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Stress Busters

A Small Group for Students to Learn Coping Skills to Fight Against Stress

A Small Group for Students to Learn Coping Skills to Fight Against Stress By: Ashley Neels

By: Ashley Neels

2014

All Rights Reserved

Table of Contents

Introduction……………………………………………………………………

3

Pre-Group Planning……………………………………………………………

5

Consent Letter………………………………………

…………………………6

Teacher Pre-test/Post-test……………………………………………………

7

Student Pre-test/Post-test…………….………………………………………

8

Parent Pre-test …………………………………………………………………

9

Parent Post-test………………….……………………………………………

10

Session One “Sweet Introductions”…………………………………………11

Session Two “Stress VS. Calm”………………………………………………

12

Session Three “iPicture”………………………………………………………

13

Session Four “Moving Mindfully”…………………………………………….14

Session Five “Worries in a Jar”…………

…………………………………

15

Session Six “Paving my way to Peace…………………………………… 16

Appendix A………………………………………………………………… …17

Appendix B……………………………………………………………….…….18

Appendix C……………………………………………………………… ……20

References……………………………………………………………… …….21

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Introduction

Stress Busters

By: Ashley Neels

It is somewhat of a common sense assumption that adults experience stress, however,

it is less researched and less talked about in regard to children experiencing stress

(Greenberg & Harris, 2012). Children experience depression, loneliness, aggression, and anxiety, many of which are brought on by stress (Onchwari, 2010). Onchwari explained stress

as a situation is said to be stressful when the demands and expectations surpass the individual’s ability to manage with the perceived threat (2010). If the situation we are being faced with is too large and too unfamiliar to us, we will have a stress response. For example,

a student who is suddenly expected to help care for younger siblings while the parents are

at work. To truly understand stress in children, it is necessary to look at the causes and effects

it may bring.

The causes for an adult to experience stress and the causes for a child to experience stress can at times be similar to those stressors experienced by adults. One explanation of the stress that children experience can be tied to Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Model as explained by Onchwari (2010). The child experiences interactions at all levels of his or her environment; the microsystem, the mesosystem, the exosystem, macrosystem and lastly, the chronosystem. The child’s stress, coping abilities, and resilience is affected with the interactions of all these levels. The emphasis is on the resilience of the child, put another way, his or her ability cope (Onchwari, 2010).

While there are other life factors that can lead to a student’s perceived stress levels, academics is also an area worth looking into. Brown, S.L., Nobiling, B.D., Tuedel, J., & Birch, D.A (2011) looked at 882 children ranging from ages nine to 13 and found that those who reported two or more hours of homework per night experienced the most stress. It was suggested that children who have more control and autonomy in their schedule were less likely to experience stress than those who felt they had less control over their life (Brown et al.,

2010).

Just as there are many causes for stress, there are many different effects that stress can be exemplified in the individual who is experiencing stress. Stress in children has been shown to effect or lead to issues with academic performance, substance abuse violence and obesity (Greenberg & Harris, 2012). Onchwari researched the effects stress plays on a child and found that reduced helplessness, reduced self-esteem, and development external locus of control are common occurrences. It was also noticed that stress seemed to interfere with the child’s cognitive functioning, therefore inhibiting the child’s ability to take part in higher order thinking (Onchwari, 2010). The lack of higher order functioning may impair the child’s ability to respond to the stress in a healthy or logical manner.

While it is clear that stress often plays a negative role in children’s lives, it is also somewhat necessary. It is tempting to wish a non-stressful life for a child, but with stress

3

comes coping skills that builds resilience for the child which as a result builds the ability for the child to handle stress and anxiety (Bauwnes & Hourcade, 1992).

After taking a look at the development of stress and the effects it may play in a child’s life, it is clear that this is an essential area for school counselors to step in. Through the comprehensive guidance program, school counselors are often in classrooms or leading small groups that help to teach students the necessary skills to live a happy and healthy life.

