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E

GOLDSTEIN

642 N HARPER AV
LOS ANGELES
CAL

SPQKEN

A MANUAL

OF

Tuki-v.

HEBREW CONVERSATIONS

BY

Daniel

Persky

IN COLLABORATION WITH

Emanuel Neumann

NEW YORK
Zionist

Organization
1921

op

America

Copyright

1921

ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA

5KLh
URL

CONTENTS
On Meeting

At Home

10

Out of Doors

44

In

The Country

61

Nature

86

On The Way

96

At The Hotel

105

At Sea

110

At Work

117

Business

131

In

The Club

147

Dress

178

Food

188

PREFATORY NOTE
This little volume is intended for the use of
persons desirous of acquiring some degree of
facility in the use of Hebrew as a spoken
language.
It is not intended as a text-book
for beginners, but rather as a help to those
who have already gained some knowledge of
elementary Hebrew. The publishers have had
specially in mind the needs of persons intending to settle in Palestine, or to go there as
tourists.

This

is,

as far as

we know, the

first

serious

effort in this direction made by the protagonists of the Hebrew Revival, and, as such, this
work is no doubt open to many criticisms.
are keenly aware of this fact,, and hope that
many suggestions will come from readers and

We

which may prove most helpful when a


second, more complete and revised edition is
published.
critics,

Due

to

many

unforeseen

difficulties,

the pub-

of this volume has been repeatedly


delayed, and the apologies of the authors and
publishers are tendered to those who have been
lication

impatiently awaiting

its

appearance.
E. N.

New

York, June 15, 1921.

ON MEETING
Good morning,
Good

nir'^iisis

sir.

morning,

-.it
Mr.

p"^-}? nip

n'bf

^-p^b

Ben-Zion.

How do you do? (Hello!)


How

are you?

Quite well.

And how is your

broth

er?

He

quite well, too.

is

And how is your


She

is

.oib^ 1^ D|

sister?

not feeling well

today.
I

am

sorry.
T

Whither bound?

Where

are you coming

from?

V T

Where are you going to?


I

am

home
I

my way

on

from

....

...

..

to a meeting.

'

-:

should like to become

acquainted with Mr.


Gil'adi.

Very

well,

will

in-

troduce you to him.

me

Allow

to

intro-

11.
duce Mr. Penini.

...

Meet Mr. Penini


I

am

pleased to me^t

you.

What

is

your name?

My name

is

GiFadio

I'd like to see you.

There is something
I would like to dis-(

(.

cuss with you.

I.

Am

Not

at

It

disturbing you?
all.

doesn't matter.

amnotinsuch a hurry.

Don't forget.

Do you speak Hebrew ?


Yes,

live

..

live?

on Herzl Street.

Come to seemeathome.
I

J -

speak Hebrew.

Where do you
I

...

will

come

to see

^n-'s nj?^

npi

you

often.
I will

drop in when

get a chance.

Do me

a favor.

Remember me
Ben-Aviv.

to

Mr.
J

will

do what you ask


I

V v: V

-:

me.

Am

taking up your

?'njDTnx^t3nJi:^jx'''7^K

time?
Just wait a while.

What

are you saying?

What

are you talking

^vt2

xrnsn

about?

beg your pardon

the sense

Will

of:

ntD^^

(In

^^^^2^ S

you

please repeat?)

little

louder, please.

Are you

in a

"Tjblp ns:

hurry to
I

-:

j -

xronn
..

go?

Can
I

speak to you?

would

like to

to you.

speak

'T!?^

"'5"lr'

'"^?'^"'

V -

'^^

6
for a

Can you stop

moment?
- v:

T -

T-:

ni2nS
nnx
~
T -

bb^r\

-I

Can you spare a moment?

Can you wait?

T-:

Do you remember?
Don't trouble yourself

am

glad to see you.

What do you wish?

T -

What do you mean?


Of what use

is it?

What must

do?

Who

-.-

are they?

Why don't you answer?


Why

are you silent?

Why don't you speak?)


Excuse me.

nnin nbrin
-J

ni2


Here

is

my

(visiting)

i: -

J-

card.

What

is

your address?

Ti^ir

?r^n

ncj

When are you at home?


Don't bother me.
Listen, please.

Look here, please,

-:

When

will

it

be con-

venient for you?

You

look familiar.

This
I

is

the

first

time

have seen you.

Where have

seen you

before?
I

have not seen you


for a long time.

cannot

recall.

!?S)n

Tjnix

nfcjn

"^jk

am

glad you remind-

."niK r)"i3Tn

'?

niiD

ed me.

How are

you getting

on?

How

is

business?

Business

is

good.

Business

is

poor.

know you by

have known you for

sight.

a long time.

Do you know me?


Do you

Who
I

recognise

T -

me?

are you?

know
knew

you.

(recognized)

you at once.

Can you guess my name?

...

-:

.^.


Your name

is

familiar.

Mr. Yitzhaki sends his


regards.

How
in

do you say that

Hebrew?

What's new?

What's the news?

How
No

?tr-in

are things?

news.

Nothing new.
Everything

What's

iT'nira

is all

new

what

in

the

nit^nn

niri::^3

Van

right.

world?
Is

r\!2

heard about
.

you true?

Whatis.it?
|

What's the matter?

-:

riD

aSirs
I
T
J I

v:


How do you know

that?

10

11

Receive the

visitor.

..

...

..

..

I-

Good morning.

Won't you

sit

down?
T

Thank

you.

Spread the

cloth.

Set the table.

^
j

\Ye must serve our vis-

with

itors

refresh-

ments.
Sit

down

at the table,

please.

Please have something.


I

am

won't be too obstinate.

Where

He

is

is

the host?

not at home.

1 It -

not hungry.

Don't refuse.
I

..


He

will

12

back very soon.

What must you see him


about?

important

an

About

It:

matter.

Does he know that you

were

to

be here?

Certainly.

He promised

to

wait

nisn^ 'nix

"STB
svi

n'tpiin

for me.
It's late.
I

nnnJ:D r\v^n
r:

IS

couldn't wait any


longer.

got tired of waiting.

am

will

It's

very busy.

accompany you.

not necessary.

When

will

again?

you

call

QVB

lip

sun

''n;:^

13

14

It'snow twenty minutes


to twelve.

...

Are you sure of that?

No

doubt.

We

have two clocks

..

..

V r

^^72

.pBD
r

in

the house.

Neither of them keeps

It

good time.

One

always slow.

is

Theother is always fast.


There

is

TV

-1:

no peace be-

"

tween them.

They don't speak the


truth.
I

don't

tell

time

by

these two clocks.


I tell

et)

time by my (pockwatch.

....

T I

...

-:

15

This watch

is

small but

16

You have to go to work.


Hurry

up.

Don't be

The

lazy.

clock

has struck

T -

eight.

Hurry or
It's

you'll

be

late.

good to sleep

so

in the

It

morning.

You're a sleepy-head.

Go

to

the wash-stand

and wash.
( /"ii:: nni'^

The water

is

Open the other

Warm water

n^^p

n^itsn

too cold.

faucet.

^Ji^n

nnri n nns

runs from

this faucet.

Do you want
hot water?

(boiling)
?

D''nni-i

17
I

want lukewarm water.

Mix warm and

cold

water and you'll have

lukewarm water.
That's a good idea.

TT

T T

Upon my word!
Please, give
I

me a towel.

must dry

my

face

and hands.

Comb

your hair.

Have you a comb?

What

kind of comb?

Give

me

a fine comb.

Give

me

coarse comb.

Take the brush


brush your
Well said!

hair.

and

pn.DD

nr

jpnrn. nirna^ri n>5

np

18
It
I

seems

me,

to

shan't eat breakfast

morning.

this
I

have something important to do.

Have something.
I

have no appetite just


now.

have

to say

my

mor-

......

's

ning prayers.
I

have to put on

tephil-

hn.

Where is the

small mir-

ror?

Who knows?
Look for

Have
do?

it

yourself.

nothing else to

T -

li

-:

19
It's

my

not

You know

fault.

all

the ins

and outs of the household.


I

forget easily.

You

jnair

are forgetful.

nrist

Not always.
I

sometimes remember.

When

the matter con-

cerns me.
I

am

ned
concerned

in

the matter.
I

am

interested

in

the matter.

That^s not

What's
There

to

is

be done?

no other way.

That's the
world.

fair.

way

of the

nVry^

nip

20

That's the custom.


Well,

what of

it?

Every one does as he

.nirr^

vrrn

nir\i tr^K

pleases.

You

can't sit here.

V V T

The rays of the sun

come

in

through the

window.

We

ought

to

lower the

shades.

That's a good idea.


I

have news for you.

Tell

me

the

news

at

once.
I

have no patience.

It's

It

time to have lunch..

seems,

VT

21

You only

care

about

-:

T -

eating.

We'll postpone

it

'^5"'^nxS nnnj

for

later.

Let's wait

till

supper

-:

nans

,n3

''s

DISS n^S^bas

vv T

V -

time.
If

my

strength,

out,

ril wait.

First of

all

holds

n:'n^

Fll say the

afternoon prayers.
getting dark in the
house.

It's

I
It's

dark

We

ought to turn on

nvf

.ni^*^f ri-p5

in the house.

the light.

Have you a box

of
:

matches?

l\

"s

22
Strike a match and light

nt< phnri]

^n5 ^VE^t

the lamp.
I

must pour some kerosene

oil

The flame

is

too big.

The flame

is

too small.

The flame

is

just right.

Strike a match and light

You have

to

open the

jet.

want

:b^

"^bv
j

/ID nni'' nmp


T - I:
:

- T

V V

nsn^i^n
- V V
:

V V

- -

n pSnm nnaa nrnn


inn

the gas.

into the lamp.

must adjust the wick.

gas

tos:
.n-'irirrB
-:

to turn

on the

electric light.

Very good.
Press the button.

23

Pull the string.

Turn on the

light in

the bulb.

Then the

.^wnn

electric light

nix

7X

n^'S''

will burn.
I

nan nV .tSik-

will light the candle,

-:

nsn
n^'v^
- nx
T
V

.nnijiisia

ril place the candle in

a candlestick.
I like

It's

nsn nix nx nnix

candle-light.

midnight already.

"'jx
.

-J

.n^"'^n-ni:^n
nr''5nnn3
-:
T

Let's go to sleep.
Is

our bed ready?


get

Please,

my

bed
T

V -

'

T-

ready.

The

feather-bed,

the
I

quilt

and the sheet

T -

vv

DDIpID
hv
T
I

are in their proper


places.

24

prefer a mattress.

Have you another

pill-

ow?
The bed

very com-

is

fortable.

Put out the

light.

Turn

gas

Turn

off the

the

off

(jet).

nx nip-rb

i5n n;.p

electric

light (globe).
I

am

going (lying

down)

to sleep.

am

sleepy.

am

very

tired.

I did'

not forget to say

my

evening prayers.

have said the

Shema

bbBnr]b

'rin?^

tIt

t<b

already.

Have you
shutters?

closed

the

-J

25

I've locked the door.

Please, shut the bed-

room

door.

How good it is
Praised

be

to sleep!

the

man

ijv'^h D'-rj

It

n^^

nits n??

x'^^pn n^^s ^'xn Tinii

whoinventedthebed.
Praised

who

be

the

Lord

TT

-:

created sleep.

v:

T"

Good night.
Sleep well.

