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SERIES-25 Census of India 2011 GUJARAT P A R T X I I - B

SERIES-25

SERIES-25 Census of India 2011 GUJARAT P A R T X I I - B DISTRICT

Census of India 2011

GUJARAT

PART XII-B

DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK

KACHCHH

VILLAGE AND TOWN WISE PRIMARY CENSUS ABSTRACT (PCA)

CENSUS HANDBOOK KACHCHH VILLAGE AND TOWN WISE PRIMARY CENSUS ABSTRACT (PCA) DIRECTORATE OF CENSUS OPERATIONS GUJARAT

DIRECTORATE OF CENSUS OPERATIONS

GUJARAT

®
®
CENSUS OF INDIA 2011 SERIES-25 GUJARAT PART XII - B DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK KACHCHH VILLAGE

CENSUS OF INDIA 2011

SERIES-25

GUJARAT

PART XII - B

DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK

KACHCHH

VILLAGE AND TOWN WISE PRIMARY CENSUS ABSTRACT (PCA)

CENSUS HANDBOOK KACHCHH VILLAGE AND TOWN WISE PRIMARY CENSUS ABSTRACT (PCA) Directorate of Census Operations GUJARAT

Directorate of Census Operations GUJARAT

Motif

Motif Rann Utsav Rann Utsav is a cultural and artistic extravaganza which is organized by the

Rann Utsav

Rann Utsav is a cultural and artistic extravaganza which is organized by the Gujarat Tourism Department annually. The Utsav or fair takes place at different locations within Rann of Kutch in Gujarat, India. The fair showcases traditional Indian art forms of India and celebrates the distinctiveness and diversity of the Kutch district highlighting the cultural splendor of Gujarat. The fair is held every year generally on the full moon night of December. The Rann Utsav has a variety of programmes like cultural and folk dances, craftsmanship, music, carnival processions, pageantry, etc. All this is combined with the true spirit and zeal of the inhabitants of Kutch.

1 Foreword

2

Preface

3 Acknowledgement

Contents

4 History and Scope of the District Census Handbook

5 Brief History of the District

6 Administrative Setup

7 District Highlights - 2011 Census

8 Important Statistics

9 Section - I

Primary Census Abstract (PCA)

(i)

(ii)

Brief note on Primary Census Abstract

District Primary Census Abstract (General)

(iii)

Appendix to District Primary Census Abstract Total, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes Population - Urban Block wise

(iv)

(v)

(vi)

(vii)

Primary Census Abstract for Scheduled Castes (SC)

Primary Census Abstract for Scheduled Tribes (ST)

Rural PCA-C.D. blocks wise Village Primary Census Abstract

Urban PCA-Town wise Primary Census Abstract

10 Section II

(i)

Table -1:

Tables based on Households Amenities and Assets (Rural /Urban) at District and Sub-District level.

Households by Ownership status and by Number of Dwelling rooms occupied in the District, 2011

Pages

1

3

5

11

13

17

24

26

30

35

49

87

95

103

237

253

(ii)

Table -2:

(iii)

Table -3:

(iv)

Table -4:

(v)

Table -5:

(vi)

Table -6:

(vii)

Table -7:

(viii)

Table -8:

(ix)

Table -9:

Percentage distribution of Households living in Permanent, Semi permanent and Temporary houses, 2011

Number and Percentage of Households by main source of Drinking water, 2011

Number and Percentage of Households by main source of Lighting, 2011

Number and Percentage of Households by type of Latrine facility, 2011

Number and Percentage of Households by type of Drainage connectivity for waste water outlet, 2011

Number and Percentage of Households by availability of Kitchen facility, 2011

Number and Percentage of Households by type of fuel used for Cooking, 2011

Number and Percentage of Households availing Banking

services and number of Households having each of the specified Assets, 2011

254

256

258

260

262

263

264

266

FOREWORD

The District Census Handbook (DCHB) is an important publication of the Census Organization since 1951. It contains both Census and non Census data of urban and rural areas for each District. The Census data provide information on demographic and socio-economic characteristics of population at the lowest administrative unit i.e. of each Village, Town and Ward of the District. The Primary Census Abstract (PCA) part of this publication contains Census data including data on household amenities collected during 1 st phase of the Census i.e. House Listing and Housing Census. The non Census data presented in the DCHB is in the form of Village Directory and Town Directory contain information on various infrastructure facilities available in the village and town viz; education, medical, drinking water, communication and transport, post and telegraph, electricity, banking, and other miscellaneous facilities. Later on, the Telegraph Services were closed by the Government of India on 15 th July, 2013. The data of DCHB are of considerable importance in the context of planning and development at the grass-root level.

2. In the 1961 Census, DCHB provided a descriptive account of the District, administrative statistics, Census tables and Village and Town Directory including Primary Census Abstract. This pattern was changed in 1971 Census and the DCHB was published in three parts: Part-A related to Village and Town Directory, Part-B to Village and Town PCA and Part-C comprised analytical report, administrative statistics, District Census tables and certain analytical tables based on PCA and amenity data in respect of Villages. The 1981 Census DCHB was published in two parts: Part-A contained Village and Town Directory and Part-B the PCA of Village and Town including the SCs and STs PCA up to Tahsil/Town levels. New features along with restructuring of the formats of Village and Town Directory were added. In Village Directory, all amenities except electricity were brought together and if any amenity was not available in the referent Village, the distance in broad ranges from the nearest place having such an amenity, was given.

3. The pattern of 1981 Census was followed by and large for the DCHB of 1991 Census

except the format of PCA. It was restructured. Nine-fold industrial classification of main workers was given against the four-fold industrial classification presented in the 1981 Census. In addition, sex wise population in 0-6 age group was included in the PCA for the first time with a view to enable the data users to compile more realistic literacy rate as all children below 7 years of age had been treated as illiterate at the time of 1991 Census. One of the important innovations in the 1991 Census was the Community Development Block (CD Block) level presentation of Village Directory and PCA data instead of the traditional Tahsil/Taluk/PS level presentation.

4. As regards DCHB of 2001 Census, the scope of Village Directory was improved by

including some other amenities like banking, recreational and cultural facilities, newspapers & magazines and `most important commodity’ manufactured in a Village in addition to prescribed facilities of earlier Censuses. In Town Directory, the statement on Slums was modified and its coverage was enlarged by including details on all slums instead of ‘notified slums’.