4

Pre-Group Planning

Before beginning the Stress Busters Small Group, the group members need to be chosen in a careful, well thought out manner. Group members should be chosen by the counselor, or from teacher or parent recommendation. This group curriculum was developed for third through fifth grade students in mind, although, changes can be made to make it appropriate for students younger or older. The ideal group size is four to eight members in the group.

It is essential that the professional school counselor to meet with and screen each student to ensure they are a good fit for the group prior to beginning the group. During this meeting, the student should complete the pre-assessment. If the counselor does not feel the student is a good fit for the group, the counselor should meet with the student individually until the student is able and ready to participate in a small group. Once the group members have been chosen, the group will meet once a week at the same day and the same time for 45 minutes.

5

Dear Parents/Guardian/Student,

Dear Parents/Guardian/Student, Stress Busters As part of our schools Comprehensive Guidance Program, I am in your

Stress Busters

As part of our schools Comprehensive Guidance Program, I am in your child’s classroom weekly to teach lessons on academic development, career development, and personal and social development. Additionally, I often lead small groups on a variety of topics. In the next six weeks, I will be leading a group on Stress Management. Each group will meet once a week for approximately thirty minutes each week.

This small group is perfect for children learning to deal with life and stressors that may arise. Through participation in this small group, students will learn healthy coping strategies, develop interpersonal skills while working with other students, and lastly, learn about self-care.

Please note that participation in the group is completely voluntary and confidentiality will be addressed and respected. Please sign the form below to indicate your consent (or non-consent). Please include comments that might be beneficial when working with your son or daughter. Complete and return the consent portion to the Counseling office no later than (date). If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at (contact number).

Sincerely,

(signature)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - cut here and return lower portion - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Consent for Participation in: Stress Busters Group Please Return to the Guidance and Counseling Office by: (date)

Student Name:

Student Signature*

Date

I give my consent for my son or daughter to participate in the

I do not give my consent for my son or daughter to participate in the

Group.

Group.

Parent/Guardian (please print)

Parent/Guardian Signature

Date

6

SMALL GROUP COUNSELING TEACHER PRE-POST-GROUP PERCEPTIONS Individual Student Behavior Rating Form

(Adapted from Columbia Public Schools’ Student Behavior Rating Form)

STUDENT

DATE: Pre-Group Assessment

GRADE

Date:

TEACHER

Post-Group Assessment

Pre-Group Concerns Student Work Habits/Personal Goals Observed Post-Group Concerns Rank on a scale of 51
Pre-Group Concerns
Student Work Habits/Personal Goals Observed
Post-Group Concerns
Rank on a scale of 51
Colleagues, will you please help us evaluate the counseling
group in which this student participated. Your opinion is
Rank on a scale of 51
(5 = HIGH1 = LOW)
(5 = HIGH1 = LOW)
extremely important as we strive to continuously improve
our effectiveness with ALL students!
Academic Development
Follows directions
Listens attentively
Stays on task
Compliance with teacher requests
Follows rules
Manages personal & school property (e.g., organized)
Works neatly and carefully
Participates in discussion and activities
Completes and returns homework
Personal and Social Development
Cooperates with others
Shows respect for others
Allows others to work undisturbed
Accepts responsibility for own mis-behavior (e.g., provoking fights,
bullying, fighting, defiant, anger, stealing)
Emotional Issues (e.g., perfectionism, anxiety, anger, depression,
suicide, aggression, withdrawn, low self-esteem)

Created by: Ashley Neels2014 Adapted from:

RSSmallGroupUnitLifeChanges-SelfAwareness3-5

MCGP Writing Team, 2009 By Ashley Neels

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Student Pre-Test/Post-Test

Name:

1. I get mad and/or stressed out easily.

Date:

= I agree

= I agree

= I agree = I’m not sure = I disagree

= I’m not sure

= I agree = I’m not sure = I disagree

= I disagree

2. I can calm myself down when I’m feeling mad and/or stressed out.

=

=

I agree

= I agree = I’m not sure = I disagree

= I’m not sure

= I agree = I’m not sure = I disagree

= I disagree

3. I know how to get along with friends and others at school.

I know how to get along with friends and others at school. = I agree =

= I agree

to get along with friends and others at school. = I agree = I’m not sure

= I’m not sure

friends and others at school. = I agree = I’m not sure = I disagree 4.