He fell

asleep so quick-

I-

^nw
T

T--

T]''^^

2^vr)

ly.

How

Fm

he snores.
frightened.

It's quiet in

the house.

There

a sound.

Hush!

isn't

.^bv bsi3

ins

26

We

are

not

satisfied

with our rooms

TV

(a-

..

..

partment, residence).

Why?
Because they're too far

from the

city.

.n^irxn \n mil

That's one reason.

And,

in

place,

second

the

I:

T X

..

our quarters

are a bit too small.

We

haven't

enough

T-:

rooms.

We're too crowded.

Why

do you want

It-

to

live in the city.


I

have to travel

to the

n^rn
"in::
h^V VD2b
'J
T
:

city

every day.

-^jk
-:

have business

27

in the

city.

What do you

intend to

do?

We

are going to

move

'

-.-

out of here.

We

will

move

to other

quarters.

Spacious quarters.

Comfortable quarters.
I

am

looking for a nice

home
I

in the city.

have found what

was looking

for.

When are you moving in-

T -

- T

to your new quarters ?

Soon.
In a few days.

nnpn

28

How many
there

rooms are

J -

-:

your new

In

home?
There are six rooms.

dining-room and a

bed-room.

A parlor and

A hall

a kitchen.

1:

and a lavatory.

The house has

the

.ninnnn b^ t^ n^nb

in the

.n'-sn mnissr-^D

all

conveniences.

Running water
house.

Hot water

at

all

times.

bath and shower.

Steam

heat.

The house
airy.

is

light

and

29

The windows open on

.ninnn'^fc^D^jiEniji'jnn

the street.

The house has a large

.n^ita

-iLtn

n^n'?

courtyard.

Also a wood-shed.
Also a beautiful

.D^::rS 'T'l D5

little

Ti:

T -

-:

T'

I:

garden.

How many

stories has

T -

the house?

Two stories withacellar


and an
There

is

attic.

also a broad

T T

V V

veranda.

You've forgotten the

- T

It

main thing.
Is there a

range (oven,
I

stove) in your apart-

ment?

-:

30
That's a fine question
to ask!

Of course!

Most

certainly!

There

is

a range (oven,

stove)for cooking and

baking.

Well then everything


is

ns^i

niiD ^2.1

pn^

just fine.

Go out

to the

market

p^^'H bi^ S}:

place.

Call

an expressman.

Tell

him

He

will

to call.

move

our

things.

How much do you want?


We'll come to terms.

We

won't quarrel.

n::n nnx n;^3

31

Everything

will

go

32

Have you the key with


you?
I

don
I

'

remember where

left

it.

Can you get another


key

to

fit

the lock?

"ins nriD^ br;::2r[

Well, let's try.

We

ought

to fix

7nez-

bi<

mriTD ,T3inS Tin::

zuzahs on the doorposts.

Just

look,

step

The

is

the

door-

broken.

repairs

not

are

yet completed.

The walls have

to

be

papered.

That

will

morrow.

be done

to-

nxV m:i^
D^^n^n
T

Tin::
1


Do you

intend to let

33

one room?

What

naT
?nDT nns
J -

are you talking

about?

need

the rooms.

all

How much

do you pay

for rent?

considerable

but
It's
I

it's

worth

sum,

.r\)p

bz^

n^na

.p:in

it.

worth while.

think

I'll

be satisfied

with these rooms.


Will you please

remove

the sign,
*

'Rooms

to let".

One oughtn't
people
trouble.

to cause

unnecessary

am coming
this house

God

to live in

sir i?uir

-iipn

next week.

willing.

have a house-warm-

I'll

^i^-h

.n^nn-n2:n

nir.?x

ing.
I'll

give a party.

Good

luck!

year from

now may

you build a home

in

bsn^r^-pKn

Palestine.

So be

it!

Amen!
I

have

to

talk

over

matters with the land-

n'-nn

lord.

There

some

is

still

need of

repairing.

nn^-i^ |pn7 nip

"rj-n^

35

There are
things to

some

still

fix

up

>riy^2

ppnnS nr "qn^

in

our quarters.

The porch
to

The

railing needs

be painted.
stairs are rickety.

The kitchen hasn't had


a

new

coat of white-

wash.

The

ceiling of the ves-

tibule

needs

to

-I:

-T

be

plastered.

The
I

floor isn't

want

to

smooth.

put up a

'it-:

.-

TV

'J

...

partition in the shed.

All

the

tenants

using one shed.

are

TV

36
janitor will attend

The

ntn

to that.

Can

get a key for

nnsD

T'^rh

it'Dsn

tLe front gate?

You

are

asking

too

unn nn

/^D nnv

much.

we agreed

So

in

ad-

vance.

Those were our terms.


Everything

let

All right.
I

shall

us quarrel.
(So be

buy new

friend

.DIBITS

it)

furni-

ture.

My

will be all

right.

Don't

is

an expert.

He knows how
nish rooms.

to fur-

87

He

advised

me

to

buy

a bureau.

The bureau has drawers.

Also a closet and an


ice-box.

Also a book-case.

wardrobe

and

clothes-rack.

sofa,

stools

and a

foot-stool,

ril

also

buy a rocker

and an arm-chair.
I

intend to put rugs

on the

D^n^tpc ens'? rtrin ^js

floor.

Drive some nails into


the wall.

'T'ipia

nm:2D.^ prjp


Please

me

hand

38

the

- -

V-

hammer.

Hang up

the pictures.
I

Fasten the shelves to

V T

the wall.
Place

flower-pots

the

'

'

-:

-:

on the window-sills.

There

are

beautiful

flowers in the pots.


I

want

to install a tel-

ephone
I

in the house.

know how

to tele-

phone.
It'seasy to speak trough

the telephone.

The telephone
ing.

is

ring-

-:

-39
Put the receiver to your

b^ nnsisrn n^

nn

car.

Take the
to

your

tiansmitter
lips.

Talk slowly.
I

have

to set the fur-

niture in the proper


places.

/^ ^}vb srSxin

Please, help me.

Move

the table to one

side.

Put the drawers ihto


the bureau.

The house needs


airing.

Open the windows.


Hook the windows.

an

,n^nn

nx mnb Tn::

40
It's

hard to bolt the

nSin n^ nnnn'p

nr,*^

door.

The

bolt

The ring

is

is

too thick.
too small.

The door turns on

its

nD
/^D

^ni^

nnn
nnnn
J Z '

nni^ nn:r nrstsn

TV'

V V

V-

hinges.

The door knob

is

out

of order.

Sarah, take a broom.

Sweep the
The broom

floor.
is

standing

in a corner.

The cuspidors need

to

.ni^ppinnsnipi^T-iii:
It
T
:i
V
I-

be cleaned.

Do not expectorate upon


the

floor.

Keep the house

Do

not

soil

clean.

the walls.

41

Sarah

is

floor

washing the

V V

IT

with soap and

water.

Sarah hghted the stove


with coal and wood.

Sarah put the pots

in-

,n^:iV2^

DVjnsjn

mu?
IT

ni"nfrn n>^ nnD*^


T
T
:

to the stove.

Sarah put the pots on

T T

the range.

She bakes and cooks.

She cleans and washes

V V

If-

(clothes).

She

looks

after

the

house.

She

is

an

excellent

house-wife.

Ring the

Come

bell.

into the house.

'-XT'

42

Have you a room

to

rent?

What

kind of room?

A furnished room

or an

unfurnished room?
This house

located

is

in a beautiful neigh-

borhood.

The house

in the vi-

is

:!

cinity of the city-park.

The synagogue

is

not

pinn ^3rx nDJ5n-n^::i

far from here.

The house
The

is

fire-proof.

stairs are of stone.

The house has

fire-es-

capes.

The house

is

insured.

T T -

!-: -

43

When

will the

room be

"linn naen''

""nr^

vacant?

On

the

first

of

the

month the tenant

T - -

-:

is
T

going to move out.


Give

me

a deposit on

the rent.
J

Tenants come and

the house.

have a good memory.


hope you

will

move

into a house of your

own soon. 'Lit.

go.

Note the number of

"Dedi-

cate your house soon"']

- -

44

OUT OF DOORS

ms

It's raining.
It's

windy.

It's

stormy.

.2^2t2

nnn

It's lightning.

It's

thundering.

It's

a rainy day.

Open your umbrella.

.
I

._.

|..

Hold yourumbrellacrver

me
I

too.

have forgotten
on

How

my
is

to

put

raincoat.

the

weather

today?

The weather

is

clear.

The weather

is

bad.

n t<

t:ihb

^nnzDi:?

It's

45

raining continually

today.
It's

DV

.pnir

a hot day.

It looks like rain.

D1^"^

V V

The rainy season is here

warm

It will

be

It will

be cold today.

Let's

find

today.

shelter

.on

n^n": n)^T\

"^P

^^D]

C*^*'"?

in

the doorway.
It's

It

pouring.

bin
-T

has stopped raining

-123 nts^n
T

T T

already.

Let's go outside.

We

will

walk on the

it:--

I"

sidewalk.

The sky has become

-:

- T

clear.

The

air is so pleasant.

- T

46
It's

good to go walk-

*vir^r h'i:h nito

ing now.

The sun
It's

is

shining.

neither

warm

cold

nor

today.

The heat

is

unendur-

is

unendur-

able.

The

cold

able.
It's

hard to stay out

pn5 r\^bb

nif?f5

of doors.

How

high was the tem-

perature yesterday?
:

It

little

be cooler

will

in a

while.

think

it's

getting

warmer.

You

can't be certain.

nns

ni?n':5

px

47

The weather

is

chang-

ing.

The sun

strong

too

is

here.

Let's cross to the other


side.

The shade there

is re-

freshing.

Let's walk in the shade.

See that you don't get

"T

sunburnt.

See that you don't get

wet

in the rain.

The hot
city is

spell

in

the

n'^!2

nrp n^v2

nnirn

very bad.

am

very cold.

n'i^^ ^^

np

am

very warm.

.ni<^ ^b

en

The

air is

damp now.

48

The

was dry.

air

don't like a cloudy

T \

T T

- T

dc.y.

There are clouds

in the

- J

-:

T-:

sky.

dark

It's

and

foggy

outside.

snowing.

It's

Everybody

is

covered
\

-:

with snow.
I

have

to

shake off the

- J "

V -

- f

snow.

The boys are throwing

-^^n3

d^-^n".!

Dnrsn

snowballs.

You rascals, don't throw


at
I'll

me.

get after you.

Stop!

lit'

-J
- J

49

Those children are mak-

"J

ing a snow man.

Suddenly

it

began

to

T r

haiL
I

didn't expect that.

Look, here's a sliding

. .

\j-

1.

..

...

..

pond.

Boys are

Put on

ice skates.

This boy
sorts

sliding.

is

of

cutting

all

capers

on

the ice.

Can you do what he


is

If

doing?
practice,

I will

able).
I

don't believe

it.

(be

-:

T -

T-:


The

50

made fig-

frost Las

T T

ures on the

window

pane.

The

frost

is

great

artist.

What's that?
Lights

hanging

are

I.

down from the roofs.


No, those are

How

icicles.

beautiful!

This old gentleman

always sitting

in

13

the

sun.