5. The scope and coverage of Village Directory of 2011 DCHB has been

including a number of new amenities in addition to those of 2001. These newly

widened by

1

added amenities are: Pre-Primary School, Engineering College, Medical College, Management Institute, Polytechnic, Non-formal Training Centre, Special School for Disabled, Community Health Centre, Veterinary Hospital, Mobile Health Clinic, Medical Practitioner with MBBS Degree, Medical Practitioner with no degree, Traditional Practitioner and faith Healer, Medicine Shop, Community Toilet, Rural Sanitary Mart or Sanitary Hardware Outlet in the Village, Community Bio- gas, Sub Post Office, Village Pin Code, Public Call Office, Mobile Phone Coverage, Internet Cafes/ Common Service Centre, Private Courier Facility, Auto/Modified Autos, Taxis and Vans, Tractors, Cycle-pulled Rickshaws, Carts driven by Animals, Village connected to National Highway, State Highway, Major District Road, and Other District Road, Availability of Water Bounded Macadam Roads in Village, ATM, Self-Help Group, Public Distribution System(PDS) Shop, Mandis/Regular Market, Weekly Haat, Agricultural Marketing Society, Nutritional Centers (ICDS), Anganwadi Centre, ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist), Sports Field, Public Library, Public Reading Room, Assembly Polling station, Birth & Death Registration Office. In the Town Directory, seven Statements containing the details and the data of each Town have been presented viz.; (i) Status and Growth History of Towns, (ii) Physical Aspects and Location of Towns, (iii) Civic and other Amenities (iv) Medical Facilities, (v) Educational, Recreational & Cultural Facilities, (vi) Industry & Banking, and (vii) Civic & other amenities in Slums respectively. CD Block wise data of Village Directory and Village PCA have been presented in DCHB of 2011 Census as presented in earlier Census.

6. The data of DCHB 2011 Census have been presented in two parts, Part-A contains Village and Town Directory and Part-B contains Village and Town wise Primary Census Abstract. Both the Parts have been published in separate volumes in 2011 Census.

7. The Village and Town level amenities data have been collected, compiled and computerized under the supervision of Shri Manish Bharadwaj, IAS, Directorate of Census Operations, Gujarat. The task of Planning, Designing and Co-ordination of this publication was carried out by Dr. Pratibha Kumari, Assistant Registrar General (SS) under the guidance & supervision of Dr. R.C.Sethi, Ex-Addl. RGI and Shri Deepak Rastogi present Addl.RGI. Shri A.P. Singh, Deputy Registrar General, (Map) provided the technical guidance in the preparation of maps. Shri A.K. Arora, Joint Director of Data Processing Division under the overall supervision of Shri M.S.Thapa, Addl. Director (EDP) provided full cooperation in preparation of record structure for digitization and validity checking of Village and Town Directory data and the programme for the generation of Village Directory and Town Directory including various analytical inset tables as well as Primary Census Abstract (PCA). The work of preparation of DCHB, 2011 Census has been monitored in the Social Studies Division. I am thankful to all of them and others who have contributed to bring out this publication in time.

New Delhi. Dated:- 16-06-2014

(C.Chandramouli) Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India

2

P r e f a c e

I am deeply indebted to all the officers of Gujarat Government for their unstained support and cooperation at all stages of Census 2011. I am grateful to Shri A. K. Joti, Chief Secretary of Gujarat State, Shri V. N. Maira, Additional Chief Secretary of General Administration Department (Planning), Shri A. D. Patel, Deputy Secretary for their prompt response, guidance and cooperation to Census Organization. They infused a sense of urgency and seriousness in the minds of officers of the District Administration, which geared up the entire administrative machinery. Cooperation received from Shri J. T. Malvi, Under Secretary and Kum. N. M. Muni, Section Officer of General Administration Department Gujarat state and officials of Directorate of Economics & Statistics are worth mentioning.

District Census Handbook of Gujarat is a joint exercise of the Government of Gujarat and the Census organization of the Government of India. In the preparation of the DCHB, the role played by the census organization is that of census data collection, scanning of collected information, validation, compilation and analysis of data. DCHB Unit of the State Government collected the basic non-census information relating to amenities and infrastructures available in the villages of the district. Apart from bearing the financial cost of this publication, all the officials of different departments of the State Government extended whole hearted co-operation for accomplishing the task. Most of the data supplied by the various departments were cross-checked and an attempt was made to reconcile the discrepancies as well in order to get the final figures.

The District Collector, the District Development Officer, District Statistical Officer, District Information Officer and their staff members extended their warm and whole hearted co-operation for carrying out field work of the census and collection of non-census data for this District Census Handbook.

I am deeply grateful to Dr. C. Chandramauli, I.A.S., the Registrar General and Census Commissioner, India for the benefit I have derived by the way of guidance and advice. I also express my thanks to Shri Deepak Rastogi present Addl.RG, Shri P.K.Banerjee. Deputy Registrar General (C&T), Shri A.P. Singh, Deputy Registrar General, (Map), Dr. Pratibha Kumari, Assistant Registrar General (SS), Shri M.S.Thapa,

3

Addl. Director (EDP), Shri A. K. Arora, Joint Director (EDP) and Shri Mahipal Singh , Assistant Director (SS) for providing technical guidance in finalizing this publication.

Shri Manish Bharadwaj, I.A.S. who held the office of Director of Census Operations, Gujarat had guided the operations of the 2011 Census. The data presented in this handbook were collected and compiled under the direction and guidance of Shri Manish Bharadwaj. However, he was repatriated to the State Government before this volume could be made available for the press.

In state office Shri M. R. Roal, Deputy Director, District Census Handbook Unit, Kum. S. B. Parmar, Research Officer, Smt. K.B. Panchal, Research Assistant of District Census Handbook Unit, and their team of assistants meticulously collected and scrutinized the non-census data from various sources and prepared draft of DCHB etc. with the help of Census section. The other officials of D.C.H.B. Unit, who scrutinized, edited and supervised the work of D.C.H.B. have been mentioned in the “Acknowledgement”.

Of this Directorate I would like to extend my sincere thanks to Shri R. S. Meena, DRG (C&T), who had played major role in Census 2011 of Gujarat. Dr. Bhavesh Mehta, JD (EDP) and his team of devoted workers deserve all praise for timely processing of Household Schedules through Intelligent Character Recognition technology. Smt V.A.Warade, Deputy Director, Shri Ramsingh Meena, Deputy Director and Shri S Lingasamy, Deputy Director who were assisted by Smt. Sanchita Sarkar, Assistant Director and her team of dedicated workers deserve all praise for their perseverance and dedication in preparing the publication. The maps provided in the D.C.H.B. are prepared by the Map Section of the Census Directorate under the supervision of Dr. R. K. Sharma, R.O (Map). I am thankful to all of them.

I am also thankful to all the census staff who provided assistance directly or indirectly in finalizing data at every stage and for final scrutiny of this publication.

