juice. Puree until
smooth. Stir in the salt, adjust seasoning as
necessary, and serve with the grilled cobia.
Grilled Cobia
Four 6 oz (170 g) pieces cobia or other oily
fish, such as salmon or escolar
Olive oil
Salt
Pepper
Preheat the grill as hot as it will go. Lightly
oil, salt, and pepper the fish. Grill to your
desired doneness. Plate and top with
Roasted Tomatillo Puree.
Beer Suggestions: Try a juicy citrus-forward
New England-style IPA such as Tree House
Julius (Monson, MA), Lawsons Sip of
Sunshine (Warren, VT), Wormtown Be
Hoppy (Worcester, MA).

38 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

| COOKING WITH BEER |

Charred Broccoli and


Beer-Barley Salad with
Blue Cheese Vinaigrette
Active preparation time: 30 minutes
Total time: 35 minutes
Serves: 4
Beer Barley
6 cup (48 fl oz/1.4 l) water
2 cup (16 fl oz/473 ml) IPA
1 lb (454 g) barley, rinsed
1 lemon, halved
1 Tbs minced garlic
2 bay leaves
Pinch crushed red pepper
2 Tbs salt

Barley cooked in IPA adds a


nutty, rustic element to this
salad with charred broccoli
and sweet potato.

In a medium saucepan, bring the water


and beer to a boil. Add the remaining
ingredients and cook until the barley is
tender, about 25 minutes. Remove the
lemon and the bay leaves and strain the
barley. Reserve at room temperature until
you assemble your salad.
Blue Cheese Vinaigrette
2 shallots, peeled and minced
1 cup (8 fl oz/237 ml) champagne vinegar
2 Tbs (1 fl oz/30 ml) smooth Dijon mustard
1 lb (454 g) crumbled blue cheese
2 cup (16 fl oz/473 ml) canola oil
1 cup (8 fl oz/237 ml) olive oil
1 bunch parsley, chopped
Kosher salt
Black pepper
In a medium bowl, combine the shallots
and vinegar and let sit for 5 minutes. Add
the Dijon mustard and stir well. Add half
of the blue cheese, mixing well.
Slowly whisk in the oils until fully incorporated. Add the remaining blue cheese
and mix well. Add parsley and season to
taste with salt and pepper.
Salad
1 lb (454 g) broccoli, charred on the grill

The jalapeo and IPA batter


on these corn dogs adds a
spicy and bitter counterpoint
to the sweet corn.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 39

| COOKING WITH BEER |


While more associated with
savory dishes, IPA adds
layers of flavor to desserts
such as this chocolate
pain perdu with butter
caramel-salted peanut ice
cream.

6 Tbs butter, chilled


1 Tbs kosher salt
1 cup roasted and salted peanuts, crushed
In a medium saucepan, combine the milk,
cream, and beer. Scald the mixture by heating on medium-low, stirring frequently, until small bubbles begin to form around the
edges. Remove the pan from the heat.
In a mixing bowl, combine the egg yolks
and 1 cup of the sugar. Pour 1/3 of the hot
milk mixture into the egg yolk mixture and
stir briskly. Return the egg and cream mixture to the saucepan and cook over medium
heat until the mixture thickens enough to
coat a spoon. Remove from the heat.
Place the remaining 2 cups of sugar and
salt in another heavy-bottom pan over medium heat. Stirring from the outside in,
cook until the sugar begins to melt. When
there is only a little sugar left, remove the
pan from the heat and stir in the butter,
2 tablespoons at a time. Once the butter
is incorporated, pour the warm ice cream
custard over the caramel and stir until the
caramel is fully incorporated. Chill.
Using your ice cream makers specific
directions, freeze the custard until ribbons
form on top. Fold in the peanuts and
freeze fully.
Pain Perdu
cup (6 fl oz/177 ml) milk
cup (2 fl oz/59 ml) IPA
2 Tbs cocoa powder
cup powdered sugar
4 eggs
4 Tbs butter
8 slices white, sourdough, or other favorite
bread, left out overnight
Butter Caramel-Salted Peanut Ice Cream

1 sweet potato, peeled, diced, and boiled


until tender
1 cup walnuts, toasted
8 oz (227 g) baby lettuces mix
1 lb (454 g) Beer Barley, cooled
11 cup (812 fl oz/237355 ml) Blue
Cheese Vinaigrette
Blue cheese to garnish
Black pepper
Toss all the ingredients in a large mixing
bowl and divide among four plates.
Garnish with crumbled blue cheese and
freshly ground black pepper.
Beer Suggestions: Almost any IPA will do,
but we prefer a dank IPA from the Pacific
Northwest, such as Barley Brown Pallet
Jack (Baker City, OR), 10 Barrel Joe IPA
(Bend, OR), Boneyard RPM (Bend, OR).

40 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Chocolate Pain Perdu


with Butter Caramel,
Salted Peanut Ice Cream
Active preparation time: 20 minutes
Total time: 68 hours to allow the ice
cream to freeze
Serves: 4
Butter Caramel, Salted Peanut Ice
Cream
Makes: 2 quarts (64 fl oz/1.9 l)
2 cup (20 fl oz/592 ml) milk
3 cup (24 fl oz/710 ml) cream
cup (4 fl oz/118 ml) IPA
8 egg yolks
3 cup sugar

In a small saucepan, combine the milk,


beer, cocoa powder, and sugar and mix
well. Warm over low heat just until the
cocoa powder and sugar dissolve. In a
pie plate or shallow dish, whisk the eggs.
Slowly whisk in the warmed milk mixture
until fully combined.
On a griddle or large pan over medium
heat, melt 12 tablespoon of butter. Dip
the bread slices in the batter and allow to
soak for a minute. Cook the pain perdu
slices on the griddle until brown on both
sides. Remove to a plate and keep warm.
Add more butter to the griddle, if needed,
and cook the remaining pain perdu slices.
To serve, place two pain perdu slices on
each plate and top with one scoop of Butter Caramel-Salted Peanut Ice Cream.
Beer Suggestions: Try a session IPA such
as Firestone Walker Easy Jack (Paso Robles,
CA), New Belgium Slow Ride (Fort Collins,
CO), Harpoon Take 5 (Boston, MA).

From

GWORKS HAS EVERYTHING YOU NEED.

BREW IT. KEG IT.

POUR IT. DRINK IT.

EXPECT more
FROM YOUR BEER

| IN THE CELLAR |

Worth the Wait:


Pairing Vintage
Beer With Food
Consider these vintage beer and food pairings the next time youre
thinking of pulling a bottle from your cellar or splurging on a vintage
offering at a restaurant. By Patrick Dawson
RANDY MOSHER BOLDLY NOTES
in his ode to all things beer, Tasting Beer,
The wine world has done a very good
job of convincing people that it is the only
acceptable beverage for fine dining. It is
time for beer to take its place at the head
of the table. And chances are if youre
reading this magazine, you already agree,

42 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

knowing the joys that a well-chosen food


and beer pairing can bring.
When it comes to food-friendly beers,
there is almost no better option than that
of a well-aged vintage beer. Loaded with a
huge palette of flavors, these beers have the
tools to deal with a multitude of foods. But
to really appreciate how well these cellared
beauties can work, its best to get down to
the foundations of food and beer pairings.
When matching up a dish with a beer
(vintage or otherwise), you first and
foremost have to match intensity with
intensity. Powerful foods go with powerful
beers, and delicate beers with delicate
foods. The strong alcohol notes of a Belgian quad would overpower the nuances
of white fish but go well with a juicy steak
(arguably better than a zinfandel would).
You then have to determine what the dominant flavors are in the beer and use them
in one of two ways: to either complement or
contrast a dish. This process is no different
from any other food and drink pairing. A
complementary pairing showcases the dominant flavors (e.g., a chocolate milkshake
and brownie), while a contrasting pairing
aims to balance those flavors (think of the
salty-sweet interplay of a burger and a Coke).
There are plenty of classic food combos already in the beer world. The go-to
complementary route is using the hoppy
bite from an IPA to heighten the impact
of spicy foods (something wine struggles
mightily to do). A prime example of a
contrasting pairing is employing the acrid
roast of a stout to cut the creaminess of

PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER CINA

A five-year-old bottle of
Sierra Nevada Bigfoot makes
a killer pairing with spicy
Thai panang curry.

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BEERANDBREWING.COM | 43

| IN THE CELLAR |

Barrel-Aged Imperial Stout


Cellaring melts the coffee-like roastedness
of an imperial stout into chocolate, while
the barrel aging adds layers of vanilla,
coconut, and caramel. The safe bet is to go

When it comes to food-friendly beers, there is


almost no better option than that of a well-aged
vintage beer. Not only will aging let some of the
more subtle flavors surface, but time yields those
delicious, yet stubborn vintage flavors such as
dried fruits, amaretto, and candied pineapple.
with a chocolate dessert for an over-thetop splurge, but consider contrasting the
beers dessert-y goodness with a simple
dish of berries whose acidic tang presents
a stellar balance.
Hops are what separates the ever-popular
American barleywine from that of its
English brethren, and even aged, a good
American barleywine should retain some
hoppiness to go along with the newly
emerged sherry and toffee notes. Pairing
that hoppy bitterness and sweet caramel
with a fiery Thai dish is the Masters degree version of the classic IPA-spicy food
match-up. A five-year-old bottle of Sierra
Nevadas Bigfoot and a steaming bowl
of panang curry should be on every beer
geeks bucket list.

English Barleywine

Belgian Quad

Beer doesnt get much more complex than


an aged English barleywine. The initially
harsh booziness mellows into a cornucopia of treacle, dried fruit, vanilla, and port.
While pairing with a dried-fruit dessert
such as panforte is a surefire bet, consider
borrowing a page from tawny port drinkers
and serve it with Parmigiano Reggiano
or a similar hard, dry, salty cheese to cut
through the rich sweet side of the beer.

Initially boozy to the point of often being


harsh, a Belgian quads higher alcohols
are transformed by time into toffee and
molasses-esqe sweetness, which show off
the Belgian yeasts fruity and spicy nature.
Perfect your Julia Child impression while
pairing a Belgian quad with a thick savory
sweet stew such as Boeuf Bourguignon
to showcase those dried-fruit notes. Or
instead, choose the finger-foods path with
pancetta-wrapped dates to deliver the
experience appetizer-style.

American Barleywine

For the record, gueuzea blend of


one-, two-, and three-year-old lambicis
already a vintage beer when its bottled.
Most versions dont necessarily require
aging, but if you do age it, you will find
that the gueuze dries even further, the
acidity softens, and it often begins to take
on more vinous, champagne-like qualities.
There is a classic gueuze-food pairing
in Belgium, in which its served with a
simple creamy sheeps milk cheese. The
creaminess balances the strong acidity,
and the cheeses simple nature doesnt get
in the way of the gueuzes plumage. To
take it to the next level, serve the cheese
CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Flanders Red
Also known as the Burgundy of Belgium, Flanders Red shares many
similarities, including food-friendliness,
with red wine. Like gueuze, Flanders Reds
are aged before their release and dont
automatically require further cellaring.
They are bright and fruity when first on
the market, and additional aging mellows
the fruit and pulls out subtle tannins and
roasted notes that were lingering in the
background. Look either to pair with a
fatty meatsuch as roasted duck or short
ribsto balance the acidity or a simple
greens and sweet pepper vinaigrette salad
whose complementary flavors raise the
Flanderss tangy profile to new heights.

Gueuze

44 |

with salmon lox, whose earthy saltiness


will complement the lambics funky notes.

Rauchbier
If there was ever a food-friendly beer, its
the smoky, malty Rauchbier. Although
Rauchbiers are powerfully smoky when
first released, cellaring integrates the overall
profile, giving the roasted notes and emerging oxidative flavors (sherry, dried fruits,
amaretto, etc.) a chance to share the stage.
While pairing it with smoked meat is the
hit-you-over-the-head obvious complementary choice, also consider smores made with
Belgian dark chocolate to really make the
beers chocolate and smoke notes sing. And
whatever you do, dont forget the stogie.

PHOTO: MATT GRAVES

ice cream or other dairy-centric desserts.


With this in mind, you can see how the
more prominent flavors a beer has, the
more versatile and food friendly it becomes. That complexity opens up a world
of pairing possibilities, and theres not
much that can rival the breadth of opportunities achieved by pairing gently aged,
cellar-worthy beers. Not only will aging let
some of the more subtle flavors surface,
affording a larger toolkit with which to
work, but time yields those delicious, yet
stubborn vintage flavors such as dried
fruits, amaretto, and candied pineapple.
So the next time youre thinking of pulling a bottle from the cellar (or splurging on
that vintage offering at the restaurant) consider these vintage beer and food pairings.

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| 45

ALLAGASH

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46 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

| BREAKOUT BREWERS: THE FORAGERS |


Scratch Brewings trio of
owner-brewers (from left
to right) Marika Josephson,
Ryan Tockstein, Aaron Kleidon

The

Locavores
PHOTO: AARON KLEIDON

Scratch Brewings owner-brewer triumvirate is out to make very drinkable


beer that uses local ingredients and tastes very regional. By Emily Hutto
THERES A CERTAIN MENTALITY
that suggests that your business will
suffer if you do it differently, says Marika
Josephson, one of the three owner-brewers
of Scratch Brewing Company in Ava,
Illinois. But for me personally, I didnt
want to create food and drink that I wasnt
100 percent proud of or a place I wouldnt
want to go myself.
Josephson and her partners, Ryan
Tockstein and Aaron Kleidon, really do
approach their brewery model differently
than most, especially for the town in
which the brewery is located. Ava is two
hours from the nearest big city, St. Louis,
in a relatively secluded rural area. We
encountered a lot of people saying, Well
youll have to have a flagship beer; you

cant just do everything seasonally; you


cant not go through distributors. Ironically enough, they have successfully done
everything they shouldnt have.
The trio of homebrewers first met at a
nearby liquor store in Carterville, what
Josephson says is a central gathering place
for local beer lovers because back then
there wasnt a lot of craft beer around here.
It wasnt just a brewery that the area lacked.
There was something we felt was missing
from the industry, something we were really
fascinated by, Josephson continues. We
were interested in creating a product that
spoke to us and the people around here in
terms of the indigenous flavors and whats
locally available. We wanted to brew with
ingredients from our backyard.

So Josephson, Tockstein, and Kleidon


spent more than a year testing locally harvested plants in small batches of homebrew. During that time, Josephson says,
they really got to know the regions flora.
Kleidon, who grew up in southern Illinois,
was no stranger to these plants, and Tockstein, who was teaching chemistry at the
time, brought a high level of meticulousness to their process.
With our minds and strengths combined,
all three of us melded to form a deep
understanding of plants and how they
work in beer. We got a sense for the best
bittering agents and for plants that have
best aromas for beer, Josephson says.
In 2013, they launched Scratch Brewing
Company, a 2-barrel farmhouse brewery
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 47

| BREAKOUT BREWERS: THE FORAGERS |

Make It

Dead Leaves
and Carrots
ALL-GRAIN
This is one of Scratch Brewing customers
all-time favorites. Its a lightly bready English
bitter with a touch of smoke and a dry, crisp
finish. It was inspired by the crisp crunch
of fall leaves and that dry, almost toasted
paper aroma. The oak leaves add extra
bitterness and tannins, and the carrots add
extra body and a little spice.
OG (est): 1.049
FG (est): 1.013
IBUs: 23
ABV: 4.7%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

7.5 lb (3.4 kg) Maris Otter


1 lb (454 g) Munich
0.6 lb (272 g) Caramel 40
2.8 oz (79 g) German Rauchmalt
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

Carrot water and juice (see below) at 60


minutes
0.7 oz (20 g) Columbus hops (15.6% AA)
at 60 minutes
2 lb (907 g) roasted carrots at 20 minutes
2 qt (1.89 l) dead or dried oak leaves at 20
minutes
DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350F (177C). Chop the


carrots into chunks and roast with about a
cup (237 ml) of water until the carrots are
soft and starting to caramelize. Remove
from oven. Add the water with carrot juice
to the boil kettle at the beginning of the
boil. Put the carrots in one fine mesh bag
and the dried leaves in another fine mesh
bag before adding them to the boil.
Mash at 154F (68C) for 60 minutes.
Boil for 60 minutes following the schedule
for hops and additions. Pitch the yeast at
64F (18C).
YEAST

Safale English Ale (S-04)


BREWERS NOTES

If you dont live near oak trees, maple


and hickory will also work well. When
gathering the leaves, try to find the driest,
crispest leaves. Damp leaves may already
be starting to mold.
Recipe is built to yield a batch size of 5 gallons
(19 liters) and assumes 72 percent efficiency.

48 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

and wood-fired pizza restaurant, on


Kleidons familys land just a few miles
outside of the Shawnee National Forest.
Tomato plants and a large herb garden
on the property supply ingredients for
the pizza, and the nearby forest yields
endless ingredients for the beer.
The ingredients we use depend on the
time of year, Josephson explains. In the
winter we use a lot of roots like wild-rose
rootsthey have tannic qualities that
add a nice finish to beer.
In the early spring, Scratchs beers
often contain burdock root, honeysuckle,
flowers, and dandelions, which Josephson says often take the place of bittering
hops in the brew. In the summer, southern Illinois has a great abundance of
fruits, and in the fall, persimmons and
pawpaw fruit grow a plenty. Persimmons that are native to this area are a
lot smaller than persimmons that come
from Asia, she says. Use them at the
wrong time, and theyre extremely bitter
and terrible, but a timely harvest yields
an orangey but not citrusy flavor, with
notes of apricot and spicy cinnamon.
And then there are the mushrooms.
We use a lot of different mushrooms,
Josephson continues. Chanterelles grow
like crazy here in the summer. We also

love trumpet mushrooms, which impart


an earthy, chocolaty flavor in beer.
It goes without saying that using locally
harvested ingredients means slight inconsistencies from batch to batch of beer. For
Scratch, thats the best part of brewing.
We embrace the fact that things change
from year to year, and we think the fun
is in the experimentation with different
ingredients, says Josephson. We learn
a lot by using ingredients differently in
each batch. Were always innovating.
Not only are they innovating, but
theyre also sharing what theyve
learned. Josephson, Kleidon, and
Tockstein are writing a homebrew
book about brewing with farmed and
foraged ingredients. Tentatively called
The Homebrewers Almanac, the book
will cover the diverse array of plants that
Scratch has used in its beers.
One thing thats generally consistent
about Scratchs beers is that they arent
very hoppy. In fact, 95 percent of the beers,
Josephson says, have only a bittering
addition of hops used as a preservative.
Hops are so recognizable and so strong
of a flavor that they eliminate a lot of other
flavors that we want to shine through.
Weve made more than fifteen gruits, or
beers without hops, or whatever you want

PHOTOS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): AARON KLEIDON, KENDALL KARMANIAN, KENDALL KARMANIAN

Clockwise from top


left Curing harvested mullein and preparing to hang
and air-dry it in the shade;
chanterelle mushrooms and
pearly-everlasting combine
to make Scratch Brewings
Chanterelle Mushroom
Bire de Garde; Scratch
Brewings 2-barrel farmhouse
brewery and wood-fired pizza
restaurant.

We want to be creating
a product that feels
regional. We make
[beer] that tastes like
where it comes from.
to call them, says Josephson. Gruit is an
ancient style of beer that uses herb blends
(such as bog myrtle, yarrow, mugwort,
heather, and juniper) instead of hops. The
brewers at Scratch are bringing it back (see
The Adventurers, page 50 for another
breakout brewery that specializes in gruits).
Last year, Scratch brewed a hops-free
saison with 105 plant and fungi additions.
It might sound like a flavor bomb, but
Scratchs brewers insist that the recipe called
for just a pinch of this and a touch of that.
This beer has an aroma of earth and herbs
that is complemented by a complex flavor of
citrus, pepper, and dirt created by the myriad
of Southern Illinoiss ingredients. It has
the essence of here, wrote Tockstein in the
beers description. We feel strongly about
wanting to make very drinkable beer that
isnt overpowering, Josephson says ardently.
Im very proud of the fact that people want
to drink several of them.
Josephson is also very proud of the fact
that she and her partners have been able
to defy expectations of what a craft brewery
can and should be. Although they have
several beers that they have brewed more
than once, they dont have a flagship offering. Whats available at the tasting room
is constantly rotating to reflect the season,
the availability of ingredients, and the
latest experiments. Currently, the beer is
available only at the brewery and at select
craft-beer bars and restaurants via selfdistribution. We made a core decision to
stay local, Josephson says. Come hell or
high water this is the way it will be.
Scratchs atypical business has not suffered
for its differences; in fact, it has experienced
the exact opposite. The thriving tasting room
and restaurant have become a community
gathering space in what was once a beer
desert, attracting a diverse demographic that
includes everyone from beer geeks to university types to people who have otherwise been
Bud Light drinkers for decades.
Craft brewers arent satisfied anymore
with just making beer within communities, Josephson proclaims. We want to be
creating a product that feels regional. Our
business model comes from a desire that
we want to make a truly local product and
support our farmers. We make something
that tastes like where it comes from.

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The Adventurers
Butch Heilshorn and Alex McDonald, cobrewers at Earth Eagle Brewings
of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, are giving their customers palates a more
adventurous experience with beers that replace hops with other less
common ingredients. By Norman Miller
HOPS. BARLEY. YEAST. WATER. Nearly
every beer is brewed with those four
ingredients and sometimes a few other
relatively common ones.
That wasnt always the case. In ancient
times, brewers used herbs and plants they
could find in the lands that surrounded
them to balance out the sweet malt and to
act as a preservative. They used ingredients
such as catnip, galangal root, mandrake,
mistletoe, mugwort, and spruce tips.
Those ingredients lost favor, though,
when brewers discovered the magic of
hops. Hops preserved beer far longer than
the likes of sweet gale or chickweed, and
hops provided flavors ranging from earthy

50 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

and piney to plum and grass and even


citrusy fruits, providing a balance to the
malt. Today, hoppy beers are still the most
popular beers in the craft-beer world, and
nearly every craft brewer brews at least
one version of an IPA.
But not every brewery has forgotten the
old way. Earth Eagle Brewings of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is a champion
of gruits, the name given to beers that
eschew hops for other less common ingredients. Its a pretty selfish thing, says
Earth Eagle Cofounder/Cobrewer Butch
Heilshorn. Im not thinking in terms
of what the world will like. Im thinking
about what would get me excited.

Heilshorn and his brother-in-law


Co-owner/Cobrewer Alex McDonald
(McDonald married Heilshorns sister,
Gretchen) became friends in the early
1990s. Both were beer geeks, and Heilshorninspired by his wife who is an
herbalistread The Art of Fermentation,
by Sandor Katz, and wanted to brew. Heilshorn and McDonald set up a homebrew
system and decided to brew a clone of
Dogfish Heads uber-potent World Wide
Stout, using no hops. It came out of the
fermentor amazing, but it came out of the
bottle like ass, Heilshorn says.
Nonetheless, their interest in brewing
continued. McDonald and his wife opened
A&G Homebrew in Portsmouth, and
then Heilshorn joined McDonald to open
Earth Eagle Brewings, a nano-brewery, in
a small adjacent space in 2013.
We were both interested in brewing
something that interested us. We didnt
want to just brew a brew and say, This is
our IPA, this is our brown ale, this is our
pale ale, says McDonald, although Earth
Eagle does brew some more common
styles in addition to the gruits.
McDonald says, The beauty of what
weve done [with the gruits] is we have
introduced people to something theyve
never tried before. Although all are called
gruits, each one tastes very different based

PHOTOS: ERIN PRAWOKO

| BREAKOUT BREWERS: THE FORAGERS |

| BREAKOUT BREWERS: THE FORAGERS |

Clockwise from Top


Left Urban forager
Jenna Darcy searches
for ingredients for Earth
Eagle Brewings gruits; the
finished beers range in color
and style; Darcys basket
filled with local wild flowers
and roots.

52 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

on the ingredients used, Heilshorn says.


The Antoinette, for example, is brewed
with catnip, mugwort, and chickweed,
while the Exhilaration is made with Labrador tea, sweet gale, and heather flowers.
Same style, but different flavors.
Heilshorn, who brews most of Earth Eagles gruits) says that brewing a gruit isnt
really that much different from brewing
the more common styles of beer. If anything, he says, its easier. For a hoppy beer,
everyone has these crazy hops schedules
where they add hops at certain times, says
Heilshorn. A gruit is a little simpler. Ill do
two additions. You dont want to boil [the
ingredients] for too long because youll lose
the taste. If there are any medicinal effects,
theyll go up in steam.
Heilshorn says that creating the various
flavor profiles comes down to trial and
error. He tries to find ingredients that he
thinks have flavors that can blend together
well. Some brewers, he says, will make tea
to test the ingredients, although he has a
more direct method. Ill be really careful
about sniffing the herbs and chewing on
them. If they have real strong flavors, Ill
chew both of them together at the same
time to see if they work.
They key to brewing a successful gruit
is to realize that sometimes the beer may
not taste exactly how you thought it
would. You have to be open and willing
to learn, says Heilshorn. Sometimes its
not easy because its not what you expect,
but thats okay. Its fine to experiment. You
have to play around with these things.
Sometimes, however, ingredients dont
work. Heilshorn says he still has not
been able to brew a beer that he has been
happy about with horehound, an edible
flower, even though others have enjoyed
the horehound brews. Weve had a
number of beers that we didnt really like,
and weve given them to our bartenders
and theyve loved them, says Heilshorn.
Weve dumped two or three batches. I
think [horehound flowers] are great, but
were still trying to dial them up.
If a homebrewer wants to brew a gruit,
Heilshorn says brewing with fresh ingredients is always preferable, but items bought
online or in stores can work if a particular

Foraging Notes
Earth Eagle Brewings
165 High St., Portsmouth, New Hampshire
The Earth Eagle Brewings taproom is open seven days a week, noon to 9 p.m. daily, and open
until 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday during the
summer. Beers are available to drink on site, as
well as by the growler. To go along with the beer,
the taproon has a small, but well-thought-out,
food menu of small dishes that pair well with
many of the available beers.
W E B : eartheaglebrewings.com

item is not available locally. Earth Eagle tries


to use as many local ingredients as possible.
To accomplish that, they work with local
urban forager Jenna Darcy, who goes into
the woods and surrounding areas searching
for fresh herbs and wild-grown flowers that
may be used in the gruits. When winter hits
New England, they resort to more mailordered ingredients and brewing with dried
herbs. Someday, McDonald and Heilshorn
hope to even have a better source of local
ingredients. Our dream is to put a garden
on the roof, Heilshorn says.
McDonald and Heilshorn also use some
ingredients for which Darcy cant forage and
that people may find odd in their gruits
wild and farmed meat products. The pair
have come up with beers brewed with a
moose head (Bogmare, a meat gruit), beef
and beef bones (Capn Beefparts, a porter,
and Them Bones, a gruit made with beef
bones), and even bear (St. Corbians Red,
a sour gruit with bear meat). The brewery
makes sure to let people know that these
beers are not vegetarian/vegan friendly.
Earth Eagles brews are available in the
taproom that is adjacent to the brewery.
Although the gruits catch peoples attention, there are plenty of common styles of
beers for those who want something more
familiar. Along with New England Gangsta (the brewerys most popular beer) and
Ancestralboth IPAs, they have beers
such as Black Adder (milk stout), Chiefy
LaRoux (Belgian pale ale), or Kiichigo (a
dunkelweizen brewed with raspberries).
McDonald and Heilshorn usually split
up brewing duties. McDonald brews
mainly the more traditional stylesIPAs,
tripels, dunkels, witbiers. Heilshorn brews
mainly gruits. People may be surprised,
but sometimes they brew the styles the
other one is known for, Heilshorn says.
[McDonald] can brew a great gruit, and I
can brew a pretty good IPA.
As a beer consumer, I want to give my
palate a more adventurous experience,
says Heilshorn. Its great that were able
to do that for people.