The sun has


The

street

been

set.
T

':

lamps have

lit.

Let's go out for a walk


in the park.

jn

^:.^'^ s;^;.


rather

It*s

cool

It's

warm

51

here.

(rather cold)

-It

there now.

There

is

an acquaint-

narip

n;3rj n^n

'T]b"in

ance of mine walking on the other side


of the street.
Efrosi,

come

insn

here.

Don't shout so on the

nip ^^nnax

!ninnn'n3-^2ps?::n^K
ir IJ

street.

Why

are you

making

1 1

such a racket?
It's

ill-mannered.

It isn't nice.

He

is

not coming over

to you.

He

is

going his way.

52

He

doesn't hear you on

account of the noise.


Well, you will

time.

had something

him

-J

meet him

some other
I

to tell

T,.!

just now.
J

To bad.

What

a commotion in

the street.

great

many

vehicles,

Be

careful

people,

and animals.

when

cross:

ing the street.


It's

dangerous.
T

Look sharp on
There

goes

mobile.

I I

all sides.

an

auto-

.fn b^2)r2^:^z^ nan

53

negro

is

driving the

automobile.
chauffeur,

Say,

don't

drive the automobile


so fast.
It's

It's

against the law.

not

allowed

-:

.15 r\''{cvb n^zt^

(it's

prohibited).

What's th^ excitement


there about?

There

has

been

an

accident.

A man

has been hurt.

He was run
leg

by a wagon.

Call for

Help!

over the

help.

.i^n

b:^

nnrr

r^b^iV


Listen;

54

there's a bell

ringing.

An ambulance

came

T T

T I

quickly.

The injured man was


taken to the hospital.

The crowd

dispersed.

Do you know, sir, where

m?n

nns

r''^

the Rabbi lives?


In that narrow street

/:Tii<

Is

-J

.t:?j
.

ncx niSin rio'iEn


T

-:

(side street) opposite.

You

will read there the

V V -

-:

sign on the house.


I

must

must

ride uptown.

ride

jl:

^'i^n

..

-.

..

line.
:

Get into the

car.

bv
-J

downtown.

There's the car

55

Pay your
Tell

fare.
:

the conductor to

stop the car at the

rin-]5 |np^n

^I^ii^Dn

next corner.
Please stop here!

subway and

Is there a

an

elevated

nnsn
V
.

r\^'n
-

n^i^n

^^^
-:

in this

town?
No,

this

not a big

is

city.
I

on a

like to ride

bi-

cycle.

Can you

me,

tell

where the

sir,

suburb

is?
I

don't

am
here.

know

not

myself.

a resident

...

56

Ask the policeman


standing on the corner.

You have

to take

bridge cr the

the

ferry

V V-

it:

across the river.

Look, there's the court


house.
T

tall,

beautiful build-

ill:*

i:

ing.

The

street

pavement

is

ninnnT

'n^-^s
I

ns::'!?^
v V

so clean.
Ti-

The pavement

is

sprin-

kled every day.

They are always

clean:

ing the streets.


I

want
bank.

to step into the

-:


Tne bank

is

on Fourth

ril find the

way my-

57

Avenue.

self.

The city is lit up by electric lights at night.


T

This

is

tiful

- -

the most beausection of

the

city.

The statue of Heine

n:^n

njpij?

stands in the central

ht
-

^Dsn
T

square.

How

do you get to the

Zionist club house?


It's

a straight road.

Don't turn to the right.


Don't turn to the

left.

\ ":

'

':

V-

58

The walk won't take

- v: V

you long.

What

..

-:

the distance

is

from

here

to

your

home?

half hour's walk.

With a cab you

will

get

T T

...

V -

there in ten minutes.


Say,

cab,

(coachman)

Jit:

t -

what do you charge?


There's

has lost
It

child
its

that

way.

should be taken to
the police station.

Why did

the policeman

arrest that

Because the

man?

man

has

committed a theft.

T-l

What

5^

a scamp!

What

contemptible

fellow

He

deserves no mercy.

He

is

not even a res-

pectable thief.

He

common

only a

is

pick-pocket.

There's a sign

*
:

*no tres-

-i^D

:^^f nan

f3

passing".
It's

a machine factory.

Clouds of smoke rise

from the tall chimney.

How

difficult

it

is

to

'

TIT

T -

breathe here.

Let us go away from


here.

.n^r2 'Ti?:) -i^DJ

60

The
I

air is stifling.

want

in to see

go

to

the exhibition.

who

Well,
Till

when

tion

We

going?

is

is

the exhibi-

open every day?

ought

nv DV

inquire

to

about that.

There are interesting


things to see there.

How
I

do you know that?

have read

it

in

the

newspapers.
Just look up there.

An

aeroplane

is

flying

in the sky.
It's

a glorious sight.

t(t

61

The aeroplane rises and

"^"iT] ^b'^v p'n'^i^n

descends.

man

It's

How

with wings.

wondrous are Thy

works,

IN
I

D^rhi^

-T

T T

,Ti'''^s?^

D^s'^a:

Lord!

THE COUNTRY

have been given a

t:-

vacation.

Where

will

you spend

t: -

V -

your vacation?
I'll

spend

it

in a village

or in a colony.
I'll

board with a far-

mer.

There

I'll

live quietly.

T T

-62ril forget the noise of

the big

It:-

- -

city,

ril enjoy (the delights


of) nature.

How

good

it

is

to

be

mr:i
V T -

niTiS
:

nits

n^

in the country!

The

air

is

so

health-

ful here.

You

are surrounded by

r\t2t21>

innf2 2^2Df2

space and silence.

Light and brightness.

Everywhere there are

D^nns^

D^i^s?

nip^ ^nn

trees and flowers.

Grass

and

standing

grain.

A few buildings are also


visible here and there.

D^i^nj D''"in^

D-rn

05

83
Do you want

to

come


When

64

do you harness

the horses?

When

travel

to

the

city.
I

have a

npuS nan

for the

stall

^b

t^

cattle.

sheepfold

for

the

sheep.

Also a chicken-coop.
Also a dove-cot.

Drink

some

fresh

T T

(warm) milk.

My

daughter

milked

ri

nnsn
nxV nnbn
^nn
T
T T T
:

the cow not long ago.

Won't you try some of

-v^s?;2a

our dairy products?

The butter we churned


today.

Kr^3

IDS??::

TV
:

T T V

V -

65

The cheese and cream

we

also

made

mnim

nrnsn n n^

our-

'

^ _

.,

selves.

Do you

like sour

milk?
I

certainly do like

am

accustomed

it.

to

,D^p ninir'? ^"^n

'jx

drink sour milk.


Yig'al, get the bucket.
I

have

draw fresh

to

water from the


I

well.

hear (a dog) barking.

That's

Yaktan,

.riisiir
''jx
...
...

Sip
nn^n:
T

our

faithful dog.

He has

way

of bark-

ing whenever a stran-

ger approaches.

Be

quiet,

Yaktan, stop

barking.

nsri

b^

,i^p; ,dt

66

Come with me

to

my

^n35

h^

^r^^;

sr i^i:i

garden.
It's

a vegetable garden.

Be careful not

to step

on the beds.

Walk

in the paths be-

tween the beds.

What grows

in

the

garden ?

Many

kinds of vege-

tables.

Carrots, radishes, and


horse-radish.

Cucumbers, onions, and

i*

tomatoes.

Cabbage,

beets,

and

nip-i-"^n^ni

pbo.nna

potatoes.

Beans and peas.

D^:^Sl D^^IS

67

Don't pluck the plants


before they are ripe.

Do you

sell

the vege-

T -

"

-:

tables?

No, the vegetables suonly for our

ffice

^TSD;::
!

Mb

n'ipn\n

It:-

own

needs.

Who

sowed your gar-

den?
I

sowed

own
I

with

it

my

-T

V V

-:

hands.

have put a

lot

of

nan

la-

^nn'itD

nnnn

bor into the garden.


First,

dug up the

ground with a spade.

Then
I

manured

plowed
plow.

it

it.

with

,-i^s?i:32 "Ti'-nr

-T

V^-Dlp
vl

68

When

did you plow?

In the plowing season

in the spring.

Why

don't you buy an

electric
I'll

buy

level

also

ground

^ir^i;

r^J^

plow?

that, too, soon.

Do you

nrnn;^ n;ip

the

It:

T -

..

in the garden ?

sometimes

level

it

with a hoe.
I

water

my

garden

with a sprinkler.

You

are

a good gar-

dener.

With God's

help!

Will the crop turn out

well?

ii-

1 -

69

For the present, you


can't be sure.

Fm

hoping for a pros-

nwb

,nrnn

ns)::^

'JK

perous year.

The

rains

came

in

season.

What beautiful flowers


They smell sweet.

'

"

Don't touch them.


Don't pluck them.
In a few weeks,

the

vegetables will ripen.

Then

Fll

have a

nnn^

onis

bn

s^bpri

nips

nirutr
It:-

lot of

work.
Fll

have

to

pick the

vegetables.

Perhaps
a

you'll give

little

help?

me

? tfl!?a ''7

-iTrn

'''71s

70
gladly help you.

I will

Happy man!

You

eat the

your

own

What's

fruit

V -

toil.

that

figure

standing

there,

of

on

one leg?
It's

a scarecrow.

It frightens

away the

birds.

Have you a beehive?


Yes,

raise bees.

I collect the honey.


I sell

the honey in town.

Do you

see a herd in

pinniiD

mi? nxn nn^

the distance?
It's

returning

pasture.

from

,nrn;:2ri j??

n^

x^n

71

There goes the shep-

nrinn

tt^ih

nan

?"T7rn

n^n

n'-s

herd.

Where does

the herd

pasture?
In the meadow, outside
of the colony.
It's

evening.

Come,

VV

let's sit

on the

veranda of my house.
We'll drink tea.

What

are

those shots

-.

....

that I'm hearing?


It's

the

Shomerim

(guards)

They

ride on horses.

They

encircle the col-

ony at night.

T T

They protect our property against thieves.

Do

you

hear

people

singing softly?

The Shomerim are singing

Who

Hebrew

songs.

looks after

your

household?
I

do,

and

my

wife and

sons help me.

Do you want to go with

me

to the threshing-

floor?

There you

will

see a

fine sight.

The

colonists

gather

there in the evening.

72

^:tr^D-

73

They

sing,

play,

and

make merry.

From the threshingfloor


comes the sound of
joyous,

Such

merry voices.

is

Jewish

Hfe

nnnrn

n^^nn an

"n^

here.

Such
in

is

a Jewish colony

T T

I-

Palestine.

Where

shall

we

sleep

- -

tonight?
In the hut in my garden.

Ding! Dong!

bell is

ringing.
It's

the colony's

bell

J T

-I

-t

that's ringing.
It

summons

to

the morning.

work

in

.rnins?'?

npbn snip s^n

74

Soon you

will see the

workmen.
There they go singing.

The Lord be with

you,

...

-:

Jewish v/orkmen!
Let's go out to the field.

The ears

(of grain) are

full.

They sway in the wind.

What

crops

grow

in

the field?

Many

kinds of grain.

Rye,

wheat,

and

.:n

'rD

r\r^:D

barle>

oats.

Let's rest a while.

We'll

stretch

out on

the grass.

How beautiful is nature

: -

T T

What

are the

workmen

75
-

...

doing here?