S. D. Bhaisare

Joint Director of Census Operations, Gujarat, Gandhinagar

4

31.10.14

Acknowledgements

Drafting and Editing

Shri S. D. Bhaisare

Joint Director

Smt. V. A. Warade

Deputy Director

Shri R.S.Meena

Deputy Director

Smt. Sanchita Sarkar

Assistant Director

Shri M. R. Roal

Deputy Director (State DCHB Unit)

Shri T. J. Munia

Statistical Investigator Grade-I

Kum. S. B. Parmar

Research Officer (State DCHB Unit)

Collection / Compilation / Drafting (DCHB Unit, Gandhinagar, Govt. of Gujarat)

Smt. K.B. Panchal

Smt. S.N. Rathwa

Smt. S.S. Bijalani

Shri O.T.Vaghela

Smt. R.M. Koshti

Shri K.R.Rathod

Smt.M.D. Panchal

Computer Assistant

Research Assistant

Research Assistant

Research Assistant

Research Assistant

Research Assistant

Statistical Assistant

Statistical Assistant

Shri A.K. Doshi

Gujarati Typist

Shri R.K. Joshi

Proof Reader

Shri S.G. Dave

Proof Reader

Collection/Compilation/Drafting (Directorate of Census Operations, Gujarat)

Kum. P. P. Patel Smt. K. J. Khambhata

Statistical Investigator Grade-I Statistical Investigator Grade -I

5

Shri R. M. Jhala Shri Mangesh S. Kumbhare Smt. Kinjal Darji Shri Deepak Choudhury Smt. Neelima Chourasiya Shri J. R. Pateriya Smt. R. C. Patel Smt. A. P. Bhavsar Shri K. B. Hathi

Statistical Investigator Grade -I Statistical Investigator Grade -I Statistical Investigator Grade -I Statistical Investigator Grade -I Statistical Investigator Grade -I Statistical Investigator Grade -II Statistical Investigator Grade -II Statistical Investigator Grade -II Senior Compiler

Mapping Dr. R. K. Sharma Shri Ch. Rajeev Shri R.K.Joshi Shri A.A.Saiyad

R. O. (Map) Sr. Geographer Sr.Draftsman Sr.Draftsman

Shri J.K.Brahmbhatt

Sr.Draftsman

Computer Assistance Shri R. R. Parmar

Operator Gr.’B’

Shri C. D. Patel

Operator Gr.’B’

Shri Himadri Modak

Compiler

Pre-Scanning Shri B. R. Dagala Shri R. N. Shah Shri Pravin Bhagat Shri K. S. Meena

Statistical Investigator Grade -I Statistical Investigator Grade -II Statistical Investigator Grade -II Senior Compiler

6

List of Nodal Officers for Phase I (Houselisting Operations and National Population Register).

Sr. No.

Name of Nodal Officer

District/M.Corp

01

Sh A B Datania, S.I.Gr.II

Kachchh

02

Sh R G Yadav, S I Gr II

Kachchh

03

Sh V B Parmar, S I Gr. II

Banas Kantha

04

Sh Pravin Bhagat, S I Gr II

Banas Kantha

05

Sh P M Vaghela, S I Gr II

Patan

06

Sh K B Hathi, Sr. Compiler

Mahesana

07

Smt B D Wadvala, S I Gr II

Sabar Kantha

08

Sh R N Shah, S I Gr II

Sabar Kantha

09

Smt. Neelima Chourasiya, S I Gr I

Gandhinagar

10

Sh J R Pateria, S I Gr II

Ahmadabad

11

Smt R C Patel, S I Gr II

Ahmadabad

12

Sh R K Joshi, Sr. Geographer

Ahmadabad

13

Sh R M Jhala, S I Gr.I

Surendranagar

14

Sh G L Solanki, S I Gr.I

Rajkot

15

Sh K L Bhatt, S I Gr.II

Rajkot

16

Sh H U Rathod, Sr. Compiler

Jamnagar

17

Sh M P Gajera, Compiler

Jamnagar

18

Sh A H Momin, S I Gr.II

Porbandar

19

Sh D J Rajpal, S I Gr.I

Junagadh

20

Sh Deepak Kumar, Compiler

Junagadh

21

Sh K R Dabhi, S I Gr.I

Amreli

22

Sh L K Meena, Sr. Compiler

Amreli

23

Sh G C Panchal, S I Gr.I

Bhavnagar

24

Sh Rajeev Kumar Jha, Compiler

Bhavnagar

25

Sh L V Kanade, Sr. Supervisor

Anand

7

26

Smt N D Mehta, Sr. Compiler

Anand

27

Smt G P Babu, S I Gr.I

Kheda

28

Sh Deepak Choudhury, S I Gr I

Kheda

29

Sh R C Joshi, S I Gr II

Panch Mahals

30

Sh K S Meena, Sr. Compiler

Panch Mahals

31

Sh B M Vaghela, Sr. Compiler

Dohad

32

Sh B R Dagla, S I Gr. I

Vadodara

33

Ku. N B Patel, S I Gr. II

Vadodara

34

Sh A K Parmar, S I Gr.II

Narmada

35

Ku P M Naik, S I Gr.I

Bharuch

36

Sh M D Bhagora, S I Gr.I

Bharuch

37

Sh M K Meena, Sr. Compiler

The Dang

38

Sh R U Rathod, Sr. Supervisor

Navsari

39

Sh M H Bhatt, S I Gr.II

Valsad

40

Sh U S Shah, S I Gr.II

Surat

41

Sh Kapil Kumar Pandey, S I Gr.II

Surat

42

Sh R D Shrimali, S I Gr. II

Tapi

List of Nodal Officers for Phase II (Population Enumeration)

Sr. No.

Name of Nodal Officer

District

01

Sh K B Hathi, Sr. Compiler

Kachchh

02

Sh V B Parmar, S I Gr II

Banas Kantha

03

Sh K L Bhatt, S I Gr.II

Patan

04

Smt G P Babu, S I Gr.I

Mahesana

05

Sh A B Datania, S I Gr.II

Sabar Kantha

06

Sh P M Vaghela, S I Gr.I

Gandhinagar

07

Sh P L Solanki, S I Gr.I

Ahmedabad

08

Sh U S Shah, S I Gr.II

Ahmedabad M. Corp

09

Sh R K Joshi, Draftsman

Surendranagar

8

10

Sh Kapil Kumar Pandey, S I Gr II

Rajkot

11

Sh K B Bhavsar, S I Gr.II

Rajkot M. Corp

12

Sh Deepak Kumar, Compiler

Jamnagar

13

Sh R N Shah, S I Gr.II

Jamnagar M.Corp

14

Sh R D Shrimali, S I Gr. II

Porbandar

15

Sh R C Joshi, S I Gr.II

Junagadh

16

Sh A K Parmar, S I Gr.II

Junagadh M.Corp

17

Sh A H Momin, S I Gr.II

Amreli

18

Sh K R Dabhi, S I Gr.I

Bhavnagar

19

Sh R M Jhala, S I Gr.I

Bhavnagar M. Corp

20

Smt B D Wadwala, S I Gr.II

Anand

21

Sh M K Meena, Sr.Compiler

Kheda

22

Sh Rajeev Jha, Compiler

Panch Mahals

23

Sh Pravin Bhagat, S I Gr.II

Dahod

24

Sh Deepak Choudhury, S I Gr I

Vadodara

25

Sh J R Pateria, S.I.Gr.II

Vadodara M. Corp

26

Sh Manoj Bhagora, S I Gr. I

Narmada

27

Sh H U Rathod, S I Gr. II

Bharuch

28

Sh R G Yadav, S I Gr.II

The Dangs

29

Sh Manoj Gajera, Compiler

Navsari

30

Sh G P Meena, Compiler

Valsad

31

Sh J K Brahmbhatt, Draftsman

Surat

32

Sh C H Rajiv, Sr. Geographer

Surat M.Corp

33

Sh M H Bhatt, S I Gr II

Tapi

9

ORGI- Data Processing Division

01

Shri Jaspal Singh Lamba

DD(EDP)