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BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 53

| BREAKOUT BREWERS: THE FORAGERS |

The

Beekeepers
Using only ingredients grown or produced in New York,
Evan and Emily Watson of Plan Bee Farm Brewery have
made brewing their backup plan. By Emily Hutto

ITS NOT EVERY DAY that the guy brewing your beer looks like that same guy you
saw performing on stage at the Bonnaroo
Music and Arts Festival. But if you visit
a farmers market in Fishkill, New York,
theres a good chance youll come across
Evan Watson. He owns Plan Bee Farm
Brewery with his wife, Emily, and indeed
he is that guy you saw on stage.
Watson is an acclaimed musician whose
folky blues-meets-rock sound has made its
way around the country since his debut album A Town Called Blue released in 2009.
Watson was recently selected to solo open
for Meatloaf, and he appeared on The

54 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Voice last fall, among many other achievements throughout his music career.
When Evan was on tour, we traveled 40odd states, says his wife, Emily. During
the tour we decided maybe that wasnt the
lifestyle we wanted to pursue any longer
it wasnt very healthy, and there was a lot
of pressure. We had to have a backup; we
had to have a plan B.
For the Watsons, plan B was brewing.
The couple had been homebrewing since
college, and Emily had been working at an
environmental nonprofit for New Yorks
Hudson River. We came up with the concept of an agriculturally sourced brewery,
Emily says. Our friends who own Bee Archetype [a New York State honey producer
that keeps bees and produces items such as
honey soaps, candles, lotions, and beeswax]
motivated us to start our own business.
Their model was completely grassroots,
Emily explains. It was inspiring.
So the musician-turned-brewer and the
environmentalist-turned-brewer started
two beehives on their farm property on
the border of Hudson Highlands and
opened Plan Bee Farm Brewery in 2013.
These beehives yield raw honey from
which they extract all of the yeast used
to ferment their beers. We wanted to
keep everything as local as possible, so we
started playing with the idea of cultivating
our own yeast, Emily says. We started by
cultivating yeast from peaches and straw-

PHOTOS: KAREN PEARSON

Plan Bee Brewers Emily


and Evan Watson

berries that we grow on the property, and


then Evan had the idea to take it out of the
honey. The bees are collecting lots of yeast
as they forage a three-mile radius nearby.
Plan Bees yeast isnt the only beer ingredient cultivated nearby. In fact, Emily and
Evan use as many ingredients from their
property as possible (including aromatic
herbs, hops, fruit, and even dandelions),
and every ingredient in Plan Bees beers
is grown or produced in New York. They
brew with grains from Farmhouse Malt
in Newark Valley, hops from Hop Wild
(owned by Kevin Durland, a farmer
friend) in Lagrangeville, and maple syrup
from Crown Maple and Madava Farms in
Dover Plains. They age beers in soaked
oak barrels from Tuthilltown Spirits in
Gardiner; they bottle the beer in bottles
from BOB (BuyOurBottles.com) in Baldwinsville; and they even clean the brewhouse with products from Finger Lakes
Soap Company in Van Etten. Weve really
committed to a local mission and we havent wavered from it, Emily says.
Plan Bee is a registered Farm Brewery,
which means that at least 20 percent of
the hops and 20 percent of all other ingredients in its beers must be grown in New
York State. The states Farm Brewery law
also gives Plan Bee the ability to sell its
beers at local farmers markets, which is
critical to the brewerys business model.
We sell our bottles only at farmstands,
Emily says. We dont distribute on
purpose; we want to be able to talk to the
people we sell to so they can understand
what were doing.
The Watsons are currently expanding their
brewery to a 25-acre farm in Poughkeepsie
where they will transition from a 1-barrel
brewhouse to a 10-barrel system. They plan
to grow their own hops, grow and malt their
own barley, and continue beekeeping for the

production of their yeast. Once expanded,


they still wont distribute their beers.
We will sell all of our beer on the property, Emily says, in the style of a winery,
where you would expect to see the
grapes in the vineyard. Instead of taking
tours in industrial parks where most breweries are located, guests will be able to see
the ingredients and the process in 10-barrel
open oak fermentors. We really want to
educate about where beer comes from, to
re-establish that agricultural connection.
In New York State, brewers are not
required to list yeast as a beer ingredient,
which is really funny because yeast makes
about 75 percent of the flavor profile of that
beer, Emily points out. Plan Bees honey-harvested yeast gives off fruity esters,
Emily says, with pineapple and banana
notes that youd expect from Belgian yeast.
Originally when we used honey in our
beers, Evan hypothesized that because there
are so many wild bacteria that make beer
sour that all of our beers would become
sour, she says. But they found that honey,
with its antiseptic properties, actually keeps
the beers really clean. So Evan started inoculating wooden barrels with yeast, which is
why all of Plan Bees beers have the potential
to become sour over time.
So, our barrel-aged beers are oaky and
honey-forward when fresh, but if you let
them stay in the bottle, they develop that
tartness, that effervescence, and that funkiness associated with sour beers, Emily
says. The yeast takes on a personality of
its own when it develops in the cellar.
Like a lot of sour-beer brewers, the Watsons are less concerned with consistency
and more invested in the flavor of their
beers from batch to batch. That variability,
coupled with a small brewhouse, gives them
the freedom to experiment. In 2014, they
brewed more than fifty different beers.
The Watsons hand bottle
and label all of their
beer and sell through
local farmstands. As they
transition to a new farm
and 10-barrel brewhouse,
they intend to sell all
of their beer from the
brewery itself.

Make It

Dandeliaison
Recipe
ALL-GRAIN
Plan Bee Farm Brewerys Evan Watson
has provided this recipe for their farmhouse ale with dandelions and honey.
He says, If youre crazy like me, [you
can] cultivate a yeast via generations of
starters and raw honey. Happy Brewin.
OG: 1.044
FG: 1.008
IBUs: 10
ABV: 4.8%
FERMENTABLES

90 percent 2-row base (local malt, if


youre lucky enough to have a maltster
nearby)
10 percent raw local honey (add postboilthe later the better/wilder)
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

5 IBUs Cascade leaf (preferably local/


homegrown) at 60 minutes
Handful of dandelion greens and
stems (no roots) per 5 gallons (19
liters) at 60 minutes
Kettle finings and yeast nutrient at 15
minutes
5 IBUs Cascade leaf at 15 minutes
Honey and as many dandelion flowers
as you can collect (just pop them off
the stems) at whirlpool (post boil).
DIRECTIONS

Single infusion mash at 150F (65C)


for 75 minutes. Boil for 60 minutes
following the schedule for hops and
additions. Pitch a healthy starter of the
yeast at 72F (22C) and let her rip.
YEAST

Wyeast 3711 French Saison (similar to


Plan Bees honey yeast profile)
BREWERS NOTES

Our water has a hard profile, so adjust


calcium additions accordingly.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 55

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56 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Finders
Keepers

In todays craft brewing culture, the concept of terroir is growing more and
more important. We set out to explore how several craft brewers in
Los Angeles are adding that sense of place to their beers in unexpected ways.

PHOTOS: JOHN VERIVE

By John Michael Verive

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 57

| THE FORAGERS |

This page Bob Kunz of


Highland Park Brewery samples a yard beer made with
ingredients foraged on his
mile-long walk from home to
work. Previous page
Kunz collects and preps ingredients for the sour saison
with foraged ingredients.
Opposite page Collecting ingredients from the
surrounding neighborhood
gives Highland Parks Yard
Beer a sense of terroir.

58 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

A dozen miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles, in


the sage-scented hills below the San Gabriel Mountains,
a brewer walks with a purpose. Founder of Pasadenas
Craftsman Brewing, Mark Jilg is a trailblazer of artisanal
beer in Los Angeles, and Craftsman started making distinctive beers long before craft beer caught on in the region.
Triple White Sage is a yearly signature
brew that captures the rather assertive aroma of the chaparral woodlands, and Jilg
forages the hills for the Belgian ales key
ingredient. I used to spend a lot of time
mountain biking in the Front Range [of
the Angeles National Forest], Jilg explains.
And I have a lot of familiarity with the
floraand the aromasof the foothills.
Before 2010when the new wave of
craft producers hit the L.A. areathere
were only a scattered handful of brewpubs and small breweries. Many new
operations now cater to the shifting tastes
of thirsty Angelenos, but the veterans at
Craftsman hold their course. The brewery
makes two distinct families of beer: expertly executed examples of classic styles
(four-ingredient beers) and more esoteric brews. These complicated beers are
often wood-aged and feature local ingredients. Jilg wants his beers to be expressive
and authentic. He forages for ingredients
to create a connection with the environment. Jilg has worked with spruce and
even acorns, but it was Southern Californias ubiquitous citrus that compelled him
to add a sense of place to his beer. I have
two really old Valencia orange trees in my
backyard, he says, and that sort of got
the ball rolling on taking advantage of the
bounty of Los Angeles.
Brewers have searched their surroundings for flavors for as long as theres been
beer to brew. In the modern craft-beer
culture, where anything goes and everything old is new again, the trend is on the
rise. Its a trend that Jilg implies is often
more about marketing than authenticity. In
Los Angeles, where authenticity is often in
short supply, brewers forage for inspiration
and a bond with the land. They are discov-

ering some unexpected connectionsto


both the environment and their neighbors.

Serendipity
Bob Kunz has a small brewery in the backroom of a hip bar in one of L.A.s historic
neighborhoods, and he makes beer for his
neighbors in Highland Park. Years ago he
was an assistant brewer at Craftsman, and
Mark Jilgs influence on the young brewer
is clear. They both talk about beer with the
same determined romance. As at Craftsman, the brews at Highland Park Brewery
fall into two camps: predictable beer, where
we try to control all of the parameters, and
unpredictable beers where we embrace it
having a life of its own, says Kunz.

It is a fun thing. Maybe you dont engineer it as much. You try to think about
[how you can] use [your] geography to
[your] advantage.
One Highland Park brew that takes advantage of springs bounty in Los Angeles
is Yard Beer. Using botanicals gathered
from Kunzs mile-long walk between his
home and the brewery, the beer captures
the scents of a spring morning in the
verdant community. For the 2015 batch,
Kunz planned to add lemon grass, sourgrass flower, and limes to a kettle-soured
saison dosed with Brettanomyces.
Urban foraging is kind of a funny thing,
Kunz quipped as he set off on his meandering stroll to gather the items on his list.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 59

| THE FORAGERS |

Primitive brew using only


lerp sugar (insect excretion),
mugwort, fermented lemons,
and yarrow.

Primitive carbonation in
a wild beer using a bow
on the gourd (basically a
primitive flip-top bottle) to
keep the pressure on.

L.A.sWildest
Brewer
Professional forager
Pascal Baudar pushes
the limits of foraged beer.

Experimenting with foraged ingredients in beer is an exciting creative exercise, but for Pascal Baudar, foraging is a way of life. Born in Belgium,
Baudar grew up close to the land and learned how to findand usewild
edibles at an early age. He now calls Los Angeles home, and as a professional forager he teaches classes on wild edibles, self-sufficiency, and foraging
practices, and he supplies foraged ingredients to some of L.A.s hautest,
hippest bars and restaurants. But finding the wild flavors growing throughout the hills and valleys in Southern California is only a part of Baudars
mission. Hes as passionate about traditional preservation techniques as he
is about foraging, and fermentation is one of his favorite ways to preserve
the bounty of plants (and bugs) that he finds. He connects to the past and to
the land with his foraged beers.
I use the term beer very loosely, he sayshis speech tinged with laccent
Belge. If my beverage tastes like a beer, I call it a beer. His beverageswines,
ciders, and sodas in addition to wild alesare often created with only the ingredients that he finds on his walks, and that means no barley and no hops.
To Baudar, flavor profile and the spirit of the land are more important than
the name of the finished product. It is a tie to historical brewing traditions.
Its like very old beer, he says. Vikings and Celts used lots of plants [in their
brews]. Some of Baudars brews have featured more than seventy different

60 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

foraged plants including wild mushrooms,


nettles, mugwort, and even ants. The botanicals
are boiled with a variety of different fermentable
sugar sources including tree saps, honey, and
something called lerp sugarthe crystallized
secretions of aphid-like insects. The yeast is all
wild (he often uses wild elderberries to start
fermentation), and the fermentation happens
in specially made clay vessels (or sometimes in
whatever glass bottles he has laying around).
Many of his brews are reminiscent of the
gueuzes and lambics of his native Belgiumfunky and tart. It takes a tremendous
amount of research, and a lot of practice to
learn to use these ingredients, he says, adding, Ive done it so often [that] I know all the
mistakes. But his definition of mistake is narrow, and he says that batches that dont taste
the way hed like get turned into vinegar or
used to cook with instead of being dumped.
Ive never had a beer go bad in seven years!
Baudar teaches a variety of wilderness-based classes, including wild beer making
(visit urbanoutdoorskills.com for details), and
he suggests that homebrewers interested in
exploring their locally available wild flavors
should find a mentor who knows their region.
Its very hard to [learn] from a book, he says
and suggests that the intrepid brewers should
stick to plants they know, but he also encourages brewers to forge a connection with the land
and the bounty of nature through exploration.
Its about going back to the original idea of
brewing. Primitive and fantastically simple.

PHOTOS: PASCAL BAUDAR

Primitive beer using mugwort,


elderflowers, organic cane
brown sugar, maple syrup
(tree sap), and lemon ants
for flavors. This beer was
custom-made for mixologist
Matthew Biancaniello.

Urban foraging is kind of a funny thing,


Kunz quipped as he set off to gather the items
on his list. Youre just in a concrete city, but
there are all these plants and vegetation [if you
look]. Its right there: the edible landscape.
Youre just in a concrete city, but there are
all these plants and vegetation [if you look].
Its right there: the edible landscape.
But foraging is never a sure thing. After
harvesting lemongrass from his own yard
and stuffing a bag until it overflowed with
the sour-grass flower that had taken over
his business partners lawn, the urban
forager came up short on the citrus. The
trees hed planned to harvest had been under-ripe and he only managed a handful of
scrawny limes. Disappointed, the typically
unflappable Kunz grew quiet for a few
blocks and pondered what adjustments
would salvage the brew. Then a chance
meeting with Carlito saved the day.
Walking past a bushy citrus tree in a
fenced yard, Kunz perked up when he
spied a lemon dangling off a branch that
overhung the sidewalk (making it fairgame for foraging). He plucked the fruit
just as the homeowner poked his head out
from under the hood of a car in the driveway. Instead of reprimanding the brewer,
the man opened his gate and welcomed
Kunz to gather more. Which trees to focus
on in Carlitos orchard-like yard was sorted
out in a jumble of Spanish and English,
and soon a shopping bag was brimming
with oranges, Meyer lemons, and limes.
Theres something about pounding the
pavementjust getting out and walking,
Kunz says at the end of the journey. You
dont experience the same sights and smells,
or interactions, when youre in the car.
Back at the brewery Kunz washed the
herbs and zested the citrus before adding
it all to a ferocious Vitamix blender.
He added the resulting vivid green and
pungent slurry to the 7-barrel batch of tart
saison. The beer was tapped a week or
so later, and its aroma was remarkable.
The botanicals added a brightness to the
edgy tartness and earthy Brett character. It
tasted like spring.

PHOTOS: LAURIE PORTER

Backyard Harvests
On the other side of Los Angeles, Brewmaster Jonathan Porter and his wife, Laurie Porter, opened a production brewery in
Torrance in 2013, and foraged ingredients
are in Smog City Brewings DNA. Using
local flavors is about defining who we are
as a brewery and redefining the rules,
Laurie Porter says. Their foraging projects

are a way to develop a connection to their


community and the environment, and
the beers capture local flavors such as the
piquant scent of the fennel flowers that
dot the hillsides above the coast (and the
alley behind the Porters house).
There is also a kumquat tree in the Porters backyard, and it wasnt long before
the ornamental citrus found its way into
a brew. The first 55-gallon batch of Kumquat Saison used more than fifty pounds
of pureed fruit, and it was a runaway hit in
the taproom. This year, the Porters wanted to brew a full-sized production, but the
15-barrel batch would require almost 500
pounds of the tiny citrus. It would take
more than the Porters backyard tree to
produce that many kumquats.
Commercially grown kumquats, they
discovered, are too sweet. They were after
the tartness of the more characterful fruit
from backyard trees. Like Bob Kunzs
fortuitous run-in with Carlito, a chance
meeting led to a source for the citrus.
At a wedding, Laurie Porter met Rachel
Maysel, the Backyard Harvest Manager of
Food Forward. The L.A. nonprofit organization rescues unsold produce from
farmers markets across Los Angeles, rerouting the would-be waste to food banks
and shelters. Food Forward also organizes
hundreds of volunteer-run backyard harvests that collect fruit from the bountiful
citrus trees on private property around the
region. They had access to a large surplus
of kumquats, and the two organizations
partnered to create Kumquat Saison.
It was a logistical challenge, but Food Forward Founder Rick Nahmias says, All our
fruit donors and volunteers were canvassed
ahead of time to take part in this special
project, knowing that instead of feeding
the hungry as all our other harvests do, this
small amount of fruit would be a fundraiser. In return for almost 800 pounds of
kumquats that Smog City would receive
from Food Forward, the brewery would
specially distribute bottles of the beer to the
area where many of
the trees were found Right The Food Forward
and Smog CIty Brewing
to raise money for the teams harvest kumquats
from a backyard tree. The
nonprofit.
urban citrus is less sweet
Its a lot of love
and has more character
thats gone into this
than commercially farmed
batch, Maysel says.
varieties.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 61

| THE FORAGERS |

Homebrewing
with Foraged
Ingredients
Not everyone has easy access to an abundance of
wild edibles or a plot of land that they can cultivate
for interesting brewing ingredients, but any adventurous brewer can still imbue his or her beers with
local flavors. You just have to think like a forager.
Shop Like a Forager
Foraging doesnt have to mean hunting through the
wilderness; you can discover interesting flavors to
add to your brews in plenty of urban locations. Farmers markets are a wonderful source of local ingredients, and ethnic groceries can provide a bounty of
novel fruits, herbs, and spices that you might not find
at the local mega-mart. Of course, the supermarkets
produce section might have some interesting finds,
too. Keep your eyes (and your nose) open.
Smell and Taste Everything
You cant showcase the flavors of your surroundings without a deep understanding of whats
around you. Both Highland Park Brewerys Bob
Kunz and Smog City Brewings Jonathan Porter
are inveterate samplers. They cant walk down
the block or through a market without careful observationand they smell (and sometimes taste)
everything that catches their eye.
Know Your Styles
For Jonathan Porter, a deep understanding of the
flavor profiles of a wide variety of beer styles is
critical when using foraged ingredients. He says
balance is the most critical concept when deciding what style would best showcase an ingredient,
and knowing how to best contrast malt, hops, or
fermentation flavors with different botanicals
comes with practice and experimentation.
Take a Class or Read a Book
Even if you have access to a forest or wild area,
it might not be prudent to go stomping into the
woods without basic knowledge of whats safe to
eat. Check with local outdoor retailers, hiking clubs,
or even culinary schools and community colleges
to see whether classes on wild edibles are offered
in your area. A little knowledge goes a long way, and
learning from someone can be inspiring.
Connect with Other Foragers
Find a local group of urban foragers with whom
you can share information and finds. Falling
Fruit (fallingfruit.org) is a collaborative map of
the urban harvest that points to more than a
half-million food sources around the world (from
plants and fungi to water wells and dumpsters).
The rapidly growing user community is actively
exploring, editing, and adding to the map.
Experiment
There are no hard and fast rules about when in
the brewing process to add foraged ingredients.
Some plants will be best showcased late in the
boil, while more delicate flavors might be best
when added after fermentation. Try different
methods and take good notes. You also dont
have to commit to a full-sized batch of beer
to use local flavors. Making a tea or tincture
of botanicals is an excellent way to test flavor
combinations and work out how much of an
ingredient to use.

62 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Brewers at Smog City


Brewing pure kumquats
picked from urban fruit
trees in Los Angeles.

The whole staff has gotten involved and passionate about it. Nahmias adds, Beer is a real connector for our Food Forward community. Were hopeful this is the first of an ongoing collaboration.
Smog Citys Kumquat Saison made its official debut at the Food
Forward Spring Melt fund-raising dinner in April, and the Porters
were on hand to pour the collaborative brew. The beer was delicately tart with an intense citrus flavor balanced against the earthy
character of the saison yeast. It was full of flavor, yet eminently
drinkable, and the crowd response was overwhelmingly positive.
This might be my favorite beer weve ever brewed. I could drink
it always, Laurie Porter said before telling a story of one harvest
she helped with. It was a decades-old backyard tree that an avid
homebrewer had planted. Each year he had made his own kumquat beer, but hed recently passed away. His widow and daughter
were present for the pick that yielded 250 pounds of fruit, and they
said their husband and father would be proud to know kumquats
from that old tree were still getting made into beer.

Sharing a Goal
While the beer industry in Los Angeles may be underdeveloped,
brewers who look beyond established paths and who bring dedication and creativity to the scene are helping it catch up fast.
For Mark Jilg, place is as important an ingredient as barley,
hops, or water. His quest for authenticity and creative expression
has fueled decades of experimentation with local flavors. Bob
Kunz highlights local flavors as a way to establish ties between
his young brewery and the changing neighborhood where he
lives and works. Jonathan and Laurie Porter define their brand
through a tireless search for exciting flavor combinations.
Different as they are, all three breweries share a goal: They want
to share the abundance of natural flavors that grow around and
throughout Los Angeles with the swelling crowd of craft-beer
fans in L.A.s developing scene.
The Porters have moved from their old home and had to
leave behind the kumquat tree and the fennel, but their new
home holds possibilities that excite Laurie Porter. Shes already
purchased almost an orchards worth of citrus trees, and she says
of her new neighborhood, The landscape is so different. Who
knows what [flavors] well find.

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| 63

| PICK SIX |

Sweet, Sour,
Smoky, and
Spicy
Patrick Rue, founder of Californias
The Bruery, chooses an international
and intensely flavorful six pack.
BREWING BEER PROVED MORE
enticing than practicing law for Patrick
Rue, founder of Californias The Bruery.
Upon graduating from law school, the
award-winning homebrewer chose to
jump into the (then) risky business of
brewing. To make matters even more
difficult, he chose to focus on 750ml
bottles of Belgian-style beers rather than
packaging formats or styles more familiar
to American beer drinkers.
But time, and a growing sophistication
in American beer drinkers, worked in
his favor, and today The Bruery is known
for creative and boundary-pushing beers
primarily aged in wine and spirits barrels.
Some of their most well-respected and
highly-rated beer never makes it to store
shelves, sold instead through their three-

64 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

tiered society program (modeled on similar


programs pioneered by wineries), but that
hasnt stopped their barrel-aged imperial stouts such as Black Tuesday, Gray
Monday, and Chocolate Rain from winning
awards and drawing huge crowds at the
rare-beer festivals where theyre served.
So what beers does Rue, the eighth
certified Master Cicerone, grab when hes
not drinking one of his own? Heres the
six pack he assembled.

Hitachino Nest White Ale


Kiuchi Brewery, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
I came across this beer when I started
homebrewing, and it was a revelation to
me. It has the perfect proportion of spicing where the nutmeg and coriander have
an impact on flavor but not to the point
where the spices are identifiable. Lightly
acidic, creamy with citrus notes, this is
one of those perfect beers. A fantastic
Belgian-style wit brewed in Japan gave
me the confidence that great Belgian-style
beers could be brewed anywhere, maybe
even Orange County, California.

Duvel
Duvel Moortgat Brewery, Breendonk,
Belgium
Duvel is the ultimate hangover beer. After
a hard night (which I try to avoid), where
I struggle to drink even a glass of water,
Duvel will bring me back to life. Dry,
effervescent, complex yet simple, this is

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| PICK SIX |

a classic beer that piqued my interest in


Belgian beer.

qualities; Id love to try them side by side


and see which one I prefer.

Gouden Carolus Cuvee van


de Keizer Blauw

Oude Geuze

Reds Rye IPA


Founders Brewing Company, Grand
Rapids, Michigan
I always seek out this beer when I travel,
as its not (yet) distributed in Southern
California. I love dry, spicy, hoppy red
alestheyre much more interesting to
me than IPAs. The subtle roast and rye
spice balanced with citrusy and pine-like
hops are a perfect combo for me. Modern
Times Blazing World has filled this hole
for me as a local offering with similar

Brouwerij 3 Fonteinen, Beersel, Belgium


This beer perfectly captures the place its
made, the tiny town of Beerseltheyre
both old, quaint, charming, a bit funky,
and hard to find. It has notes of hay, leather, apricot, cellar must, and leafy, spicy
hops in the background. Id drink this
every day if I could.

Schlenkerla Urbock
Schlenkerla, Bamberg, Germany
To my palate, smoked beers can be really
amazing or really terrible. Schlenkerla
falls on the amazing side of thingsthe
smoke gives a savory, smoked-sausage
sort of quality. All of their beers are
amazing, but Urbock is my favorite. It
has the perfect level of maltiness to carry
the smoked flavors. When I think of an
ideal brewery, I think of Schlenkerla.
They know who they are today and who
they want to be in 100 years. I love their
commitment to smoked beer, to being a
small family brewery. Sometimes I wish I
had that level of restraint and focus.

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66 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

PHOTO: COURTESY THE BRUERY

Brouwerij Het Anker, Mechelen, Belgium


There are so many great Belgian strong
dark ales out there, its really hard to
choose among them. Cuvee Van de Keizer
from Brouwerij Het Anker is one that my
wife, Rachel, and I love to drink together.
Dried figs, licorice, brown sugar, a hint
of citrusits damn good. After years of
drinking this fantastic beer, I visited this
historic brewery and gained even more
respect for it.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 67

g Magazine
ft Beer & Brewin

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Fresh
Hops
PHOTOS: MATT GRAVES

Each year, brewers have a several-week window


of time in which to brew special beers that take
advantage of flavors not available to them yearround. Heres what you need to know about
tasting and brewing beers with

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 69

| FRESH HOPS |

Taste the
Freshness
Stan Hieronymus shares the three keys to brewing successfully with wet
hops and the four rules of hops that you should understand.
TREVOR HOLMES, HEAD BREWER
AT Wadworth Brewery in the south of
England, surely was not the first to add
freshly picked hops to a batch of beer
that likely happened hundreds, maybe
even thousands, of years before Holmes
made the first batch of Malt n Hops in
1992. However, his beer begat the first
Sierra Nevada Harvest Ale in 1996, which
in turn begat hundreds of beers variously
described as wet hopped or fresh hopped.
The two arent necessarily the same.
Brewers sometimes describe hops right out
of a drying kiln as fresh, so fresh-hops
beers may be brewed with either dried
hops or unkilned hops. Wet hops are never
kilned. The difference matters in the brewing kettle just as much as in the glass.
The first time Holmes brewed Malt n
Hops, he expected the 100-barrel batch
to last a month. It sold out in a week.
The late Michael Jackson described it as
having a surge of cleansing, refreshing,
resiny, almost orange-zest flavors; and,
finally, an astonishingly late, long finish
of fresh, appetite-arousing bitterness.
Sierra Nevada Brewmaster Steve Dresler

70 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

learned about the beer secondhand, from


Gerard Lemmens, a native of England who
worked for an American hops broker at the
time. Dresler was otherwise left to his own
devices, but these days the path is better
marked. There are three keys to brewing
successfully with wet hops and four rules
of hops that you should understand.

What You Really Need


to Know

WET HOPS TRULY ARE WET.

Water accounts for about 80 percent of


the weight of unkilned hops cones and 10
percent of dried hops. Thats why most
brewers add five to eight times, measured
by weight, more wet hops than they would
dry. The wet hops will take up more room
in the kettle, not five times more, but
enough to consider reducing the batch
size. Theyll also add water that needs
to be considered when calculating final
gravities. To brew HopTime Harvest Ale,
Vinnie Cilurzo at Russian River Brewing
makes three hops additions: at the beginning of a 90-minute boil, with 30 minutes

to go, and at the end. He knows hes on


track to hit his target gravity when the
reading with 30 minutes to go matches
his final target because the last two hops
additions will contain as much moisture
as will evaporate in 30 minutes.

FRESH MATTERS.

Because cones contain such a high percentage of water, they literally begin to rot shortly
after they are picked, which is why farmers
transport them directly from the field to
drying kilns. They generally must be dried
or added to a batch of beer within 24 to 48
hours after they are picked. Brewers in the
Northwest, located close to the farms where
most of Americas hops are grown, often
dispatch their own trucks to collect freshly
harvested hops. Back at the brewery, another
crew will start the mash based upon when
they expect the hops to arrive. Brewers elsewhere may have hops shipped overnight.
YCH HOPS expects to sell about 20 tons
of Green Hops during the 2015 harvest,
shipping them across the United States,
including to Alaska and Hawaii.
The resurgence in hops growing outside
the Northwest has made it easier for
commercial brewers and homebrewers
to find locally grown fresh hops. And of
course, some commercial brewers and

| FRESH HOPS |

Growing Your Own Hops


Interesting in growing your own hops? Follow these seven simple steps:
Good hops arent hard to find. Chances
are your local homebrew store carries at
least a dozen varieties, probably many
more. And even if it doesnt (or if you
dont have a local homebrew store),
Internet commerce offers the promise
of hops delivered right to your door in
as few business days as youre willing
to pay for. But with a little planning and
some TLC, you can also grow your own.
Growing your own hops is a rewarding and surprisingly easy way to make
your brew uniquely yours. A full treatise
on planting a hops garden can easily
occupy several volumes, but to get
started, you need to master only seven
simple steps.
1. Buy your rhizomes in March or April.
Some retailers offer presales as early
as January, but preordering usually
isnt necessary unless youre after a
particularly in-demand variety (keep
in mind, though, that many of todays
most popular cultivarsthink Amarillo,
Citra, Mosaic, and Simcoeare patented,
proprietary, and not for sale). In many
cases, you can simply put your name on
a list at your local store, and someone
will call when the rhizomes arrive. Once
you receive your baby hops, keep them
in the refrigerator until its time to plant.
2. Plant the rhizomes once the
ground has thawed and your area
has safely passed beyond the
specter of winter.
Choose a south-facing location that
receives plenty of daytime sunlight,
ideally one that is slightly elevated and
drains well. Place rhizomes of the same
variety about 3 feet (1 meter) apart and
keep different cultivars at least 6 feet (2
meters) from one another. Bury each
rhizome about 612 inches (1530 cm)
deep, oriented horizontally.
3. Nurture your growing plants with
frequent light waterings.
Your goal is to provide enough water to
help the plant establish its roots, but not
so much that the rhizomes start to rot.
Once the first shoots break the surface of
the soil (24 weeks after planting), things
will start moving quicklyits not uncommon for plants to grow up to a foot (30
cm) per day at the height of summer!