They

harvesting

are

T It -

'

the (standing) grain.

This

With

harvest time.

is

what

do

they

reap?

With a harvester.
In

other

fields

they

reap with a sickle.

There they are binding


sheaves.

The grain

is

loaded on

is

taken to

wagons.

The grain
.

the threshing-floor.

Why

are there several


stacks on the threshing-floor?

n'^iti^ri ]r2]

)^tDV

Q^i^ip

n^3

76

Every stack belongs

to

.in^
nD^t^
TV nss^
T

another farmer.

Wait a while, and you

willsee the threshing.

There they are threshing

with

threshing

machines.

The grains drop from

nn^ii "'rr^nan

\t2
I

the ears.

On

other

threshing

floors

they

with a

flail.

-:

t:

thresh

There they are winnowT

ing the grain with a

winnowing basket.
Is

the

work on

threshing-floor

done?

the
all

-:

77

Not

yet.

With a rake they gather


it all

nisi^i

D-'nn^ip

niD-is?

into heaps.

....

The chaff and the straw


go into one heap.

The threshed grain goes

-:

into another (heap).

And what

will

they do

afterwards?

Afterwards the heaps


are stuffed into sacks.

The sacks are brought

DDxn
T T T

to the granary.

And

where

do

they

grind the grain?

We
in

This

have a mill (here)


our colony.
is

a windmill.

-:

-78Soonwe'llbuildasteammill
Millstones grind bran,

and

flour,

n?::p,D''3DC''3nitoc^nnn

fine flour.

The miller and the workers are covered with


flour.

must work today

in

an orchard.

Your orchard

is

really

lovely.
I

have put a lot of labor


-

into

my

kinds

of

h^

nine

D^ri2

grow there?

Apples,

pears,

and
I

peaches.

'

orchard.

How many
fruit

- -:-

t ;

n?^3

79
cherries,

and

intend to plant

new

Plums,
carobs.
I

trees.

Let

me have

-i

the prun-

ing-knife.
I

have

prune

to

the

tops of the branches.


I

also

have

lopping

Tomorrow

to

do some

off.

Til

cut off

the withered twigs.

You have to watch carefully (Lit. "with

seven

eyes") over the trees


in the grove.
a^:ii?n

Don't climb the

trees.

'^s?

DetfiD '7K

80

This

is

fpm s^n

nm

yvn

nnvn

niri

yvr^

the oldest tree

in the grove.

^^in

-m

How

beautiful

is

the

ym

r\^f2'^

n3 nt22

treetop!

Are

these

all

fruit

trees?

Not

.D^D

all.

There

are

also

that are not

lib

trees
fruit-

bearing.
1

am

going to remove

(root

up)

the

trees
I

that are

not

It-

fruit-

bearing.
I

haven't enough room


in the grove.*

.\1'2

Dlp!^ "1

''S

81
I

dig ditches

around

82
Please bring the young

V2
I

trees

D^^^nrn_ ns ^rsnn
J
^
.

..

..

from the nur-

sery.

ril

plant

young

the

trees at the edge of

my

..I.

vineyard.

The young

trees

have

^3n ""S'Tii^n

.iy"i\r

taken root.

The bark has already


hardened.

The trunk
The

is

firm.

vim

Pin

trees are blossom-

ing

What's there,

in

the

V V -

center of the vine-

yard?
That's a hut for the

watchman.

nt:i3^

n^D

K\-i ni^T

83

The

first

of the ripened

grapes

,n^2^vr\

n^3n ^sn J nns

already

are

appearing.

!^bi D^njs?

Pluck a cluster of grapes

and eat

it.

Don't eat unripe

The
is

^i3u nbp

vintage

fruit.

(season)

here.

When

will

the

owner

nniDn

TlD

b^nnt2

of the vineyard begin

Mie vintage?
I

have

to prepare

the

- T

baskets.

Fm

going to town to
:

hire

What

'

-:

workmen.
a commotion in

the vineyard!

V V -

T -

84
Everybody

is

working

nT,w?

D''nnip ^'nn

industriously.

There

are

so

many

ni^:!7

D^'pDS^

-nn-S^

wagons and camels


on the roads.

They are conveying the


grapes to the wine
cellar.

Here

they

press

the

grapes.

Drink

some wine

our health

(Lit.

to

''Say

rchayim'\)

Where
Not

On

is

your grove?

far from here.

the level land,

by

the bank of the river.

-:

'J


Thus

far, I have

only a few

85

planted

.nnn^

^:)lants in

nir^to;

pn
I

the grove.

Oranges,

and

citrons,

''

: 1 -1

,nnt-^n^Bn

pomegranates.

Next

year,

also

will plant

lemons,

dates,
I

nuts,

have almost finished

And now I have to make


a pool.

The conduits running


from the pool
water the

will

roots.

have not yet done

any grafting.
I

nn^n

,D'^n:it^

J f -

^n^^^i^h

and bananas.

digging the well.

TT-

-V

have to graft the trees.

- T

86

There's a butterfly on
the fence.

The

butterfly

is

of

all

colors.

Let's take a

little stroll

between the row? of

trees.

Are there many planters in the colony?

Not

so

T T

many.

NATURE
The cock has crowed.
I

have awakened from

my

sleep.

The day

is

dawning.

The sun has

risen.

IT

..

87

dew

There^s

on the

r*^?? ^p h^

ground.
*

'Chirp! Chirp!*'

the

birds are chirping.

The nightingale is sing-

'

ing.

The sky
The

is

blue.

....

- T

air is clear.

Let's go

and explore

the place.

The landscape is beautiful.

The ground

is

fertile.

The plants here

are

vigorous.

Pm

thirsty.

There's a spring.

You can drink your fill.

It:

nnni

nntrn

Do you know what has


occurred to

rm

me?

thinking of leaving

-:

the city.

Fm

sick

of

being

TiDX^

/Jin^s? nvr^f^

town dweller.
I

want to be a

I like

villagere

.n23

ni^n':'

n^n

^:

agriculture (farm-

ing).
I'll

buy an estate some-

- -

T \-i

vl: V

where.

Near a colony

or

village.

Or, ril settle on a farm.


I'll

engage

in ordinary

v:v

farm-work.
1

have some knowledge


of agriculture.

I:

-:

89
In

my

youth,

an

in

studied

agricultural

I:

school.

ril also learn

from ex-

/nii< i?^b^ ri'Esn n:i

perience.
You'll be doing a good

thing,

my

friend.

Look, there's a summer

home

(hotel).

Summer boarders from


the city stop there.

Take care not

to lose
I

your way.

You needn't
I

know

fear.

the neighbor-

hood well.

I'm

depending

you.

upon

'?
T"?? "^a^o

90

We

had better follow


'

'

the highway.
A.11

right,

there's

the

road.

Look about you.


Here's a

little

^n^ntpip p.i^nn

swamp

T -I:

(mud-hole).
Let's

jump

across the

T\^'2r\

n^

nn?ji pep;

mud-hole.

There are many thorns


here.

Take care not

to

be

pricked by the thorns.

Withered leaves are on


the ground.
It is

of

now

the beginning

fall,

Who pitched these tents?

ic^iipsm^n^wnriTn

They have begun

91

to af-

-:

forest the whole place.


I

This

is

T -

a large area.

nyn ^2V2 d:^:

Let^s enter the thicket.

Don't

fear.

inan
.

There are no beasts of

bt<

prey in the forest.

The hunters don't come

niair D-'^!!

Drs

n'^'i^^n

there to hunt.

This

is

a young forest.
T

Cry out: ''Hurrah!"

in

You'll hear an echo.

Come up

j?i2t^n

the mountain

with me.
It's

hard

for

me

to

r^B^n Dstab

^b

ntr^p

nnn
T T

climb up the mountain slope.

Take firm

steps.

n::2

ni?]i

92

From the summit you'll

nxnn
...

nr^n
T T

hv^

tiin

be able to see for a

distance.

From here you


some

will see

..

natural

fine

scenery.

The

horizon

."1^0

very

is

nnn pQ^n

wide.

down

Let's go

to

the

valley.

Look!

A river runs here.

little

boat

is

floating

TT

T-lj

on the water.
That's a fishing boat.

fisherman has gone


out to

He rows
oars.

fish.

the boat with

93

no one

Look,

hold-

is

vv T

ing the rudder.

The fisherman threw


a line into the river.

There a

fish is

caught

T -

- VIV

on the hook.

Here the fishermen do


not cast nets.

Do you want

to

bathe

in the river?

?nn3n
T T -

Can you swim?


Take care not to drown.

The water

is

.,.

not deep.
I.

Don't dive

to the

^-j

..

..

bot-

tom.

Tm

shivering

with
I

cold.

..

-,


Go out on the

94

land

and dry yourself.


Croak,

croak

the

frogs are croaking.

a pond

There's

back
T

of the

What

-:

hill.

road leads to

my

hotel?

The road

- T

to the east.
T 1

Go

-:

V V-

straight ahead.
T T

Don't stumble against


'

the stones.

My

legs are tired

from

walking.

Fm

not accustomed to

walk
This

in the sand.

place

pebbles.

is

full

of

V V T

- -

'

I"

95

Pve strayed

far

from

.^iw'X^ fp 'riipnnnn

the settlement.

Some people

are com-

ing toward us.


Let's go in company.

appear

Stars

in

-:

)'

the

west.

How beautiful the moon


is

tonight!

What

are those sparks

there?
Fireflies are

glimmer-

ing.

The country has won

my
Such

heart.
is

the power of

nature.

96

ON THE WAY
I've decided to go away.

Where

VJV

are you travel-

ling to?

To

visit Palestine.

Perhaps ril settle there.

For the present,

VV

I"-

am

a tourist.

How much

time will

spend

you

on

the

way?
I

tell in

can^t

On

the way,

at a
ril

few

see

my

advance.
Fll

stop

places.

acquaint-

ances in the country


towns.

maipo

97
my

leave of

already

secured

ril take

-nan? n^ 050

n;?^

them.
I've

.PD;p-niiirrT'n:ts^nnn3

a passport.
I

must make the necessary preparations.

my

must get

baggage

ip^ssn
IT
I

nKV

r::T\b
I

'Ss?
- T

ready,
ril pack the necessary

mnan

nK t^nnx
IV

T T

things in the valise.

Clothes,

linens,

and

odds and ends.

With me

handbag

PIl

(satchel).

In the handbag Til put

the journey.

for

T T -

-T

-i

take a

some provisions

96 ~
Have you bought some
foodstuffs for

me?

The journey is long and


one has

to

-:

V V-

provide

himself with food.

Who
me

accompany

will

to

the railroad

station?

Here's the depot.

Don't smoke!

Look at the sign: "Smoking here prohibited

What

class

are

! '

"\x^vb

n^D

you

travelling?

Third class.

Buy me a

It

ticket.

There's the ticket office.

'

\ ~

- -

Here's some

money

99

for

!]9I

^h xn"

you.

Which do you prefer?

An

ordinary train, or

V V -

?pTn

an express train?
It

V V -

.nD3
Tsn'?
'sn^
sb
V V

doesn't pay to throw

away money.
What's the price of a
ticket

of

to

the

city

X?

What's the price of a

-:

return ticket?

Take the

-J

mim
TT-;-

valise to the

baggage room.
Get a receipt.
We'll wait for you in
the waiting room.