02

Ms. Usha

AD(EDP)

03

Shri Anurag Gupta

DPA Grade ‘A’

04

Shri Mukesh Kumar Mahawar

DPA Grade ‘A’

05

Ms. Shaghufta Nasreen Bhat

DPA Grade ‘A’

06

Shri Khem Verma Jadon

Sr. Consultant

07

Shri Yashwant Singh

Sr. Consultant

08

Ms. Archana Khare

Jr. Consultant

10

HISTORY AND SCOPE OF THE DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK

The need of data at the grass root level for the administrative and planning purposes at sub micro level as well as academic studies prompted the innovation of District Census Handbook. District Census Handbook is a unique publication from the Census organization which provides most authentic details of census and non-census information from village and town level to district level. The District Census Handbook was firstly introduced during the 1951 Census. It contains both census and non census data of urban as well as rural areas for each district. The census data contain several demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the lowest administrative unit i.e. of each village and town and ward of the district. The non census data comprise of data on availability of various civic amenities and infrastructural facilities etc. at the town and village level which constitute Village Directory and Town Directory part of the DCHB. The data of DCHB are of considerable importance in the context of planning and development at grass-root level.

In1961 census DCHB provided a descriptive account of the district, administrative statistics, census tables and village and town directory including Primary Census Abstract. This pattern was changed in 1971 Census and the DCHB was published in three parts: Part-A related to village and town directory, Part-B to village and town PCA and Part-C comprised analytical report, administrative statistics, district census tables and certain analytical tables based on PCA and amenity data in respect of villages.The 1981 census DCHB was published in two parts: Part-A contained village and town directory and Part-B the PCA of village and town including the SCs and STs PCA up to tahsil/town levels. New features along with restructuring of the formats of village and town directory were added into it. In Village Directory, all amenities except electricity were brought together and if any amenity was not available in the referent village, the distance in broad ranges from the nearest place having such an amenity, was given.

The pattern of 1981 census was followed by and large for the DCHB of 1991 Census except the format of PCA. It was restructured. Nine-fold industrial classification of main workers was given against the four-fold industrial classification presented in the 1981 census. In addition, sex wise population in 0-6 age group was included in the PCA for the first time with a view to enable the data users to compile more realistic literacy rate as all children below 7 years of age had been treated as illiterate at the time of 1991 census. One of the important innovations in the 1991 census was the Community Development Block (CD Block) level presentation of village directory and PCA data instead of the traditional tahsil/taluk/PS level presentation.

11

As regards DCHB of 2001 Census,the scope of Village Directory was improved by including some other amenities like banking, recreational and cultural facilities, news papers & magazines and `most important commodity’ manufactured in a village in addition to prescribed facilities of earlier censuses. In Town Directory, the statement on Slums was modified and its coverage was enlarged by including details on all slums instead of ‘notified slums’.

The scope and coverage of Village Directory of 2011 DCHB hasbeen widenedby including a number of new amenities in addition to those of 2001. In the Town Directory, seven Statements containing the details and the data of each town have been presentedviz.;(i)-Status and Growth History of towns,(ii)-Physical Aspects and Location of Towns,(iii)-Civic and other Amenities,(iv)-Medical Facilities,(v)-Educational, Recreational & Cultural Facilities,(vi)-Industry & Banking, and (vii)-Civic & other amenities in Slums respectively.CD Block wise data of Village Directory and Village PCA have been presented in DCHB of 2011 census as presented in earlier census.The data of DCHB 2011Census have been presented in two parts, Part-Acontains Village and Town Directory and Part-B contains Village and Town wise Primary Census Abstract. Both the Parts have been published in separate volumes in 2011 Census.

--------------------------------------------------------

12

Brief History of the District

Kachchh is an ancient land possessed of great antiquity which takes its name from its geographical characteristics and topographical features resembling a tortoise (Kachchh), the name by which it has been referred to in the ancient literature, has been defined by Mallinath as a marshy region or waste land in Sanjivani his commentary on Amarkosh. By this name it has been referred to in the Puranas, in the various notes on this region by foreign travellers that visited this country in olden times, as also in stone inscriptions and copper plates and in old writings and manuscripts. Prior to the dawn of Christian era, the region lying between Sindh and Saurashtra has been described as Abhir by which name it has also been referred to in the Mahabharat. A Greek traveller and Military Commander also named this region as Abiria or Abir corrupted from its original name of Abhir during the second century before the Christ. Till the 3rd and 4th Century A.D. and even thereafter, it came to be referred to by both the names Kachchh as well as Abhir. First known as Abhir from its original inhabitants, the Abirs who resided in this area, it later on came to be known as Kachchh because of its unique geographical location surrounded by water and waste land.

The administrative background of Kachchh appears to be chequered. This domain has been settled by various races and tribes that came from the north and east since ancient times. During the period of known history it has from time to time come under the sway of various dynasties that exercised its authority over Sindh and Gujarat. It once formed part of the Mauryan Empire and then came under the authority of Sakas, Kshtrapas, Guptas, Haihayas and was later ruled over by the Maitrakas, Gurjars, Chalukyas, Chavdas, Solanki, Kathis and other Gujarat kings. Kachchh has thus been closely interlinked with Gujarat, the course of whose history has greatly influenced this region.

