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Jaclyn Turner

Observation #4
Date: 2/16/2016
Lesson: Drama- summarizing, point of view, context clues
Grade: 3rd
Time: 60 minutes
Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.10

By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas,
and poetry, at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently
and proficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.6

Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the
characters.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
Objective:
Students will be able to summarize the main events of a drama by
underlining or otherwise identifying the important details.
Students will be able to determine the narrator and other characters
point of view along with establishing their own point of view.
Students will be able to use context clues from the dramas text to
identify the meaning of a word they were previously unfamiliar with.
Materials Needed:
Drama packet
Copy of How Honeybee Got Her Stinger for each student
Summary chart
BEFORE (10 minutes):
Practicing the skill, summarizing: We will begin by practicing the skill of
summarizing the main events of a scene from a play Jack and the
Beanstalk. This is a skill that students should be using during their
first read, making sure that they really understand what is happening
in the story. We will practice this skill by reading the short scene as a
class, underlining and identifying the main events. Students will each
write a brief summary of the scene on their personal white boards.
Students will then turn to their partners and share their sentence. I will
ask two students to share their sentences.
Practicing the skill, point of view of the narrator: We will then transition
into how to distinguish the narrators point of view in a drama, which is
a skill needed to focus on the second read. By distinguishing the

narrators point of view, students will have a better understanding of


how the characters feel about the main events that are happening in
the story. We will read the practice skills page together, which explains
the importance to the students. Students will practice this skill by
choosing one of the characters from the scene we read from Jack and
the Beanstalk. Students will turn to their partner sitting next to them
and share their thoughts.
DURING (30 minutes):
We will read the drama, How Honeybee got her Stinger together as a
class, however the students will be assigned characters, so they will be
reading a specific characters lines. There are 5 total characters in the
play, so each character will be choral read by 5 students. During this
first read, we will focus on the skill of summarizing the main events of
the story. We will periodically stop to summarize the main events of the
play, which students will record in their summary chart. The first few
summaries we will decide on as a class, then students will begin
writing their own summaries.
Extension: If time allows, students will begin their second read of the
story, focusing on the points of view of the characters. We will highlight
the boxes along the side of the story, which prompt students to think
about the characters point of view; students will highlight where in the
text there is evidence supporting that point of view. If we are short on
time, the second read will be done the following day.
AFTER (10 minutes):
After finishing reading the story, students will compare their
summaries with their table members summaries. I will call on a few
students to share their summaries to the class. I will bring the lesson to
a close asking the Three Ws: what did we learn today? So what
(relevance/importance)? And now what (can we predict where the
lesson is going/ how does it affect our thin king)? The students will turn
in their summaries charts so that I can check their understanding of
how to summarize, it will not be for a grade.