72 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

4. Support the hops bines as they grow.


Hops prefer to grow vertically. Effective
support methods range from simple
lengths of sturdy twine to sophisticated trellis systems. Just make sure that
whatever you choose is strong enough
to hold a full-grown, heavy plant: Commercial hops farms feature trellises as
tall as 20 feet (6 meters).
5. Harvest your homegrown hops
when they are ready.
By late August or early September, the
cones will lighten in color and begin to
dry and feel papery. These visual and
tactile clues are your indication that its
time to harvest, though a more scientific
approach is to conduct a dry matter test
(see Ask the Experts, page 104). Once
youve made the decision to harvest,
simply snip the top of the twine that the
plant has climbed and lay the bine flat on
the ground (if your hops grow on a trellis,
you can leave the bines in place as you
harvest the cones). Pick the cones from
the bine and either use them straight
away (within 24 hours) in a wet-hopped
beer or dry them for future use. Leave
the bines attached to the plant until the
first frost, then cut the plants about a foot
(30 cm) above the ground and discard
the bines in preparation for winter.
6. Dry your hops immediately if you
plan to save them for later.
A food dehydrator can do the job, but
many home growers build makeshift
racks to handle the harvest. You can
alternate window screens, air filters, or
chicken wire with single layers of hops
and blow air over the rig with a box fan.
Youre aiming for brittle, papery-feeling
hops cones with stems that snap when
bent. A warm garage is an ideal location
in which to dry hops because its out of
the sun but hot enough (without being
too hot) to encourage rapid dehydration.
7. Store your dried homegrown hops
as you would (or should) store any
other hops.
Vacuum seal them to keep oxidation at
bay and freeze them to preserve freshness. Well-stored hops should remain
good for at least a year. But if you brew as
frequently as we do, theres no way theyll
last that long. Dave Carpenter

homebrewers simply grow their own (see


Growing Your Own Hops, left).

IT IS POSSIBLE TO USE
TOO MUCH.

Theres a point of saturation at which


grassy is no longer a positive attribute,
and the experience becomes more like
chewing on green leaves. I really want
the aroma. The freshness is what its
about, Sierra Nevadas Dresler says.
If you try to drive up the bitterness [by
adding more wet hops], youll start to get
those grassy notes, chlorophylly. Thats
one reason to consider using dried hops,
including in pellet form, for the bittering
addition. It not only reduces the hops
load in the kettle, but it also provides a
known source of alpha acids. Another
reason to use dry hops for bittering is that
home growers can only guess how much
bitterness the hops from their backyards
may add.

Four Rules of Hops

HOPS CHEMISTRY BEFORE


THE KETTLE

The aromas and flavors from wet hops


that brewers covet are products of
essential oils that increase dramatically
throughout the weeks before harvest and
will continue to change even after hops
are dried and stored in bales. During the
2013 harvest, Sierra Nevada measured the
essential oil content of early harvested
Cascade hops at 0.30.7 percent, while
hops picked three to four days later
contained 0.71 percent and smelled more
floral. Cascade picked at mid-harvest had
11.5 percent oils, and mid- to late-harvest
hops 1.52 percent. Those were more floral, with citrus and emerging pine notes.
Cascades picked two and a half weeks
after the first hops had up to 3 percent
oil. At their best, they had pleasant herbal
and woody aromas but sometimes less
pleasant onion and garlic character.
Research at Oregon State University has
shown that not only does the amount of
oil change, but so does the composition.
Unfortunately, there are no studies comparing the differences between wet hops
and those that have been kilned. This is
not a scientific exploration of brewing,
says Ninkasi Brewing Cofounder Jamie
Floyd, who brews multiple wet-hops beers
each harvest. Wheres the economic benefit of analyzing a beer made once a year?

HOPS CHEMISTRY IN THE


KETTLE

Boiling triggers many of hops positive


attributes, but it also removes oil. Brewers
concerned with adding a known amount
of bitterness to beer may choose to use
dried hops with measured alpha acids
during the boil. Those concerned with
preserving oilsand that is much of
the point of wet-hopped beersshould
remember that a study in Japan found
that boiling only 10 minutes drives off half
of valuable compounds such as linalool
and gernaniol. Thats why many brewers
choose to add wet hops only at flameout
or in a hops stand (whirlpool hopping).

HOPS CHEMISTRY DURING


FERMENTATION AND DRY
HOPPING

Hops scientists agree that more research


is needed on the biotransformations
of hops compounds that occur in the
presence of yeast, but recent studies prove
that new ones are certainly created. Thats
another reason to expect the aromas in
wet-hopped beers to differ from those
made with kilned hops and also why
brewers should not expect a wet-hopped
beer to smell just like hops picked directly
off the bine. When I taste it the first 12
or 24 hours [into fermentation], all I get
is chlorophyll, says Jeremy Marshall at
Lagunitas Brewing. The first time we
made [a wet-hopped beer], it tasted like a
cigar. I almost dropped a batch because of
the cigar taste. Then it starts to open up;
the oils go through.

HOPS CHEMISTRY IN THE


PACKAGE

John Harris at Ecliptic Brewing in


Portland, Oregon, does not favor bottling
fresh-hopped beers. I think they fall
apart too fast to put them in the bottle.
In a month they are a different beer, he
says. However, there is no reason that the
aromas from wet-hopped beers would
be any more ephemeral than any other
hops aromas. Tom Nielsen, manager of
Raw Material Development and Quality at
Sierra Nevada, points out that poor oxygen
control in the bottling process will injure
any hoppy beer and that crown liners may
scalp aroma. However, he wrote in an
email, Our harvest ales hold up exceedingly well in the bottleprobably some of
the best storing beer we make.
Because they taste fresh.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 73

| FRESH HOPS |
Opposite Left Hand
Brewing relies on local pilots
to fly in their fresh hops
from farms in Paonia, on
Colorados Western Slope.

The Last
Seasonal
BREWERS PERSPECTIVES:

Wet hops are a flavorful argument against having everything, all the time.
Dave Carpenter gets the lowdown on how professional brewers get the
best results with freshly harvested hops.
WE LIVE AT A TIME when most foods
are available most of the time. Want to
brew a pumpkin beer? Look in your cupboard and think back to last Thanksgiving.
Youll probably uncover pure that had
been sentenced to another year in the can.
But year-round availability of onceseasonal products is a new phenomenon. Canned goods as we know them
didnt exist until after the American Civil
War, when the invention of double-seam
canning made sanitary seals a reality. It
would take a few more decades before mechanical refrigeration (developed, in part,
to meet the demands of brewers) would
widely deploy itself in households.
So for most of human history, our
customs, our rituals, even our bacchanals,
have been ruled by the perpetual but predictable cosmic waltz of earth and sun.
The same is true for the beer we drink.
Lager brewing, once impossibleeven
prohibitedin summer, is now a yearround operation for breweries worldwide.
And the very climate control that enables
on-demand cold fermentation also preserves hops, malt, and yeast, empowering
brewers to bring forth beer of any kind
at any time. Today, seasonality is guided
more by our nostalgic notions than by
agricultural constraints. Almost.

74 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Hops, the bitter, aromatic cones of Humulus lupulus that are so critical to modern beer,
grow only from late spring to late summer.
Accordingly, the hops harvest comes but
once a year, starting in August and winding
down by the end of September in the Northern Hemisphere (mid-February through
early April in the Southern Hemisphere).
And while the vast majority of the haul is
destined for drying in oast houses for yearround use, a select few end up in brewers
kettles within a day of having been picked.
These freshly harvested hops take us right
back to the days of Use-It-Or-Lose-It. Every
autumn, brewers rush to give us a wide
range of wet-hopped ales and lagers, beers
that beg to be enjoyed in the moment.
In a world of always available, wet-hopped
beer may very well be the last seasonal.

A Serious Seasonal
Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, Colorado, is well known for its wildly
successful Milk Stout Nitro. Having solved
the challenge of cramming innumerable
tiny nitrogen bubbles into a 12-ounce glass
bottle, sans widget, Left Hand has become
synonymous with creamy nitro pours and
smooth malty silk. But that hasnt stopped
its once-a-year Warrior IPA from tickling
tongues and turning heads.

With an original gravity of 1.066 (16.2P)


and an alcohol by volume (ABV) of 7.3 percent, Warrior IPAs base of pale, Munich,
and caramel malts delivers a sturdy framework upon which to hang wet, locally
grown Cascade hops.
Joe Schiraldi, vice president of brewing
operations at Left Hand Brewing, used to
overnight wet hops from Yakima, Washington, but the freight fees for hundreds of
pounds of hops more than quintupled the
cost of the hops themselves. Now he sources a more local product. Every year, usually
in the last week of August, Schiraldi drives
over the Continental Divide to help harvest
and haul back truckloads of fresh Cascades
from farms near Paonia, a high, dry, sunny
town on Colorados Western Slope.
More recently, a couple of locals who
frequent Left Hands taproom have taken
the whole freshness thing a step further.
The two experienced pilots volunteer their
time and their aircraft to mount a precision touch-and-go hops recovery operation. Schiraldis Cascades go from bine to
kettle in just a few hours time.
In Left Hands brew house, fresh Colorado Cascades are used both in the kettle
and in the hopback. But because wet hops
occupy so much more volume than their
dried counterparts, Schiraldi actually runs
finished wort from the kettle back through
the lauter tunwhich he crams full of
hopson its way to the fermentor. Tying
up the lauter tun in this way means waiting
eight hours between batches, but for Left

way. You really get to explore the terroir


of where the hops are grown, he notes.
Working with wet hops means getting to
know the plant at a fundamental level.

A Super Seasonal

Hand and its legions of thirsty hopheads,


the minor blip in production is worth it.
For Schiraldi, it all comes back to freshness. Anything you can smell is no longer
in the hops cone, he reminds me. You
have to get [the hops] in the kettle as soon
as possible.

PHOTO: LEFT HAND BREWING CO.

A Sticky Seasonal
Eighty miles west and three thousand
feet up, Vail, Colorado, is internationally
famous for world-class skiing, pricey real
estate, and celebrity sightings. A short
drive from the ski slopes, in the small
town of Edwards, Crazy Mountain Brewery
turns out crafty concoctions with such
memorable names as Horseshoes & Hand
Grenades American ESB, Hookiebobb IPA,
and Lawyers, Guns & Money Barleywine.
CEO and Brewmaster Kevin Selvy left
a career in finance to get his feet wet and
his fingers sticky in craft brewing. Following several California gigs, including a
stint at Anchor Brewing Company, Selvy
opened Crazy Mountain in 2010. His reverence for hops shines through in Crazy

Mountains Sticky Fingers Wet Hopped


Ale, the name of which is a nod to the
sticky residue that clings to ones hands after a day of picking hops (it also happens
to be a Rolling Stones album).
Like Left Hands Schiraldi, Selvy relies on
wet hops for late kettle additions. His close
proximity to Western Slope hops farms
means that many of the fresh Cascades and
Chinooks that find their way into Crazy
Mountains kettle have been off the bine
less than two hours. Its so much fun to
work with wet hops, he says, but you only
get to do so a couple of days each year.
Selvy brews Sticky Fingers for many
reasons, but he especially enjoys the intimate
connection it offers to the raw ingredients.
Production brewing means making lots of
the same thing over and over, he observes.
Wet-hopped beer, however, removes routine
from the equation because youre constantly
monitoring lab results, weather, and the
condition of the plants to know just when to
harvest them. And you have to be ready for
them when they come off the bines.
But Selvy wouldnt have it any other

Superpowers usually develop over a


period of time, quietly amassing wealth,
steadily developing infrastructure, and
gradually increasing in profile and
influence with measured strides. A few,
however, are forged in the immediacy of
revolution, an overnight sea change thrust
upon the global stage. Comrade Brewing
Company, situated between the arbitrary
political borders of Denvers Indian Creek,
Goldsmith, and Hampden neighborhoods, is one such example.
Behind the communist-themed faade,
Founder David Lin (The Chairman)
and Brewmaster Marks Lantham (The
Supreme Commander) produce what
many are calling the best IPA in Colorado.
Superpower IPA features a triumvirate of
the worlds most wanted Pacific Northwest
hops: Citra, Amarillo, and Simcoe. But it
is Superpowers wet-hopped comrade that
energized the proletariat at 2014s Great
American Beer Festival (GABF), so much
so that judges awarded it silver in the Fresh
or Wet Hop Ale category. The brewery had
been open fewer than six months when Lin
and Lanham took home the medal.
I started looking for hops in 2012,
knowing that wed need the right contracts
in place to keep up with demand, says
Lin. But while Superpowers base model
relies on a suite of proprietary hops that
bear trademarked names, it was stalwart
standbys Cascade and Chinook that
carried Fresh Hop Superpower past the
kiss-and-cry area at GABF. For Lin, freshness, not variety, is mission critical when
working with wet hops.
You only get to make wet-hopped beer
once a year, so make the most of it, he
advises brewers. Dont avoid using wet
hops just because you cant get your hands
on a certain type. Freshness comes first.
Variety is an afterthought.

The Last Seasonal


Imperial everything is giving way to the
subtleties of session, and glass longnecks
are yielding ever more shelf space to
aluminum cans. But fresh-hopped beers
appear to be here to stay, and it is clear
that freshness comes first, that the hops
need to speak for themselves.
The same unprocessed approach that lets
the fresh-hops character shine through in
the glass also guarantees that the experience will be a fleeting pleasure. Fresh hops
remind us that there is virtue in reserving
some things for special occasions.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 75

Wet Hops Recipes


We asked four professional brewers to share their recipes for fresh(wet-) hops beers. Each brewery has a different approach to using wet
hops. Here are a harvest ale recipe, two IPA recipes, and a lager recipe
for you to try your hand at different ways of using wet hops. All recipes
have been scaled to 5.25 gallons from the original recipe, and they
assume 72% brewhouse efficiency. Wet-hops additions have been
italicized to distinguish them from dried-hops additions.

Sticky Fingers
Harvest Ale

Fresh Hops
Superpower IPA

Crazy Mountain Brewing Company


(Vail, Colorado)

Comrade Brewing Company


(Denver, Colorado)

ALL-GRAIN

ALL-GRAIN

Kevin Selvy, founder and CEO of Crazy


Mountain Brewing Company shared this
recipe for a tasty wet-hops harvest ale.

Comrade Brewings wet-hops American


IPA won a 2014 GABF silver medal. With
loads of Pacific Northwest hops, it has
huge pine and grapefruit hops aromas,
with flavors of citrus and balanced bitterness with a light malt character.

OG: 1.060
FG: 1.012
IBUs: 63
ABV: 6.5%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

10.75 lb (4.88 kg) Pale malt


0.5 lb (227 g) Crystal 20
0.5 lb (227 g) Crystal 40
0.5 lb (227 g) Crystal 60
HOPS SCHEDULE

1 oz (28 g) Chinook pellets at 60 minutes


0.75 oz (21g) Chinook pellets at 21 minutes
8 oz (227 g) Chinook wet hops at 7 minutes
8 oz (227 g) Cascade wet hops at 7 minutes
5 oz (142 g) Chinook wet hops at knockout
5 oz (142 g) Cascade wet hops at knockout
DIRECTIONS

Mash at 152F (67C) for 60 minutes. Boil


for 60 minutes following the hops schedule.
YEAST OPTIONS

Wyeast 1056 American Ale, White Labs


WLP001 California Ale, or Fermentis US-05
BREWERS NOTES

Vail Valley water is very hard. Heres the


water profile we use (its a pretty typical Burton-style water profile) if you want to match it:

Calcium 223 parts per million (ppm)


Magnesium 10 ppm
Sodium 44 ppm
Sulfate 490 ppm
Bicarbonate 51 ppm
Chloride 69 ppm

76 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

OG: 1.066
FG: 1.011
IBUs: 100+
ABV: 7.5%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

12 lb (5.4 kg) Pale malt (2-row)


8 oz (227 g) Crystal 15 malt
7 oz (198 g) Munich type II malt
6 oz (170 g) Wheat malt
HOPS SCHEDULE

0.25 oz (7 g) Citra [12% AA] at FWH


0.25 oz (7 g) Simcoe [13% AA] at FWH
0.50 oz (14 g) Chinook [13% AA] at
60minutes
0.25 oz (7 g) Amarillo [9.2% AA] at
30minutes
0.25 oz (7 g) Citra [12% AA] at 30 minutes
0.25 oz (7 g) Simcoe [13% AA] at 30minutes
0.50 oz (14 g) Amarillo [9.2% AA] at
10minutes
0.50 oz (14 g) Citra [12% AA] at 10 minutes
1 oz (28 g) Citra [12% AA] at 5 minutes
1 oz (28 g) Simcoe [13% AA] at 5 minutes
1 oz (28 g) Amarillo [9.2% AA] at knockout
1 oz (28 g) Citra [12% AA] at knockout
1 oz (28 g) Simcoe [13% AA] at knockout
5 lb (2.27 kg) blend of fresh (wet) hops,
whatever is available (Cascade and Chinook
recommended) at whirlpool/hopback
First dry-hop addition: Add after primary
fermentation and leave for 7 days total
1 oz (28 g) Citra
1 oz (28 g) Simcoe

1 oz (28 g) Amarillo
Second dry-hop addition: Add two days
after first dry-hop addition and leave for 5
days total
1 oz (28 g) Citra
1 oz (28 g) Simcoe
1 oz (28 g) Amarillo
DIRECTIONS

Mash the grains for 60 minutes at 154F


(68C). Boil for 60 minutes following
the hops schedule. Whirlpool and chill.
Ferment at 68F (20C) and dry hop in
two stages after fermentation. Fine for
clarity, carbonate to 2.6 volumes of carbon
dioxide, and serve fresh.
YEAST

Wyeast 1056 American Ale, White Labs


WLP001 California Ale, or Fermentis US-05
BREWERS NOTE

The 5 pounds (2.27 kg) of wet hops


added post-boil occupy about 5 gallons
(19 liters). Therefore, you either need to
devise a 5-gallon hopback or make sure
theres enough extra space in your brew
kettle to accommodate the wet hops as the
wort chills. A 10-gallon (37.8 l) kettle for a
5-gallon batch should work well.

Fresh IPA
Fort George Brewery (Astoria, Oregon)
ALL-GRAIN
Jack Harris of Fort George Brewery
provided this recipe for their wet-hops
India pale ale. Says the website, Fresh
IPA is like beer in 3Dwithout those silly
glasses. Expect hints of citrus, resin, and
fruit to flood forward, followed by a piney,
earthy complexity.
OG: 1.067
FG: 1.015
IBUs: 90
ABV: 6.5%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

12 lb (5.4 kg) organic pale malt (2-row)


1 lb (454 g) flaked maize
8 oz (227 g) Crystal 15 malt
HOPS SCHEDULE

0.5 oz (14 g) Simcoe pellets [13% AA] at


90minutes
2 oz (57 g) Simcoe pellets [13% AA] at
30minutes
1 lb (454 g) fresh Simcoe wet hops at knockout
2 oz (57 g) Simcoe pellets dry hop 7 days

Brew Pots, Chemicals, Yeast,


Hops, Grain, Malt Extract,
Beer Kits, Kegs, Keg Fittings,
Carboy Accessories, Bottling,
Digital Thermostats, CO2
Regulators, & More!

DIRECTIONS

Mash the grains for 60 minutes at


154F (68C). Boil for 90 minutes, following the hops schedule. Whirlpool
and chill, then ferment at 66F (19C),
dry hop as indicated, and bottle or keg.
YEAST

Wyeast 1968 London ESB, White Labs


WLP002 English Ale, or Fermentis
S-04

Beer, Wine, Distilling,


Cheese Making Supplies

Mom & Pops


Wet Hops Lager
Jacks Abby Brewing (Framingham,
Massachusetts)
ALL-GRAIN
The recipe for this wet-hops lager from
Jacks Abby changes every year because
they use 10 percent local unmalted
grain (whatever is available that year)
and add as many wet hops as they can
fit into the kettle. Says Sonia Friedman, marketing manager for Jacks
Abby, [The approach] isnt particularly
scientific, but it delivers a truly unique
flavor that cant be replicated.
OG: 1.054
FG: 1.015
IBUs: Varies
ABV: 5.2%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

AT LEAST YOUR BEER

Will Look Good!


CUSTOMIZABLE, REUSABLE

BEER LABELS
BOTTLE CAPS
COASTERS
METAL PUB SIGNS
KEG & CARBOY LABELS
& MORE

9.5 lb (4.3 kg) locally sourced pale malt


1 lb (454 g) locally sourced unmalted
rye, wheat, spelt, or triticale
HOPS SCHEDULE

Hops and schedule vary, but add as many


local wet hops as can fit into the kettle
and hopback.
DIRECTIONS

Follow your usual mash, boil, and lager fermentation regimen. For sample
regimens, see Craft Beer & Brewing
Magazines Lager issue (Fall 2014).
Each batch of this beer is meant to be
fresh, local, and unique!
YEAST

Choose your favorite lager yeast.


Weihenstephan 34 / 70 is a worldwide
favorite among lager brewers and will
deliver outstanding results.

grogtag.com

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AT CHECKOUT

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BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 77

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| HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE |

GOODBYE, TEENAGE
BODY WASH
Hello, dense chunk of cleanliness. Discover new levels
of outdoorsy freshness with
these rustic all-natural beer
soaps made from Georgia
homebrew.
redbeardbrewbars.com

There's no place like home for the


holidays, and where there's home,
there's homebrew! These beer-related
gifts are sure to excite any
beer lover or homebrewer...

Holiday
Gift Guide

GET SALTY
Hops are good. Sea salt is
good. Hops-infused sea salt
is brilliant. Perfect for rubs,
meats, fish, or rimming that
Bloody Mary (on the rare
occasion youre not drinking
beer). hoppycooking.com

THE PICKPOCKET
This titanium key-chain
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slips nicely into your pocket
and hangs keys without
bulging at the bottom.
Lightweight and durable, the
Torq model includes a clever
integrated " wrench.
pangea-designs.com

MAKE IT PERSONAL
Homebrewed beer is
one-of-a-kind, so match it
with reusable labels from
Grogtag. Customize one of
their stock designs or upload
your own label art for bottles,
kegs, growlers, personalized
coasters, bottle caps, and
more. Thoughtful gifts for
the homebrewer in your life.
grogtag.com

BEER LOVER'S GIFT


BASKET
Perfect for that beer lover in
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Beerloved offers gift baskets
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hop candy to beer spice rubs
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OPENING ACT
Made from repurposed
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Give the craft-beer lover in
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Cicerone is a great way to
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Coming to our next issue, Holiday


Gift Guide 2015! The showcase
for beer-related gifts that are sure
to excite any beer lover or brewer.

16 |

SERIOUSLY HEAVY
DUTY
You could break out of jail
with one of these things. The
overbuilt 11-gauge stainless
steel performance lager
lever from Beersnap even
includes a beveled edge to
cut through those special
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WHATS BEHIND THE


MILK?
A keg of killer homebrew.
Small enough to fit in
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Uses standard corny keg
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POP A CAP IN IT
Do something useful with
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BROWN BAG IT
These handmade soaps use
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CRAFT BEER & BREWING

016_CBB4-Holiday Gift Guide-jb-tfa-na.indd 16

BEERANDBREWING.COM

9/2/14 8:43 PM

016_CBB4-Holiday Gift Guide-jb-tfa-na.indd 17

| 17

9/2/14 8:43 PM

If you have a beer-related product youd like to have


considered for inclusion, please contact Alex Johnson at
ajohnson@beerandbrewing.com or 888.875.8708 x707.

The season arrives earlier


and earlier every year, as
critics decry it and beer
geeks roll their eyes,
but still the venerable
pumpkin beer remains
one of the most popular
seasonal beers on
brewers calendars.
We talked to top
commercial brewers
and an award-winning
homebrewer to find
out just what makes
pumpkin beers
so polarizing
yet so delicious.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 79

| PUMPKIN BEERS |

Pumpkin,
Spice, and
Everything
Nice
BREWERS GENERALLY AGREE THAT
there are two ways to design a pumpkin
beergo for a harvest-style ale that highlights the vegetal flavors of the pumpkin
itself or dig into the spice rack and make a
beer that mimics a pumpkin pie unless,
of course, youre making a pumpkinenhanced stout or porter, in which case
pumpkin can add an umami-like background complexity with perhaps a dash of
spice; or a barrel-aged pumpkin brew with
oaky notes of bourbon or rum; or even a
spontaneously fermented pumpkin sour
such as Allagash Brewings Ghoulschip
(Portland, Maine); or a Brett-fermented
pumpkin ale such as Elysian Brewings
Headless Horsey (Seattle, Washington).
As the cult-like obsession with pumpkin
beers intensifiespumpkin beers are
typically the top-selling seasonal release
among breweries that make thembrewers
are finding inventive ways to explore the
fringes of this once gimmicky style.

The Great Pumpkin


Its said that, years ago, Elysian Founder
Dick Cantwell and fellow brewers made a
pumpkin ale, and it was pretty good. They
tried again, and it was terrible. So they
made a third batch and invited a few hun-

80 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

dred friends to the Seattle-based brewery


for a tasting party.
A decade later, Elysians annual Great
Pumpkin Beer Festival attracts 4,000 people over two days and serves about eighty
different pumpkin beers from breweries
near and far, including roughly twenty
varieties from Elysian itself. The fest is
perhaps the greatest concentration of
pumpkin beers on the planet and a living
laboratory for brewers to see how far they
can take the style.
With so many [pumpkin beers] under
our belt, its fun to challenge each other
and say, Okay, whats the next thing? How
much farther can we spread our wings
within pumpkin? says Elysian Head
Brewer Josh Waldman. I dont know if
there is a limit.
One thing that Waldman and fellow
brewers agree onas does the Alcohol
and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB),
according to recent labeling guidelines
is that a pumpkin beer must contain at
least a little bit of actual pumpkin, otherwise its a pumpkin-spice beer, he says.
Elysian uses mostly Golden Delicious
pumpkins in its beers. The gourds are
blanched, the pulp separated and seeds
removed, and delivered to Elysian as

PHOTOS: MATT GRAVES

As pumpkin-flavored beers continue to grow in popularity,


brewers experiment with a variety of ingredients and techniques
to make these most culinary of beers. Tom Wilmes gets the
scoop on successfully spiced beers from three pumpkin pros.

buckets of pured pumpkin meat. Elysian


brewers also frequently use canned pumpkin, such as Libbys brand, especially
when making smaller batches. Its really
great for brewing, Waldman says. Just be
sure to use pure pumpkin pure rather
than pumpkin-pie filling, which contains
spices and preservatives.
Roasting the pumpkins first is another
popular preparation. Some brewers cover
sliced pumpkin chunks with sugar and
roast them in a convection oven to impart a
little sweetness to the meat. Elysian, however, relies on its grain billspecifically specialty malts such as caramel and Munich
maltsto balance the raw pumpkin flavor.
You want a little bit of that gourdy
character, Waldman says, but if you can
soften up the vegetal quality with a touch
of caramel on the palate, that sets up a nice
base for any spicing that youre going to do.
Depending on what form the pumpkins
are in when added to the mash tun, its
also wise to adjust gravity calculations to
compensate for the portion of water in the
pumpkin. Brix-wise its pretty low, but if
you take a bunch of pured pumpkin and
drop it in, its likely going to drop your
gravity, Waldman says. We keep notes
and have learned from experience. We can
also compensate by adjusting successive
batches or successive brews.
Elysian does most of its spicing on the
cold side, just a few days before packaging, to impart more subtle spice flavors
and aroma to the beer. Spices added on
the hot side will have a more dominant
presence in the finished beer, but also
run the risk of becoming bitter if allowed
to steep too long. Less is more when
it comes to spicing, unless you want to
crank something up because thats what
youre going for, Waldman says. We also
schedule a few extra days in the conditioning tank in case a batch needs an extra
dose. Its all done according to taste.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

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| PUMPKIN BEERS |

Popular Pumpkin Beer Spices


Brewers use any number of spices to evoke warm feelings of fall in their pumpkin beers.
Here are a few of the more popular spices used, along with the common flavors they impart.

Cinnamon

Ginger

Nutmeg

Mace

Allspice

Cloves

Cinnamon is the
dried bark of various
trees in the genus
Cinnamomum. It
has a sweet, spicy,
woody fragrance. In
commercial pumpkin-pie spice blends,
cinnamon comprises
almost half of the
blend, so cinnamon
is essential if you
want that pumpkin-pie taste in your
pumpkin beer. Cassia
cinnamon is the grocery-store variety and
tastes stronger and
hotter than Ceylon
cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum), which is
sold in gourmet stores.
Ceylon cinnamon is
lighter in color and
has a lighter, brighter
fragrance. Brewers
seem to be divided
on whether cassia or
Ceylon cinnamon
is better in pumpkin
beers.