The history of Kachchh may be roughly divided into two periods, ancient and modern; before and after the Samma of Jadeja conquest about the

13

beginning of the 14th century. Or it was the conquest of Kachchh by the Sindh tribes of Samma Rajputs that marked the emergence of Kachchh as a separate kingdom in the 14th century. In old Hindu writings the country is under the name of Kachchh of coast land, spoken of as a desert. Early notice of Kachchh are found in the Greek literature. In 142-124 B.C. Kachchh was part of Menander’s kingdom which stretched from the Jamma to Saurashtra. Soon after this (120 B.C.) the Gracco-Baktrian Empire was over-thrown and Saythian, known to the Indians as Saka established themselves in Kachchh and other parts of north Gujarat. Defeated by Vikramaditya about 56 B.C. they came back between 20 and 30 years later and under Yeukaotschin founded a dynasty which in turn was, in the first century of the Christian era, overthrown Parthians whose power stretched from Sindh to as far south as Bharuch. In the first century after Christ, Pliny’s (77 A.D.) Odambaris are generally taken to have been the people of Kachchh and Ptolemy’s (150 A.D.) town of Orbadari to the east of the Indus to have been their headquarters. The next mention of Kachchh is that early in the eighth Century (about 714) on the death of Pramar of Telegu, Kachchh was given to the Charans. At this time the other chief tribe of Kachchh would seen to have been the Chavdas in east. During this time the Arabs, beginning with raids on the Kathiawar and Gujarat coasts, had completed the conquest of Sindh. In the ninth century they had made settlements on the Kachchh coasts. Al-Biruni (970-1039) speaks of Kachchh by its present name and notice that one branch of the Indus flows into the Sindh Sagar on the borders of Kachchh. Early in the eleventh century (1023), Bhimdev I (1022-1072) of Anhilwada fled before Mohmud of Ghazni to Kanthkot. About the close of the century the province was, as far as Manikbai, overrun by Singhar, the fourth Sumra prince of Sindh.

The modern history of Kachchh may be said to date from its conquest by the Sindh tribes of Samma Rajputs. This took place or at least was completed during the fourteenth century. Early in the fifteenth century (1410) Muzafar Shah (1390-1411) the founder of the Ahmadabad dynasty defeated the chief of

14

Kanthkot. In spite of this defeat, though nominally subject to Ahmadabad, Kachchh remained independent till 1472. In the beginning of the sixteenth century, the Kachchh chief would seem to have been on no friendly terms with the Arghun dynasty (1519-1543), the over throwers of the Tatta Sammas. According to the Sindh historians on the occassion, about 1530, Shah Hussain (1522-1544) entered Kachchh and inflicted on the Rao a severe defeat. At this time the representative of the three branches of the Jadeja family were Jam Dadarji, Jam Hamirji and Jam Raval. During the time of the Mogul Emperor

Jahangir, Bharmal went to Ahmadabad to pay his respects and made nazar. Jahangir was much pleased with him, gave presents in return and freed Kachchh from tribute on the condition of giving pilgrims a passage to Mecca. In 1741, Lakhaji Rao placed his father in confinement and assumed the ruler of Kachchh Rao Desalji continued to rule till 1860. For some years there was an unfortunate quarrel between Rao Desalji and his eldest son. But before the end of his life, friendly relations were established. In 1859 as he had for some time been suffering serious ilness, the Rao prayed Government to appoint a regency to relieve him from the burden of State affairs. His wish was granted, and on the 12 th July, under the Political Agent as president, the Rao chose the heir apparent, the minister, and two Jadeja chiefs, as members of the Regency. On

21 st June of the next year, at the Rao’s urgent request, the Regency was

dissolved and the management of the State handed over to heir apparent, Rao Pragmalji II who ruled from 1860 to 1875. Pragmalji was succeeded by Rao Khengar III who at the time of installation was only ten years of age and managed the State affairs, under the supervision of the Political Agent. The dynasty lasted till Independence.

The present district of Kachchh is formed of the former native State of Kachchh and 10 enclave villages of the former native State of Morvi. After 1947, it was a part ‘C’ State administered by the Government of India through the Chief Commissioner.

15

In November 1956, the States were reorganized and the bigger bilingual State of Bombay was formed with Vidarbha, Marathawada, Saurashtra and Kachchh regions and Kachchh district became a part of the bilingual State. Lastly, the Bombay State was bifurcated on 1 st May 1960 and separate States of Gujarat and Maharashtra were formed since that date, the Kachchh district became a part of the newly formed Gujarat State.

The district of Kachchh attracted pointed attention after Independence on account of the border dispute between India and Pakistan regarding the Sovereignty over certain parts of the Kachchh district. India and Pakistan Governments decided to refer the boundary dispute to an Impartial Tribunal. On 30 th June 1965 they also agreed that decision of the tribunal would be binding on both of them and would not be questioned on any ground whatsoever. A tribunal was constituted with headquarters at Geneva. The Tribunal heard arguments of both sides, examined the documents, maps etc. put forth by both the sides and gave an award on 19 th February 1968 which is embodied in the Award of the Indo Pakistan Western Boundary Case Tribunal. Accordingly, the work of the demarcation of the boundary by erecting pillars on the ground was undertaken in 1968 and was completed in June 1969.

16

Administrative Set-up

With a view to run the administration of the State smoothly, it has been divided into Districts, which in turn have been further sub-divided into Talukas (Tahsils). In the State of Gujarat, the community development blocks are co-terminus with the Talukas. The Talukas contain large number of villages and possibly several towns. The villages have Village Panchayats to run the local administration. A Village Panchayat may constitute of one revenue village, several revenue villages or a part of a large village. Similarly, the towns have Municipality or Municipal Corporation as the seat of local self-government.

In the State of Gujarat, as on December 2009 there were 26 districts and 225 Talukas, against 25 districts and 226 Talukas in 2001 Census. Alike 2001, in 2011 also, there are 10 talukas in the Kachchh district.

The District Collector looks after the general administration, maintenance of collection of land revenue and settlement of law related disputes, civil supplies, district planning, mid-day meal scheme etc. at the district level. The functions of administration of law and order and control and investigation of crime are done by the Superintendent of Police of the district with the help of Police Stations working under him. At the Taluka level, Mamlatdar looks after the land development, revenue collection and law and order. For the purpose of maintaining law and order there are 26 police stations, 6 police chowkies and 52 outpost, as per statement below.

 

Police Station in the District

 

Sl. No.

Particulars

2008

2009

1

2

3

4

1

Police Station

25

26

2

Police Chowky

06

06

3

Out Post

56

52

Source: Director General of Police, Gandhinagar, 2010

 

17

During the period 2008 to 2009 police chowkies were increased and out-posts and police stations were decreased.

The Panchayati Raj institutions are fairly strong and most of the development works have been transferred to the District Panchayats and its subordinate bodies. The District Panchayat has an elected President and District Development Officer appointed by the Government, works as its Secretary, who looks after day-to-day work related to the development. Similarly, at the Taluka level, Taluka Panchayats have been constituted which have an elected President. The Taluka Development Officer, placed by the Government as Secretary of the Taluka Panchayats and he conducts the regular administrative work. Like-wise, an elected President heads the Municipality and the Chief Officer works as the Secretary of the Municipality, who looks after the dayto- day work. In case of the large cities, the State Government has constituted Municipal Corporations, which are headed by an elected Mayor and the Municipal Commissioner, appointed by the Government, looks after the routine work. At the Village level, the Sarpanch is the elected Chief and the Talati (Village Mantri) works as the Secretary to the Village Panchayat and looks after the day-to- day work. In view of the expanding role of the public administration in a state like Gujarat, the Government has taken-up many activities and has set up several offices. Such offices which came into the existence are as under:

(1)

Education (Primary and Higher Education)

(2)

Agricultural and Research

(3)

Animal Husbandry and Poultry

(4)

Forest and Environment

18

(5)

Roads and Buildings, Bridges

(6)

Co-operation and Co-operative Societies

(7)

Industries, Small and Large as well as Cottage

(8)

Health and Medical Services, Medical Education and Research, Family Welfare and Nutrition

(9)

Information Department

(10)

Irrigation, Minor and Major

(11)

Social Welfare and Social Defence

The functions of above offices are managed and controlled by concerned Head of Departments and in some cases also by District and Taluka Panchayats. The task of providing primary education in rural areas has been entrusted to District Panchayats and functions relating to Government of providing primary education are assigned by District Development Office and are controlled by the District Primary Education Officer. The secondary education is looked after by District Education Officer of Education Department. Primary education as well as higher secondary education of all types of institutions is governed by District Education Officer.