= I disagree

4. I know how to take care of myself when I do feel upset or stressed out.

to take care of myself when I do feel upset or stressed out. = I agree

= I agree

of myself when I do feel upset or stressed out. = I agree = I’m not

= I’m not sure

I do feel upset or stressed out. = I agree = I’m not sure = I

= I disagree

5. When I am feeling mad or stressed out, I can… (Please write answer on the back)

or stressed out, I can… (Please write answer on the back) Created by: Ashley Neels2014 Adapted

Created by: Ashley Neels2014 Adapted from:

RSSmallGroupUnitLifeChanges-SelfAwareness3-5

MCGP Writing Team, 2009 By Ashley Neels *Adapted by Matthew B. Tolliver (2016)

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Parent Pre-Test

Dear Parent or Guardian, your child is about to participate in a small group where he or she will learn more about managing stress and developing positive coping strategies. Please fill out this pre-test and return to (school counselor) by (date). Completing this assessment will help us to understand the needs and effectiveness of this small group.

Please answer the following questions regarding (Students Name)

Strongly

Agree

Unknown

Disagree

Strongly

Agree

Disagree

My child is able to identify when he or she is experiencing stress.

         

When my child is experiencing stress, he or she is able to cope with the stress in a healthy way.

         

My child is able to relate to other students in a positive manner.

         

My child experiences a significant amount of stress or appears to be overwhelmed in his or her day to day life.

         

Other comments:

Pretest created by Ashley Neels, 2014

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Parent Post-Test

Dear Parent or Guardian, your child participated in a small group where he or she learned about managing stress and how to develop positive coping strategies. Please fill out this post-test and return to (school counselor) by (date). Completing this assessment will help us to understand the needs and effectiveness of this small group.

Please answer the following questions regarding (Students Name)

Strongly

Agree

Unknown

Disagree

Strongly

Agree

Disagree

My child is able to identify when he or she is experiencing stress.

         

When my child is experiencing stress, he or she is able to cope with the stress in a healthy way.

         

My child is able to relate to other students in a positive manner.

         

My child experiences a significant amount of stress or appears to be overwhelmed in his or her day to day life.

         

Other comments:

Posttest created by Ashley Neels, 2014

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Session Title: Sweet Introductions Grade Level: 3

Mindful Stress Busters

Session # 1 of 6 Estimated Time: 45 mins

Small Group Counseling Session Purpose: In this session, students will become acquainted with the other group members and will begin to build rapport. Students will build this relationship with each other by creating group name and group rules. Students will begin to learn how to breathe in a relaxing and calming manner. Missouri Comprehensive Guidance Big Idea:

PS 1. Identify and demonstrate ways to participate in team building. PS 2. Interacting with others in ways that respect individual and group differences. PS 3. Identify coping skills for managing life changes or events.

Materials

M&Ms and Skittles M&M/Skittles Color Key- Appendix A Rocks Art Supplies- Crayons, Markers, Paint, Permanent Markers ETC. Zip-Lock Bag Computer with internet access Smart Board or Screen Projector to play YouTube video

Lesson: 1 of 6

1. Start by introducing group members and explain the purpose of the group. Describe that the purpose of this group is to help students learn healthy coping skills to reduce stress. Next, go over confidentiality in a group setting and what it means to be a member of a group.

2. Instruct students to choose a pack of skittles or M&Ms. Students will share something about themselves for every candy they have. Write on the board that Yellow= Something that you love; Blue/Purple= Dream Vacation; Red= Something you are good at; Orange= Something you wish for; Green=Your Choice! (Anything you would like to share about you). Brown= Something you couldn’t live without. See appendix A for sheet. (Katie,

2012).