Ginger is the rhizome


of a perennial in the
Zingiberaceae family. In Savoring Spices
and Herbs, Chef Julie
Sahni describes gingers flavor as spicy
camphoric and its
aroma as peppery,
reminiscent of
cloves and lemon,
cedar and mint.
Fresh ginger has a
stronger flavor than
ground ginger. Like
cinnamon, ginger
can enhance both
savory and sweet
dishes. In commercial pumpkin-pie
spice blends, ginger
comprises 2530
percent of the blend.

Nutmeg is the ovalshaped fruit pit of


an evergreen tree in
the genus Myristica
that is native to the
Moluccasthe Spice
Islands. The most
important commercial species is Myristica fragrans. Nutmeg
has a strong nutty,
slightly sweet flavor
that, like cinnamon
and ginger, enhances both sweet
and savory dishes.
Whole nutmeg nuts
store well and can be
grated as needed. In
commercial pumpkin-pie spice blends,
nutmeg comprises
710 percent of the
blend.

While nutmeg is
the pit of the fruit
of the Myristica
fragrans tree, mace
is the dried reddish
webbing that
surrounds the pit.
Maces flavor is more
pungent and spicier
than nutmegs. Some
find it similar to a
combination of cinnamon and pepper.
Mace lacks nutmegs
sweetness. In baking,
nutmeg and mace
have similar uses
but are seldom used
together: Commercial pumpkin-pie
spice blends seem
to be the exception.
Like nutmeg, mace
comprises 710 percent of the blend. In
brewing, experiment
to see whether you
prefer one more
than the other.

Despite its name,


allspice isnt a blend
of spices. It is the
dried unripe fruit of
the tree Pimenta
dioica, which is
native to southern
Mexico, Central
America, and the
Greater Antilles. Its
name arises from
the fact that many
people think its
warm sweet flavor
tastes like a blend of
cinnamon, cloves,
and nutmeg. In
commercial pumpkin-pie spice blends,
allspice comprises
710 percent of the
blend.

Cloves are the dried


unopened flower
buds of a tree in the
Myrtaceae family.
Their flavor is warm,
sweet, and intense.
They can bring out
and round off fruity
flavors (remember,
pumpkin is a fruit).
But a little goes a
long way. Eugenol,
one of a broad
class of phenolic
compounds, makes
up most of the taste
of cloves. Too many
cloves in the brew,
and you could
have what a lot of
judges would find
to be an off-flavor. In
commercial pumpkin-pie spice blends,
cloves comprise 57
percent of the blend.

Bottled Nostalgia
Geoff Logan, head brewer at AleWerks
Brewing Company in Williamsburg,
Virginia, modeled his spiced Pumpkin Ale
after his mothers pumpkin pie. He uses
biscuit malt and Munich malt to mimic
the toasty notes of the graham-cracker
crust, along with crystal malt and pale
malt to balance the pumpkin and spice
flavors in the filling. He also adds lactose,
which mimics the whipped-cream topping and also adds body and a creamy texture. Its like bottled nostalgia, he says.
Contrary to popular thought, Logan
finds that using roasted and pured butternut squash gives him a sweeter, richer,
and nuttier flavor than actual pumpkin.
We tested a whole bunch of pie pumpkins, but they were watery and runny
and didnt give us the same flavor, Logan
says. Its kind of odd, but the pumpkin
tasted more like squash and the butternut
squash tasted more like pumpkin.

82 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Logan adds bags of the squash pure


and hops to the wort throughout an hourlong boil, then flames out and adds some
spices to the kettle. He then pitches Whitbread ale yeast, lets the beer ferment, and
adds packets of dry spice at the end before
filtering and packaging. We went the pie
route, for sure, Logan says of the beer.
Logan is working with Frank Clark,
director of the Historic Foodways
department at nearby Colonial Williamsburg and a beer historian, to develop a

pumpkin beer thats more in line with


the colonial history of the style. AleWerks
currently brews three historic beer styles
that are served in the taverns and sold in
gift shops at Colonial Williamsburg.
Pumpkin is a New World plant and was
readily available to the colonists, Clark
says. The beer was probably tan to brown
in color, with a little bit of sweetness and
pumpkin flavor, along with the hops.
Sometimes theyd add ginger and maybe
molasses, as well.

We tested a whole bunch of pie pumpkins, but


they were watery and runny and didnt give us
the same flavor, Logan says. Its kind of odd, but
the pumpkin tasted more like squash and the
butternut squash tasted more like pumpkin.

Clark notes that eighteenth-century


colonists experimented with pumpkins,
squash, and all manner of adjuncts to
brew beer, especially as they moved
farther away from ports and rivers
with access to imported goods such as
English-made ale. Theres even a recipe
published in the Virginia Gazette for a
beer made from green corn stalks, Clark
says. That was also around the time they
were debating and passing the Nonimportation Agreements, which included ale.
They made beer from whatever ingredients they had on hand and probably tried
just about everything.

All Hail the King


Pumking, from Lakewood, New Yorks
Southern Tier Brewing Co., is one of
todays most highly rated pumpkin beers
and the beer that helped kick-start the
pumpkin craze when it was first released
in 2007. The brewery released roughly
25,000 barrels of Pumking last year,
according to Head Brewer Dustin Hazer,
and will introduce four-packs of 12-ounce
bottles, as well as 22-ounce bombers, with
this years release. We never really stop
thinking about it. The beer is never totally
off our minds, Hazer says of the seasonal
favorite.
Pumking is made with about one third
of a pound of roasted and pureed pumpkin per barrel in the mash, which lends
a golden color and a softer mouthfeel, as
well as a subtle pumpkin character thats
not overwhelmingly vegetal, Hazer says.
Brewers use a hopback to add a proprietary spice blend, which is designed to
add a sweet, dessert-like aroma.
Hazer fields numerous inquiries and
comments from fans about Pumking yearround, he says. Many want to know whether the recipe or spice blend has changed
from one release to anotherit hasnt
and many are homebrewers looking for
insight into making pumpkin beers.
Like Waldman, Hazer advises a less-ismore approach when spicing, especially
with spices added on the hot side. He
also advises homebrewers to be careful
about when and how much pumpkin they
add to the mash, so it doesnt become
too sticky and thick. Knowing your raw
materials and using the best-quality ingredients you can is key, Hazer says. Half
the fun of craft brewing is playing around
with unique ingredients and figuring out
what ratio to use.
Pumpkin beers are very labor- and ingredient-intensive beers to make, he says.
But its definitely worth it, especially when
you see the enjoyment that people get out
of it for a couple of months each year.

Five on Five

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BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 83

| PUMPKIN BEERS |

Brewing
the Perfect
Pumpkin Ale
More than a decade ago, Mark Pasquinelli embarked on a quest to brew
the perfect pumpkin ale. Here, he shares his finely honed recipe and
techniques for brewing a fall favorite brimming with malty comfort, rich
pumpkin flavor, and an assertive spice profile.
PUMPKIN BEER PREDATES THE
founding of the United States. Brewed
with an indigenous fruit unknown to
most Europeans until the sixteenth century, it was our first truly national beer. Its
beginnings were humblefirst brewed
during colonial days out of necessity,
when malt was scarce and fermentable
sugars had to be found wherever possible.
The beer became popular among colonists, either straight or mixed in a cocktail
known as flip. But nothing lasts forever.
Its appeal fell when nineteenth-century
hipsters deemed it too rustic and quaint.
The style was resurrected more than a
century laterin 1985, during the early
days of the craft-beer revolutionby
Bill Owens of Buffalo Bills Brewery in
Hayward, California. Inspired by one of
George Washingtons recipes, Owens
brewed a pumpkin ale and added an X

84 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Factorspices (the colonial versions were


unspiced). A star was born.
Today, it seems every brewery and brewpub makes a pumpkin ale. The style has
become one of Americas favorite seasonal
beers. Some examples are outstanding:
Southern Tiers Pumking, Weyerbachers
Imperial Pumpkin, and Cigar Citys Good
Gourd spring to my mind immediately.
Unfortunately, there are also weak-hearted efforts. This dearth of quality has led
me on a quest, now more than ten years
old, to homebrew the perfect pumpkin
ale. My version is robust, brims with maltiness from a solid grain bill, packs tons of
pumpkin flavor, and sports an assertive
spice profile. To taste my Perfect Pumpkin
Ale is to savor the flavor of pumpkin pie
in a glass. Its not a difficult recipe to brew.
The only special ingredient is a small
investment of time.

Beer Style

Many beer styles are amenable as a


base for pumpkin ale. For example, the
roastiness of porter or stout makes an
excellent complement to the spice regime.
My recipe uses an amber ale base, which
has a strong malt backbone to support the
pumpkin and spices and lets the orange
color shine through.

Grain Bill
The grain bill is simple. Maris Otter and
Light Munich are the base malts, selected
for their bready and toasty characteristics.
These malts are available in extract form
for those who dont brew all-grain. The
recipe is reinforced with Belgian specialty
malts: Dingemans Aromatic and Caramunich for their malty aroma, hint of
sweetness, and pumpkin-like orange and
brown coloring.
A dose of brown sugar rounds out
the recipe and adds a touch of colonial
authenticity. It was a common ingredient
back in the day, plus it provides additional
fermentables to bump up the alcohol
percentage without making the beer cloy-

ing. Over the years, Ive brewed Perfect


Pumpkin Ale at several different original
gravities (sometimes unintentionally). A
specific gravity of about 1.065 seems to
be perfectproviding the best balance
of alcohol percentage and drinkability. I
mash the grains in a single step at 155F
(68C) for 60 minutes to ensure a rich,
full-bodied beer.

PHOTO: MATT GRAVES

Pumpkin, Of Course
Pumpkin beer needs pumpkin. This
revelation is lost on some brewers, for no
pumpkins are harmed in the making of
their beer. And while Im on my soapbox,
I prefer fresh, not canned, pumpkin.
Many breweries want their pumpkin offering to be the first to hit the marketplace.
Thus, the release date of a fall seasonal
has become earlier and earlier (last year,
the first cases of pumpkin beer appeared
in retail stores at the end of June). Since
the harvest has yet to occur, these earlyrelease pumpkin ales have to be brewed
with last years canned instead of fresh
pumpkina violation of all thats holy, as
far as Im concerned.
But not just any type of pumpkin will
suffice. The traditional Halloween jack o
lantern pumpkins (a cultivar of Cucurbita
pepo), arent the best choice. They provide
minimal flavor and fermentables. In my
neck of the woods, I use a crookneck
pumpkin, also known as a neck pumpkin
(a cultivar of Cucurbita moschata). Its tan
in color and looks similar to a cashew
on steroids. My recipe calls for about a
pound of pumpkin per gallon, so buy a
couple. (If you dont have ready access to
neck pumpkins, use butternut squash,
also a cultivar of C. moschata.) Check the
farmers markets first; they have better
quality, prices, and selection than the
supermarkets.
You need to prepare the pumpkin a few
days in advance of the brew day. Using a
large knife, halve the pumpkin, remove
the seeds, and cut the halves into pieces
about 6 inches (15 cm) long. Cover some
cookie sheets with aluminum foil, arrange
the pumpkin pieces on the cookie sheets,
and sprinkle them liberally with brown
sugar. Roast in the oven at 375F (190C)
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 85

| PUMPKIN BEERS |

Make It

Perfect
Pumpkin Ale
ALL-GRAIN
Batch Size: 6 gallons (22.7 liters)
Brewhouse efficiency: 75%
OG: 1.063
FG: 1.018
IBUs: 19
ABV: 5.9%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

7 lb (3.18 kg) Maris Otter


3 lb (1.36 kg) Light Munich
2 lb (907 g) Aromatic malt
14 oz (400 g) Caramunich malt
ADJUNCT, HOPS,
AND SPICE SCHEDULE

8 oz (230 g) dark brown sugar at 90


minutes
5 lb (2.27 kg) pumpkin (see preparation in article) at 90 minutes
0.55 oz (16 g) Northern Brewer hops
(pellet) at 60 minutes
5 tsp ground Saigon cinnamon at 5
minutes
1 tsp fresh ground nutmeg at 5 minutes
1 tsp fresh ground ginger (or 1 tsp dry)
at 5 minutes
3 tsp vanilla extract at secondary
DIRECTIONS

Mash at 155F (68C) for 60 minutes.


Boil 90 minutes, following the schedule for adding adjuncts, hops, and
spices. If needed, add more spices in
the form of a hot tea during secondary conditioning.
YEAST

White Labs WLP002 English Ale


yeast1.5L starter
EXTRACT VERSION

Substitute 7 lb, 10 oz (3.46 kg) of Maris


Otter liquid extract and 2 lb (907 g)
of Munich liquid extract for the base
grains. Steep the specialty grains for 20
minutes at about 155F (68C).

86 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Fresh is Best
My mind is boggled by brewersobsessively
quality-conscious folkwho commit hours of
work to brewing and then ruin their masterpieces by adding dollar-store quality spices. We
wouldnt settle for anything but the best with
our malts, extracts, and hops. The good stuff
gourmet cinnamon, freshly ground nutmeg
and gingercosts a mere pittance more, but the
flavor blows away the cheap stuff. Often, these
ingredients are on sale during the holidays.
And dont skimp on the vanilla, either.
Imitation vanilla is vile and cant compare to
pure vanilla extract, which has myriad other
uses, not the least of which is holiday baking.
While many of these spices are available
at grocery stores or spice shops, I highly
recommend Penzeys Spices (penzeys.com).
Their quality, prices, and customer service
are outstanding.

until soft. This usually takes two to


three hours. During roasting, the brown
sugar will melt and caramelize onto the
pumpkin, providing extra flavor. Remove
the pumpkin from the oven and let cool.
Then peel off the pumpkin skin, dice
the flesh into large cubes (being sure to
save the juice for its color and flavor), and
store in a covered bowl in the fridge. On
brew day, let the pumpkin warm to room
temperature and put it in the kettle for
the duration of the boil. (As an aside, for
those who are into sustainable brewing,
the boiled pumpkin flesh makes excellent
pies.) To avoid a mess in the kettle and
clogged valves or siphons, put the pumpkin into either a large fine-mesh bag designed for fruit or a hop spider equipped
with a paint-straining bag.

Hops and Spices


Unlike for an IPA, hops arent a big deal
for pumpkin ale. Almost any clean-flavored
hops will do. Ive used Fuggles in the past,
but now I prefer a higher alpha-acid varietysuch as Northern Brewer, Galena, or
Magnumto keep the vegetal matter to a
minimum. Only a bittering dose is needed,
not quite 20 IBUs worth, to keep the malt
sweetness in check.
As Buffalo Bills Bill Owens discovered,
spices make the pumpkin ale come alive.
They take the place of the traditional flavor
and aroma hops. This is where you can be
creative and let your imagination run wild.
My spice regimen is aggressive: lots of
cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger, and a
touch of vanilla. I prefer Saigon cinnamon
(Vietnamese cinnamon) to other varieties
for its strong, rich, and sweet flavor. Its

more expensive than regular cinnamon,


but its usually on sale during the holidays. I dont care for other pumpkin-pie
spices, such as cloves or allspice (although
my wife always tries to sneak in some allspice when Im not looking), so I dont use
them. But if you like a particular spice, by
all means use it.
Vanilla is the key final additive. It
provides a certain je ne sais quoia flavor
that cant be ascertained, but would be
missed if not present. Vanilla lends a silky
creaminess and rounds out the spice profile. I add the vanilla during the secondary
conditioning phase, a few days before
kegging. But be carefulwhile the other
spice flavors will mellow and soften with
age, vanilla wont. Youre stuck with it.
The amounts of the spices in my recipe
may seem daunting. Most pumpkin ale
recipes call for only one or two teaspoons
of spices altogether. Dont be afraid. You
have nothing to fear but bland beer. If
youre squeamish about the amounts,
add the spices graduallytasting along
the wayuntil you achieve the flavor you
want. Its always possible to add more, but
you cant subtract once its in. I add my
spices just before knockout and later, in
the form of a hot tea, during conditioning, much the way you would dry hop.

Yeast
The yeast strain is importantI ferment
with White labs WLP002 English Ale
yeast. Fermentation takes off like gangbusters, and it flocculates beautifully a few
days later, leaving a wonderful pumpkin
color and just a hint of desired sweetness.
I used to ferment at 65F to 68F (18C to

The Eternal Question


As the Homebrew Bard once opined: To mash or boil? That is
the question. When my Perfect Pumpkin Ale recipe was first
published, one would have thought I was guilty of heresy for
boiling the pumpkin in the wort instead of mashing. Id never
seen so much such vitriol before in homebrewing forums:
Itll be filled with starchundrinkable, cloudy, and unstable!
Thats nonsensean old brewers myth, like the existence
of hot-side aeration. The starches in the raw pumpkin seem to
convert during the oven-roasting process, the ale is crystal clear,
and the stability improves with agethe pumpkin ale I brew in
the fall is still delicious the next summer.
I believe in freedom of choice. If you want to mash your
pumpkin, continue to do so. All youll get for it is a few gravity
points and probably a stuck mash. To maximize the pumpkin flavor and get a lovely orange-colored ale in the process,
take a walk on the wild side and boil your pumpkin.

20C), but Ive found that fermenting at


72F to 74F (22C to 23C) seems to give
a better flavor profileperhaps from the
increased ester production.
An alternative yeast thats worth investigating is White Labs WLP565 or Wyeast
3724 Saison Dupont. Tregs Brewing
made a wonderful pumpkin ale, Master
of Pumpkins, using this strain. Whatever
your choice, dont ferment with California Ale yeast. Its clean flavor profile is
outstanding for so many styles, but it
doesnt enhance pumpkin ale. In addition,
it ferments too dry.
As with all my homebrews, I make a
1.5-liter starter a few days before brew day
to ensure complete fermentation. Dont
let the yeasts chunkiness scare you. Pour
off most of the liquid on top before pitchingits not really beer.

PHOTOS: LEFT, MATT GRAVES; RIGHT, MARK PASQUINELLI

Fermentation
Even though primary fermentation will be
complete in a few days, wait at least a week
before racking to a secondary fermentor.
The secondary phase lasts another week
or two. At this juncture, taste and add
more spices as needed. The spice profile
may seem a little rough at this point, but
dont panic. All the flavors will magically
coalescesnap together. Add the vanilla a
few days before bottling or kegging.
Sometimes, the waiting is the hardest
part, but your patience will be rewarded.
My Perfect Pumpkin Ale recipe takes
about a month of conditioning to hit its
peak, which it will retain throughout the
winter and well into the springalthough
your first Perfect Pumpkin Ale probably
wont last that long. Cheers!

From top Neck


pumpkins at a roadside farm
sale; roasting the pumpkin;
pumpkin, prepared and ready
for the boil; pumpkin, bagged
in the boil kettle.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 87

A Tall Glass of
Pumpkin Pie

Oh My Gourd
SmokedPumpkin
Brown Ale

Want to try your hand at brewing a pumpkin beer? Try one of these
recipes, provided by the respective breweries, for a creative take on
the fall favorite. Then buy a bottle (or two, or four) of the original to see
how yours compares.

Odell Brewing Co. (Fort Collins, Colorado)

Punkuccino

La Parcela

ALL-GRAIN

ALL-GRAIN

A pumpkin ale with the attitude of a


world-weary barista, Punkuccino packs a
short shot of coffee toddy with just a shake
of cinnamon and nutmeg in your pint.

Packed with real pumpkin, hints of spice,


and a gentle kiss of cacao to lighten the
soul, La Parcela is an every-day easy way
to fill your squashy quotient. Only available for a few short months [unless you
brew your own].

Elysian Brewing Co. (Seattle, Washington)

OG: 1.056
FG: 1.018
IBUs: 20
ABV: 5%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

8 lb (3.6 kg) Pale malt (2-row)


9 oz (255 g) Brown malt
9 oz (255 g) Kiln Coffee malt
7.5 oz (213 g) English Dark Crystal malt (77L)
4.5 oz (128 g) Biscuit malt
4.5 oz (128 g) Chocolate malt
2 lb (907 g) pumpkin
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

0.75 oz (21 g) German Northern Brewer


[8% AA] at 60 minutes
0.25 lb (113 g) lactose (milk sugar) at 10
minutes
2 lb (907 g) pumpkin at 10 minutes
2 lb (907 g) pumpkin in primary
tsp (1.2 ml) nutmeg in secondary
1 tsp (7.3 ml) cinnamon in secondary
12 fl oz (355 ml) cold-brewed coffee toddy
in secondary
DIRECTIONS

Mash the grains and 2 pounds of pumpkin for 60 minutes at 154F (68C). Boil
for 60 minutes, following the schedule
for hops, lactose, and more pumpkin.
Whirlpool and chill, then ferment at 68F
(20C). Add more pumpkin, spices, and
coffee to secondary, then keg or bottle.
YEAST

Wyeast 1056 American Ale, White Labs


WLP001 California Ale, or Fermentis
US-05

88 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales (Dexter, Michigan)

OG: 1.050
FG: 1.0061.008
IBUs: 22
ABV: 5.9%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

7 lb (3.2 kg) Pilsner malt


1 lb (454 g) Munich malt
1 lb (454 g) Vienna malt
4 oz (113 g) Crystal 75 malt
3 oz (85 g) Crystal 30 malt
0.5 oz (14 g) Black malt
8 oz (227 g) pumpkin
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

0.25 oz (7 g) Perle [8.5% AA] at 60 minutes


1 oz (28 g) Hallertau [4.5% AA] at 30
minutes
2.5 oz (71 g) pumpkin pie spice at knockout
DIRECTIONS

Mash the grains and pumpkin for 60


minutes at 152F (67C). Boil for 60 minutes,
following the schedule for hops and other
additions. Whirlpool and chill, then ferment
at 68F (20C) with Belgian yeast. Transfer to
secondary for oak aging (either in a barrel or
on oak cubes) with the souring microorganisms of your choice. Bottle condition after
the gravity falls to 1.0061.008.

ALL-GRAIN
Dave Clapsaddle, a Packaging Tech at
Odell, roasts, smokes, and marinates
pumpkins at his house to produce the
puree that goes into Oh My Gourd. Dave
doesnt reveal exactly how he makes his
pumpkin puree, but notes Some very
simple spices are added, but very little to
keep the pumpkin-pie effect at bay.
OG: 1.070
FG: 1.014
IBUs: 35
ABV: 7.4%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

6.5 lb (2.9 kg) Pale malt (2-row)


6 lb (2.7 kg) Vienna malt
8 oz (227 g) Amber malt
8 oz (227 g) Crystal 120
4 oz (113 g) Crystal 80
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

1 oz (28 g) Perle at 60 minutes


0.5 oz (14 g) East Kent Golding at 20 minutes
0.5 oz (14 g) Saaz at 20 minutes
0.5 oz (14 g) East Kent Golding at whirlpool
0.5 oz (14 g) Saaz at whirlpool
2 lb (907 g) marinated, fire-roasted pumpkin
puree in secondary
DIRECTIONS

For the pumpkin puree: Fire roast and chop


about 5 pounds (2.3 kg) of raw pumpkins,
then marinate with cinnamon and nutmeg to
taste and puree. Final yield should be roughly
2 pounds (907 grams) of pumpkin puree.
Mash the grains for 60 minutes at 152F
(67C). Boil for 60 minutes, following the
hops addition schedule. Whirlpool, chill,
and ferment at 66F (19C). Add the pumpkin puree to secondary and let condition
for a week or longer before packaging.
YEAST

Wyeast 1028 London Ale

YEAST

NOTES

Use your favorite Belgian yeast in primary.


If you dont have a favorite, Wyeast 3787
or White Labs 530 would both be excellent
choices. Souring microbes in secondary.

Dave says, I have messed with adding the


pumpkin at different times but have found
that dry hopping with the pumpkin helps it
pop (the kettle reduces the pumpkin flavor).
However, I recommend boiling the pumpkin
beforehand with added water to pasteurize it
and be sure to kill off any funky stuff.

Rumpkin

Pump[KY]n

ALL-GRAIN

ALL-GRAIN

We wondered what would happen if a


monstrous pumpkin ale, plump full of
spicy gourdiness, were aged in fine fresh
rum barrels to add suggestions of delicate
oak and candied molasses. Rumpkin is
what happened!

Whats in a name? Sometimes the simplest


can be the most descriptive, and in this case,
derisive and divisive! After much internal
debate (ad nauseum! Bourb[KY]n, anyone?),
we decided a single letter change was the
best way to embody the bourbon-barrel
aging that adds layers of complexity to an
already exquisitely spiced pumpkin porter.

Avery Brewing Co. (Boulder, Colorado)

OG: 1.135
FG: 1.020
IBUs: 25
ABV: 16%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

25 lb (11.3 kg) Pale malt (2-row)


14 oz (397 g) Dingemans Aromatic Malt
14 oz (397 g) Gambrinus Honey Malt
8 oz (227 g) Dingemans Special B Malt
4 oz (113 g) Weyermann Acidulated Malt
1 lb (454 g) pumpkin puree (start with a
pound, then use your best judgement!)
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

1 oz (28 g) Bravo [14% AA] at 60 minutes


0.1 oz (3 g) calcium chloride at 30 minutes
0.33 oz (9 g) nutmeg at knockout
0.05 oz (1 g) ginger at knockout
0.25 oz (7 g) allspice at knockout
0.4 oz (11 g) cinnamon at knockout
DIRECTIONS

Mash the grains and pumpkin puree


for 60 minutes at 152F (67C). Boil for
60 minutes, following the schedule for
hops and other additions. Whirlpool and
chill, then oxygenate and ferment at 68F
(20C). Age for six months or more in a
dark-rum barrel or in a carboy with oak
cubes that have been soaked in dark rum.

Avery Brewing Co. (Boulder, Colorado)

OG: 1.135
FG: 1.022
IBUs: 60
ABV: 16%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

21 lb 10 oz (9.8 kg) Pale malt (2-row)


2 lb 5 oz (1.05 kg) Munich malt
1 lb (454 g) Simpsons Coffee Brown Malt
1 lb (454 g) Dingemans Special B Malt
1 lb (454 g) flaked oats
1 lb (454 g) pumpkin puree (start with a
pound, then use your best judgment!)
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

2.2 oz (62 g) Columbus [14.2% AA] at


60 minutes
0.07 oz (2 g) calcium chloride at 30 minutes
0.3 oz (8.5 g) nutmeg at knockout
0.02 oz (0.6 g) cloves at knockout
0.25 oz (7 g) allspice at knockout
0.16 oz (4.5 g) cinnamon at knockout
DIRECTIONS

Out of Your Gourd


Pumpkin Porter
Redhook Ale Brewery (Seattle, Washington)
ALL-GRAIN
Out of Your Gourd Pumpkin Porter is dark
chestnut brown in color and is made with
pureed pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and maple syrup. This full-bodied, rich
roasty porter makes you want to eat turkey
and watch football or build a bonfire.
OG: 1.056
FG: 1.012
IBUs: 28
ABV: 5.8%
MALT/GRAIN BILL

9 lb (4.1 kg) Pale malt (2-row)


10 oz (283 g) Crystal 120 malt
9 oz (255 g) Dark chocolate malt
8 oz (227 g) Carafa Special I malt
7 oz (198 g) Aromatic malt
3 oz (85 g) flaked oats
8 oz (227 g) pumpkin puree
HOPS AND ADDITIONS SCHEDULE

0.4 oz (11 g) Warrior [15% AA], or any other


high alpha acid, low cohumulone bittering
hops at 60 minutes (see notes below)
1.25 oz (35 g) Willamette [5% AA] at 10 minutes
Cinnamon at whirlpool, to taste (start with
tsp and adjust as needed)
Nutmeg at whirlpool, to taste (start with
tsp and adjust as needed)
Ginger at whirlpool, to taste (start with 1/8
tsp and adjust as needed)
Maple syrup at whirlpool (start with 8 fl
oz/237 ml and adjust as needed)

Wyeast 1028 London Ale

Mash the grains and pumpkin puree


for 60 minutes at 152F (67C). Boil for
60 minutes, following the schedule for
hops and other additions. Whirlpool and
chill, then oxygenate and ferment at 68F
(20C). Age for six months or more in a
bourbon barrel or in a carboy with oak
cubes that have been soaked in bourbon.

BREWERS NOTES

YEAST

Youll need a gigantic starter to make this


beer!
For a beer this big, your brewhouse efficiency will almost certainly suffer. You can
make up for this by including additional
pale malt in your grist or by adding a measured amount of dried malt extract (DME)
to reach the indicated original gravity.

Wyeast 1028 London Ale

Mash the grains and pumpkin for 50 minutes at 153F (67C). Boil for 60 minutes,
following the schedule for hops additions.
Whirlpool after the boil and add the spices.
Chill and ferment at 66F (19C).

BREWERS NOTES

YEAST

Youll need a gigantic starter to make this beer!


For a beer this big, your brewhouse efficiency will almost certainly suffer. You can
make up for this by including additional
pale malt in your grist or by adding a measured amount of dried malt extract (DME)
to reach the indicated original gravity.