Agriculture activities have been delegated to District Panchayat to a large extent and District Agriculture Officer is in-charge of looking after agricultural produce including crops and vegetables. Similarly Animal Husbandry is also a Panchayat activity and routine work is controlled by the Deputy Director (Animal Husbandry) who sits in District Panchayat taking care of animals and poultry farms. Besides, District Agriculture Office in Panchayat Offices such as Deputy Director (Agriculture) and

19

other officials look after various aspects of agriculture for developing the sector as well as to extend necessary assistance to farmers at district level.

Besides Director, Animal Husbandry Officer of Panchayat offices such as Deputy Director (Animal Husbandry) Special Officers at Veterinary Offices etc. in state government animal husbandry department also monitor activities of the sector at district level.

Public Health in rural area is assigned to the District Panchayat under the Chief District Health Officer who looks after epidemics, malaria control, water borne diseases and district level administration of Public Health Centres. District and Talukas Hospitals and Referral Hospitals are being looked after by the District Civil Surgeon of medical services in the State, while Medical Colleges and Research activities attached with the respective Civil Hospitals are controlled by Medical Education and Research Wing.

Family welfare activities are also monitored by the District Health Officer. Chief District Health Officer is also functioning as District Registrar of Birth and Death of the district and Talati cum Mantri is also Registrar of Death and Birth for the respective villages. Anaemic mothers and children upto to the age of 14 are looked after by Nutrition Officer under the Nutrition Programme.

District Ayurvedic Officer looks after the Ayurvedic dispensaries and hospitals. They also take care of the Ayurvedic plants and medicines and gardens. The District Food and Drugs Officer generally looks after the quality of the food and drugs in the district. Labourers and workers who are working in registered units are covered under the Employees State Insurance Scheme.

20

The rural roads have been transferred to the District Panchayats and their maintenance is done by the Executive Engineer, Roads and Buildings Department. Minor irrigation works are transferred to the District Panchayat and Executive Engineer (Panchayat) of the Panchayat’s irrigation office looks after water harvesting and check dams.

The Roads and Buildings Department of State Government looks after the maintenance of roads, buildings, bridges and government multi- storey buildings etc. Besides Panchayat officials, major district roads and the state highways are looked after by the Executive Engineer (Roads & Buildings). The large multi-purpose irrigation projects are controlled by State Government directly through its Executive Engineers.

District Industry Centre is functioning to develop the small and village industries, handloom industries and the scope of industrial growth in the district. Besides, other departments are working for the rights of the industrial workers and rural labourers engaged in agriculture and others sectors.

Social welfare activities relating to the Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes, Other Backward Castes and Other Backward Communities in the District are organized by the District Welfare Officer. Generally the schemes under Tribal Area Sub Plan and Special Component Plan are organized by the District Welfare Officer.

In each District Panchayat, District Statistical Officer of Directorate of Economics and Statistics looks after co-ordination of different development programmes. He is also Member-Secretary of District Planning Board. Similarly in every Collector Office, District Planning Officer looks after development work of various Government (State & Centre) sponsored programmes.

21

Co-operative Societies i.e. Co-operative Milk Societies, Agricultural

Produce Market Societies, Cooperative banking and other co-operative

societies are controlled by the District Registrar, Co-operative Societies.

As per 2011 census 6 new CT towns were included and none of the

existing towns was declassified.

The taluka wise break up of towns and villages in the district are

shown as following.

 

Taluka wise Number of Towns and Villages

 

Name of

No. of

No. of Villages

Sl. No.

Taluka

Towns

Total

Inhabited

1

2

3

4

5

1

Lakhpat

-

100

86

2

Rapar

1

97

97

3

Bhachau

1

70

69

4

Anjar

1

68

66

5

Bhuj

5

159

149

6

Nakhtrana

-

132

120

7

Abdasa

-

136

133

8

Mandvi

1

94

92

9

Mundra

1

62

59

10

Gandhidham

4

6

6

 

Total:

14

924

877

Taluka wise list of newly added towns is as follows:

 

Taluka wise of New Census Towns added

 
 

Name of

No. of Census Town

   

Sl. No.

Taluka

L.C. 2001

L.C. 2011

1

2

3

4

5

1

Bhuj

Madhapar(OG)

-

506920

2

Bhuj

Mirjhpar (part)

00045000

506921

3

Bhuj

Sukhpar

00045100

506922

4

Bhuj

Mankuva

00045200

506923

22

5

Gandhidham

Galpadar

00094600

507356

6

Gandhidham

Antarjal

00094700

507357

Note:- Madhapar & Mirjhpar were OG in Census 2001

The civic status of the 14 towns is as under:

Municipality :

6

Census Towns :

8

Total :

14

Amrapar village has been bifercated into two villages Amrapar-1 & Amrapar-2 in January 2010.Pragpar village has been bifercated into two villages Pragpar-1 & Pragpar-2 the area of Pragpar-2 has been included in Pragpar-1. Pratappar village has been bifercated into two villages Pratappar-1 & Pratappar-2 , the area of Pratappar-2 has been included in Pratappar-1 in January 2010. Taluka wise list of new added villages

Sl.

Name of

Name of the village from which new village created

Name of New Village

 

No.

Taluka

L.C. No. 2011

1

2

3

4

5

1

Anjar

Amrapar

Amrapar 1

506696

2

Anjar

Amrapar

Amrapar 2

Uninhabited

3

Mundra

Pragpar

Pragpar-1

507329

4

Mundra

Pragpar

Pragpar-2

507330

5

Mundra

Pratappar

Pratappar-1

507341

6

Mundra

Pratappar

Pratappar-2

Uninhabited

23

District Highlights 2011 Census

Kachchh district has 10 sub-district and 877 inhabited villages and 47 uninhabited villages.

Area & Density :

1. Kachchh covers 23.27% of total area of Gujarat State.

2. Kachchh has the lowest density (Population per sq. km) of 46 in the state.

3. Kachchh district has the longest coast line of about 406 km.

Population :

1. Kachchh district is the 14 th most populated district in the State.

2. In Kachchh district, Sub-district Bhuj has the highest population (443269) whereas sub-district Lakhpat has the lowest (62552).