3. Encourage students to brainstorm together and think of a name for the group.

4. Encourage students to state the rules they want the group to follow. The counselor should write the rules on a large piece of chart paper that can be saved for future sessions.

5. Ask students to set three goals for themselves and three group goals that they hope to accomplish through the group. Students should write down goals on paper, and the counselor should write the group goals on a large piece of chart paper.

6. Explain and discuss breathing and the benefits it can have. Discuss what it feels like when you breathe stressed verses not stressed. Play YouTube video that teaches students to breathe. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uxbdx-SeOOo(Gozenonline, 2012).

7. Allow students to choose a rock and to decorate the rock based off of today’s activities. Explain to students that the counselor will hold on to all of the rocks until a later time. Students should place rocks in zip-lock bag with their name on it.

8. End session with five deep breaths.

Process:

At the end of the session, students will have time to share their feelings about the group and today’s activities. Students will have time to process while decorating his or her rock.

Created by Ashley Neels 2014

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Session Title: Stress VS. Calm Grade Level: 3

Mindful Stress Busters

Session # 2 of 6 Estimated Time: 45 mins

Small Group Counseling Session Purpose: In this session, students will continue getting to know each other while learning more about stress and the personal stress triggers they each may have. Missouri Comprehensive Guidance Big Idea:

PS 1. Identify and demonstrate ways to participate in team building. PS 2. Interacting with others in ways that respect individual and group differences. PS 3. Identify coping skills for managing life changes or events.

Materials

Rocks Art Supplies- Crayons, Markers, Paint, Permanent Markers ETC. White and Construction Paper

Lesson: 2 of 6

1. Review breathing technique and begin session with five deep breaths.

2. Allow for each student to take a turn sharing about anything they would like for 30 seconds each.

3. Review group rules that were written on the poster board with the students.

4. Students will continue building rapport with each other by sharing and discussing what stress means to them. Additionally, counselor will encourage students to share what they are feeling stressed about now. Lastly, the counselor should lead a discussion where students share what helps them to feel better when they are experiencing stress.

5. Give each student a piece of paper and spread out art supplies. Ask students to show in whatever way they see fit how they feel when they are experiencing stress verses when they feel calm and relaxed. Provide time for students to share and discuss each other’s pictures.

6. Allow students to choose a rock and to decorate the rock based off of today’s activities. Explain to students that the counselor will hold on to all of the rocks until a later time. Students should place rocks in zip-lock bag with their name on it.

7. End session with five deep breaths.

Process:

Provide time students time to discuss how they are feeling about being in a group and how things are going. Students will have time to process while working on their rock.

Created by Ashley Neels 2014

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Session Title: iPicture Grade Level: 3

Mindful Stress Busters

Session # 3 of 6 Estimated Time: 45 mins

Small Group Counseling Session Purpose: In this group session, students will continue building rapport with each other while participating stress management activity. Missouri Comprehensive Guidance Big Idea:

PS 1. Identify and demonstrate ways to participate in team building. PS 2. Interacting with others in ways that respect individual and group differences. PS 3. Identify coping skills for managing life changes or events.

Materials

Rock Art Supplies- Crayons, Markers, Paint, Permanent Markers ETC. White Paper and Construction Paper Guided Meditation (Sivak)-Appendix B

Lesson: 3 of 6

1. Review breathing technique and begin session with five deep breaths.

2. Allow for each student to take a turn sharing about anything they would like for 30 seconds each.

3. Explain what a guided meditation is and the challenges that may arise (i.e: distractions). Ask students to find a comfortable position either on ground, or sitting in a chair. Once the students are comfortable, the counselor should read the peaceful guided meditation located in appendix A. (Sivak)

4. Spread out papers and art supplies. Encourage students to draw or write about their peaceful place they pictured in the guided meditation. After students have finished their pictures, encourage students to talk and share about their special place while also discussing how they felt about the guided meditation.