Wyeast 1056 American Ale

YEAST

All recipes are for 5.25 gallons (19.9 liters) and assume 72 percent brewhouse efficiency unless otherwise noted. Some recipes call for whirlpool additions. Brewers who dont include
a whirlpool in their process may simply add those additions at knockout.

DIRECTIONS

BREWERS NOTES

Redhook bitters with a proprietary blend


of hops called Alchemy. A high alpha acid,
low cohumulone cultivar such as Warrior
will do the trick at home. Youre aiming
for 20 IBUs with the 60-minute addition
and 8 IBUs with the 10-minute addition,
so adjust your hops additions as needed to
account for differences in alpha acids.

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| 89

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Tasted

With the onset of fall comes pumpkin beer season, and to warm you up for
the coming cool-down, our blind-tasting panel sampled through forty-three
different Pumpkin Ales, Pumpkin Lagers, Pumpkin Stouts & Porters,
Imperial Pumpkin Ales, and Belgian-style Pumpkin Ales.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 91

| PUMPKIN ALES & LAGERS |


INSIDE CB&B

How We
Taste & Test
Reviewing beer may sound like a
dream job, but our tasting and review panel takes the role seriously.
Composed entirely of Beer Judge
Certification Program (BJCP) judges who have all studied, trained,
and been tested on their ability to
discern characteristics in beer, our
panel is independent and doesnt
include any CB&B editors or staff.
The panel tastes all beer blindly
they do not know what brands
and beers they are tasting until the
tasting is complete.
Our goal is to inform you about
the strengths and weaknesses
of these beers as well as their relative differences (not everyone
has the same taste in beer, so
accurate descriptors are more
valuable than straight numerical
values). The quotes you see
are compiled from the review
panels score sheets to give you a
well-rounded picture of the beer.
As our reviewers judge, they
score based on the standard
BJCP components: Aroma (max
12 points), Appearance (max 3
points), Flavor (max 20 points),
Mouthfeel (max 5 points),
and Overall Impression (max
10 points). Weve listed these
individual component scores,
and the bottom-line number is
derived from adding then doubling these component scores to
produce a rating on a 100-point
scale. Note that weve rounded
the printed component scores to
the nearest whole number, so the
math wont necessarily add up.
Our judges use the following
scale in valuing scores:
95100 Extraordinary
World-class beers of superlative
character and flawless execution
9094 Exceptional
Distinguished beers with special
character, style, and flavor
8589 Very good
Well-crafted beers with noteworthy flavor and style
8084 Good
Solid, quality, enjoyable beers
7579 Above Average
Drinkable and satisfactory beers
with minor flaws or style deviations
7074 Average
5069 Not recommended
Wed like for you to keep one
thing in mind as you read these
reviewsyour perception of a
beer is more important than
that of our review panel or editorial staff, and reading reviews
in a magazine (or on the Web
or in a book) is no substitute for
trying the beer yourself.

92 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

TOP

RATED

Anderson
AleWerks
Pumpkin Ale Valley Fall
Hornin Ale

Blue Moon
Harvest
Pumpkin Ale

| ABV: 7.3% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 6% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.7% | IBU: 16 | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


This amber colored ale is loaded with
pumpkin-pie aroma and flavor. It actually does taste like pumpkin pie!

What the brewer says


A deep copper hue and creamy beige
head. Aromas of caramelized malt and
baking bread with highlights of cinnamon, nutmeg, pumpkin, and seasonal
spices. Creamy mouthfeel and silky
body. Smooth, round finish.

What the brewer says


Deep amber ale with a rich, white head.
Aroma of malty spice notes. Taste of
malty notes balanced with the spices.
A little bitterness balances the malt.
Finishes with a smooth malt and spice
taste.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Good pie-spice aroma with all
of the obvious pie spices evident. Clove
is prominent with notes of cinnamon and
allspice and a touch of ginger supporting. Toffee and caramel malt notes with
some toasted, caramelized pumpkin.
Flavor: Very toasty malt up front, spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, allspice,
clove) right behind and holding their own
without one being overly dominant. Very
nice caramel malt sweetness with notes
of toffee and brown sugar leads into a
bitter, dry finish.
Overall: A good example of the style
its spiced and malty with a bitter finish
that keeps it from cloying. Very balanced
malt/spice. Spices are well executed
to support the base beer. Very tasty,
full-bodied pumpkin beer that is easy
to drink.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Pumpkin, brown sugar, and
caramel malt notes with a supportive
spice character (cinnamon, ginger, clove,
and allspice) plus a hint of hops and a
bit of fruity esters.
Flavor: Pumpkin-pie flavors are prominent, with notes of toasted pumpkin,
cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger. Just
a touch of dark fruit esters mostly
raisinwith no hops to speak of. Malt
character offers a bit of graham cracker
crust, with a splash of brown sugar. A
bit on the sweet side with a touch of
sweetness lingering in the finish.
Overall: A nice example of the style
although the malt character is fairly
simple and straightforward. A tasty
pumpkin beer with a considered use of
spices that support and complement the
pumpkin flavors. The caramel malts pair
well with the pumpkin.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Pumpkin notes and a touch
of caramel malt with some clove,
cinnamon, and nutmeg. This smells like
a pumpkin-beer pie: crust, spice, warm,
and some malt to make you think beer.
Flavor: Where the nose was fairly mild,
the flavor is much more interestinga
rich malt sweetness up front buffers the
clove, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Notes of
caramel and toffee with a bit of brown
sugar, pumpkin, ginger, and vanilla.
Hops bitterness balances nicely. More
drinkable than one might expectits
not a big and heavy fall seasonal. Toasty
crust lingers, reminds of pie. Finishes a
bit sweet but nice for the style.
Overall: Well-crafted pumpkin beer
with a nice malt base and a compelling
blend of spices. The spicing is bold but
balanced. The spices and malt complexity are a delight. Everything works
together to make a classic pumpkin
beer.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

94

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

90

AROMA: 9
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

88

Buffalo Bills Cambridge


Captain
Elysian Night
Pumpkin Ale Brewing Great Lawrence
Owl Pumpkin
Pumpkin Ale Pumpkin Ale Ale
| ABV: 6% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.4% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5% | IBU: 20 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.9% | IBU: 18 | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


Pumpkin pie in a bottle. Americas
Original Pumpkin Ale is made with real
pumpkin. It has a golden amber color
and the sweet aroma of pumpkin pie.

What the brewer says


Brewed with locally grown sugar pumpkins and organic barley that was grown
and malted in Massachusetts.

What the brewer says


Brewed with pureed pumpkins added to
the mash and pumpkin-pie spices added
to the end of the boil. Pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice dominate the
flavor profile, with the hops playing in
the background.

What the brewer says


Both roasted and raw pumpkin seeds
are in the mash, with pumpkin added to
the mash, kettle, and fermentor. Spiced
in conditioning with ginger, cinnamon,
nutmeg, cloves, and allspice.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Strong, almost overwhelming,
spice notes up front, with clove, cinnamon, and ginger dominating. Caramel
malt sweetness follows the spices.
Nutmeg and a touch of caramel create a
nice image of pumpkin pie.
Flavor: Lots of spice with notes of
cinnamon, ginger, and maybe nutmeg.
A touch of caramel malt sweetness,
but spices are center stage here. Its
balanced without being too sweet, but a
bit dry in the finish. Finish is sweet but
not cloying, leaving a spicy aftertaste
and medium-low bitterness. Creamy
mouthfeel with a substantial carbonic
bite.
Overall: A tasty pumpkin beer that is
sure to please any pumpkin-pie spice
fans. A bit more body and sweetness
would help balance the spices but
otherwise, its a well-executed, spicy
pumpkin beer that hits dead-center on
the style.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

90

What our panel thought


Aroma: Strong pumpkin-pie spices up
front with notes of cinnamon, cloves,
allspice, and a touch of nutmeg. A bit
of malt sweetness and a bit of brown
sugar-molasses is balanced with a hint
of earthy hops.
Flavor: Brown sugar and caramel
malt sweetness up front followed by
pumpkin-pie spices that arent too heavy
handed but accentuate the pumpkin
flavors. Clove dominates first and then
fades while faint cinnamon adds a spicy
touch. Residual sweetness continues
through the finish for a decidedly sweet
beer, without being cloying. Mild hops
bitterness helps balance the sweetness
and provides some earthiness.
Overall: Pumpkin flavors, brown sugar
and caramel sweetness, and pumpkin-pie spices all work together to make
a beer reminiscent of pumpkin pie. A bit
lighter on the spectrum but still has a lot
of character. Great body and pleasant
sweetness are the highlights for this one,
while the clean finish makes this beer
easy to drink.
AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

87

What our panel thought


Aroma: Pumpkin-pie spices up front,
with notes of cinnamon and ginger and
a hint of clove supported by very subtle
caramel malt sweetness. Somewhat
bready malt character with mild spicy
phenol, but a weaker nose overall. More
zucchini bread than pumpkin pie.
Flavor: Spices (mostly clove and possibly cinnamon) and malt sweetness work
in tandem at the front. Malt sweetness
comes through as caramel and a touch
of toffee, but the pumpkin flavor is hard
to pick up. Finish is just a touch on the
dry side.
Overall: A decent example of a pumpkin beer but spices here dont express
the same depth as other examples, and
finishing malt character could be more
forward to support those flavors. A bit
overly simplistic in body, mouthfeel, and
finish.

AROMA: 9
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 15
MOUTHFEEL: 3
OVERALL: 7

74

What our panel thought


Aroma: Evokes notes of cherry and
fruitcake, with plenty of cinnamon, ginger, and pecans plus a touch of caramel
malt sweetness. Cinnamon cookies with
sweet frosting and a moderate lemongrass chaser. Theres enough caramel
and brown sugar to still seem like a pie,
but the citrus is a little funky.
Flavor: Way more Christmasy than
pumpkin, but well done. Maraschino,
banana-nut, cinnamon, pecan, and
graham-cracker notes. Cinnamon dominates with some caramel and a touch
of biscuit malt sweetness to support. A
bit of lemon notes from the hops and a
finish thats a bit dry and a bit short of
the expected sweetness.
Overall: Just a bit over the top. Could
use more sweetness and body to finish
slightly sweeter and more balanced
for the style. Cinnamon spice tends to
drown out other spice flavors. Hops lend
a lemon flavor that is a bit off-putting
compared to others.
AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 16
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 8

84

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 93

| PUMPKIN ALES & LAGERS |

TOP

RATED

Elysian
Punkuccino

Lakefront
Pumpkin
Lager

Magic Hat
Wilhelm
Scream

New Belgium
Pumpkick

| ABV: 5% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.8% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.4% | IBU: 20 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 6% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


Punkuccino packs a short shot of
Stumptown coffee toddy in your pint with
just a shake of cinnamon and nutmeg.

What the brewer says


A frothy entry leads to an off-dry
medium-to-full body of intense cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, and candied
yam flavor on a nutty wheat toast
palate. Finishes with a drier spice and
light toffee fade.

What the brewer says


Ripe with fall flavors of pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, and caramel
malts. Medium-bodied and the color of
orange setting suns, it finishes with just
a hint of bitterness.

What the brewer says


Cranberry juice brightens this traditionally spiced seasonal ale. Brewed
with plenty of pumpkin juice, cinnamon,
nutmeg, and allspice, but its the cranberries and touch of lemongrass that
send your taste buds sailing.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Espresso coffee aroma with
some cinnamon, clove, and nutmeg
notes. As it warms, ginger and some
subtle caramel malt sweetness comes
through.
Flavor: Very nice espresso coffee up
front blended with brown sugar, ginger,
cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg supported by nice toffee and caramel malt
sweetness and some baked pumpkin
notes. Reminds me of Lebkuchen (German ginger cookies) and molasses. Good
balance of pie spicefinish is a bit
sweet but coffee serves to balance, with
both coffee and sweetness lingering.
Overall: One of the most unique and
complex pumpkin beers Ive had, without
being cloying. Coffee adds a sharp
note and serves to balance sweetness
of the pumpkin, and caramel malt and
cinnamon tie it all together. If you like
Starbucks pumpkin-spice latte, seek out
this beer. They take a big chance with
the style and succeed.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

94 |

93

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

What our panel thought


Aroma: A note of pumpkin sweetness
with caramel malts followed by a nice
complex spice character (cinnamon,
ginger, and nutmeg). Very clean fermentation with no perceivable hops.
Flavor: Sweet pumpkin and rich caramel malt notes balanced by pumpkin-pie
spices, mostly cinnamon, nutmeg, and
allspice. Very clean and crisp with a
lingering slightly sweet gingery finish.
Germanish floral hops flavor plays nice.
Nice full and creamy mouthfeel.
Overall: Incredibly smooth, clean,
crisp pumpkin beer that really puts the
pumpkin at the forefront. Hardly detectable as a lager, other than the clean
fermentation profile and crispness, but
spices are used perfectly to balance
the pumpkin and malt sweetness. Very
enjoyable. The malt character makes this
an easy drinker.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

94

What our panel thought


Aroma: Pumpkin-pie spices with notes
of cinnamon, ginger, clove, and allspice
at the front. Bready malt and light
esters.
Flavor: Well-blended spices (clove,
allspice, and ginger) with a light toasty
malt. Caramel malts are subtle but pair
well with brown sugar notes. Some fruity
character. Some baked pumpkin with
subtle caramel malt notes, followed
quickly by cinnamon and allspice.
Overall: More of an everyday, drinkable
pumpkin beer than a rare exotic specimen. The caramel malts, pumpkin, and
pumpkin-pie spices are all wellbalanced and enjoyable. Its sweet
without being cloyingpumpkin pie in
a glass.

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

84

What our panel thought


Aroma: Very light cinnamon, clove, and
ginger spice up front with some supportive caramel malt and even pilsner malt
sweetness, with notes of toffee, biscuit,
and white bread. Faint esters create a
sense of pumpkin itself.
Flavor: Pumpkin-pie flavors abound,
with notes of baked, caramelized pumpkin, brown sugar, and caramel malts all
supported by cinnamon, nutmeg, and
other pumpkin-pie spices. No hops or
esters. Finish is slightly sweet then dries
and lingers with a very light bitterness
creating a nice balance.
Overall: A great example of a pumpkin-pie beer that blends pumpkin, brown
sugar, and spices to create a tasty fall
beer. Not over the top with spices, but
everything works well together. Great
body and sweetness and excellent base
beer with caramel malt notes to let the
pumpkin-pie flavors stand out.
AROMA: 9
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 5
OVERALL: 9

87

New Holland Renaissance SamuelAdams Saranac


Brewing
Enlightenment Harvest
Pumpkin Ale
Ichabod
Great Punkin Pumpkin Ale
| ABV: 5.2% | IBU: 26 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 7% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.7% | IBU: 14 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.1% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


Ichabod combines malted barley
and real pumpkin with cinnamon and
nutmeg in this brew. After dinner, try it
with your favorite dessert.

What the brewer says


While pumpkin sounds unappetizing
to many, maybe it was meant for beer,
not a dinner plate. Youll quaff this with
pumpkin pie and marvel over why you
havent tried it before.

What the brewer says


Real pumpkin and warming ginger,
cinnamon, and nutmeg give this brew a
smooth, hearty character.

What the brewer says


A hearty ale brewed with pumpkin,
cinnamon, allspice, and ginger with a
full body and amber color.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Caramel malt sweetness
with toffee and biscuit notes followed
by subtle spicescinnamon, clove,
allspice, and ginger. Burnt sugar on
top of ale-yeast fruitiness with plums
and burnt pumpkin, yet very light for a
pumpkin beer.
Flavor: Caramel malt sweetness and
a hint of pumpkin open, with cinnamon,
nutmeg, and ginger or clove to support.
Spices are full and all well-represented,
but I would love a touch more weight
behind them. Grassy hops are very low
and appropriately restrained. A hint of
sweetness in the finish.
Overall: Nice full-bodied pumpkin
beer that goes tastefully lighter on
the spicesa refreshing choice for a
style filled with sometimes over-spiced
beers. Great caramel malt notes and a
perceivable pumpkin flavor that many
pumpkin beers lack. Finishes a touch
sweet, which is perfect for the style.
Great beer that immediately brings up
thoughts of autumn.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Rich malty aroma, but not
much spice. Moderate esters. Nose
is more toward the beery side than
pumpkin-pie spice.
Flavor: So much more flavor than
aroma. Pumpkin and caramel malt
notes are followed by balanced spices
(cinnamon, a touch of ginger or clove)
and a touch of brown sugar. In the
finish, the balance shifts toward malt
and sweetness. Moderate fruity esters
throughout.
Overall: Flavor is good with a nice
underlying sweetness that accentuates
the pumpkin-pie flavorwith whipped
cream and all. Good beer but overall
level of flavor and spice is perhaps too
subdued for the category.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Tons of ginger up front, almost
like smelling raw ginger. Ginger dominates and overwhelms everything else,
with caramel malt, pumpkin, and other
spices struggling to come through.
Flavor: Ginger is dominant, but not as
much as in the aroma. Malt, pumpkin,
and other spices are muted. Finish is
dry and a bit astringent from the ginger.
Hops flavor comes through in the finish,
but it needs more malt presence to
support the spice.
Overall: A somewhat simple but
easy-drinking example. For my taste,
could use more malt sweetness,
heavier pumpkin, and other pie spices
(especially cinnamon). This beer is more
ginger beer than pumpkin and tastes
like an outlier among this selection of
pumpkin-pie spice-focused beers.

AROMA: 8
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 15
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 7

72

What our panel thought


Aroma: Lots of caramel and toffee
notes from the malt, with an almost
honey-like sweetness. Dark fruit esters
come through as raisin and dates. Subtle complex spices, possibly cinnamon
or nutmeg. Slightly tart and slightly
smoky.
Flavor: Deep caramel and toffee notes,
with strong melanoidin and toast/biscuit
flavors that help balance all the malt/
honey/brown sugar sweetness. Some
dark fruit (date, plum, cherry) esters also
show up. Spices are subtle but a touch
of cinnamon seems to come through.
Balance is definitely sweet with a
lingering sweetness.
Overall: Extremely complex, malt-centric, original take on a pumpkin beer with
diverse flavors that combine for a tasty
fall beer. Some very pleasant dark fruit
esters and just a touch of spices. An
outlier for the style, but quite nice!

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

92

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 5
OVERALL: 8

84

AROMA: 8
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 16
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 8

79

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 95

| PUMPKIN ALES & LAGERS |

| IMPERIAL PUMPKIN ALES |

Shipyard
Tommy
Brewing
knocker
Pumpkinhead Small Patch

Uinta
Brewing
Punkn

Elysian
The Great
Pumpkin

| ABV: 4.5% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5% | IBU: 10 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 8.1% | IBU: 20 | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


A crisp and refreshing wheat ale with
delightful aromatics and subtle spiced
flavor.

What the brewer says


A hearty brown ale brewed with a
hint ofspice and a touch of molasses.
The malty backbone is rounded out by
anaddition of real pumpkin to the mash
andbrew kettle.

What the brewer says


Brewed with fresh pumpkin and
seasonal spices. The flavor is malt and
hops accented with roasted pumpkin
and spices of the season plus a hint of
vanilla and honey.

What the brewer says


Pumpkin, sugar, and spice on the
nose with a bready, malty backdrop.
Roasted pumpkin seeds in the mash,
and pumpkin added in the mash, kettle,
and fermentor. Spiced with cinnamon,
nutmeg, cloves, and allspice.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Lots of malt balanced with
spices that hit the pie zone with a nice
bit of raisin and brown sugar. Aroma is a
bit muted overall.
Flavor: Baked pumpkin, caramel
malt, a touch of brown sugar, and some
pumpkin-pie spices (cinnamon and
nutmeg mostly). Light toast spice is
understated. Nice fruity hops flavor but
a touch of papery oxidation. Finish and
flavor are surprisingly balanced for the
style.
Overall: Good overall beer. Roasty
with a low spice level that, although
balanced, is a bit too mild to satisfy true
pumpkin fans. Its a middle of the road
beer, but well executedoverall, the
flavor and aroma are a bit muted.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Brown sugar and toasted
pumpkin followed by subtle cinnamon
and nutmeg and maybe a hint of cloves.
Malt sweetness is there but very subtle.
Mild esters.
Flavor: Some caramel malt sweetness
with notes of pumpkin and brown sugar
followed by cinnamon, ginger, and pie
spices. A bit dry with a finish that
borders too close to bitter, with a very
subtle lingering bitterness and very light
hops flavor.
Overall: Very nice. At first, the spices
are a bit too subtle, but as it warms,
the spices grow more apparent. Needs
a touch more malt backbone and could
benefit from richer spicing. A slight
bitterness lingers into the finish.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Nice malty nose, but the spices
offer more of a phenolic complexity than
pumpkin character. The aroma doesnt
promise much.
Flavor: Pumpkin flavor comes through
as baked pumpkin with a touch of brown
sugar, followed by cinnamon and allspice
that add complexity rather than a big pie
experience. Nice big mouthful of malt,
with toast and caramel standing tall.
Crisp with almost a carbonic bite and
balanced with a subtle hint of sweetness
in the finish.
Overall: Spices are used well to support the pumpkin flavor. Very tasty but
comparatively simple in its use of spice
and malt complexity.

AROMA: 9
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 15
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 8

96 |

77

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 13
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 8

74

AROMA: 9
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 14
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 7

74

What our panel thought


Aroma: Smells rich, like pumpkin pie
and whipped cream. Allspice, cinnamon,
ginger, and nutmeg come through
prominentlyits tough to discern much
beyond those spices.
Flavor: Light bodied and highly carbonated, which really make the spices pop.
The initial subtle note of sweet brown
sugar is quickly overtaken by myriad
spices, the strongest being cinnamon,
nutmeg, ginger, and allspice. Its very
tasty but out of balance with the mild
malt backbone. Surprisingly, spices arent so overdone to carry over too strongly
in the finish, with a bit of sweetness
lingering in the light alcoholic finish.
Overall: Christmas-spice fans rejoice!
This beer has one of the best spice
aromas I have experienced, but Id like
to see a touch more body to support the
strong spice character. However, still a
very tasty beer that is sure to please any
spice fan.
AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 15
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

83

TOP

TOP

RATED

RATED

SamuelAdams Schlafly
Shipyard
Fat Jack
Pumpkin Ale Smashed
Pumpkin

Southern Tier
Pumking

| ABV: 8.5% | IBU: 25 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 8% | IBU: 16 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 9% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 8.6% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


More than twenty-eight pounds of
pumpkin per barrel for a full-bodied
sweetness and deep russet color.
Classic pumpkin-pie spices such as
cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice an
undercurrent of roasty smoked malts.

What the brewer says


Blends the spices of the harvest with
full-bodied sweetness for a beer that
tastes like pumpkin pie with the fall
flavors of cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove.

What the brewer says


A big-bodied beer with a light coppery
color and aroma of pumpkin and
nutmeg. The malts combine with the
natural tannin in pumpkin and the
delicate spiciness of the hops to balance
the fruits sweetness.

What the brewer says


Take a whiff of this complex ale and
your journey has just begun. At first sip,
a magical spell will bewitch your taste
buds, yet another victim enraptured by
the Pumking.

What our panel thought


Aroma: A smooth blend of pumpkin-pie
spices (cinnamon, clove, nutmeg) and
a rich, bready sweet caramel malt
character (bordering on toffee) compete
for dominance, with a pleasant note of
fresh-baked pumpkins.
Flavor: Deep malt sweetness comes
through as caramelized brown sugar and
toffee, supported by a very nice spice
character with notes of clove, cinnamon,
nutmeg, and ginger. Surprisingly
balanced, considering the sweetness,
thanks in part to the spice profile. Clean,
crisp, warm finish with a slight lingering
sweetness, but far from cloying. Definitely a big beer.
Overall: This beer has a lot to offer
full-bodied, rich, and complex, with a
very well designed spice profile thats
not too spiced nor too sweet. It all
comes together well, and the warmth
of the beer makes it bigger than most
pumpkins. Big yet approachable.
AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

95

What our panel thought


Aroma: Pumpkin-pie spices (cinnamon,
ginger, allspice, clove) up front and
clearly on display. Very nice caramel
malt character, with notes of brown sugar and toffee. Low-to-medium pumpkin
aroma, too.
Flavor: Simple malt sweetness with a
round spice character of cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg. Clean, lightly sweet
finish with a lingering hint of citrus.
Balances well and finishes smooth and
slightly spiced with some warmth. Great
pumpkin flavor.
Overall: A tasty, well-crafted pumpkin
beer that is hard to find fault with.
Spices are well done, pumpkin flavors
come through nicely, and balance is well
executed. A classic example of the style
that comes together very nicely. I enjoyed
the finish of slight spice character with
the warmth.

AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

95

What our panel thought


Aroma: Citrus and pleasant pumpkin-pie spicecinnamon, nutmeg,
allspice, gingerwith a light toffee
and caramel sweetness. Nice earthy
character.
Flavor: Nice balance of sweetness,
caramel, toffee, and pumpkin character
with a supportive cinnamon spice. The
spice is mild but balances well with the
moderately restrained sweetness. The
finish is smooth and drinks like a pumpkin pie. Slight warmth in the finish.
Overall: An excellent, well-balanced,
well-executed beer with a clear malt
backbone to support the spicing
without overwhelming it. The spices and
sweetness work very well together and
combine to evoke delicious pumpkin pie.
Nice warming character and very full
body set it apart.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

91

What our panel thought


Aroma: Unique lemon and malt sweetness up front, with notes of vanilla,
toffee, caramel, and creme brle. A hint
of cinnamon and nutmeg, but caramel
candy note dominates. Slight floral
potpourri notes on top of the pumpkin.
Flavor: Vanilla, brown sugar, and caramel sweetness at first taste, with a touch
of pumpkin-pie spices (mostly ginger)
to support. The sweetness gives way to
the ginger spiciness. The vanilla/caramel
flavor comes through a bit artificial, but
still works well in the beer. Also tastes
of lemon and some earthiness. Finishes
slightly astringent and sharp.
Overall: A unique, well-executed,
original take on a pumpkin beer (the
lemon-esque flavor is unique). Biggest
complaint from others will be the ginger
and the artificial flavoring, but personally, I really enjoy it in this beer. It will be
polarizing, but for this particular judge,
one of my favorite pumpkin beers.
AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

84

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 97

| IMPERIAL PUMPKIN |

| BARREL-AGED PUMPKIN BEERS |

TOP

RATED

Upslope
Almanac
Pumpkin Ale Heirloom
Pumpkin

Anderson
Avery Brewing
Valley Pinchy Pump[KY]n
Jeek Barl

| ABV: 7.7% | IBU: 25 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 12% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 7% | IBU: 20 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 17% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


Adding organic Baby Bear pumpkins to
malt and hops makes this truly a local
farm-to-brewhouse collaboration. A
custom blend of six spices rounds out
the flavors in this beer.

What the brewer says


This American Barleywine-style ale is
brewed with more than 1,000 pounds of
pumpkins and aged in rye and brandy
barrels for a year. It pairs well with
pecan pie, bread pudding, and a warm
campfire.

What the brewer says


Aged for six months in Wild Turkey
barrels, this pumpkin ale has a silky
body and sweet caramel flavor. Notes of
coconut, vanilla, and oak complement
the spices and a hint of hops.