3. Among villages of Kachchh district, Nakhatrana village of Sub-

district Nakhatrana is the most populated villages with population 17478 and Lahariya nana village of Anjar sub-district has the lowest population of 1. There are 19 villages from different sub- districts of Kachchh having population less than 50.

Sex ratio :

1. Kachchh district has a sex ratio of 908 (no. of females per 1000 males). District has third lowest sex ratio in the State.

2. Among sub-districts, Nakhatrana has the highest sex ratio of 968 and Mundra has the lowest sex ratio of 705.

Child sex ratio :

1. In terms of child sex ratio, Kachchh secure 8 th position with child sex ratio of 921.

2. Sub-district Lakhpat has the highest child sex ratio of 940 and Gandhidham has the least child sex ratio of 902.

24

Literacy :

1. Kachchh district has 70.59% literacy rate and female literacy rate is 60.87%. Kachchh ranks 23 rd both in literacy and female literacy

rate.

2. Sub-district Gandhidham has the highest literacy rate of 77.92% and Rapar has the lowest literacy rate of 54.76 % among all sub- districts of Kachchh.

Economic Activity :

1. After 2001 earthquake, Kachchh district is reincarnated; many new industries are established like cement plant, steel plant, fertilizer, fisheries, plastic & salt industries etc. so economy of the district is basically dependent on industrial workers.

2. Kandla port is the major port of western region so a big junction

for import-export industries.

25

Important Statistics

State

District

Number of Villages

Total

18,225

924

 

Inhabited

17,843

877

 

Uninhabited

382

47

Number of Towns

Statutory

195

6

 

Census

153

8

 

Total

348

14

Number of Households

Normal

12,193,328

443,777

 

Institutional

18,175

1,200

 

Houseless

36,925

695

Population

Total

Persons

60,439,692

2,092,371

 

Males

31,491,260

1,096,737

 

Females

28,948,432

995,634

 

Rural

Persons

34,694,609

1,363,836

 

Males

17,799,159

713,524

 

Females

16,895,450

650,312

 

Urban

Persons

25,745,083

728,535

 

Males

13,692,101

383,213

 

Females

12,052,982

345,322

Percentage Urban Population

 

42.6

34.82

Decadal Population Growth

 

2001-2011

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

 

Persons

9,768,675

19.28

509,146

32.16

 

Males

5,105,683

19.35

281,585

34.54

 

Females

4,662,992

19.20

227,561

29.63

Area (in sq Km.)

196244

45674.00

Density of Population (Persons per sq Km.)

 

308

46

Sex Ratio

Total

919

908

(Number of females per 1000 males)

Rural

949

911

 

Urban

880

901

26

Important Statistics

State

District

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Literates

Persons

41,093,358

78.03

1,252,319

70.59

 

Males

23,474,873

85.75

739,239

79.40

 

Females

17,618,485

69.68

513,080

60.87

Scheduled Castes

Persons

4,074,447

6.74

258,859

12.37

 

Males

2,110,331

6.7

133,224

12.15

 

Females

1,964,116

6.78

125,635

12.62

Scheduled Tribes

Persons

8,917,174

14.75

24,228

1.16

 

Males

4,501,389

14.29

12,825

1.17

 

Females

4,415,785

15.25

11,403

1.15

Workers and Non-Workers

 
 

Total Workers (Main and Marginal)

Persons

24,767,747

40.98

776,228

37.10

Males

18,000,914

57.16

624,704

56.96

 

Females

6,766,833

23.38

151,524

15.22

(i)

Main Workers

Persons

20,365,374

33.7

686,937

32.83

 

Males

16,567,695

52.61

591,369

53.92

 

Females

3,797,679

13.12

95,568

9.60

(ii) Marginal Workers

Persons

4,402,373

7.28

89,291

4.27

 

Males

1,433,219

4.55

33,335

3.04

 

Females

2,969,154

10.26

55,956

5.62

Non-Workers

Persons

35,671,945

59.02

1,316,143

62.90

 

Males

13,490,346

42.84

472,033

43.04

 

Females

22,181,599

76.62

844,110

84.78

Category of Workers (Main & Marginal)

 

(i)

Cultivators

Persons

5,447,500

21.99

105,876

13.64

 

Males

4,244,449

23.58

90,368

14.47

 

Females

1,203,051

17.78

15,508

10.23

(ii)Agricultural Labourers

Persons

6,839,415

27.61

183,971

23.70

 

Males

3,649,591

20.27

115,882

18.55

 

Females

3,189,824

47.14

68,089

44.94

(iii)Workers in household industry

Persons

343,999

1.39

10,802

1.39

Males

210,561

1.17

6,056

0.97

 

Females

133,438

1.97

4,746

3.13

(iv) Other Workers

Persons

12,136,833

49

475,579

61.27

 

Males

9,896,313

54.98

412,398

66.01

 

Females

2,240,520

33.11

63,181

41.70

27

Section - I

Primary Census Abstract (PCA)

Brief Note on Primary Census Abstract

Introduction:

The Indian Census has the reputation of being one of the best in the world. The first Census in India was conducted in the year 1872. This was conducted at different points of time in different parts of the country. In 1881 a Census was taken for the entire country simultaneously. Since then, Census has been conducted every ten years, without a break. Thus, the Census of India 2011 was the fifteenth in this unbroken series since 1872, the seventh after independence and the second census of the third millennium and twenty first century. The census has been uninterruptedly continued despite several adversities like wars, epidemics, natural calamities, political unrest, etc. The Census of India is conducted under the provisions of the Census Act 1948 and the Census Rules, 1990. In Censuses until 1931, a synchronous de- facto method was adopted wherein the Census was conducted throughout the country on a single night. This being a very costly affair and involved the deployment of very large force at one point of time was given up in 1941. Since then the same methodology has been followed in all the Censuses. It is a gigantic operation and considered to be the single largest, complex, peace time administrative exercise in the world. The Census Operation in India is carried out in two distinct but inter connected phases - the House listing and Housing Census followed by the Population Enumeration. During the first phase of Census 2011 i.e., House listing and Housing Census, the buildings, census houses and households were identified and systematically listed in the House Listing and Housing Census Schedule during the period April to September, 2010 in different States/Union Territories. Apart from listing of houses, some useful data on the amenities available to the households was also collected for assessing condition of human settlements, housing deficits etc. Censuses prior to Census 2001 had the system of collecting the information through Individual Slip which was a key schedule for every individual. The information collected through slip was then compiled for a household. Some information was also collected in addition to this for the household. During 2001 Census a comprehensive Household Schedule was adopted replacing the individual slip concept. In 2011 Census also similar household schedule was used for canvassing. The scope of demographic, socio- economic parameters has been widened in every census.