V -

D^rDisn

-:


Don't miss the

train.

100

101

102

There's a draught.

,pnw i^i^n

The locomotive is whistling.

All things rush swift

^^^

^V 'FT

ly by.

sign

forests

Fields,

rDnr*"

onnir

,ni"itr

posts pass by.


I

like to travel

find

by

travelling

rail.

very

pleasant.

How

far

is

it

to the

next station?

About another mile and


a half.

The

train stopped here

|K3
I

for five minutes.

This

is

a small town.

n nV 3V n- nJ

m;2i7
TIT
J.

T-l:

TT-:

..

have forgotten

103

its

- T

name.
I

must

look

up

my

...

- J

"Travellers' Guide'\

Where

From

are you from?

the city of X.

In that case you are

my fellow-townsman.
Don't sticK your jead
out of the window.

Why has

it

grown dark

suddenly?

The

train

is

passing

through a tunnel.
1

have engaged a bertli


in the car.

The

jolting of the car

doesn't let

me

sleep.

n j<ns 'qrn n^^


Don't

converse

in

104

105

Coachman,

is

your cab

Ts

J -

vacant?

Where do you want

to

s?D3b

}nxn

n^^i-i

\^h

go, sir?

To the

"Zion** Hoteh

AT THE HOTEL
I

want

to

speak to the

proprietor

of

-I

the

hotel.

Can

get board and

Dips y'erh

-le^ssxn

lodging?

Do you wish

to

have

a separate room, sir?

V V

T T

-t

106

Do

the windows face


Has any mail come

107.-

for

me?
Has anybody inquired

me?

for

Tm

going out to see

'

-s

the town,

few

ril visit a

friends.

anybody asks

If

me,

him

tell

I'll

for

.Dnni<

Dnn^ ^pn
- T

.^b ""iin ^3;;

jim

v:

be

back in the evening.


I

want the

servant.

Please fetch
of

warm

Bring up
I

me

a glass

water.

my

things.

don't like the room.

It's too small.


It's

also

dark.

somewhat

nnnn


And

it's

108

warm

not

enough.

Have you another room

..

..

..

I,

...J

to let?

A
A

larger room.

more

T \

.m:

comfortable

nni"'

nnn

room.

A room with more light.


I

am

.-iii^

nnv vhn^ nin


..

very sorry.

There are only a few

.D^^^JB

Dnn nmn

p"i

rooms vacant.

The larger and more


comfortable

rooms

are taken.

New

guests

arrived

.Dvn^nD''t2^nnD''nni

today.

What

are

the

for meals?

hours

mnnijrt mrt^

|ri

no

109

As one

wishes.

Tomorrow

Fll leave the

city.
I

must

Let

ride to the port.

me have my

Put down

bill.

each

item

T T

separately.

How much

do

Here's what
If

owe?

....

owe you.

you receive any

let-

nn
3
T

ters for me, mail


to

The

my

address.

service

was ex-

cellent.
I

was

them

satisfied.

J -

dk

h^pri
"I-

13

110

AT SEA
This

the port city.

is

When

does the

shish

D^3
T -

'
'

sail from

"Tar-

r\^2i<r:

rSsn

\x^t2

"^n^

here ?

tomorrow mor-

Early

T-

Iv

T T

ning.

In the meantime,

change
I

my

will

-;

money.

got myself a steamship tickat in advance

What

congestion in the

harbor!

The longshoremen are

rr'j^nnsn^'jriifiD'^^nDr;

loading the ship.

The passengers are tak


ing

leave

relatives.

of

their

hvr2

"'-ins:)

D'^roisn

-Dn^ninp

Ill
They are waving

their

handkerchiefs.
Let's go on board.

At

T-

t:t

-:

t t

I'm standing

last,

on the ship's deck.

Thank Heaven!

'J

rnin
t

...

...

I'^i^'?

Look there are some

.J -

sailors!

They're running a flag

.["inn

b^ bn c^^^np an

up the mast.

The orchestra

is

play-

ing.

The

ship has

begun

to

move.

The sea
I

is

calm now.

hope the voyage


be pleasant.

will

.topiiT
I"

nr^'D^n

's

nni? D^'^
T-

T-

,nipa

'jx


What

112

are those white

't;

birds?

Those are sea-gulls.

My

head

is

in a whirl

feel dizzy).

(I

You

are sea sick.

Go up on deck.

You

will

breathe fresh

air.

Here

feel

little

better.
If

only had a ham-

mock here on board

You need

not

call

T-TJT

I-

..

the
1

It

ship's doctor.
It's

nothing.
:

There goes a steamship.

113

No:

The

-nrsD
-

a sail-boat

it's

sea

nsT

x^n

Mb

getting

is

stormier.

The waves are breaking into foam.

Our ship

tossed

is

on
J

VI

! i:

all sides.

There's no danger.

The ship has


and

life-boats

life-belts.

Let's go

IT-

down

to

our

down

to

the

TT -

cabins.

Let's go

steerage.

Here

is

the third class.

How many

immigrants

there are on this ship

- -


This

year

there

is

114
a

.n':5n5nn''5nn!n
nj^^n
T
T
:

large immigration.

The arrangements are


not good.
I

haven't tasted a thing


today.

Vm

going to complain

to the captain.

Don't go down to the

..

..

..

hold.
fj-.j

The

freight and

gage

is

down

bagthere.

The sea has grown calm.


I

- T

Do you see a light-house


in the distance?

This

proves

near shore.

we

are

115

Look,

there's

a rock

on the seashore.

We

arrived at the port

of Jaffa.

The ship

cast its anchor.

The ship was quarantined.

The ship

will

anchor

here.

We

shall not be able to

land for three days.

We'll get to the shore


in row-boats.

Boatman,

what's

the
J

charge

to Jaffa?
T

can see the bottom


(of the sea)

here.

116

From here you can

see

the ebb ane flow of


the tide.

The

first

group of pas-

t:t

TT--

'T

sengers has landed.

A crowd of people

came

out to receive us.

Welcome!
I

am privileged to stand
on Palestinian

The

climate

-1-

soil.

here

'T

vv

'

is

warm.
ril acclimatize myself

quickly.

How
is

glaring the light

her el

I've decided to remain

permanently
land.

in

the

V T T

- VJ


ril settle
I'll

117

.D'^ns-^ns n^-^n^

Tel-Aviv.

nnsi?

always speak He-

Ti!?ri

nani^

brew.
I

hope

to

get settled
I

vl-

here.
I

will

not leave

the

Homeland.

AT WORK
I

am

going about

am

out of work.

Pm

idle.

not earning any-

thing.

Pm

going to apply at

an employment bureau.

-:

'

118

Who

119

the proprietor

is

here?
I've been sent here

by

the employment bureau.

Good; the work for the


season has begun.
I

belong to

trade-

union.
Is this

a union shop?

h^

?n^r:cpi:D

Of course

(lit.

n^n

n^i^Sj^-n'^s

"with-

mas

'pl?9

p^

out doubt'').
Well,

then,

what are

the terms?

Your weekly wage

will

be such and such.

I"


We

120

work here eight

hours a day.
Fridays, half a day.
If

you work overtime,

111

-I

V V

-I

you'll get double pay.


If

you wish, you can

,n:^nn
^3s?b ^Din
VI*
-I-

do piece-work.

How

are the sanitary

conditions

in

your

place?

There'splenty of space,
cleanliness, light,

and

air.

Are the conditions

sat

isfactory to you?
ril consider the matter.

There's a great deal of

work on hand.

\:

"

The foreman

is

121

exact-

ing (drives the men).

The

attitude (relation)

of the employer tow-

ard us has changed.


We'll complain to the
(trade) union.

It

The complaint has been

.n^npnj

r^:^hriri

accepted (as valid).

We've decided

to call

.nn-n^ tnsnS ^:^hm

a strike.

There are

no

strike-

breakers.

What

are

your

deI

mands, strikers?

An

increase of wages.

Shortening
hours.

of

work

T T -

-J


It's

122

forbidden to dis-

h^ D'-^riS

workmen

charge

without

"ItSEiS "I^IDK

- -

sufficient

cause.

A minimum

scale

of

wages.

Two

weeks' vocation

every year.

These are our demands.

Under no circumstances
will

we

surrender

our demands.

What do you

intend

doing, boss?
I

agree

to

refer

the

dispute to an arbitration committee.

..

...

..

123

124
advertise

I'll

the

in

.D^'jinrs

mix

papers.

The season
It's

over.

line,

it's

-^3 nn-i- n3rx n-nntsnTV


T
T
T

not so busy.

my

In

is

slack

now.
I

have no prospects of
getting employment.

wish to be an expert
craftsman.
V

I'll

enter a trade school.

There

I'll

pert in

become ex-

my

line.

125

Vm

working

in

a fac-

tory now.

Fve

accustomed

self to the

my-

noise

of

the machines.
I

ask that you increase

my

wage.
T

got

my

increase.

I'm making a

living.

Thank Heaven!

What

workmen

lav^ri

'rim

are

organized?

The

railroad

workers

V y -J

....

and metal workers.

The blacksmiths

and

TV-:

T--

tinsmiths.

The mechanics and construction workers.

,D^x|iiri] Q'':3J'i3J2ri

126

The masons and

plas

terers.

What

workmen

still

nip

D^Sr'E

T"i:r

irx

need to be organized?

The

glaziers

and pho-

tographers.

The barbers and painters.

The watchmakers and


engineers.

The book-binders and


bakers.

The

iron

workers and

hat makers.

The printing industry is

'

-.

completly organized.

The type-setters' union

is

I:

very strong.
Itt-:

:-

-:

127

The organizer

is

now

nx

]^^Br\

I'^^'sr n^p?:^

organizing the agri-

I:

- -

-:

cultural laborers.

Why

aren't you orga-

nizing yourselves?
In unity
I

have

is

ourstrength.

given

up

my

-T

work.

What work

are you go-

ing to engage in?

Fve decided

to

become

a farmer.
ril

work

ril lease

at planting.

some

hope

hope you

know how

T -

v:v

land.

to succeed.

(a farm.)

will.

to

manage

..

-i


For the

time

being,

the

ground

till

I'll

128
r\i^

^2v^

hj^u-'eS

as a member of a (co-

operative) group.

We'll divide the income


equally.

Are you earning much?


I

earn

My

little.

earnings

are

in-

sufficient.

The needs

of

my house

hold are many.

The work
for
I

is

too difficult

me.

haven't tne strength


to work.

want

my

to

get rid of

(present) work.

VT

T T

129
ril choose

some other

something

work,
easy.

Are you

with

new work?

your
1

satisfied

can't

tell

I've

bought

But

yet.

-T

ntrnnn
T

tools.

haven't enough

material.

Don't be

Work

lazy.

diligently.

Love work.

Do you know how

to

-.

..

-.

-,

-v

^ _

.,

..

do this?
It's

very simple:

-ii<;2 tapirs
:

Do thus and

so.

That's a diligent work-

man

nn-in
J J

130

He

supports himself by

his

own

T -

vv:v

labor.

For that reason, he

is

not so poor.
A^lthough he

is

not rich

either.

Why
me
You

you

do
in

disturb

my work?

are w^asting

my

time.

You

bother

me

too

much.

You

are a nuisance.