What the brewer says


A Kentucky bourbon barrel-aged porter
with a smattering of fall spices.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Strong malt sweetness blends
with traditional pumpkin-spice blend
and a nice earthy hops character. When
you really dig in, slight aroma of toasted
pumpkin. Slight alcohol on the nose.
Flavor: Smooth caramel malt sweetness up front with a lot of pumpkin-pie
spice, mostly cinnamon and nutmeg and
a touch of clove. A bit more balanced
than most pumpkin beers, with a touch
of lingering bitterness (perhaps from
spices) in the slightly warm finish. Spice
flavors tend to compete rather than
complement each other.
Overall: Enjoyable pumpkin flavors.
The spice character is a little more
dominant with the sweetness coming
through in the end with slight warmth. A
fairly large pumpkin beer with all of the
right components, but the blend of those
components is slightly disjointed and
keeps them from working together in
perfect harmony.
AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 16
MOUTHFEEL: 3
OVERALL: 8

98 |

79

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

What our panel thought


Aroma: Nice caramel malt and
pumpkin sweetness with notes of brown
sugar and a hint of lemon. Spices are
present but a bit subtle, with notes of
clove, black pepper, and cinnamon. Nice
pumpkin aroma.
Flavor: Caramel, toffee, some vanilla,
and good pumpkin flavor. Caramel and
toffee notes with some pumpkin sweetness pair nicely with the subtle cinnamon and ginger notes. A bit of fruitiness,
perhaps from the hops, comes through
as lemon and maybe pineapple. Barrel
character is subtle, with some tannins
and sugar rum. Very balanced.
Overall: Very good pumpkin beer. The
balanced sweetness to spice makes this
beer very enjoyable. Surprisingly smooth
and easy-drinking for a higher alcohol
barrel-aged pumpkin beer. A well done
huge pumpkin beer with a well-balanced
barrel profile.
AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

95

What our panel thought


Aroma: Lots of vanilla and bourbon
notes up front, with some pumpkin and
caramel malt sweetness and a touch of
cinnamon and chocolate. Oak character
is present.
Flavor: Quite sweet with a moderate
amount of pumpkin flavor. Bourbon is
up front but not too boozy, with notes
of cinnamon and caramel malts coming
through. Lots of vanilla oak character,
but no tannins.
Overall: All the flavors are excellent; its
just a bit too tilted to the sweet side. The
pumpkin and bourbon characters come
through nicely, but the body of the beer
could use some beefing up to support
the strong, rich, and heavy flavors.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 16
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

84

What our panel thought


Aroma: Huge bourbon and vanilla
notes up front with a rich chocolate
malt character and good pumpkin spice
to support. Very strong bourbon-barrel
character.
Flavor: Massive vanilla and bourbon
pair nicely with spice (cinnamon, clove,
nutmeg) profile and chocolate malt flavors. Huge chewy body. Finishes big and
very warming with a surprisingly hoppy
dryness. There is so much going on in
this beer that it could easily become a
trainwreck, but the brewers have done
a masterful job of structuring each
element to complement the others.
Overall: Extremely well-balanced
and scarily drinkable. The marriage of
bourbon, pumpkin, spice, and chocolate
is simply divine. The pumpkin spice and
dark malt base are a great match, and
the bourbon-barrel character pushes
it over the top. Loved the vanilla and
the slight dryness in the finish. Wow!
It drinks incredibly nice now, and I can
imagine what some aging would do!
Dont let this one get away.
AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 20
MOUTHFEEL: 5
OVERALL: 10

99

TOP

RATED

Avery Brewing Heavy Seas


Two Roads
Uinta Brewing
Rumpkin
The GreatER Roadsmarys Oak Jacked
Pumpkin
Baby
Imperial
| ABV: 18.5% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 10% | IBU: 20 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 6.8% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 10.3% | IBU: 39 | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


Rumpkin was brewed with roasted
pumpkins from a local Boulder County
farm, spiced with nutmeg, cinnamon,
and ginger, and aged in fine fresh rum
barrels to add suggestions of delicate
oak and candied molasses.

What the brewer says


Pours a burnished orange color. Aromas
of bourbon, cinnamon, ginger, allspice,
and clove. The full malt body is dominated
by British crystal malt, brown sugar, and
pumpkin. Bourbon-barrel aging adds
notes of oak, vanilla, bourbon.

What the brewer says


Roadsmarys Baby is a traditional
pumpkin ale with a Two Roads spin:
its aged in rum barrels. The result is
a smooth ale with notes of pumpkin,
spices, vanilla, oak, and a touch of rum.

What the brewer says


Aged in oak barrels.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Huge caramel and toffee notes
up front with a decent warming from the
alcohol and some rum notes. Spices are
a bit subtle, with notes of cinnamon and
ginger. Smells like molasses and rum.
Flavor: Intensely sweet caramel and
vanilla notes, like candi sugar. Pumpkin
flavors are pleasant and come through
as candied pumpkin. Spices mostly show
up as cinnamon (also allspice, clove, and
nutmeg), but work well with the intense
sweetness and rum-barrel character.
Very sweet, from flavor to finish. Lots of
warmth and heat from the alcohol.
Overall: A slow sipper on the porch
after Thanksgiving dinner. Big and bold,
very rich and sweet, with great spice
and sweet complexity, this is a beer that
would be very well suited for aging, but
it still drinks amazingly fresh. Incredible
barrel character, malt complexity, and
spices all mingle for a truly unique
pumpkin beer experience.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Cinnamon and vanilla up front,
with notes of caramel and brown sugar
and some subtle pumpkin sweetness.
Nice pumpkin-spice charactercinnamon, clove, allspice, nutmeg. Smells like
a pumpkin pie spiked with whiskey.
Flavor: Solid caramel malt sweetness
up front with notes of brown sugar and
candi sugar. Nice supportive spices
with cinnamon and nutmeg notes. The
whiskey-barrel character comes through
as a touch of vanilla. Lots of pumpkin
flavor and nice cherry and fig flavors
in the finish. The warmth adds a nice
complexity to this beer.
Overall: A complex and yet surprisingly
well-rounded beer with a good balance
between sweet and spicy. I particularly
like the finish, with a nice caramel
balanced with oak. A tasty pumpkin beer
for colder nights.

AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 20
MOUTHFEEL: 5
OVERALL: 10

AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

99

92

What our panel thought


Aroma: Tart, almost lactic notes. Spice
character of cinnamon, allspice, and
nutmeg with some pumpkin and caramel
malt notes. Orange and some vanilla,
pineapple, and rum.
Flavor: Caramel malt sweetness and
subtle notes of pumpkin give way to
cinnamon and nutmeg spices. Light
body and minimal barrel character.
Smooth, slightly sweet, pineapple esters,
slight vanilla and dark sugar. Clean,
light, citrusy finish.
Overall: Spices are well executed, as is
the base beer, but its odd for a pumpkin
beerthe citrusy hops character
dominates much more than the pumpkin
or spices do. Rum-barrel character is
somewhat subdued. This beer does not
say pumpkin beer to me, nor does it say
barrel aged; however it is balanced and
drinks easy and well. Fairly sessionable,
light bodied amber ale profile with esters
from barrel and possibly hops.
AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

86

What our panel thought


Aroma: Cinnamon and vanilla up front
mingle with caramel malts, brown sugar,
and pumpkin sweetness. A bit warming
on the nose. Good bourbon-barrel
character is present with a fair amount
of alcohol heat.
Flavor: Deep, rich, complex malt
sweetness with a nice spice character
(cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice) to
support. Barrel character comes through
as vanilla and some pleasant tannins.
Spices are subdued but well-balanced.
Some pumpkin flavor with moderate
alcohol heat. Very sweet. Lots of alcohol
but very tasty.
Overall: The barrel character with the
sweetness and the spices makes this
an enjoyable experience. Big, boozy, and
complex pumpkin beer that showcases
barrel character, spices, and pumpkin
flavors very well. Definitely a sipper but
very tasty and one worth seeking out.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

88

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 99

| PUMPKIN PORTERS & STOUTS |

21st Amend- Alaskan


ment He Said Pumpkin
Baltic Porter Porter

Elysian Dark
O The Moon

Epic Brewing
Fermentation
Without Rep

| ABV: 8.2% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 7% | IBU: 25 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 6.5% | IBU: 20 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 8.5% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


A collaboration with Elysian Brewing,
He Said is a Baltic-style porter brewed
with pumpkin, caraway, and cinnamon.

What the brewer says


More than eleven pounds per barrel
of pumpkin give this imperial porter
a smooth,velvety texture. Brown
sugar, holiday spices, and Alaskans
alder-smoked malt create an aroma
and flavor reminiscent of Grandmas
Thanksgiving pumpkin pie.

What the brewer says


Pours dark as night with creamy tan
head. A little smokiness on the nose with
malty bittersweet chocolate and a little
coffee with subtle earthy pumpkin and
spices for an overall nice and creamy
mouth.

What the brewer says


Fermentation without Representation,
brewed in collaboration with DC Brau, is
an imperial pumpkin porter to celebrate
the season.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Pumpkin and caramel malt
sweetness work nicely with cinnamon
and chocolate notes. Nice pumpkin-spice character and nice roasty and
coffee flavor.
Flavor: Caramel malt sweetness up
front coupled with notes of brown sugar
blend nicely with cinnamon and nutmeg
spices and coffee-like roasted malt notes.
Milk chocolate, vanilla, roast, and coffee
help to enhance the beer and are not
overpowering. Finish is mostly balanced,
thanks to roasted malt and spices. Nice
clean finish with some warmth.
Overall: A good example of a dark
pumpkin beer, this beer displays great
execution with a variety of complex
flavors, including pumpkin-pie spices,
roasted-malt character, and caramel-malt sweetness. Chocolate works
great with caramel and pumpkin, all enhanced by the spice profile of cinnamon
and nutmeg. Seek this one out if you like
porters, pumpkin beers, or well-executed
beers in general.
AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

100 |

90

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

What our panel thought


Aroma: Sweet Belgian fruity esters,
banana and clove, with a hint of
cinnamon. Some brown sugar, caramel,
and toffee notes with very subtle roast
character.
Flavor: Interesting choice of yeasts
lots of Belgian character. Caramel malt
and brown sugar sweetness lead the
charge, with earthy spices following behind and spices coming in as the anchor.
Roasted-malt character is subtle, with
a bit of chocolate and coffee that work
to balance the sweet pumpkin and malt
character. Finish is mostly sweet, but
balanced by spices and roasted malt.
Overall: The unique use of spices
works well with the subtle roasted-malt
character and dominant malt sweetness
to create a unique pumpkin porter that
would be an excellent dessert beer. Rich,
creamy, and spicy with a bit of pumpkin
to keep it grounded.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Nice pumpkin-pie spice character (cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, ginger)
with hints of caramel malt sweetness and
brown sugar, followed by a roasted-malt
character, mostly coming through as dark
chocolate and coffee notes.
Flavor: Some caramel notes up front
with a lot of cinnamon. Sweetness from
malt and pumpkin, maybe brown sugar,
with a lot of cinnamon and a touch of
nutmeg. Dark malts are surprisingly
subtle, with notes of dark chocolate and
espresso. The spices of nutmeg, allspice,
and lots of cinnamon come through very
strong in the beginning, carry into the
roasty-malt sweetness of the stout, and
fade into some bitterness on the back.
Overall: A welcome, original take on
pumpkin beer. Roasted-malt character
works well with caramel malt and
pumpkin sweetness, with a heavy dose
of cinnamonits a chocolate pumpkin
pie with extra cinnamon in the glass.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

91

92

What our panel thought


Aroma: Some pumpkin-pie spices
(clove, cinnamon) intermingle with
caramel, caramelized brown sugar, and
vanilla notes, with a very subtle dark
chocolate note from the roasted malt
with just a touch of smokiness. Spices
are well blended.
Flavor: Sweet creamy vanilla and
caramelized brown sugar notes up front,
almost candy-like in flavor. Some subtle
pumpkin-pie spices followed by pleasant
milk chocolate notes, accentuated by
the vanilla. Finish is roasty with a hint of
cinnamon spice.
Overall: The vanilla and caramel notes
work well with roasted malt to create a
milk-chocolate note that pairs well with
the pumpkin. Sweet and enjoyable, but
pumpkin spices get a bit overshadowed
by other strong flavors. Possibly a
polarizing beer that will find fans and
detractors both, but it is extremely tasty
and unique.

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

85

TOP

RATED

Flying Dog
The Fear

Redhook
Saint Arnold Southern Tier
Out of Your
Pumpkinator Warlock
Gourd Porter

| ABV: 9% | IBU: 45 | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.8% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 10% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 8.6% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


Brewed with local pumpkin puree and a
secret blend of spices. Bold pumpkin-pie
flavor complemented by graham cracker
and chocolate notes.

What the brewer says


This is a full-bodied, rich roasty porter
that is dark chestnut brown and is
made with pureed pumpkin. Cinnamon,
nutmeg, and ginger are added to the
whirlpool, and maple syrup is added
during fermentation.

What the brewer says


Pumpkinator is an imperial pumpkin
stout brewed with pale two-row,
caramel, and black malts; Cascade and
Liberty hops; pumpkin; molasses, brown
sugar, and spices to make it feel like
your mom is baking pumpkin pie.

What the brewer says


Reanimate your senses with Warlocks
huge roasted malt character, moderate
carbonation, and spicy pumpkin-pie
aroma. Tastes like pumpkin pie laced
with coffee and dark chocolate. Smooth,
velvety mouthfeel and finishes slightly
sweeter than Pumking.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Roasted-malt character up
front, with notes of chocolate and a
hint of espresso. Very subtle cinnamon
and clove spices with a hint of pumpkin
flavor shining through.
Flavor: Dark chocolate and roast notes
from the malt mingle with the sweetness
from the caramel malts. Malt profile
is well supported by spices, mostly
cinnamon and some nutmeg. Some
pumpkin character but mild. Mostly
balanced in flavor and finish, with just a
slight edge toward sweetness, especially
as it warms.
Overall: A bit strong with roasted-malt
character, but it surprisingly works
with the caramel malt sweetness and
spices. Great example of a unique style
of pumpkin beer, with added layers of
complexity from the roast character. A
bit thin in body but very drinkable. Any
dark beer fan who likes pumpkin beers
will like this one.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Big pumpkin-pie spice aroma,
particularly clove, ginger, and cinnamon.
Some sweet toasted malt behind the
spices and some nice pumpkin notes.
Smells like Mexican hot chocolate, with
cocoa, cinnamon, and a touch of ginger
heat. A slight ester character adds some
depth.
Flavor: There is a nice roasted base
with cacao and chocolate sweetness.
The spice character adds to the beer
with the nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice,
and ginger. Pumpkin flavor itself is subtle but still present, adding some nice
sweetness. Smooth, rich, and full
finishes sweet with a nice warmth.
Overall: All about the spicesstrong
but not overpowering. Full of flavors that
come together well. The roasted chocolate sweetness and the pumpkin-pie
spices blend great. A very surprising and
complex beer that I would love to drink
on a cold night. Awesome holiday beer.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Caramelized brown sugar,
toffee, and vanilla notes with subtle
chocolate and cinnamon notes. Pumpkin
is a bit subdued, but enhanced a bit
with the caramel sweetness.
Flavor: Very strong and unique vanilla,
caramelized brown sugar, crme brle
flavor up front with cinnamon and
pumpkin-pie spices coming through
next, followed by subtle milk chocolate
notes. The spices enhance the profile
of this beer and complement the malt
sweetness and the vanilla. Pumpkin is
there, but more of a background.
Overall: The spice level is excellent
and the base beer supports it well. Very
enjoyable and unique. The flavors blend
well, and the roast and vanilla character
add good complexity. Nice caramel malt
character and pumpkin notes with a fun
spice character.

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 17
MOUTHFEEL: 3
OVERALL: 9

AROMA: 12
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 20
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

What our panel thought


Aroma: Roasty, chocolaty, and nice
pumpkin-pie spice character. Cinnamon,
vanilla, and brown sugar notes up front,
followed by deep, rich caramel/toffee
malt sweetness and pumpkin.
Flavor: Caramel malt flavorsreminiscent of toffee, brown sugar, and
candi sugarmingle beautifully with
the cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, allspice,
and clove spice character and blend
nicely with the vanilla and pumpkin.
Finishes mostly sweet, with a pleasant
lingering sweetness and a nice warming
character.
Overall: Very enjoyable beer. The body
of the beer and sweetness of the malt
and pumpkin blend nicely with the
spice character, making it a pretty dang
drinkable beerwhich could get you in
trouble. The body and warming character
make it absolutely perfect for cold
autumn nights.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

92

83

98

88

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 101

| BELGIAN-STYLE PUMPKIN BEER |

TOP

RATED

Jolly
21st Amend- Almanac
ment He Said Dark Pumpkin Pumpkin
La Parcela
Tripel
Sour

Timmermans
Pumpkin
Lambicus

| ABV: 8.2% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 7% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 5.9% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

| ABV: 4% | IBU: N/A | SRM: N/A |

What the brewer says


A collaboration with Elysian Brewing,
He Said is a white Belgian-Style Tripel
ale brewed with pumpkin, tarragon, and
galangal.

What the brewer says


A rich and roasty dark sour ale brewed
with organic heirloom pumpkins and
spices and aged in used red wine barrels
for a year.

What the brewer says


Packed with real pumpkins, hints of
spice, and a gentle kiss of cacao. Aged
in oak barrels and bottle-conditioned.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Tripel first and foremost.
Belgian strong ale (banana, orange, and
apple) esters are the first impression,
with a subtle spiciness of pepper and
clove. Alcohol to tickle the nose and
yeasty notes to confuse it. Not much to
suggest an underlying pumpkin, but that
isnt a bad thing.
Flavor: Malt sweetness (strong for the
style) complements and softens the medium-light spices (clove and cinnamon).
Pepper from the yeast complements the
spice additions. Pumpkin flavor is present, but not distinctive; it merges with
the malt sweetness. Hops bitterness is
medium low.
Overall: Excellent example of a Belgian
tripel with a variety of strong flavors.
The pumpkin and spices add complexity
without interfering with the tripel
flavors. Somewhat sweeter than most
tripels.

What our panel thought


Aroma: Funktasticpineapple, cherry,
prominent lactic notes, red-wine character, blackberry. Some malt sweetness,
but little to no pumpkin spice.
Flavor: The lactic character in the beer
is intense, but doesnt overwhelm some
of the other more nuanced flavors
ripened dark cherry, currant, orange
zest, raisin, and very low pumpkin-spice
character. The body of the beer provides
some good roast character and malt
sweetness. The pumpkin provides a
very subtle sweetness and complexity.
A slight vanilla note comes out as it
warms. Finishes tart in the end.
Overall: A very delicious and complex
sour beer. The lactic tartness and
malt-roasted sweetness did well to complement one another and not contrast.
Youll struggle to find what makes it a
pumpkin beer as there isnt much spice
or pumpkin. Nonetheless, it is a beer
that I would seek out.

What the brewer says


Pours a dark orange color with a
creamy head. Aroma of pumpkin pie, fall
spices, brown sugar, wheat, and a tart,
funky earthiness. Tastes of pumpkin
pie with hints of sour citrus fruit and
wheat.

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE:3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

102 |

88

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

AROMA: 10
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

91

What our panel thought


Aroma: Warming cinnamon and clove
right from the start. A cross between
apple and pumpkin pie, with the
sweetness and smell of apples but the
spice character of pumpkin. A slight
lactic (lemon) note and some funky
earthy barn character add complexity
and depth.
Flavor: An assertive Brett character,
with the prototypical barnyard and fruity
notes, but beautifully paired with pumpkin spices and a slight pumpkin-flesh
character. A welcomed acidity dries out
the finish, leaving little on the tongue,
which requires further sipping to fill the
flavor void.
Overall: Wonderful, complex, and interestingly crafted beer that marries the
concept of a pumpkin-spiced beer with
well-executed sour/Brett base. Lingering
spice finish continues to be pleasant
long after the beer is gone.

AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 18
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 9

90

What our panel thought


Aroma: Lovely aroma of gingerbread
cookies, spiced cider, and pumpkin-pie
spices. This beer has a sour apple tartness as well, providing extra complexity.
Sweet malt caramel notes come through
over strong pumpkin aroma, fresh from
the garden.
Flavor: The beer starts with a tart sour
apple-cider flavor that then rolls into
the pumpkin-pie spices and pumpkin
character. Nice cinnamon and nutmeg,
and good malt sweetness (almost
caramel) carries through this beer to the
finish. Spices and pumpkin flavor nicely
melded. Smooth and creamy mouthfeel.
Overall: Many different aspects come
through, from the tart slight-sweet sourness to the spiced character and malt
sweetness. I actually taste pumpkin over
the spices, apple, and malt flavors. Quite
drinkable with enough spice to make it
special for the fall/winter time of year.
Very approachable.
AROMA: 11
APPEARANCE: 3
FLAVOR: 19
MOUTHFEEL: 4
OVERALL: 10

92

Craft Beer & Brewing

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| 103

| ASK THE EXPERTS |

Harvesting Your
Homegrown Hops
Our Ask the Experts column poses your brewing questions to industry
experts. In this issues column, we answer the question, How do I know when
my homegrown hops are ready to harvest?
cones dry as they age, and picking them
at their peak means catching them when
theyve hit just the right moisture level.
The process is fairly straightforward.
As harvest time approaches (the cones
will start to lighten in color), pluck a representative sample. Try to randomize the
sample as best you can by pulling cones
from various plants of the same variety and
aim to remove hops from the upper reaches
of the plant, near the top of the trellis.
1. Weigh the freshly harvested hops and
write down the weight. Dont forget to tare
your scale or manually subtract the weight
of the container!
2. Fully dry the hops. If you own a food
dehydrator, this is the easiest method.
Otherwise, conventional ovens can do the
job. Just be sure to use the lowest heat
setting and check the hops frequently to
prevent burning. Much like taking gravity
readings to monitor fermentation progress, you can check dehydration progress
by weighing the sample. The weight of
the sample will decrease as the hops dry

Peak harvest varies with location, elevation, and


growing conditions. Dont pull the hops too early,
especially if youre harvesting in your backyard
and using them as wet-hops additions. Let the
hops tell you when theyre ready, instead of
following the traditional windows for harvesting.
104 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

OBTAINING DRIED HOPS IS easy.


Walk, bike, or drive down to your local
homebrew store, open the fridge, and take
your pick. If the exact variety you want
isnt available, you may have to ask the
shopkeeper about suitable substitutions.
Otherwise, the hardest decision you have
to make is Leaves or pellets?
Acquiring wet hops, however, is
something else entirely. Some retailers
and homebrew clubs place a group order
from growers and divide the overnight
shipment cost among a number of people.
But the most convenient way to get your
hands on truly fresh wet hops is to grow
them yourself (see Growing Your Own
Hops, page 72 for some great tips). And
once youve solved the normal challenges
associated with nurturing a healthy plant,
you need to start thinking about the harvest. How do you know when its time?
Joe Schiraldi of Left Hand Brewing
Company (Longmont, Colorado) recommends that homebrewers conduct a dry
matter test to know when hops are ready
to go. The idea behind the test is that hops

Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine

BREWED &
REVIEWED

PUMPKIN BEERS!

FOR THOSE WHO


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GREAT BEER
SECRETS OF FRESH HOPS | BREWING WITH FORAGED INGREDIENTS | PUMPKIN BEERS!

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Stan Hieronymus On Brewing
with Fresh Hops

August-September 2015 |
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6/23/15 11:18 AM

| BREAKOUT BREWERS: THE FORAGERS |

Fresh
Hops
Each year, brewers have a several-week window
of time in which to brew special beers that take
advantage of flavors not available to them yearround. Heres what you need to know about
tasting and brewing beers with

Tasted

With the onset of fall comes pumpkin beer season, and to warm you up for
the coming cool-down, our blind-tasting panel sampled through forty-three
different Pumpkin Ales, Pumpkin Lagers, Pumpkin Stouts & Porters,
Imperial Pumpkin Ales, and Belgian-style Pumpkin Ales.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

091_CBB8_Reviews-tfa-na.indd 91

The Adventurers
Butch Heilshorn and Alex McDonald, cobrewers at Earth Eagle Brewings
of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, are giving their customers palates a more

adventurous
experience with beers that replace hops with other less
BEERANDBREWING.COM
| 69
common ingredients. By Norman Miller

069_CBB8_Fresh-Hops-tfa-na.indd 69

HOPS. BARLEY. YEAST. WATER. Nearly


every 6/24/15
beer is4:00
brewed
PM with those four
ingredients and sometimes a few other
relatively common ones.
That wasnt always the case. In ancient
times, brewers used herbs and plants they
could find in the lands that surrounded
them to balance out the sweet malt and to
act as a preservative. They used ingredients
such as catnip, galangal root, mandrake,
mistletoe, mugwort, and spruce tips.
Those ingredients lost favor, though,
when brewers discovered the magic of
hops. Hops preserved beer far longer than
the likes of sweet gale or chickweed, and
hops provided flavors ranging from earthy

50 |

Heilshorn and his brother-in-law


Co-owner/Cobrewer Alex McDonald
(McDonald married Heilshorns sister,
Gretchen) became friends in the early
1990s. Both were beer geeks, and Heilshorninspired by his wife who is an
herbalistread The Art of Fermentation,
by Sandor Katz, and wanted to brew. Heilshorn and McDonald set up a homebrew
system and decided to brew a clone of
Dogfish Heads uber-potent World Wide
Stout, using no hops. It came out of the
fermentor amazing, but it came out of the
bottle like ass, Heilshorn says.
Nonetheless, their interest in brewing
continued. McDonald and his wife opened
A&G Homebrew in Portsmouth, and
then Heilshorn joined McDonald to open
Earth Eagle Brewings, a nano-brewery, in
a small adjacent space in 2013.
We were both interested in brewing
something that interested us. We didnt
want to just brew a brew and say, This is
our IPA, this is our brown ale, this is our
pale ale, says McDonald, although Earth
Eagle does brew some more common
styles in addition to the gruits.
McDonald says, The beauty of what
weve done [with the gruits] is we have
introduced people to something theyve
never tried before. Although all are called
gruits, each one tastes very different based

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

050_CBB8_BB-Earth Eagle-tfa-na.indd 50

Subscribe now at

and piney to plum and grass and even


citrusy fruits, providing a balance to the
malt. Today, hoppy beers are still the most
popular beers in the craft-beer world, and
nearly every craft brewer brews at least
one version of an IPA.
But not every brewery has forgotten the
old way. Earth Eagle Brewings of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is a champion
of gruits, the name given to beers that
eschew hops for other less common ingredients. Its a pretty selfish thing, says
Earth Eagle Cofounder/Cobrewer Butch
Heilshorn. Im not thinking in terms
of what the world will like. Im thinking
about what would get me excited.

| 91

6/24/15 5:12 PM

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with great recipes, techniques,
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beer, plus style features for
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and recipes for cooking with
beer (and pairing it too). Theres
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& Brewing Magazine.

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| ASK THE EXPERTS |

and then level off as the moisture content


drops to nil.
3. Weigh the dried hops and divide by the
weight of the original to obtain the dry
matter percentage.
Youre looking for about 22 to 24
percent dry matter, says Schiraldi. If your
hops hit the target moisture level, youre
ready to harvest them and throw them
into a kettle of boiling wort. If not, wait a
day or two and try again. According to the
Oregon Hop Commission, you can expect
to observe a one percent increase in dry
matter every four to seven days, depending upon the variety.
Schiraldi also reminds brewers that the
peak harvest varies with location, elevation, and growing conditions. Over in Paonia, Colorado, the hops are ready a week
or two earlier than they are in Yakima or
Willamette, he says. Dont pull the hops
too early, especially if youre harvesting
in your backyard and using them as wet-

hops additions. Let the hops tell you when


theyre ready, not the traditional windows
for harvesting.
Ultimately, intuition, common sense,
and annual practice may be your best
guides. Thats one of many reasons why
Crazy Mountains Kevin Selvy recommends getting to know a hops farmer.
Volunteer your time with a grower, he
advises. Wake up at 3 a.m., drive to the
farm, help pick hops, then go back home
with a few pounds and brew with them
the same day.
If you volunteer to pick hops on a farm,
youll take home far more than fresh hops
to brew with. Youll also take home the
most useful skill of all: experience you can
apply to your own homegrown harvest.
If you have a question for the experts, email
us at info@beerandbrewing.com or visit our
website at beerandbrewing.com.

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106 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

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| BREWING GLOSSARY |

Brewing A-Z
-Aacetic >> vinegary aroma caused by acetic
acid bacteria; common in sour beers.
acetaldehyde >> chemical present in beer
that has the aroma and flavor of fresh-cut
green apples or green leaves.
acid >> a solution with a pH value between
0 and 7.
acrospire >> the barley shoot that develops
during germination and malting.
adjunct >> any non-enzymatic fermentable
material that will feed the yeast. Common
examples are rice, corn, refined sugar, raw
wheat, flaked barley, and syrup.
aerobic >> a process that occurs in the
presence of oxygen.
aftertaste >> the flavor that lingers after
beer leaves the mouth.
aldehyde >> a chemical precursor to
alcohol. In some situations, alcohol can be
oxidized to aldehydes, creating off-flavors.
ale >> a beer brewed using a top-fermenting
yeast at 6075F (1524C) for a relatively
short time (23 weeks).
aleurone layer >> the outermost layer of
the endosperm of a barley grain, containing
enzymes.
alkaline >> a pH value between 7 and 14.
alpha acid >> a class of chemical
compounds found in hops cones resin
glands that is the source of hop bitterness.
alpha acid unit (AAU) >> a homebrewing
measurement of hops that is calculated by
multiplying the percent alpha acid of the
hops by the number of ounces of hops.
American Society of Brewing Chemists
(ASBC) >> the organization that sets
standards and test methods for brewing
materials and processes.
amino acids >> a group of complex organic
chemicals that form the building blocks of
protein.
amylase >> an enzyme group that converts
starch to sugar.
attenuation >> the degree to which the
fermentation process converts residual
sugars to alcohol and CO2.
anaerobic >> a process that occurs in the
absence of oxygen.