5. Allow students to choose a rock and to decorate the rock based off of today’s activities. Explain to students that the counselor will hold on to all of the rocks until a later time. Students should place rocks in zip-lock bag with their name on it.

6. End session with five deep breaths.

Process:

At the end of the session, students will have the opportunity to share their feelings about today’s activity and their view of the group. Students will have time to process while creating their rock they decorated from today’s activity.

Created by Ashley Neels 2014

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Session Title: Moving Mindfully Grade Level: 3

Mindful Stress Busters

Session # 4 of 6 Estimated Time: 45 mins

Small Group Counseling Session Purpose: The purpose of this activity is for students to learn a stress management activity and that their body is a tool to help fight and prevent stress. Missouri Comprehensive Guidance Big Idea:

PS 1. Identify and demonstrate ways to participate in team building. PS 2. Interacting with others in ways that respect individual and group differences. PS 3. Identify coping skills for managing life changes or events.

Materials

Rock Art Supplies- Crayons, Markers, Paint, Permanent Markers ETC. Computer with internet access Smart Board or Screen Projector to play YouTube video

Lesson: 4 of 6

1. Review breathing technique and begin session with five deep breaths.

2. Allow for each student to take a turn sharing about anything they would like for 30 seconds each.

3. Ask students what they know about yoga and how it can help a person. The counselor should lead a short discussion about how our body is a tool to help fight stress.

4. Ask students to spread out in room. Once the students are spread out, the counselor will play

the YouTube video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmeTZGr_R5Q (YogaToday, 2009).

5. After the yoga video, the counselor will lead a short discussion about how the students felt about participating.

6. After the yoga discussion, the counselor will talk about and explain what a progressive muscle meditation is. After a short discussion, the counselor will play the video and the students will

participate. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUY0HEVbD1s (MindfulnessforMums, 2013).

7. After the progress muscle relaxation video, the counselor will lead a short discussion about how the students felt about participating.

8. Allow students to choose a rock and to decorate the rock based off of today’s activities. Explain to students that the counselor will hold on to all of the rocks until a later time. Students should place rocks in zip-lock bag with their name on it.

9. End session with five deep breaths.

Process:

Allow for students to process activity at the end of the group session. Check in with students on how they are feeling about the group and the progress thus far. Students will have time to process while creating their rock they decorated from today’s activity. Students will discuss how their bodies felt during and after participating in yoga and meditation.

Created by Ashley Neels 2014

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Session Title: Worries in a Jar Grade Level: 3

Mindful Stress Busters

Session # 5 of 6 Estimated Time: 45 mins

Small Group Counseling Session Purpose: In this session, students will continue to build rapport with each other by participating in group discussions and sharing materials. Students will create their own relaxation jar to take home with them and use as needed. Missouri Comprehensive Guidance Big Idea:

PS 1. Identify and demonstrate ways to participate in team building. PS 2. Interacting with others in ways that respect individual and group differences. PS 3. Identify coping skills for managing life changes or events.

Materials

Bottles or Jars With Lid Glitter Hot Water Corn Syrup Dish Soap Utensil for stirring and Measuring Cup Rock Art Supplies- Crayons, Markers, Paint, Permanent Markers ETC.

Lesson: 5 of 6

1. Review breathing technique and begin session with five deep breaths.

2. Allow for each student to take a turn sharing about anything they would like for 30 seconds each.

3. Counselor will notify students that including today, there are two sessions left. A short discussion regarding termination will follow.

4. Begin discussion of what it feels like it your head when you have too much stress. Encourage students to share their perspective of what stress feels like to them. Explain that stress can feel like a messy tornado (kind of like relaxation jar when it is shaken up).

5. Set up and pass out materials for creating relaxation jar. See appendix C for detailed instructions. (MamaOwl, 2012).

6. Explain to students that when they are feeling stressed, shaking their relaxation jar can help them to feel calmer. Explain that if we become still like the jar, we begin to feel more relaxed as well.