Can't you see that I'm

busy?
Finish your work

first.

Afterwards we'll chat.

Now Fm

not so busy.

nnr

T I

'

Have you
Give

Do
I

it

me

little

little

131

time?

help.

'

-:

J-:

yourself.

have

worked today

...

.-J

more than enough.


I

must

What' s

rest now.

that

workman
*

T -

- T

merry

singing?

'Work is our very life.

'

BUSINESS

nnDf:>:::

Rebecca, go out to the


store.

Buy us some foodstuffs.


Whereabouts

is

there

a grocery store?

It

182

Here, in the middle of


the block.
Grocer,

me some

sell

grits.

Wait for your


Give
I

me a full

turn.

measure.

need some millet also.

-.

One pound.

ink

Also

rice.

Two

pounds.

How much

n2]

a pound?

Fifteen prutot.

Give me correct weight.

Why, you can

see

for

yourself.

The scales are balanced.

.ni^^;

n^i7t<;2n

nis3

seems

It

1^3

me that the

to

weights weigh down.


I

am an honest merchar. t

T T

-:

(dealer).
I

am

don't cheat the pub-

not a cheat.

He (purchasers).

my

custom-

me have

half a

Especially
ers.

Let

measure of winegar.
Let me have ten

jwiitot

worth of kerosene.

nitons
:

Give

me

a dozen eg-gs.

Also soap and coffee.


Please
I

wrap

bought.

u:^

what

'Si-

-:

T -


What's the

34

for the

bill

T"

':

T -

whole purchase?

How much must


you,

Two

all

pay

I:

-J

told?

shekolim and a bit

over.
I

have money

in large

denominations.

mc

Give
I

the change.

have no small change.

I'll

send

the

boy

nir^p

nirip ^b ps;

to

change the money.

Take care not


bad

take

npn

b<^t^

nnin

coins.

Take good
I

to

coins.

must bay a new

set

ma;

mr?^-;; np

c^i^^mnD ni]p^

'^^r

qf fnn.iture.
T


My

old

worn

You

furniture

135

is

*'^\?i\l^^ D^:ir?\n ''is^nn

out.

had

better

buy

at auction.

There you will get every-

,h'i2

b^n rrn cv

thing cheap.

Don't spend a

lot

of

money.
Idon'tlikeused articles.

Are you prepared

.....

-:

to

spend the necessary

T -

amount?
Let's go in here.

This

is

reliable con-

It

cern.

Do you
L

sell

sell retail?

only wholesale.

D^-nt^':?

.n^ritO^Cin

rr^^ nri,!:^

pi

'"iZ i*J

\'K

186
Let's go somewhere else.

Have you high grade


goods?
I

am

a good judge of

...

..

wares.
I

have no inferior goods


at

all.

Select
ril

what you

please,

give you satis-

faction.

.p:in Tinis r^nt*

ril satisfy you.

In the very best way.

Perhaps you

will

lower

the price?

The

price

is

very high.

Please don't bargain.

Here prices are fixed.

It

-:

]
It

Here

it is

one price.

:-!-:


my word

Take

Everything

is

for

137

it.

bv

^nnn-1

offered

VT

'^b

It

at a fair price.

You charge high prices.

On

the contrary,

I sell
It

-:

cheaply.

me

Give
I'll

a discount.

per cent

^b nt'v

-:

allow you (deduct)

five

nn^n
TT

-:

-:

-:

v-

-:

off the

price.

That's a large discount.

Will you pay cash?

No,
I

want

don't

sell

But you

n:rn
.napnn
V
T

credit.

on

can

It

':
":

Mb

credit.

pay

in

d'?^':'

b^^ri

b2^

instalments.

A payment every week.


I

undertake

to

do

so.

.s?uu?
T

n-htr\
bD2
T
:

^r.nnrp ^:^
.J5 niirs?b


You must

1 ^.8

give (me) a

deposit.

On

account.

Shall

make out a

T T

check?
It's all

the same tome.

check or cash.

Any way

(anyhow),

trust you.

The

bookkeeper

enter

your

will

account

in the ledger.

Please pay the cashier


at the desk.

There you

will get a re-

ceipt for the


T

amount.

have too much stock


in

my

store.

'

V -

139
A

sale

special

should

??

be arranged.
In that
will

way

V V

the income

is

The expense

is

larger

than the income.

making any

not

profit

now.

You ought

to raise the

prices.

They owe me a

lot of

money.
hard to

collect the

debts.
I

nD:3nn nnnnn ni?

D^rn

bad.

Thelossesaretooheavy.

It's

be increased.

Business

I'm

1^-\?

need a loan.

D^porn

140

Do you know

a money-

...

..

lender?
I

wish

to

borrow some

money from you

for
T T

V V

one year.
Sign the note.

You should

advertise

extensively.

Advertising helps business,


ril do as

The

you say.

crisis is

Conditions

passed.

have

im-

proved.
Profits

have increased.

V/hat are you engaged


in

now?

Fve become a

peddlar.

.^15
-T
?

vrs!? pDis?

nn

nnn
VT
-

ni^ss

-.

141

At times, Pin

also

:-

broker.

am

trusted mer-

"

-:

'np'l^

'^^

chant.

Do the wholesalers have


confidence in you?

They give me

silverware

sell

credit.

and

gold objects.

Copper

objects

and

glassware.

Of
I

all

sell

kinds.

on instalment.

Do you always make


a profit?

Sometimes

lose.

'b?^

^D? '^3

142

How much

do you

still

J-

owe me?
I still

owe a

little.

don't wish to be in

nrnS

f -

ni'in

^3r^

debt.

Let's settle the account.

Take some paper and

I-

t:

figure up.
I'll

pay

off

my

debt.

need some rare books.

Order them from out-

Tr^

pnip

[?Jiri

of-town.

The

book-dealer

filled

my

has

order with

precision.

He

sent

me

C. 0. D.

the books
.ns-'pTB
T

received a

(item-

bill

ized statement)

>^f2^tn

^^t2?2

^ri^5p

from

him.

Some books

are out of

^hi^

nnn^ nnsD

stock.

They are lacking en-

tirely,

I
.n^iD^'p

They are not

to

be

had.

c]pn en

Theexpressagehe charged
I

to

my

account.

intend to buy Bezalel


rugs.

Is

there

much demand

for these goods?

This

is

salable

mer-

chandize.

You must pay


vance.

in ad-

.l^^^nD

n^irb ^^hv

144

Fve

retired

from

busiI

"T

- T

ness.

Take advantage of the


opportunity.

Buy

the stock for next

!D3n

to nothing.
I

have given up

the

-J

business entirely.
I

have not even drawn


out

my

initial invest-

ment.
ril invest
in

my

capital

another business.

I've opened a store in

the

new market.

sell

earthenware and

T T V

^hD^

Dnn

"^^3 ^^)f2

- I

^;k

porcelain.

Dolls and playthings.


:


And

l-_d

writing materials.

That

is

merchandise

needed by

II

....

all.

The

prices are cheap.'

The

receipts are big.

Have you regular

cus-

tomers?
No, but there are

many

transient buyers.

Do you need
I

am

candies?

an agent of the

Methek factory.

pn;:^//

About how much

will

you take for the

first

cr5

npri

Tin;73 n?^2i

time?

Send

me

sample.

little

as

P'-e;^ torp ^Si<

nb^

146

pay me,

If it will

I'll

take more.
You'll have to give a

bigger discount.

And to reduce the price.


Let's settle our account.

The low prices are gone.

.nip

is

bm

n^^srJ n,Tn

Prices are mounting.

Who

^lSr^^

at fault in that

regard?

The profiteers, of course.


Everything

Even raw

is

dear.

materials.

Some things have mounted to double the price.

Or even
The

triple.

value

of

has fallen.

money

.1-)''

-T

D^'aoan
T
:

nw


Speculators

make

eve-

n.s

D^^i^t^i?^
.

cnoar:

rything dear.

,i^-

THE CLUB

IN

Come,

-. 1

organize

let's

a society.

What

is

the object of

the society?

To work for Zionism.


To spread the Hebrew
language.

To help the

To

assist

need

When

poor.

students in

(of support).

will the organi-

zation meeting take

place?

T T

148

We

shall post notices.

We

shall

in che

We

announce
synagogue.

send

also

shall

personal
It's

it

lette-rSo

necessary to

call

a mass-meeting.
In

the

name

society,

meeting

of the
this

call

to

order

(open the meeting).


Elect a chairman

for

the meeting.

Nominations

are

in

order.
I

nominate Mr.
reeli as

Yiz-

chairman.

149

Mr.

Yizreeli,

accept

you

do

the nomina-

tion?

Yes,

We

sir.

iiave only

one can-

.^m

if2V!2

pi

^:h

t^

didate.

All those

who favor

nomination

of

the

Mr.

Yizreeli raise hands.

Those opposd
nomination

to

of

the

1*;)

riyn^b

n^-]|;ri;2n

Mr.

Yizreeli raise hands.

Mr. Yizreeli

is

elected

unanimously as chair-

man.

We

must

also elect a

temporary secretary.

*im ns

irn


the

Will

secretary

150
.

please take notes of

proceedings

the
this
I

Dirn^ n^37!2n
T

-:

t<r^xi''
J

at

meeting?

appoint Mr. Ben David


as sergeant-at-arms.

Mr. Shimoni
liver

He

will

de-

an address.

will

speak on an

p:s?^

pin bv D^r K^n

interesting topic.

Let

there

be

silence

nx3n nrtrn na^ np^nt?

during the address!


Congratulations,

Mr.

Shimoni!

You made a fine speech.


You spoke

briefly.

You spoke

long.

-J

VT

.:

151

Mr. Shimoni

an ex-

is

}j

..

cellent speaker.

Don't raise

distur-

urn

^^^pri

h^

bance.

What

is

on the agenda?

(What's the order of


business)

Mr. Chairman,
the

desire

floor.

Mr. Levi has the

floor.
:

move we

"TV

discuss the

constitution

of

the

club.

There

is

pisn hv

a motion on

ni?2:n

the floor (before the


house).
I

second this motion.

^)

np^ns

Ti^in ^:^


Those

in favor of

152

the

motion say '*aye".


Opposed, "nay".

The majority being

in
;

favor, the motion

is

passed.

\^^D2 ^^njnn

Please keep order!

The count was

irregu-

lar.

.nt^pnin

T T

demand a recount

-:

of

the votes.

Who

desires

the floor

on this question?

The discussions are

'ni

too

lengthy.
I

move

to

limit

the

time of speeches to
five minutes.

-pi

nii'j^nb

n^n-^n

153

The motion
I

move

is

seconded.

the

previous

question (to proceed

It:--

to a vote).
I

move

to

close

the

debate.
I

move an amendment
to the motion.

move

to

table

the

motion.

The motion
I

is lost.

appeal from the de-

- T

-:

:-

'

cision of the chair.

The chair does not conduct the meeting according

to

mentary law.

parlia-

y7^:r2

rs-ra^'i^n

iV3 2n:)r:i5nDDt<nn^

151
L

move

to

reconsider
T J

-:

this question.

We

should defer this

^1

^r^r

nbi^v r\)nnb

question to the next

T I -

-:

meeting.

That
I

is

the rule.

,]'^'iri

sin ^^

object to the decision


of the chair.