108 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

autolysis >> self-digestion and


disintegration of yeast cells that can cause
off-flavors if beer isnt racked from dead
yeast after primary fermentation.
-BBalling >> one of three units that are used
as the standard to describe the amount of
available extract as a weight percentage of
cane sugar in solution.
barley >> cereal grain, member of the genus
Hordeum. Malted barley is the primary
ingredient in beer.
barrel >> standard unit in commercial
brewing. A U.S. barrel is 31.5 gallons; a
British barrel is 43.2 U.S. gallons.
Baum >> hydrometer scale, developed by
the French chemist Antoine Baum, used to
measure the specific gravity of liquids.
beerstone >> a hard brown scale (calcium
oxalate) that deposits on fermentation
equipment.
beta glucans >> a group of gums that are
produced in the malting process and can,
if present in excess, cause problems with
runoff and fermentation.
biotin >> one of the B-complex vitamins
found in yeast.
blow-off tube >> a tube used during
vigorous fermentation to allow the release of
CO2 and excess fermentation material.
Brettanomyces >> colloquially referred to
as Brett, a genus of yeast sometimes used in
brewing. In a glucose-rich environment, it
produces acetic acid.
-Ccalcium >> mineral ion important in
brewing-water chemistry.
caryophyllene >> one of four primary
essential hops oils. Also found in basil,
caraway, cloves, oregano, and pepper.
chill haze >> cloudy protein residue that
precipitates when beer is chilled but redissloves as the beer warms up.
citronellol >> a monoterpene alcohol that is
primarily biotransformed by yeast from geraniol
when high levels of linalool are present.

cold break >> rapid precipitation of proteins


that occurs when the wort is rapidly chilled
before pitching the yeast.
coolship >> a large shallow pan used to cool
wort using outside air temperature. During
the cooling process, naturally occurring
yeast from the air inoculates the wort.
Then the cooled wort is transferred into
fermentors.
conditioning >> a term for secondary
fermentation, in which the beer matures.
cone >> the part of the hops plant used in
brewing.
corn sugar >> dextrose. Sometimes added
as an adjunct in beer to raise alcohol
percentage and lighten the color of the beer.
-Ddecoction >> a mashing technique that
involves removing some of the mash to
another pot, boiling it, then returning it to
the mash tun to raise the temperature.
dextrin >> a complex sugar molecule,
not normally fermentable by yeast, that
contributes to body in beer.
diacetyl >> a powerful flavor chemical with
the aroma of butter or butterscotch.
diastase >> an enzyme complex in barley
and malt that is responsible for the
conversion of starch into sugars during the
mashing process.
dimethyl sulfide (DMS) >> a powerful
flavor chemical found in beer, with the
aroma of cooked corn or cabbage.
dough-in rest >> the process of mixing the
crushed malt with water in the beginning of
the mash operation.
dry-hopping >> adding hops directly to
the fermentor at the end of fermentation to
increase hop aroma without adding bitterness.
-Eendosperm >> the starchy middle of a
barley grain that is the source of fermentable
material for brewing.
enzymes >> proteins that act as catalysts for
most reactions crucial to brewing, including
starch conversion and yeast metabolism.

esters >> aromatic compounds formed from


yeasts complete oxidation of various alcohols
and responsible for most fruity aromas in beer.
ethanol >> the type of alcohol found in beer,
formed by yeast from malt sugars.
European Brewing Convention (EBC)
>> Most commonly encountered as a term
applied to malt color. EBC is about twice
Lovibond/SRM.
European Bitterness Unit (EBU) >>
equivalent to International Bittering Unit
(IBU).
extract >> concentrated wort in dry or syrup
form.
-Ffarnesene >> one of four primary essential
hops oils. Although farnesene makes up a
very low percentage of total oil in most hop
varieties, it is considered significant because
it makes up a substantial proportion of some
noble hops.
fatty acid >> among the secondary elements
that are produced during fermentation and
create much of a beers flavor.
fermentation >> yeasts biochemical process
involving the metabolism of sugars and the
release of CO2 and alcohol.
finings >> clarifying agents added to wort
or beer to help pull suspended yeast, malt
proteins, and polyphenols out of the beer.
firkin >> British cask containing 10.8 U.S. or
9 Imperial gallons (40.9 liters).
first runnings >> the first few quarts of
wort that are drained off at the beginning of
runoff until the draining wort is fairly clear.
flocculation >> the clumping together and
settling of the yeast out of solution.
fusel alcohol >> a group of more complex
alcohols that esterify under normal
conditions. In beer, fusel alcohols can be
produced by excessive amounts of yeast.
FWH >> first wort hopping is a process that
involves adding finishing hops to the boil
kettle as the wort is drained from the lauter
or mash tun.
-Ggelatin >> one of several fining agents.
gelatinization >> the process of breaking
down the starch granules in corn or other
unmalted cereals to make the starch
accessible for conversion into sugar.
geraniol >> one of many hop compounds.
Researchers have determined that citronellol
is primarily generated from geraniol when
high levels of linalool are present.
germination >> the process by which the
barley shoot begins to grow and emerge
from the hull.
glucanase >> an enzyme that acts on the
beta glucans of unmalted barley, oatmeal,
rye, and wheat.
glucose >> grape sugar or dextrose, the most
common type of sugar.
grist >> ground grain ready for brewing.

-Hhardness >> in water chemistry, denotes the


presence and concentration of calcium and
magnesium.
hops >> a climbing vine of the
Cannabacinae family, whose cones
are used to give beer its bitterness and
characteristic aroma.
hopback >> a sealed container that is filled
with whole hops and inserted in line as
the wort is transferred into the fermentor.
The hops add aroma and act as a filter for
removing the break material.
hot break >> (also known as hot trub) the
rapid coagulation of proteins and tannins
that forms a brown scum on top of the wort
as the boil begins.
humulene >> one of the chemicals that give
hops their characteristic aroma.
husk >> the outer covering of barley or other
grains.
hydrolysis >> in homebrewing, the process
by which the addition of water breaks down
proteins and carbohydrates.
hydrometer >> a glass instrument used in
brewing to measure the specific gravity of
beer and wort to calculate alcohol percentage
and fermentation status.
-IIBU (international bittering unit) >>
the accepted method of expressing hop
bitterness in beer.
impact hops >> also called special flavor
hops. Hops varietals bred to exhibit
such flavor and aroma attributes as pine,
pineapple, grapefruit, mango, lychee, and
gooseberries.
infusion >> a mashing technique where
heating is accomplished with addition of
boiling water.
Irish moss (also called carrageen) >> a
marine algae used to promote the formation
of break material and precipitation during
the boil.
isinglass >> a fining agent that comes from
the swim bladder of sturgeon.
iso-alpha acid >> predominant source of
bitterness in beer. Derived from the hops
during the boil.
isomerization >> chemical change during
wort boiling that causes hops alpha acids to
become more bitter and soluble in wort.
-Kkettle >> boiling vessel, also known as a copper.
kraeusen >> as a noun, the thick foamy
head on fermenting beer. As a verb,
a priming method where vigorously
fermenting young beer is added to beer
during secondary fermentation.
-Llactic acid >> a tart, sour acid that is a byproduct of Lactobacillus.

Lactobacillus >> large genus of bacteria.


Some species are used in the production of
yogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, and sour beers.
lactose >> an unfermentable sugar that comes
from milk. Traditionally used in milk stout.
lag time >> adaptation phase after the yeast
is pitched during which the yeast begins a
period of rapid aerobic growth.
lager >> a beer brewed with a bottomfermenting yeast between 4555F (713C)
and given 46 weeks to ferment.
lautering >> a process in which the mash
is separated into the liquid wort and the
residual grain.
lauter tun >> traditional vessel used to
separate the wort from the residual grains.
lightstruck >> a skunky off-flavor in beer
that develops from exposure to shortwavelength light.
linalool >> one of many hops compounds.
Although linalool constitutes a tiny
percentage of hops oils, combined with
geraniol, it strongly affects the aroma of
beer.
lipid >> types of fat in animal and plant
matter.
liquification >> the process by which alpha
amylase breaks up the branched amylopectin
molecules in the mash.
Lovibond >> a method of measuring beer
and grain color, superseded by the SRM
method for beer, but still often used in
reference to grain color.
lupulin >> hops resiny substance that
contains all the resins and aromatic oils.
-MMaillard browning >> a caramelization
reaction that creates malts roasted color and
flavor.
malt >> barley or other grain that has been
allowed to sprout, then dried or roasted.
maltose >> a simple sugar that is the
predominant fermentable material in wort.
mash >> the hot-water steeping process in
which starch is converted into sugars.
mash tun >> vessel with a false bottom in
which mashing is carried out.
melanoidins >> the strong flavor
compounds produced by Maillard browning.
milling >> grinding or crushing grain.
modification >> the degree to which the
protein-starch matrix breaks down during
malting.
mouthfeel >> sensory qualities of a beer other
than flavor, such as body and carbonation.
myrcene>> one of four primary essential hop
oils. Also found in bay, wild thyme, and parsley.
-Ooriginal gravity (OG) >> measure of wort
strength expressed as specific gravity.
oxidation >> chemical reaction that occurs
between oxygen and various components in
beer.

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 109

| BREWING GLOSSARY |

-Pparti-gyle >> to get multiple beers out of


the same mash. The brewer boils successive
runnings separately and, ideally, blends
them to different strengths.
pasteurization >> the process of sterilizing
by heat.
Pediococcus >> bacteria similar to Lacto-

bacillus that produces lactic acid. Pedio


is less sensitive to hops and can work at
lower pH levels than Lacto, so most of the
lactic-acid character in sour ales comes
from Pedio.
pH (potential of hydrogen) >> the scale
used to express the level of acidity and
alkalinity in a solution in a water-based
solution. Neutral pH in water has a value of
7; most acidic is a value of 0; most alkaline is
a value of 14.
phenol >> chemical family responsible for
spicy, smoky, clove-like, and other aromas
in beer.
pitch >> adding yeast to the fermentor.
Plato >> European and American scale of
gravity based on a percentage of pure sugar
in the wort. A newer, more accurate version
of the Balling scale.
polishing >> final filtration before bottling
that leaves beer sparkling clear.
polyphenol >> tannins that contribute to
haze and staling reactions.
polysaccharide >> polymers of simple
sugars.
ppm >> parts per million. Most commonly
used to express dissolved mineral
concentrations in water.
precipitation >> a chemical process
involving a compound coming out of
solution.
primary fermentation >> initial rapid stage
of yeast activity when maltose and other
simple sugars are metabolized.
priming >> adding a small amount
of sugar to beer before bottling to
restart fermentation and give the beer
carbonization.
protein >> complex organic molecules
involved in enzyme activity, yeast
nutrition, head retention, and colloidal
stability.

proteinase (protease) >> an enzyme that


breaks proteins apart into smaller, more
soluble units. The breaking up of the
proteins is called proteolysis.
protein rest >> during mashing, a rest that
allows remnant large proteins to be broken
down into smaller proteins and amino acids
and any remaining starches to be released
from the endosperm.
-Rracking >> carefully siphoning the beer away
from the trub to another fermentor or to
bottles.
Reinheitsgebot >> Bavarian beer-purity law,
enacted in 1516 decreeing that beer can have
only three components: water, barley, and
hops. Yeast was added later.
runnings >> wort that is drained from the
mash during sparging.
-Ssaccharification >> conversion of starch
to sugars in the mash through enzymatic
action.
Saccharomyces >> scientific genus name of
brewers yeast.
sanitize >> to reduce microbial
contaminants to insignificant levels.
secondary fermentation >> after the
primary fermentation, beer is racked to a
sterile container for a slower phase of yeast
activity during which complex sugars are
metabolized.
session beer >> a beer that is lighter in
gravity and alcohol (usually less than 4.5%
ABV).
set mash >> during sparging, when the grain
bed plugs up and no liquid flows through it.
six-row >> the type of barley most often
grown in the United States and used in the
production of American-style beers.
sparge >> rinsing mashed grains with hot
water to recover all available wort sugars.
specific gravity >> the ratio of the density
of a solution to standard solution, such as
water, at a defined temperature.
SRM (Standard Reference Method) >> the
measurement of beer color.

LEARN TO BREW

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online learning platform can help you become a better brewer, one video lesson at a time.
Seven classes, led by CB&B staff or brewers from renowned breweries, are now available for
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learn.beerandbrewing.com

110 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

starch >> complex carbohydrates that are


converted into sugars during mashing.
starch haze >> suspended starch particles
that cause cloudiness in beer.
steep >> soaking barley or wheat in water to
begin malting.
step mash >> mashing technique that uses
controlled temperature steps.
sterilize >> to eliminate all forms of life by
either chemical or physical means.
strike >> adding hot water to the crushed malt
to raise the temperature and begin mashing.
-Ttannins >> polyphenols, complex organic
materials with an astringent flavor, extracted
from barley husks and hops.
terpenes >> the flavor chemicals in hop oils.
trub >> the hot and cold break material, hop
bits, and dead yeast sediment at the bottom
of the fermentor.
two-row >> the most common type of barley
for brewing everywhere except America.
-Uunderlet >> adding water to a mash from
below to encourage quicker and more
thorough mixing of the grains and water.
-V, W, X, Y, ZVinnie nail >> attributed to Vinnie Cilurzo
from Russian River Brewing. Made of
stainless steel and typically 1.5" 2" long,
these are used to plug the small hole that
is drilled into a wooden barrel to retrieve a
sample of aging beer.
whirlpool >> a device that separates the
hops and trub from the wort after boiling.
wine thief >> an instrument used for taking
a sample of wine or beer from a fermentor.
wort >> the sugar-laden liquid from the
mash.
wort chiller >> a heat exchanger that rapidly
cools wort from near boiling to pitching
temperatures.
yeast >> a large class of microscopic fungi,
several species of which are used in brewing.
zymurgy >> the science of brewing and
fermentation.

HOT

R
FE

1. THE MASH
(AND STEEP)

This process extracts


fermentable and
non-fermentable sugars from the grains as
well as valuable color,
flavor, and body.

2. THE BOIL

MEN

8. PITCH YEAST

Boiling not only


concentrates the
wort into a delicious
sugary liquid, it also
pulls bitterness from
the hops and causes
reactions that are
necessary for rigorous
fermentation.

Make sure that your


yeast and wort are
both at room temperature and then
add the yeast to your
fermenter.

7. OXYGENATE
WORT

Oxygen plays a key


role in jumpstarting the
yeasts fermentation
ability. While not
mandatory, adding
oxygen to your wort
via an aeration stone
or 02 tank is recommended.

3. ADD HOPS

Hops are generally


divided into two categoriesbittering hops
and aroma hops. The
longer you boil hops,
the more bitterness
you extract. Aroma
hops are added later
in the boil process to
preserve the essential
oils that contribute
their distinct aromatic
profiles.

6. TRANSFER TO
FERMENTER
5. CHILL WORT

Rapidly chilling
the wort helps add
clarity to the wort
and gets the wort
to a temperature
where it will be ready
to accept yeast.
Rapidly chilling also
decreases the chance
of potential bacterial
infection of the wort.

4. ADD MISC
(OPTIONAL)

9. RACK TO
SECONDARY

After primary fermentation is complete,


beer is racked to a
secondary fermenter.
This removes the
beer from the trub left
in the bottom of the
primary fermenter,
which has the
potential to produce
off-flavors.

10. DRY HOP

An optional step
based on the style of
beer and personal
taste, additional hops
are added to the
secondary fermenter
after primary fermentation is complete.
This process adds
hop aroma without
bitterness.

11. BOTTLE/KEG

Once fermentation
is complete, the beer
can then be racked
to either a bottling
bucket or keg. If bottling,
priming sugar is added
to the beer, giving the
yeast material with
which to carbonate
the beer in the bottle.
If kegging and force
carbonating, no
additional sugar is
required.

COLD

Toward the end of


the boil, recipes may
call for adding other
ingredients such as
brown sugar, spices,
extracts, or herbs.
Clarifying agents such
as Whirfloc or Irish
moss may also be
added at this time.

Homebrewing,
Start to Finish

ENJOY!

Once youve decided on a recipe or ordered your kit,


follow these eleven steps and youll be drinking great beer in no time!
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 111

Available Now!
Chef Cooper Brunk offers a fresh
and creative approach to cooking
with beer. Featuring101+ recipes
and photos of every dish, forward
by Kim Jordan of New Belgium
Brewing, plus proper beer service
and pairing guides, this book
will change your preconceptions
about cooking with beer!

Craft

The

Beer
Kitchen
1
01ES+
RECIP
for cookin
g with
BEER

A FRESH AND CREATIVE APPROACH TO COOKING WITH BEER

Cooper Brunk
FOREWORD BY KIM JORDAN, CO-FOUNDER OF NEW BELGIUM BREWING

Cover-8x9.indd 1

ACTIVE PREP: 20 minutes


TOTAL TIME:
SERVES:

35 minutes

24

Lamb
2 racks of lamb, frenched
2 Tbs fresh rosemary, chopped
2 Tbs garlic, minced
Kosher salt
Black pepper
Sprigs of fresh rosemary for garnish

White Beans
1 can white beans, great northern beans,
or cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
1 cup (8 fl oz/237 ml) water
1 large shallot, sliced
2 Tbs garlic, minced
1 tsp fresh thyme, minced
Kosher salt
Black pepper

Peach Preserves
2 cup frozen peaches
1 cup (8 fl oz/237 ml) smoked porter
2 Tbs brown sugar

Alaskan Smoked Porter


(JUNEAU, AK)

Founders Smoked Porter

(GRAND RAPIDS, MI)

Captain Lawrence Smoked Porter


(ELMSFORD, NY)

4/20/15 7:50 PM

Rack of Lamb with


White Beans and
Smoked Porter
Peach Preserves
A frenched rack of lamb has the meat, fat, and membranes that
connect the individual ribs removed. It gives the rack a clean
look. You can do it yourself or ask your butcher to do it for you.
LAMB
Preheat the oven to 400F (204C). Rub the lamb with the rosemary and garlic and salt and pepper to taste. Place the lamb
racks in a roasting pan and roast for 1720 minutes. Add 710
minutes if you prefer a more well-done lamb. Let the racks rest
34 minutes before carving.
WHITE BEANS
In a small saucepan, combine the beans, water, shallot, garlic,
and thyme. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for
1012 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
PEACH PRESERVES
In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the ingredients, bring to a simmer, and cook down to a syrup consistency. If desired, puree the mixture.
For a dramatic presentation, cut each rack of lamb in half
and interweave the rib bones. Spoon the white beans in a line
across each plate. Arrange the lamb over the beans. Place a
spoonful of the Smoked Porter Peach Preserves in front of
each half-rack of lamb. Garnish with rosemary.

ACTIVE PREP: 40 minutes


TOTAL TIME: 60 minutes
SERVES: 2

Gnocchi
cup dehydrated potato flakes
cup (2 fl oz/59 ml) pumpkin beer
1 cup pumpkin puree
1 egg
2 Tbs sugar
1 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp ground ginger
cup all-purpose flour, plus more for
rolling later
Kosher salt
Black pepper
2 Tbs unsalted butter

Reduction
1 cup (12 fl oz/355 ml) pumpkin beer

Pepitas
1 tsp unsalted butter
2 Tbs pepitas
Pinch of cayenne
Kosher salt

Roasted Mushrooms
1 Tbs unsalted butter
4 large button mushrooms, stems removed

Lakefront Pumpkin Lager


(MILWAUKEE, WI)

Alewerks Pumpkin Ale

(WILLIAMSBURG, VA)

Anderson Valley Fall Hornin Pumpkin Ale


(BOONVILLE, CA)

88

114

Gnocchi with Pumpkin


Beer Reduction and
Roasted Mushrooms
GNOCCHI
In a large bowl, combine the potato flakes and beer. Add the
pumpkin, egg, sugar, and spices. Mix well. Slowly incorporate
the flour until a thick, mostly dry, dough forms. Turn the
dough out onto a floured surface. Dust with flour and knead
gently for 34 minutes, adding a little flour as necessary, until
the dough is slightly elastic and smooth. Divide the dough into
4 portions. Roll each portion out into a rope -inch (19-mm)
thick. Cut the rope into 1-inch (25-mm) pieces. Reserve.
REDUCTION
In a small saucepan, bring the beer to a boil. Reduce the heat
to a simmer and cook until the beer is reduced to a syrup.
PEPITAS
In a small saucepan over low heat, melt the butter, then add
the cayenne and pepitas. Slowly toast the pepitas for 3 minutes. Season lightly with salt.
ROASTED MUSHROOMS
Preheat the oven to 400F (204C). In a small pan over medium-high heat, melt the butter. Place the mushrooms top down
in the butter and cook for 2 minutes. Turn over and finsh in
the oven for 5 minutes.
Drop the gnocchi pieces into a pot of boiling salted water and
cook for 34 minutes, until the gnocchi float to the surface.
Remove the gnocchi and drain. In a large saut pan over medium-high heat, melt 2 tablespoons of butter. Add the gnocchi
and saut until lightly browned. Add a little of the beer reduction and toss to coat the gnocchi. Remove from the heat. Add
the pepitas and stir gently.
Divide the gnocchi between 2 pasta bowls. Top with the
Roasted Mushrooms, whole or sliced, and drizzle more of the
Pumpkin Beer Reduction over the top.

GUIDE TO BE E R
GLA S S WA RE
We all taste first with our
eyes before we take a bite
or a sip, and that visual
component is just as
important when serving
beer as it is when preparing food. Appropriate and
stylish beer glassware that
beautifully presents beer
can place your guests in
a more receptive state of
mind for the flavors in the
food and beer that youre
sharing with them. In addition, different glasses play
to the strengths of different styles of beer, whether its helping to focus
aromas, produce a more
attractive head for the beer,
release the volatile aromatics, or simply showcase the
beautiful color of the beer.
Here, weve identified and
demystified some of the
major glassware styles so
you can put the right beer
in the right glass with the
right dish every time. The
best meals are made from a
combination of great food,
fantastic company, and
compelling presentation,
and while the right glassware wont make or break
a meal, it will certainly add
to the experience.

10

ACTIVE PREP: 20 minutes


TOTAL TIME:
SERVES:

7085 minutes

Beer-Cheese Grits
DIMPLED MUG

Sturdy and social, the dimpled mug is


a staple for English pub and German
beerhall-style beers (think amber German
lagers such as Marzen and Oktoberfest and
British-ale styles such as ESB, mild, pale ale,
or dry stout.

PILSNER

Visually stunning, the pilsner glass shows


off crisp beers in their best light. The tall
and thin body generates a tall and attractive
head for your beer. Its perfect for pilsners
and light American lagers, but can also be
used for darker German-lager styles such as
Schwarzbier.

ENGLISH NONIC PINT

The go-to glass for British-beer styles that


range from pale ales and IPAs to milds and
bitters, the nonic pint is also great for lower
ABV sessionable stouts and porters. One
defining feature (and advantage over the
more common Shaker pint) are the thinner
wallsthey wont change the temperature of
your beer as rapidly as the thicker
Shaker-pint walls.

WEIZEN GLASS

Built for wheat beers, the weizen glass features


a bowled top to create more space for that
signature luscious head (the additional protein
content in wheat beers aids in head creation
and retention). That head isnt just a visual
cue, howeverit delivers the yeast-derived aromatics that the beers are known for. Use with
American wheat styles as well as hefeweizen,
weizenbock, and dunkleweizen.

SNIFTER

The deep bowl of the snifter glass focuses


and delivers the rich aromas of strong beer
styles such as barleywine, imperial stout,
and any bigger beer that has spent time
in a barrel (Scotch ale, old ale, etc.). Swirl
gently, then stick your nose in the glass and
breathe deeply to get the full aroma experiencemuch of what we perceive as taste
is actually smell, and the snifter is built to
maximize it.

WHITE WINE GLASS

For entertaining at home, its convenient to use


one set of glasses for multiple purposes, and
serving beer in wine glasses can definitely be
a conversation starter. White wine glasses are
the right size for smaller pours of bigger beers
that would otherwise look out-of-scale in larger
glasses (red wine glasses tend to be too large).
Wine glasses are suitable for big beer styles
(imperial stout, barleywine, etc.) but also lambic,
gueuze, and wild ale.

TULIP

Traditionally associated with Belgian styles


such as saison, the tulip glass has now
evolved into the defacto standard craft-beer
glass at many breweries and craft-beer bars.
The shape is great for aromatic beers such
as imperial IPAs, and their similarity to snifters makes them great for barleywines and
big stouts. If you buy only one specialty beer
glass, make it a footed tulip. Its versatility is
unmatched in the beer-glass world.

FLUTE

Highly carbonated, bright, and colorful beer


such as lambic is showcased beautifully in
a flute glass. The narrow shape creates an
impressive champagne-like head and allows
the glass to showcase the beers color.

CHALICE (OR GOBLET)

Glassware can be as much about marketing


as it is about presentation, and many Belgian
beers have custom-branded versions of the
chalice. But its the right choice for serving
Belgian (and Belgian-style) dubbel, tripel,
and quadrupel as well as Belgian dark strong
ale and even Berliner weisse.

3 cup (24 fl oz/710 ml) water


1 cup (8 fl oz/237 ml) brown ale
cup (4 fl oz/118 ml) milk or cream
1 cup coarse-ground white grits
1 cup shredded smoked Gouda
Kosher salt
Black pepper

Shrimp
4 Tbs (2 fl oz/59 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
46 cloves garlic, minced
1 green bell pepper, julienned
1 red bell pepper, julienned
1 red onion, julienned
1 lb (454 g) shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 Tbs blackening or Creole spice
1 tsp all-purpose flour
cup diced tomatoes
1 cup (8 fl oz/237 ml) lager
8 Tbs (1 stick) unsalted butter
Kosher salt
Black pepper

SPECIALTY GLASSES

Glassmakers have jumped on the growing


craft-beer market in recent years with increasing numbers of specialty glasses. Rastals Teku (left) is a stylized tulip glass aimed
at high-end beer styles such as imperial
stout, barleywine, and wild ale, while Spiegelaus IPA glass (right) is purpose-designed
for releasing and concentrating intense hops
aromatics. The thin glass walls of both are
highly refined and present beer very well.

Sauted Shrimp
and Beer-Cheese
Grits with Creole
Lager Sauce
BEER-CHEESE GRITS
In a medium saucepan, bring the water, beer, and milk to a
boil. Slowly whisk in the grits. Continue whisking slowly for at
least 1 minute. Reduce the heat to low and cover. Simmer for
4560 minutes whisking often so the grits dont stick to bottom of the pan. Remove from the heat and stir in the cheese.
Season to taste with salt and pepper.
SHRIMP
Heat a large skillet or saut pan over medium-high heat. Add
the olive oil and garlic. Cook the garlic for 12 minutes. Add
the bell peppers and onion and continue cooking 57 minutes,
stirring occasionally. Add the shrimp, blackening spice, and
flour to pan. Stir well to coat everything in spices. Cook an
additional 2 minutes, then add the tomatoes, lager, and butter.
Bring the sauce to a boil, then reduce heat to low. Simmer for
710 minutes to thicken the sauce. Season to taste with salt
and pepper.
Spoon the Beer-Cheese Grits into the center of each large pasta bowl. Arrange the shrimp, peppers, and onion on top of the
grits. Cover with the lager sauce left in the pan.

New Belgium Brewing Blue Paddle


(FORT COLLINS, CO)

Firestone Walker Pivo Pils


(PASO ROBLES, CA)

August Schells Pils


(NEW ULM, MN)

62

Buy now! At bookstores, homebrew shops, or shop.beerandbrewing.com.

Marketplace
Hands-down the best
place to stop in
Southern Vermont for:
Tasty Snacks
Hot and Cold Caffeine
Made-to-order
Sandwiches
Craft Beer and Hard
Cider
Open 7 Days
until 8 p.m.
802.387.5866

VT Exit 4, I-91

www.putneyfood.coop

Brew Your Own


Masterpiece
myLHBS has everything you need to
produce your very first masterpiece.
And every one that follows too!

CHECK OUT OUR WEB STORE FOR A FULL LISTING


www.myLHBS.com 703-241-3874 info@mylhbs.com

FALSE BOTTOMS
TO FIT ANY NEED

Pro Hobbyist Beer Spirits Custom

NorCalBrewingSolutions.com (530) 243-2337


BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 113

Marketplace

Advertise
In The CB&B
Marketplace!
The Craft Beer & Brewing Marketplace
offers cost-effective ways to reach an
engaged craft beer and homebrewing
audience. To discuss advertising
options, contact:

Alex Johnson

(Media Sales Manager)


888-875-8708 x707
ajohnson@beerandbrewing.com
@CraftBrewAL

Beer r

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Its how we get from HERE to BEER.

114 |

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INCLUDE:

AND
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MORE!

Retail Shop Directory


Please visit one of these fine shops wherever you are.
If you would like to be listed in our directory, please contact Rachel Szado,
rszado@beerandbrewing.com, (888) 875-8708, ext 705.

Alabama
Wish You Were Beer
(256) 325-9992
7407 US Highway 72, Ste G
Madison, AL 35758
wishyouwerebeer.net
Alaska
Brew Time
(907) 479-0200
29 College Road Ste 4
Fairbanks, AK 99701
Alaska Home Brew Supply
(907) 863-0025
6033 Westview Circle
Wasilla, AK 99654
alaskahomebrew.com

HopTech Homebrewing
Supplies
(925) 875-0246
6398 Dougherty Rd., Ste 7
Dublin, CA 94568
hoptech.com
Operated by 2 passionate
home brewers. Over 60 hops,
loads of grain and extract.
Equipment and ingredients.
Military and AHA discount!