7. Allow students to choose a rock and to decorate the rock based off of today’s activities. Explain to students that the counselor will hold on to all of the rocks until a later time. Students should place rocks in zip-lock bag with their name on it.

8. End session with five deep breaths.

Process:

Allow for students to process activity at the end of the group session. Check in with students on how they are feeling about the group and the progress thus far. Students will have time to process while working on their rock.

Created by Ashley Neels 2014

15

Mindful Stress Busters

Session Title: Paving my way to Peace Grade Level: 3

Session # 6 of 6 Estimated Time: 45 mins

Small Group Counseling Session Purpose: The purpose of this session is to provide a terminating activity that will sum-up what the students have learned and help to bring closure to the group. Missouri Comprehensive Guidance Big Idea:

PS 1. Identify and demonstrate ways to participate in team building. PS 2. Interacting with others in ways that respect individual and group differences. PS 3. Identify coping skills for managing life changes or events.

Materials

Students Rocks from Previous Group Sessions Small Plastic Box Sand Fork or Stick

Lesson: 6 of 6

1. Review breathing technique and begin session with five deep breaths.

2. Allow for each student to take a turn sharing about anything they would like for 30 seconds each.

3. Provide time for students to share and discuss feelings about the group coming to an end.

4. Give each student a plastic box with enough at least enough sand to cover the bottom of the box. Pass back each students bag of rocks. Pass out forks or small sticks for students to use in the sand. Explain to students that they are creating a garden for their rocks to stay. The box will be a reminder of what they have learned in the group and a place for them to go to when they are needing some reminders. Encourage for students to share their rocks and gardens that they have created.

5. Have students complete Post-Test.

6. End session with five deep breaths.

Process:

Allow for students to process activity at the end of the group session. Students will process feelings about this being their last session through group discussion.

Created by Ashley Neels 2014

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Appendix A

Sweet Introduction Activity

Yellow= Something that you love

Blue/Purple= Dream Vacation

Red= Something you are good at

Orange= Something you wish for

Green=Your Choice!

Brown= Something you couldn’t live without

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Appendix B

Peaceful Guided Meditation

For the next few moments, focus on calming your mind by focusing on your

breathing. Allow you breathing calm you and relax you. Breathe in

In

out

In

Out

and out.

Continue to breathe slowly and peacefully as you allow the stress to start to leave your body. Relax any tight muscles, feeling your muscles relax and become more comfortable with each breath.

Continue to let your breathing relax you

Breathe in

2

3

4

hold

2

3

out

2

3

4

5

 

again

2

3

4

 

hold

2

3

out

2

3

4

5

Continue to breathe slowly, gently, comfortably

Let the rate of your breathing become gradually slower as your body relaxes. Now begin to create a picture in your mind of a place where you can

completely relax. Imagine what this place needs to be like in order for you to feel calm and relaxed.

Think about what this place looks like

where is this peaceful place? This place

might be outdoors

it may be a small place or large one

your mind, create a peaceful image of what your peaceful place

or indoors

in

Now picture some more details about your peaceful place. Who is in this place? Are you alone? Or maybe you are with someone else? Are there other people there? Animals? Birds? Imagine who is at your place, whether it is you only, or if you have company.(pause)

Imagine even more detail about your surroundings. Focus now on the relaxing sounds around you in your peaceful place.

Now imagine any tastes and smells in your special place.

Imagine the sensations of touch

including the temperature, any breeze that

may be present, what are you sitting or standing on

imagine the details of this

calming place in your mind.

Focus now on the sights of your place

-colors, shapes

objects

plants

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water

all of the

beautiful things that make your place enjoyable.