The

objection

.rt^n
is

over-

rnb^pn:
IT
:

iib n^^ni^n*

ruled.
I

am

object.

This

opposed.

is

.ni

bv

"irnrrj

out of order.

Point of order!
Point of information!

Question
tion 1

of

inform.a-

.pJS7n Di^r':'

nnrn

.i^jrn d:!:^'^

n^w

move

155

substitute

VV

-!

motion.

Have

a vote?

may

members

Only
vote.

Point of procedure as
to
I

he v.te.

move a

An

open

secret ballot.
ballot.
J

A
I

T T

rising vote.

demand a

Let

me have

bership

roll-call.

the

mem-

list.

Mr. So and So.


Present!

We

have no resolution

on this point.
Don't get excited.

pjrn
It:':

ntfi':'nn
t t

":

^3r

^^^
t

r"


How

enthusiastic

156

he

nnSnJ2 ^n nj23

gets!

Why

don't you express

n^n^

ma

"qrs

your opinion?
I

don't care to mix

don't care

my

to

influence

in.

exert
for or

againsto

That befits a chairman.


Sit

still!
T

Don't whisper!

For

this

shall

purpose

call

we

tI:

-:

a special

VV

meeting.
I

suggest that the meet-

-:t

-:

ing be secret.

That

is

tion.

a good sugges-

nnitfi n^^r

s^n

r\iii

157
It

would be better that

meeting be

the

an

n-^'^a

open one.

That

'

my personal opin-

ion.

You

are right.

What remains on

the

?pnsn bv

nip

ni;:ip

n^

order of business?
Collection of dues.

We

have not yet de-

cided

n'^n]

n;^5 ^ ^tD^nn iib nip

what the dues

D1DD

.a^r\

shall be.

What shall be the initiation fee of the society ?

These proposals

mittee.

"'ttn

rn*"

n^s
t

nn:K^

have

been referred to the


Constitution

nD-'j^n
-

Com-

.niJjPriniPl


We

must

elect a tem-

158

-i

porary president.

How

shall

we

proceed

with the election?

Fetch a ballot box.

Distribute
among

ballots

^^^p^

[x?^

^^nri

-nipn D'lnn^ ^pbn

the members.

Record the names of

ni ^ u

ro

the candidates.
the

D.o^:>

ballots into

the ballot box.

When

will the regular

-:

- f

-f

jnecting take place?


L'i
1

the time set.

liiovo to adjou>-n

the

meeting:.

This

is

ing.

genex-iil

meet-

J-


The secretary

159

will

please read the minutes.

Who has any comments


to

make on

the min-

'

utes?

The minutes stand ap-

proved.

We
to

shall

the

now proceed
reading

ns'''?nnnnri<-ipSi:7''

of

correspondence.

The

Constitution

Commlltec

will ren-

der a report of

its

work.
I

L,hall

first

prt^amble.

read the

nrTEnn.^n^nnw-ips

~
The

constitution

160

con-

tains three articles.

Each

article is divided

pns
vv

p'^nj

d^^^d'?

IT

v:v

h:D
t

into several sections.

Please read each


stitutional

con-

provision

r\i2b

separately.

We

must

also discuss

05 ]^ib

riJi^riB

^ir^r

the by-laws.

The

society elects four

T T

vv

standing committees.

An

I:

-:

Executive Commit-

tee.

A Propaganda Commit-

tee.

Literary Committee.

House Committee.

*^\^b

ir.i

161

The

Com-

Executive

directs

mittee

all

the business of the


society.
It carries

out

the re-

niiD^nnn

solutions adopted.

We

must

elect

permanent

seven

officers.

president and a vicepresident.

secretary, treasurer

and

nsiDi

'

corresponding

secretary.

financial

and

secretary

sergeant-at-

arms.

The president is a member ex officio of


committees.

D^nr^n ^D^? inn x'^ran

all
T

162

Have we the
add

number?

to the

As many

right to

as you desire.
I

move

" T

T -

add a Com-

to

Member-

mittee on

- tI-

. .. _,

ship.
It

always

is

to

possible

elect

T-i^n

nus
T
V

nn-^i^
T \

is?n
-:

special

committee.
In

my opinion, we ought
to

add two trustees.

According

to the

stitution, the

tive

con-

Execu-

Committee has

the power to coopt.


It

has

add
ship.

the
to

its

power

to

member-

Ix

J v:v


That's not

So

163

fair.

was decided.

it

The chairman

acts ty-

..

..

rannically.

You should
I

retract

We

apologize.

my statement.

almost

.nn'irj "inn

forgot to

elect

What

an
is

""ii^

editor.

?T[nirn Tpari

the duty of

n^

the editor?

He

has to arrange the

literary

.rr'nnaDn

program.

We do not need a leader.

We

are not a club of

.Tink '^h

'^n^r-pn

rrT.n
..

^3r^^
..

^^vb ^b

^D"'^

.n^3i2p
Sir
- |.
..
.

pK
.

..

youngsters.

Pay attention

to

the

rest of the constitution.

!ni3pnn

164

Whoever does not

at-

165

propose Shimoni for

membership.

move

to

arrange a

literary evening.

reception in

honor

of the visiting author.


desire

to

givj

reasons for

my

the

mo-

tion.

All are agreed.

There

is

no need for

explanation.

Of how many members


shall the committee on

arrangements consist?
It

makes no difference.

We

ought to invite the


prominent men of
the

city.

':'^!7Dir

nt2 r\^ i^-^D ^JK

166

Send out the invitations


as soon as possible.

Next week there

will

niDi<
"
-:

riMn
v^zv
r:jz
v:
I

be a meeting for the


installation of officers.

Also

ceremony of

initiation for the

-T

... -.

-:

new

members.

Who

will

new

install

l.

._.

honor

the president of

our organization.

The treasury

We

officers?

We shall give the


to

the

shall

is

empty.

have

to

im-

pose a special tax on


the members.

TV

,:-:-

167

Let us hire a theater

ri^tDxn S^irj

.n'tn':'

for a play.

The chirman

shall ap-

J -.-

point a committee to
I

select the play.

Let's arrange a mas-

querade for the benefit of the society.

With a "flying post".


The person with the
most

effective

shall receive

mask

a prize.

Or perhaps a concert
and dance?

What shall be the charge


for a

ticket of

mission?

ad-

..

..

I-

168

The

was

evening

n^^^in

n^

success.

In the summer we shall

arrange a picnic

nn^B rntD

"rpv:

ppn

in

one of the parks.

Admission

members.

to

We

shall be free

ought

to

open up

.i2^t2
T

^rSr
nhsh
" f

a center.

And

a gymnasium.
:

am

very fond of gym-

nastics.

Come to the

dedication.

That

be

will

fine

celebration.

Our society has been

in

existence for a year.

^jrTisKDrp^ nj^nx^j3
TIT
TT

169
I

move

to

arrange a

170

171

Mr. Yardeni will recite

move

that the meet-

ings

be held twice

172

-;

-.

trnnri n^t^^jB nr^rtn

a month.

Once

for

business

rs^

Dre

r\^vvf2 TiLD^

riTinaD nsDt^

meeting and once for


a Hterary meeting.

Now

comes the

social

phn

xin;

nris?

(recreational) part of

the program.
Call

the

roll

of

the

members.

Whoever does not

tend

the

shall

pay a

move

to

not

office.

...

-J

at-

meeting
fine.

impeach our

president.

He's

annnn-

fit

..

for this


He

doesn^t

fulfil

173

his

duties.
T

resign of

my own

accord.

motion to accept the

I-

T T -

resignation.

Will the

secretary

please read the

we

cular

cir-

received.

The annual convention


of our
will

Let us

organization

take place soon.


call

an election

meeting.

Every branch
titled

gates.

to

two

is

endele-

1:

174

We

also

have

to elect

:inn:2^^rbr

^^?2D3

.Dip?^

alternates.

What

be the

shall

in-

structions to our rep-

resentatives?
I

move
them

that
full

we

give

-''^'

nrh

DT^b

s^^'Si?:)

power.

The delegates are

re-

I;

"'ii^

quested to participate
in

preliminary

the

conference.

When

the

will

first

..

session begin?

This

is

the

opening

session.

How many
must we

committees
elect?

'nh^b ^^-^h]) D^iT. n^2n

175

Committee on Creden-

Committee on

tials,

.nitD^nnn

Resolutions.

Press (Publicity) Committee,

Budget Cmo-

mittee,

Committee

on Nominations.

The Budget Committee


moves

to appropriate

money
The

for schools.

appropriation

is
T

I-

adopted.

Mr. Chairman,
for

the

matter

floor

of

ask

on

personal

..

privilege.

The president refuses


to accept the

nomina-

n ^3pS

1-

^<^i:*:n
nncj^o

T-

176
tion for the

coming

term (future).
It is an official announce

ment

T T

(statement).

of thanks to

vote

-:

the president.

He worked

faithfully.
v:v

Mr. GeHli

will

- T

deliver

a lecture.
Please sign the petiT

tion.
J \j

We demand

that there

be a conference every
half year.
All the workers of the
It

party should participate


rence.

in

the

confe-

.T\hsi^r\

-:


Who

is

to

convene the

177

ns

n^rriian

Tri"* ^^

conference?

The Central Committee,

,[n^D| r''T3n;5n

ii?iri

of course.
It is

doubtful whether

this

demand

will

be

granted.

At any

rate,

we must
J7ir\VT\b

try.

This

IS

the

closing

session.

The

convention

ad-

journed with the singin^ ol ''Hatikvah'*^

-:

/'mpnn

178

DRESS
T T

- -

Imusthave a suit made.

My old clothes are torn.


Do you like ready-made

T -

clothes?
clothes

I like

made

to

order.

They

me

fit

Come

well.

me

wiih

to

dress goods store.

Measure
(ells)

What

off four

yards

of cloth for me.


color

do

you

prefer?

What's your opinion?

The

color that

becoming

is

most

to you.

.nnvn ^b n^'p

]\yn

179

Does Gamliel, the tailor,

?tDjnn S^^^DS JXS

nnn

nD''bn

Sen

here?

live

Make up
in

a suit for

me

^^b

^b

the latest fashion.

my

Take

measure.

Take care not

have

to

the sleeves too long.

You can depend upon

.^Sr it2Db bb^

nn

me.
I

guarantee that
fit

will

well.

Come

n^^'^nn bv

'xnnK

'J^

T T

the day after to-

morrow, and
let

it

will

you try on

the

suit.

Take

off

your clothes.

Put on the new clothes.


1

-:

180

Can one dress and undress here?

The coat

too

is

tight

-J

for me.
It feels tight

under the

- -

\j J

...

arms.

The pockets are

too

shoi't.

The trousers are

too

wide.

nf2

Button the west.

Unbutton the

vest.
T

The buttons are not

in
T

the proper places.

The button-holes need


to be
It
I

nis^^^nni^fpnS

^n^

mended.

doesn't

fit

well here.

like pointed lapels.

.ns;*

ni^in

.nnn w^zn
J

px fxa

:]ni
'

'jx
-;


And round

181

.D^^:r

coat-tails.

Everything

n^'^^tri

.ns'' nSr*' '^'an

turn

will

\i

out well.

Wear

in

it

good health.

Do you wear

suspen-

mans
... nnx
J

u-^nnn
irninn

ders?
I

wear a

Here

belt.

a tear in your

is

overcoat.