Arizona

Humboldt Beer Works


(707) 442-6258
110 3rd St., Ste D
Eureka, CA 95501
humboldtbeerworks.com

Brew Your Own Brew Gilbert


(480) 497-0011
525 E. Baseline Rd., Ste 108
Gilbert, AZ 85233
brewyourownbrew.com

The Brewmeister Folsom


(916) 985-7299
802A Reading St.
Folsom, CA 95630
shopbrewmeister.com

What Ales Ya Homebrew


(623) 486-8016
6363 W. Bell Rd., Ste 2
Glendale, AZ 85308
whatalesya.com

OShea Brewing Co.


(949) 364-4440
28142 Camino Capistrano,
Ste. 107
Laguna Niguel, CA 92677
osheabrewing.com

Brew Your Own Brew


Scottsdale
(480) 625-4200
8230 E. Raintree Rd. #103
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
brewyourownbrew.com
Brew Your Own Brew Tuscon
(520) 322-5049
2564 N. Campbell Ave.
Tuscon, AZ 85719
brewyourownbrew.com
California
CRAFT Beer & Wine
(510) 769-9463
2526 A Santa Clara Ave
Alameda, CA 94501
craftalameda.com
Fermentation Solutions
(408) 871-1400
2507 Winchester Blvd.
Campbell, CA 95008
fermentationsolutions.com
Baycrest Wines & Spirits
(949) 293-3609
333 E. 17th St., Ste 1
Costa Mesa, CA 92627

116 |

Monrovia Homebrew Shop


(626) 531-0825
1945 S. Myrtle Ave.
Monrovia, CA 91016
Murrieta Homebrew
Emporium
(951) 600-0008
38750 Sky Canyon Dr., Ste A
Murrieta, CA 92563
murrietahomebrew.com
J&M Brewing Supplies
(415) 883-7300
101 Roblar Dr., Ste C
Novato, CA 94949
jmbrew.com
The Bearded Brewer
(661) 418-6348
4855 W. Columbia Way
Quartz Hill, CA 93536

The Cellar
(949) 212-6182
156 Avenida Del Mar
San Clemente, CA 92672
thecellarsite.com
The Homebrewer
(619) 450-6165
2911 El Cajon Blvd., Ste 2
San Diego, CA 92104
thehomebrewersd.com
Pacific Brewing Supplies
(800) 448-2337
240 S. San Dimas Ave.
San Dimas, CA 91773
pacificbrewingsupplies.com
Seven Bridges Co-op
Organic Homebrew
(800) 768-4409
325 River St., Ste A
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
breworganic.com
Simi Valley Homebrew
(805) 583-3110
4352 Eileen St.
Simi Valley, CA 93063
simivalleyhomebrew.com
Valley Brewers
(805) 691-9159
515 4th Pl.
Solvang, CA 93463
valleybrewers.com
The Brewmeister West
Sacramento
(916) 371-7299
1409 Shore St.
West Sacramento, CA 95691
shopbrewmeister.com
Colorado
The Brew Hut
(303) 680-8898
15120 E. Hampden Ave.
Aurora, CO 80014
thebrewhut.com
Avon Liquor
(970) 949-4384
100 West Beaver Creek Blvd.
Avon, CO 81620
avon-liquor.com

NorCal Brewing Solutions


(530) 243-2337
1768 Churn Creek Rd.
Redding, CA 96002
norcalbrewingsolutions.com

Boulder Fermentation
Supply
(303) 578-0041
2510 47th St. Unit I
Boulder, CO 80301
boulderfermentationsupply.com

The Brewmeister Roseville


(916) 780-7299
1031 Junction Blvd., Ste 802
Roseville, CA 95678
shopbrewmeister.com

Hazels Beverage World


(303) 447-1955
1955 28th St.
Boulder, CO 80301
hazelsboulder.com

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Castle Rock Homebrew


Supply
(303) 660-2275
1043 Park St.
Castle Rock, CO 80109
castlerockhomebrew.com
Cheers Liquor Mart
(719) 574-2244
1105 N Circle Dr.
Colorado Springs, CO 80909
cheersliquormart.com
Fermentations
(719) 598-1164
6820 N. Academy Blvd.
Colorado Springs, CO 80918
fermentations.biz

Pringles Fine Wine & Spirits


(970) 221-1717
2100 W. Drake Rd.
Fort Collins, CO 80526
pringleswine.com
Savory Spice Shop
(970) 682-2971
123 N. College Ave., #100
Fort Collins, CO 80524
myecard.pro/savory
Supermarket Liquors
(970) 221-2428
1300 E. Mulberry St
Fort Collins, CO 80524
sml-uncorked.com

Acme Liquor
(970) 349-5709
510 Belleview Ave.
Crested Butte, CO 81224
acmeliquor.com

Barley Haven Homebrew


(303) 936-2337
1050 South Wadsworth Blvd.,
Ste B
Lakewood, CO 80226
barleyhaven.com

Argonaut Wine & Liquor


(303) 831-7788
760 E. Colfax Ave
Denver, CO 80203
argonautliquor.com

Warhammer Supply
(970) 635-2602
1112 Monroe Ave.
Loveland, CO 80537
warhammersupply.com

Park Avenue Wine & Spirits


(303) 477-5700
3480 Park Ave. W., Ste E
Denver, CO 80216
parkavewineandspirits.com

Bruin Spirits
(303) 840-1678
11177 S. Dransfeldt Rd.
Parker, CO 80134
bruinspiritsinc.com

Beer At Home
(303) 789-3676
4393 S. Broadway
Englewood, CO 80113
beerathome.com

Barley Haven Draft n Still


(303) 789-2337
4131 South Natches Ct., Unit B
Sheridan, CO 80110
barleyhaven.com

Rambos Longhorn Liquor Mart


(970) 586-8583
1640 Big Thompson Ave.
Estes Park, CO 80517
ramboslonghornliquor.com

Ski Haus Liquors


(970) 879-7278
1450 S. Lincoln Ave
Steamboat Springs, CO 80477

Als Newsstand
(970) 482-9853
177 North College Ave.
Fort Collins, CO 80524

Applejack Wine & Spirits


(303) 233-3331
3320 Youngfield St.
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
applejack.com

Craft Beer Cellar Fort Collins


(970) 482-0665
122 S. Mason St.
Fort Collins, CO 80524
craftbeercellar.com/fortcollins

Kitchen & Homebrew Supply


(719) 687-0557
118 W. Midland Ave.
Woodland Park, CO 80863
kitchenandhomebrewsupply.com

Hops and Berries Old Town


(970) 493-2484
130 W. Olive St., Unit B
Fort Collins, CO 80524
hopsandberries.com

Connecticut

Hops and Berries South


(970) 493-2484
1833 E. Harmony Rd., Unit 16
Fort Collins, CO 80528
hopsandberries.com
Old Town Liquor
(970) 493-0443
214 S. College Ave., Ste 1
Fort Collins, CO 80524

Stomp N Crush
(860) 552-4634
140 Killingsworth Turnpike
(Rt.81)
Clinton, CT 06413
stompncrush.com
Maltose Express
(203) 452-7332
246 Main St.
Monroe, CT 06468
maltoseexpress.net

Florida
Brew Story
(239) 494-1923
20451 S. Tamiami Trail, #11
Estero, FL 33928
Hanger 41 Winery and Brew
Shop
(239) 542-9463
10970 South Cleveland Ave.,
Unit 304
Fort Myers, FL 33907
www.timetomakewine.com
Hop Heads Craft
Homebrewing Supplies
(850) 586-7626
26C NW Racetrack Rd.
Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547
hopheadsfwb.com
Biscayne Home Brew
(305) 479-2691
7939 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, FL 33138
biscaynehomebrew.com
Sanford Homebrew Shop
(407) 732-6931
115 S. Magnolia Ave.
Sanford, FL 32771
sanfordhomebrewshop.com
Georgia
Taps Craft Beers
(404) 996-6939
1248 Clairmont Rd.
Decatur, GA 30030
tapscraftbeers.com
Beverage World
(706) 866-5644
1840 Lafayette Rd.
Fort Oglethorpe, GA 30742
ourbeers.com
Tap It
(770) 534-0041
1850 Thompson Bridge Rd.
Gainesville, GA 30501
tapitgrowler.com
Operation Homebrew
(770) 638-8383
1142 Athens Hwy, #105
Grayson, GA 30017
operationhomebrew.com
Hops & Barley Craft Beer
(912) 657-2006
412 MLK Jr. Blvd.
Savannah, GA 31401
hopsandbarleysav.com
Savannah Homebrew Shop
(912) 201-9880
2102 Skidway Rd.
Savannah, GA 31404
savannahhomebrew.com

Barley & Vine


(770) 507-5998
1445 Rock Quarry Road #202
Stockbridge, GA 30281
barleynvine.com
Craft Beer (draft/bottled/
kegged), Wine, Cider, and
Mead. Supplies to make your
own beer, wine, cider, mead
or cheese.
Idaho
Brewers Haven Boise
(208) 991-4677
1795 S. Vista Ave.
Boise, ID 83705
www.brewershaven.com
HomeBrewStuff
(208) 375-2559
9165 W. Chinden Blvd., Ste 103
Garden City, ID 83714
homebrewstuff.com
Brewers Haven Nampa
(208) 461-3172
1311 12th Ave. Rd.
Nampa, ID 83686
www.brewershaven.com
Rocky Mountain Homebrew
Supply
(208) 745-0866
218 N 4000 E.
Rigby, ID 83442
rockymountainhomebrew.com
Illinois
Bev Art Brewer & Winemaker
Supply
(773) 233-7579
10033 S. Western Ave.
Chicago, IL 60643
bev-art.com
Brew & Grow Chicago
(312) 243-0005
19 S. Morgan St.
Chicago, IL 60618
brewandgrow.com
Brew & Grow Chicago
(773) 463-7430
3625 N. Kedzie Ave.
Chicago, IL 60618
brewandgrow.com
Brew & Grow Crystal Lake
(815) 301-4950
176 W. Terra Cotta Ave., Ste A
Crystal Lake, IL 60014
brewandgrow.com
North Shore Brewing Supply
(847) 831-0570
1480 Old Deerfield Rd., Ste 15
Highland Park, IL 60035
northshorebrewingsupply.com

Perfect Brewing Supply


(847) 816-7055
619 E. Park Ave.
Libertyville, IL 60048
perfectbrewsupply.com

Brewniverse
(318) 671-4141
855 Pierremont Rd., Ste 124
Shreveport, LA 71106
brewniversebeerstore.com

Larkins Wine & Spirits


(508) 359-4562
20 North St.
Medfield, MA 02052
larkinsliquors.com

Windy Hill Hops


(312) 834-4677
139 Windy Hill Rd.
Murphysboro, IL 62966
www.windyhillhops.com

Maryland

Austin Liquors Shrewbury


(508) 755-8100
20 Boston Turnpike Rd.
Shrewbury, MA 01545
austinliquors.com

Brew & Grow Roselle


(630) 894-4885
359 W. Irving Park Rd.
Roselle, IL 60172
brewandgrow.com

Nepenthe Homebrew
(443) 438-4846
3600 Clipper Mill Road 130A
Baltimore, MD 21211
nepenthehomebrew.com

Indiana

Brews Up
(443) 513-4744
9028 Worcester Hwy
Berlin, MD 21811
brewsup.net

Great Fermentations West


(317) 268-6776
7900 E. US 36 West
Avon, IN 46123
greatfermentations.com

Maryland Homebrew
(888) 273-9669
6770 Oak Hall Lane #108
Columbia, MD 21045
marylandhomebrew.com

Great Fermentations Indy


(317) 257-9463
5127 East 65th St.
Indianapolis, IN 47220
greatfermentations.com

Flying Barrel
(301) 663-4491
1781 N. Market St.
Federick, MD 21701
flyingbarrel.com

Brewhouse Supplies
(219) 286-7285
1555 West Lincolnway, Ste 102
Valparaiso, IN 46385
brewhousesupplies.com

Massachusetts

Iowa
C & S Brew Supply
(515) 963-1965
315 SW Maple St
Ankeny, IA 50023
www.candsbrewsupply.com
Kansas
All Grain Brewing Specialists
LLC
(785) 230-2145
1235 NW 39th
Topeka, KS 66618
allgrainbrewing.biz
Louisiana
Baton Rouges Premier
Liquor Store
(225) 364-2248
3911 Perkins Rd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
LA Homebrew
(225) 773-9128
7987 Pecue Ln., Ste 8-H
Baton Rouge, LA 70809
lahomebrew.com
Brewstock
(504) 208-2788
3800 Dryades St.
New Orleans, LA 70115
brewstock.com

DownTown Wine & Spirits


(617) 625-7777
225 Elm St.
Somerville, MA 02144
downtownwineandspirits.com
Craft Beer Cellar Winchester
(781) 369-1174
18 Thompson St.
Winchester, MA 01890
craftbeercellar.com
Beer and Wine Hobby
(781) 933-8818
155 T New Boston St.
Woburn, MA 01801
beer-wine.com
Austin Liquors Worcester
(508) 852-8953
117 Gold Star Blvd.
Worcester, MA 01606
austinliquors.com

Craft Beer Cellar Belmont


(617) 932-1885
51 Leonard St.
Belmont, MA 02478
craftbeercellar.com

Michigan

Modern Homebrew
Emporium
(617) 498-0400
2304 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02140
beerbrew.com
Jamies Fine Wine & Spirits
(508) 866-9700
100 North Main St.
Carver, MA 02330
jamiesfinewineandspirits.com
Drum Hill Liquors
(978) 452-3400
85 Parkhurst Rd.
Clemsford, MA 01824
drumhillliquors.com

Adventures In Homebrewing
(313) 277-2739
6071 Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
www.homebrewing.org
Serving HomeBrewers Since
1999. We specialize in Beer
Making, Wine Making and
Kegging.
G B Russo & Son
(616) 942-2980
2770 29th St. SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49512
gbrusso.com

Strange Brew
(508) 460-5050
416 Boston Post Rd. East
(Rte 20)
Marlboro, MA 01752
Home-Brew.com
Visit New Englands Largest
Retail Home-Brew Store! Save
10% off Craft Beer & Brewing
online courses with coupon
code strangebrew.

Sicilianos Market
(616) 453-9674
2840 Lake Michigan Dr. NW
Grand Rapids, MI 49504
sicilianosmkt.com
Bells General Store
(269) 382-5712
355 E. Kalamazoo Ave.
Kalamazoo, MI 49007
bellsbeer.com
Capital City Homebrew
Supply
(517) 374-1070
2006 E. Michigan Ave.
Lansing, MI 48912
capitalcityhomebrewsupply.com

BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 117

Retail Shop Directory


Pere Marquette Expeditions
(231) 845-7285
1649 South Pere Marquette
Hwy
Ludington, MI 49431
pmexpeditions.com
Cap N Cork Homebrew
Supply
(586) 286-5202
16776 21 Mile Rd.
Macomb, MI 48044
capncorkhomebrew.com
Altek Sports and Scuba
(616) 772-0088
331 East Main Ave.
Zeeland, MI 49464
alteksports.com

Nevada

Oregon

South Carolina

Reno Homebrewer
(775) 329-2537
2335 Dickerson Rd. Unit A
Reno, NV 89503
renohomebrewer.com

The Brew Shop


(541) 323-2318
1203 NE Third St.
Bend, OR 97701
thebrewshopbend.com

Liquid Hobby
(803) 798-2033
736-F St. Andrews Rd.
Columbia, SC 29210
liquidhobby.com

F.H., Steinbart Co.


(503) 232-8793
234 SE 12th Ave
Portland, OR 97214
fhsteinbart.com

Tennessee

BrewChatter
(775) 358-0477
1275 Kleppe Ln. Unit 21
Sparks, NV 89431
brewchatter.com
New Hampshire

Mississippi

A&G Homebrew Supply


(603) 767-8235
175 High St.
Portsmouth, NH 03801
aghomebrewsupply.com

Brew Ha Ha Homebrew Supply


(601) 362-0201
4800 I-55 North Ste 17A
Jackson, MS 39211
brewhahasupply.com

Kettle to Keg
(603) 485-2054
123 Main St.
Suncook, NH 03275
kettletokeg.com

Missouri
St. Louis Wine & Beermaking
(636) 230-8277
231 Lamp and Lantern Village
Chesterfield, MO 63017
wineandbeermaking.com
Brew & Wine Supply
(636) 797-8155
10663 Business 21
Hillsboro, MO 63050
brewandwinesupply.com
Grains & Taps
(816) 866-5827
224 SE Douglas St.
Lees Summit, MO 64063
grains-taps.myshopify.com

New Jersey

North Carolina

Keg & Barrel Homebrew


Supply
(856) 809-6931
2 S. Rt. 73 Unit I
Berlin, NJ 08009
kegandbarrel
homebrewsupply.com

Bull City Homebrew


(919) 682-0300
1906 E. NC Hwy 54, Ste 200-B
Durham, NC 27713
bullcityhomebrew.com

Back Alley Beverage


(484) 463-8518
Corner of State Rd. &
Lansdowne Ave.
Drexel Hill, PA 19026
backalleybev.com

The Brewers Apprentice


(732) 863-9411
865 State Rte 33, Ste 4
Freehold, NJ 07728
brewapp.com

Hennessy Market
(406) 723-3097
32 East Granite St.
Butte, MT 59701
hennessymarket.com

Love2Brew Paterson
(973) 925-4005
27 East 33rd St.
Paterson, NJ 07514
love2brew.com

Rock Hand Hardware


(406) 442-7770
2414 N. Montana Ave
Helena, MT 59601
rockhandacehardware.com

New Mexico

Kirks Brew
(402) 476-7414
1150 Cornhusker Hwy
Lincoln, NE 68521
kirksbrew.com

118 |

Pennsylvania
In and Out Beverage
(717) 264-2614
1106 Sheller Ave.
Chambersburg, PA 17201

Montana

Nebraska

Saratoga Zymurgist
(518) 580-9785
112 Excelsior Ave.
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
saratogaz.com

Above The Rest Beer & Wine


Homebrewing Supplies
(503) 968-2736
11945 SW Pacific Hwy, #235
Tigard, OR 97223
atr-homebrewing.com

Hop & Goblet


(315) 790-5946
2007 Genesee St
Utica, NY 13501

Love2Brew North Brunswick


(732) 658-3550
1583 Livingston Ave., Unit #2
North Brunswick, NJ 08902
love2brew.com

Summer Sun Garden & Brew


(406) 541-8623
838 West Spruce St.
Missoula, MT 59802
summersungardenandbrew.com

The KegWorks Store


(716) 929-7570
1460 Military Rd.
Kenmore, NY 14217
kegworks.com/store
From drinkware and draft
beer equipment to bar
accessories, homebrewing
supplies, cocktail bitters, and
mixers, The KegWorks Store is
a Drinkers Paradise.

Susans Fine Wine and Spirits


(505) 984-1582
1005 South St. Francis Drive,
Ste 105
Santa Fe, NM 87505
sfwineandspirits.com
New York
Dunkirk Homebrew Supplies
(716) 679-7977
3375 East Main Rd.
Dunkirk, NY 14048
dunkirkhomebrew.com
Arbor Wine and Beer Supplies
(631) 277-3004
184 Islip Ave
Islip, NY 11751
arborwine.com

CRAFT BEER & BREWING

Atlantic Brew Supply


(919) 400-9087
3709 Neil St.
Raleigh, NC 27607
atlanticbrewsupply.com
Whether you homebrew, new
to the commercial brewing
scene, or expanding, Atlantic
Brew Supply is ready to set
you up!
Ohio
Wolfs Premium Nuts & Crafts
(419) 423-1355
1016 Tiffin Ave.
Findlay, OH 45840
wolfiesnuts.com
The PumpHouse Homebrew
Shop
(330) 755-3642
336 Elm St.
Struthers, OH 44471
pumphousehomebrew.com
Oklahoma
High Gravity
(918) 461-2605
7142 S. Memorial Drive
Tulsa, OK 74133
highgravitybrew.com

Simply Homebrew
(570) 788-2311
2 Honey Hole Rd.
Drums, PA 18222
simplyhomebrew.com
Wine, Barley & Hops
Homebrew Supply
(215) 322-4780
248 Bustleton Pike
Feasterville Trevose, PA 19053
winebarleyandhops.com
Hamlin Distributors
(570) 689-2891
590 Hamlin Hwy
Hamlin, PA 18427
hamlindistributors.com
Scotzin Bros
(717) 737-0483
65 C North Fifth St.
Lemoyne, PA 17043
scotzinbros.com
Weak Knee Home Brew
Supply
(610) 327-1450
1277 N.Charlotte St.
Pottstown, PA 19464
weakkneehomebrew.com
Bailees Homebrew & Wine
Supplies
(717) 755-7599
2252 Industrial Hwy
York, PA 17402
baileeshomebrew.com

Rebel Brewer
(615) 859-2188
105 Space Park N.
Goodlettsville, TN 37072
rebelbrewer.com
Texas
Stubbys Texas Brewing Inc.
(682) 647-1267
5200 Airport Freeway, Ste B
Haltom City, TX 76117
txbrewing.com
Black Hawk Brewing Supply
(254) 393-0491
582 E. Central Texas
Expressway
Harker Heights, TX 76548
blackhawkbrewing.com
DeFalcos Home Wine and
Beer Supplies
(800) 216-2739
9223 Stella Link Rd.
Houston, TX 77025
defalcos.com
Texas Homebrewers
(855) 744-2739
3130 North Fry Rd., Ste 800
Katy, TX 77449
texashomebrewers.com
Yellow House Canyon
BrewWorks
(806) 744-1917
601 N. University Ave.
Lubbock, TX 79408
www.yellowhousecanyon
brewworks.com
Cypress Grape and Grain
(832) 698-1402
24914 State Hwy 249 Ste 145
Tomball, TX 77375
cypressgrapeandgrain.com
Utah

Salt City Brew Supply


(801) 849-0955
750 E. Fort Union Blvd.
Midvale, UT 84047
saltcitybrewsupply.com
Call us with your brewing
questions and make whatever
beer you want with our
selection of hops, yeast, and
grain.

Advertiser Index
Vermont
Craft Beer Cellar Waterbury
(802) 882-8034
3 Elm St.
Waterbury, VT 05676
craftbeercellar.com

International
Shops
Australia

Virgina

My LHBS
(703) 241-3874
6201 Leesburg Pike
Falls Church, VA 22044
mylhbs.com
Huge selection of ingredients
and equipment conveniently
located inside the Beltway.
Check out our unique and
delicious store recipe kits!
Wine and Cake Hobbies
(757) 857-0245
6527 Tidewater Dr.
Norfolk, VA 23509
wineandcake.com
Washington
Olympic Brewing
(360) 373-1094
2817 Wheaton Way #102
Bremerton, WA 98310
olybrew.com
Homebrew Heaven
(425) 355-8865
9121 Evergreen Way.
Everett, WA 98204
homebrewheaven.com
Whidbey Island Homebrew
Supply
(360) 682-5011
3161 Goldie Rd., Ste H
Oak Harbor, WA 98277
whidbeyislandhomebrew.com
Cascadia Homebrew
(360) 943-2337
211 4th Ave. E
Olympia, WA 98501
cascadiahomebrew.com
Sound Homebrew
(206) 734-8074
6505 5th Place S.
Seattle, WA 98108
soundhomebrew.com
Wisconsin
Corks and Caps
(920) 757-9270
N1788 Lily of the Valley Drive
Greenville, WI 54942
corksncaps.com
The Malt Shoppe
(414) 585-0321
813 N. Mayfair Rd.
Wauwatosa, WI 53226
maltshoppetosa.com

Germany

Our advertisers help make it possible


for us to bring you great content
from the best contributors, issue
after issue!

Clever Brewing
cleverbrewing.com.au
Were here for all your clever
brewing needs and are the
CB&B Magazine distributor
for Australian retail shops.
Contact us!

Hopfen und mehr


Rudenweiler 16
Tettnang 88069
www.hobbybrauerversand.de
In Germany? Were the
exclusive distributor of CB&B
magazine here! Check us out!
New Zealand

Belgium

Oak & Vine Wine and Spirits


(403) 455-6333
1139 9th Ave. SE, Ste #3
Calgary,
AB T2G
HOME BREWING
FOR0S8
CLEVER FOLKS
oakandvine.ca

BrewShop
64 7 929 4547
P.O. Box 998
Hamilton 3240
brewshop.co.nz
BrewShop is the exclusive
distributor of Craft Beer
& Brewing Magazine to
independent retail shops in
New Zealand. Contact us
today!

Oak & Vine Wine and Spirits


(403) 453-2294
1030 16th Ave. NW
Calgary, AB T2M 0K6
oakandvine.ca

Hauraki Home Brew


64 9 4425070
17 N Douglas Alexander Pde
Auckland 0632
haurakihomebrew.co.nz

Canadian Home Brew


Supplies
(905) 450-0191
10 Wilkinson Rd. Unit 1
Brampton, ON L6T 5B1
homebrewsupplies.ca

Home Brew West


64 9 8377177
Shop 1, 4 Waipareira Ave
Auckland 0610
homebrewwest.co.nz

Malt Attacks
32 (0) 471/66.10.69
Av. Jean Volders 18
Brussels 1060
Canada

The Vineyard Fermentation


Centre
(403) 258-1580
6025 Centre St. South
Calgary, AB T2H 0C2
thevineyard.ca
Denmark, Finland,
Iceland, Norway,
Sweden

Home Brew West


64 9 3771544
19 Mt. Eden Road
Auckland 1023
homebrewwest.co.nz

65 K-Malt Inc. /Corosys


Kellerworks

22

Alaskan Brewing

17 Krome Dispense

46

Allagash Brewing
Company

46 Label Tec Inc.

35

Anchor Brewing

45

ARCHON
Industries

35

Atlantic Brewing
Supply

43

Barley & Vine

114 Mr. Beer

49

Barley Haven

56 My LHBS

113

Bay Tech Label

67 NDL Keg

Beer Cap Maps

29 New Belgium
Brewing
67
NorCal Brewing
2
Solutions

Lakefront Brewing

BH Enterprises
Blichmann
Engineering

Bootleg Biology LLC 114

Firestone Walker
Brewing Co.
Fort Collins Brewery

Bakke Brygg AS
+47 73 20 16 40
Fjordgata 9B
Trondheim S-T N-7010
bakkebrygg.no

G&D Chillers

Oficina da Cerveja
+351 911 555 851
Rua Bernardim Ribeiro 59
Lisbon
1150-069
www.oficinadacerveja.pt
Visit our website! Were the
exclusive distributor of Craft
Beer & Brewing Magazine
to independent retail shops in
Portugal.

19

LD Carlson

22

Love2Brew

45

Madison Chemicals

33

Millars Mills

33

51
Back
Cover

Odell Brewing

113
10

Ohmbrew
63
Brew & Wine Supply 77
Automations
Brew Heads
114
Putney Food Co-op 113
Brew Jacket
29
Ruby Street Brewing 41
Brewmation
68
Salt City Brew Supply 114
Brkert Fluid
65
Saranac
7
Control Systems
Separator
90
Craft Beer &
107
Technology
Brewing Nation
Solutions
CraftBeer.com
41
Ska Brewing
67
Deschutes Brewery
9
Society of Beer
114
Electric Brewing
63
Travelers
Supply
Southern Tier
13
Epic Brewing
51
Brewing

Norway

Portugal
Humlegardens Ekolager AB
46 7 049 50168
Bergkallavagen 28
Sollentuna, SE 19279
humle.se
Were the exclusive distributor
of Craft Beer & Brewing
Magazine to independent
retail shops in this Nordic
Region. Contact us!

Airgas National
Carbonation

5 Ss Brewing
Technologies

53

15 St. Louis Wine


& Beer Making

113

53

112
51 The Craft Beer
Kitchen
Gotta-Brew
56
The Home Brewery 35
Grandstand
Inside
Back Cover Thirsty Dog Brewing 29
Inside
GrogTag
77 Total Beverage
Solution Front Cover
Habitat Glassware 103
Uinta Brewing
43
High Gravity
67
Vin Table
63
High Hops Brewery 63
Wild Goose Canning
1
Hurst Boiler
33
Wisconsin Craft
115
KegWorks
41
Beer Festival
Geeks Who Drink

For more information about advertising in


Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine, please
contact Media Sales Manager Alex Johnson at ajohnson@beerandbrewing.com
or 888.875.8708 x707.
BEERANDBREWING.COM

| 119

| CHILL PLATE |

On The Road In June, the Craft Beer & Brewingmobile became a reality. Our rolling tribute to the art and craft of beer took its maiden voyage to California, landing
at the AHAs National Homebrewers Conference in San Diego. Along the way, we made a few necessary pit stops to refuel and visit friends. Top row Entering Wyoming; a morning visit to Epic Brewing in Salt Lake City; enjoying Eclipse variants at Fifty Fifty Brewing in Truckee. Second row Barrels upon barrels in The Bruerys
cellar; storm clouds over Nevada; when Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson insisted we take a selfie, we had to oblige. Third row The Rare Barrel in
Berkeley; Ballast Point Brewings employee-lounge beer vending machine; samplers at Green Flash Brewings new Cellar 3. Fourth row Club night at NHC; Lost
Abbey professes its belief in Brettanomyces; a gorgeous sunset followed a stellar tasting at Firestone Walker Barrelworks.

120 |

CRAFT BEER & BREWING