To add further detail to this relaxing scene, imagine yourself there. What would you be doing in this calming place? Perhaps you are just sitting, enjoying this

place, relaxing. Maybe you imagine walking around variety of activities.

or doing any other

Picture yourself in this peaceful place. Imagine a feeling of calm

of peace

a place where you have no worries, cares, or concerns

a place where you

can simply relax, and enjoy just being. (pause)

Enjoy your peaceful place for a few more moments. Memorize the sights, sounds, and sensations around you. Know that you can return to this place in your mind whenever you need a break. You can take a mental vacation to allow yourself to relax and become calm before returning to your regular roles.

In these last few moments of relaxation, create a picture in your mind that you will return to the next time you need a quick relaxation break. Picture yourself in your peaceful place. This moment you are imagining now, you can picture again the next time you need to relax.

When you are ready to return to your day, file your peaceful place in a special part mind, where it will be waiting for you the next time you need it.

Slowly turn your attention back to the present. Notice your surroundings as your body and mind return to their usual level of alertness and wakefulness. Keep with you the feeling of calm from your peaceful place as you return to your everyday life

Adapted from:

http://www.therapysites.com/userfiles/2139734/file/Grounding Exercises.pdf By: Sivak

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Appendix C

Relaxation Jar Instructions

Materials Needed Per Jar

Hot Water -1/2 Cup Corn Syrup- ½ Cup Glitter 1 teaspoon Dish soap- 3-4 drops ½ Pint Size Jar Utensil for Stirring Measuring Cup

Instructions

1. Pass out a jar to each student.

2. Assist students in measuring out hot water if needed.

3. Pour hot water and corn syrup into jar.

4. Mix hot water and corn syrup together until well blended.

5. Add glitter.

6. Add dish soap.

Helpful Hints -With the recipe above, it should take about 2-3 minutes for the ingredients to settle.

-If you want the solution to settle quicker, change ingredients to a higher ratio of water to corn syrup.

-If you want the solution to take longer to settle, change ingredients to have a higher ratio of corn syrup to water.

-If you are worried about spills, you can hot glue the lid shut on the jar.

Adapted from http://mommaowlslab.blogspot.com/2012/02/science-thursday-glitter- jars.html

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References

Bauwens, J., & Hourcade, J. J. (1992). School-based sources of stress among elementary

and secondary at-risk students. School Counselor, 40(2), 97.

Brown, S. L., Nobiling, B. D., Teufel, J., & Birch, D. A. (2011). Are Kids Too Busy? Early

Adolescents' Perceptions of Discretionary Activities, Overscheduling, and Stress.

Journal Of School Health, 81(9), 574-580.

Gozenonline. (2012, December 4). 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise by GoZen [Video file].

Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uxbdx-SeOOo

Greenberg, M. T., & Harris, A. R. (2012). Nurturing Mindfulness in Children and Youth:

Current State of Research. Child Development Perspectives, 6(2), 161-166.

doi:10.1111/j.1750-8606.2011.00215.x

Henkes, K. (2000). Wemberly worried. New York: Greenwillow Books.

Katie. (2012, May 14). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.livecrafteat.com/live/skittles-ice-breaker-game/ Mama Owl. (2012, February 24). [Web log message]. Retrieved from

http://mommaowlslab.blogspot.com/2012/02/science-thursday-glitter-jars.html

MCGP Writing Team, 2009. Small group counseling module.

Mindfulnessformums. (2013, May 9). Progressive Muscle Relaxation Meditation for

Mothers & Children [Video file]. Retrieved from

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUY0HEVbD1s

Onchwari, J. (2010). Early Childhood Inservice and Preservice Teachers’ Perceived

Levels of Preparedness to Handle Stress in their Students. Early Childhood

Education Journal, 37(5), 391-400. doi:10.1007/s10643-009-0361-9

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Sivak, K. (n.d.). Grounding exercises. Retrieved from

http://www.therapysites.com/userfiles/2139734/file/Grounding Exercises.pdf

Yoga Today. (2009, March 15). Yoga for Kids [Video file]. Retrieved from

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmeTZGr_R5Q

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