Let

me have

needle

and thread.
I

must sew up the rent.


don't

like

patched

clothes.

Where

is

the spool of

thread?

You had

better

sew

up by machine.

it

n3i3D3 -isnnir n'^^D


My

182

brother's wedding

will take

ras
r-c^
n^nn
n^nn
T
V
,

-:

place in a

week from now.

My

be

needs to

suit

'J

VI--:

-:

pressed.
I

have

to

buy a new

nmb

tnn
Tilp^^nJ

':

^bv
~
J

shirt with cuffs.

collar

stiff

and

cravat.

A pair of

woolen socks.

Gloves, handkerchiefs,

!-

'

-f

and a cane.
Linen shirts and drawers.

My

cap

worn

is

faded

and

out.

Put on a hat.

Take

off the hat.

!nr32?2 irrn
!

nra^i^n
- !

nsV

"ion

183

Where can one borrow


a

hat (high hat)?

silk

You can get

it

upon

leaving a deposit.
I

must put on (wear)

.D-^aDtTD

^hn'? ^hv

glasses.

And buy

a gold (watch)

.nriT

bt nnunir

nijp'^i

chain.

You are giving too much


attention

to

.n^nn

tDrj-jn?)

nm

your

clothes.

You're a dandy.

Where
Take

is

off

the cobbler's?

The

n^-iiDH

Dip?:: rr'K

your shoes.

Put on the new shoes.

The heel

is

not straight.

sole is thin.

:niir-TnnD^Sr2nn^rj
.nt?^ i2r>;

nprn


The

leather

is

184

not

strong (durable).

The point

is

not wide

enough.
Tie the shoe laces.

Don't forget

to

polish

the shoes.

Can

also get slippers

and overshoes (rubbers) here?

Do you
Don't

like boots?

soil

and

don't

tfl^pri

b^] "^b^bip

crease your clothes.


I

Buy

overalls for work.


I

Where

is

the brush?

How many

spots there

are on your fur coat!

b^

VT

.. |.


The fur needs a

185

clean-

ing.

Where about

is

the

barber shop?
I

must have a haircut


and a shave.

Leah,

when

will

you

^pr\ 'n^

r\ht2'^

,nb

buy a dress trimmed


with lace?
I

need a plain

skirt.

Without a train

'

and

without pleats.
I

must

also

and a

buy a muff

scarf.

Stockings, garters, and

an apron.

It-:-

msDi .nin^^

'

'D:i^?7?

186

veil,

a corset,

iDnni i\)n^

and

^^''v:^

a purse.

Esther,

how do you

like the
I

blouse that

- T

-I

have sewed for my-

self?

the blouse.

I like

Who

did

embroi-

the

I- T

'T

':

dering?
I,

myself

(Lit.

my own

"with

hands").

Have you a

piece

of

I:

-:

It

velvet?
I

must make a patch.

Give
I

me

must

- j

the hairpin.

arrange

hair (coiffure).

my

Iv

-.

- J


Give

me

187

ribbons

the

and the pins.

Why

haven't you any

ear-rings,

bracelets,

and rings?
I

hate jewelry (orna-

ments).

Who

is

the old

woman

knitting a stocking?

She wears a peruke.

have
cap

to

buy a

skull-

gift for

T T -

'

my

grandfather.

What are these parcels?

Wash

to

be

the laundry.

sent

to

.HMD;::'? "ibaS 0^:2^-

188

And

rags to

sell to

the

rag dealer.

FOOD
I

am

hungry.

Let's

go

into

-:

res-

taurant.

Wash your hands

for

the meal.

Waiter, set the table.


I

Let

me have

a spoon

i:hir2^
... -

n3
I-

-^b
.

-.

xrir:n
J

and a fork.

And

a knife to cut the

bread.

Please give

me

a nap-

kin.

AVhat do you wish to eat ?

r\^Bt:i '^b \r\

,'r\tp'22


Here's the

menu

189

(bill

of fare).
I

want

to eat a regular

dinner (table d'hote).

What have you

for ent-

t'

^.r\t2^hb -Th

T\t2

ree (hors-d' oeuvres)?

Marinaded herring.

Chopped

liver.

Stuffed or fried

fish.

It \

t:

J \

Calves' feet.

Smoked salmon

or var-

ious vegetables.

Salad, or marinaded fish,

Red-beet soup, or sorrel.

The
This

Give

sorrel tastes good.


is

'TV

nutritious food.

me

tion.

-It

another por-

mnx

MjD nip

"-^

jn

190

Eat

heartily!

Where

the

is

and the

pepper

salt?

The oil and the vinegar?


Take some white bread
and butter.
I like

rye bread.

find fresh, soft bread


tasteless.

will

give you some

stale bread.

What kind of soup have

'^b

ur""

pnitD r:i^^

you?
Noodles, or potatoes.

T T

-:

Porridge, millet, or rice.

Egg

barley

(dough-

crumbs), or peas.

Mushrooms or tomatoes.

J ;-

...


Egg-drops,

191

croutons,

or beans.

Pumpkins,

parsnips,

carrots, or grits.

Lentils or cabbage.

Give

me some marrow-

balls.

The soup

is

too salty.

This dish

is

tasteless.

The plate

is

.^^r2

not clean

nnv

f '

n^b;:^

TV

p^^n

enough.

?nt^ ntrn

Have you fresh meat?

Do you

like

roast,

or

Tib ir^n

^6i' nt?2 nni<


^nisrrT

T T

':':r

nt'^

..

cooked meat?

Fat or lean?
Beef, veal, or lamb?

^s

np2

nirn

192
Shall I give

you a por-

tion of chicken?

Goose, or turkey?
Breast, tongue, or cutlet?
I

don't want any cutlet.

It
I

nsiaa ^ni^ r.w nn.

smells of garlic.

don't like roast either.

Can

Let

me have

order a steak?

n::;^

r^irh n^aK*2

a side-

dish with the meat.

There

is

some mustard

vv-;-

T :~

and horse-radish.
Pickles, olives, spinach,

and radishes
Celery,

green

onions

,Q^pi-i^

'Dsn3

'b??

(scallions), cauliflower.
I

want some

lettuce.

T -

Lettuce

me

Give

is

193

wholesome.

IT

another sHce

of bread.

What have

you

for

dessert?
I

am

going

(you)

serve

to

some

stewed

fruit.

The

coffee

Put some

is

not sweet.

sugar

the glass and

Have you some


pie,

We

into

!irnr^Di3riT|in'pn|Dfri

stir.

tart,

It-

V T

or pudding?

have '^strudel"

to-

-:

..

day.

Are you sated?


Yes, but

Pm

thirsty.

T -

-"IT

/i^^
s^i*
^ns ,p
T
T

Shall

serve

194

some

brandy?
Wine, beer, or water.
I

don't like strong or

Sinn npt??2 sniK

*'2rx

bitter beverages.
I

.ij^ri (ran "-jx

want some mead.

The

bottle

is

.p^pB

corked.
?

Have you a corkscrew?


I

p^n,':p2n

fhnf2 v^b t^rj

have drawn the cork


(uncorked the bottle).

What

is

there to eat

along with

it?

Cakes or cookies.

We

do our

I-

I-

-T

own baking.
nsK^sn
^:b^
- V
T V
-:

have eaten and drunk

my

fill.

^n-^nt)

pnir'?

^d^dk

195

We

have

to

say grace

>])ir^r[

n^'n? "^^^ih 'qn.^

after the meal.

Don't forget

to

give

the waiter a tip.

Let

me have

a tooth-

T T

pick.

Don't pick your teeth


in

pubhc.

Can we

have

break-

-:

ninnn van
v:v

fast?
I

haven't tasted a thing

Do you want bread with


cheese, or sardines?

prefer cakes, cookies,


or Haman-taschen.

Shall

^2b

nx

"^rinro

V -

npsn
i<b nip

am

today.

get you a hard

or soft-boiled eggl

196

Make an omelet for me.

Vm

right,

All

going

into the kitchen.

Try some of the sour


cream and the sweet

VV

cream.

Perhaps you

some

eat

will

with

biscuits

J T

milk.

Give

me raw

Here

is

milk.

slice of

wa-

termelon.

slice of pineapple.

Will you
or

eat creplach

(pancakes)
I like

fritters

cheese
?

pancakes

(lathes)

with sour milk.

.D^ipS

W^SSD -HIS

"^J^^


Buttermilk

good for

digestion

the
'

is

197

(Lit.

'stomach' 0.

When

will

you

have

'i

lunch and supper?


I

na^ -I'oan

,n3|^S

have no appetite

to-

?nns?n-nnnxiQnn2:n
T
*'

-t:

-.

\nm

pn^n

TT

^b

p^

nr\b
T

^hv
-

day.
In honor of the guests,
I'll

prepare the samo-

var.
I

must prepare some

refreshments

.nnnpn
I:

nrtS
V T

for

them.

Where's the tray?

The samovar

is

Pour a glass of tea for


yourself.

Here

is

.nnin

boiling.

the strainer.

r\r\

D13

nmri
-nS 2T1D

198
Strain the tea that

is

in the tea-pot.

Take some preserves.


Put some lemon

in

your

^m

nnpn?2
I

D13S

np_

])?^b n^t'

glass.

The tea
Shall

will

get cold.

nrirr

.;:tfi:y:^

send some one

out to buy wurst or

It*.:

/;in^ir

'^j^?

smoked meat (cornedbeef)?

No,

Tm

a vegetarian.

Fetch some

Eat the

The

ice

cream.

"

fruit.

nuts, the walnuts,

^D^jtann
^wi^bn
^n'^nixn

the

Mb

pistachio

v:t

nuts,

and the almonds.


I

have no nut-cracker
to crack the nuts with.

,.

..

..


We

have

to

199

give the
I

-:

.n^3^pri rs:

and

food

Httle-ones

drink.

Children,

white

eat

some

bread

with

f -

honey.
Stir the tea in the cup.

Don't drink from the


saucer.

Look! They are Hcking

i. i.

..

..

the candy.
I

shall serve

you with

Sabbath dishes.

Have you ever

tasted

such a tzimmesl

The

cholent (meatstew)

turned out

fine.

r^n^sh

T^"^

r\f2v^n

200

The pudding is dripping


with

fat.

You've cut off too large

n^n5
n^^nn
T
T
-

slice for

-.

^h
.

nsnn
... J
J

me.

(You Ve given me too


large a
It's

hard

slice).

for

me

to

D-'^DXD ^sr^j ^b

nrp
\i

digest heavy food.


"I

You must chew


You have
some
For

it

well

to eat whole-

.snnj::
rliD ^2i<b

v:

Tbv
V T
1

food.

example,

apples

and apricots.
Oranges, bananas, and
carob fruit.

Pears, plums, and


cherries

"^n

iisn

,bt

f2b

Figs, dates,

201

and pome-

D''3lJ:2m

on^n

,n^}^r\

granates.

The berries are

also

good to eat.
Huckleberries, grapes,

and

raisins.

Goosberries

and

cur-

.7nir""':i3n njD-^njs;

rants.

Cranberries,
berries,

and

strawrasp-

-.

berries.

Remember your

table

manners.
Don't

soil yourself.

Don't swallow any

fish

bones.

Don't be a glutton.

UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY

000 011 088

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