2. Population Enumeration - Census 2011:

The field work of the second phase i.e. Population Enumeration was carried out during February-March, 2011. One of the essential features of Population Enumeration in the second phase was that each person was enumerated and her/his individual particulars were collected at a well-defined point of time.

30

The Census moment and the reference date for the Census of India 2011 was 00:00 hours of 1st March, 2011. The enumeration was conducted from 9th February to 28 th February, 2011 alongwith a revisional round from 1 st March, 2011 to 5 th March, 2011 synchronously all over the country except for few specific areas of the Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand states that remain snowbound in February. In these locations the population enumeration was done from 11 th September, 2010 to 30 th September, 2010 along with a revisional round from 1 st October, 2010 to 5 th October, 2010. The reference date for the census in snow bound non- synchronous areas of these states was 00.00 hours of the first day of October, 2010. In addition to the coverage during House listing & Housing Census, the enumeration of the Houseless population was carried out on the night of 28th February, 2011, as has been the usual practice. For the purpose of Census, certain areas where the access of the civilian enumerators was not permissible due to security reasons termed as ‘Special Charges’ such as the Defence and strictly Military/Para-Military areas, including operational areas were also covered. Such areas were not covered during the House listing & Housing Census. In addition to the defence/para-military areas, Special Charges also included certain factory areas, certain colonies, sensitive areas, scientific establishments, etc. These also formed Special Charges as these were not accessible by the usual census enumerator.

3. Quality Assurance:

A Task Force for Quality Assurance (TFQA) functioned under the chairmanship of the RG & CCI. Experienced officers of the different divisions of the organization i.e. Heads and senior officers of the Census Division, Data Processing Division, Map Division, Demography Division and Social Studies Division comprised the TFQA. The Directors of Census Operations were co- opted as members whenever the TFQA discussed the data for their States/Union territories. The main objective of constituting the TFQA was to subject the data to stringent validation checks and ensure its quality before release as it was expedient to be satisfied itself about the quality of data before putting the same in public domain. The Directors and their senior officers were involved at all levels with respect to the quality and the coverage of their States/UTs. The TFQA intensively scrutinized coverage and content parameters including edit and imputation logic. The most important aspect of the data quality was to ensure complete coverage of all geographical areas especially for the population enumeration phase where the data is disseminated right up to the village level in the rural areas and the ward level in the urban areas. Thus ensuring the complete coverage and correct geographical linkage of each enumeration block was one of the major planks of the quality control, especially for small area population statistics. The content was scrutinized mainly through the process of internal consistency, comparison with similar data in the past and also through validation with likewise data if available, from external sources. Quite often the local knowledge and perception was looked at to understand both the existing and the new emerging trends of population distribution and characteristics. A very comprehensive check and edit mechanism was put in

31

place to objectively examine the preliminary Census 2011 Population Enumeration results and finally clear them for use. The population data was cleared only after the full possible satisfaction of the TFQA. The entire work relating to the data validation and scrutiny was completed by all the States/Union territories under the overall supervision and monitoring of the Census Division of the Office of the Registrar General, India with active cooperation and support of the Social Studies Division, Data Processing Division, Data Dissemination Division and Map Division.

4. Primary Census Abstract:

The Primary Census Abstract which is an important publication of 2011 Census gives basic information on Area, Total Number of Households, Total Population, Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes Population, Population in the age group 0-6, Literates, Main Workers and Marginal Workers classified by thefour broad industrial categories, namely, (i) Cultivators, (ii) Agricultural Labourers, (iii) Household Industry Workers, and (iv) Other Workers and also Non-Workers. The characteristics of the Total Population include Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes, Institutional and Houseless Population and are presented by sex and rural-urban residence.

In 1981 census main workers were presented into four categories. As regards 1991 Census, the nine-fold industrial classification of main workers has been given in the Primary Census Abstract. One of the important features of the Primary Census Abstract of 1991 Census was the presentation of population of the age group 0-6 which is continued in 2001 and 2011 Census. All the children of age 6 years or less have been treated as illiterate even if the child is going to a school and may have picked up reading and writing. This will help the data users in better analysis and understanding of the literacy data as the literacy rate is calculated with 7 years and above population and it is referred as effective literacy rate. In 2001 and 2011 census four categories of main workers have been given in the Primary Census Abstract.

5. Level of Presentation of PCA data in District Census Handbooks:

The format of Primary Census Abstract (PCA) adopted in the DCHB of 2001 Census has been continued for 2011 Census as the data on four categories of works have been presented similar to 2001 census. The Primary Census Abstract data in different PCAs are presented at different levels. The level of presentation of Primary Census Abstracts in DCHB is as under:

1.District Primary Census Abstract -District/C.D. Block/Town.

2. Primary Census Abstract for Scheduled Castes- District/C.D. Block/Town.

3.Primary Census Abstract for Scheduled Tribes -District/C.D. Block/Town.

4. Village Primary Census Abstract -C.D. Block/Village wise.

5. Urban Primary Census Abstract- Town/Ward level.

The PCA Data for villages was presented C.D. Block wise for the first time in 1991 Census. This practice is continued in 2001 and 2011 Census. The

32

term ‘Total Population’ includes the Scheduled Castes, the Scheduled Tribes, the Institutional and the Houseless populations. An appendix to District Primary Census Abstract has also been furnished showing urban enumeration block-wise particulars on Total Population, the Scheduled Castes Population and the Scheduled Tribes Population for each town.

6. Area Figures:

The area figures supplied by local revenue authorities of the district in respect of tahsils, Police Stations and by the local bodies in respect of towns are given in square kilometers. The area figures of the villages supplied by the Tahsildars in acres have been converted and shown in hectares. The area figures of the C.D. Block are the total of the village areas coming under each C.D. Block. The area figures for the district are the same as adopted by the Surveyor General of India to maintain uniformity at the national level.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

33

District Primary Census Abstract (General)

 

DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK : KACHCHH

 

DISTRICT PRIMARY

Location

Total/

Area in

Total population (including institutional and houseless population)

 

code

District/ CD Block/ Town

Rural/

Square

Number of

 

Population in the age-group 0-6

number

Urban

Kilometre

households

Persons

Males

Females

Persons

Males

Females

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

468

Kachchh - District

Total

45,674.00

445,672

2,092,371

1,096,737

995,634

318,412

165,739

152,673

 

Rural

45,381.94

286,001

1,363,836

713,524

650,312

222,543

115,533

107,010

 

Urban

292.06

159,671

728,535

383,213

345,322

95,869

50,206

45,663

0001

Lakhpat

Total

1,944.99

12,155

62,552

32,274

30,278

10,966

5,654

5,312

 

Rural

1,944.99

12,155

62,552

32,274

30,278

10,966

5,654

5,312

 

Urban

0.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0002

Rapar

Total

2,971.84

36,630

188,908

96,677

92,231

35,447

18,337

17,110

 

Rural

2,971.84

36,630

188,908

96,677

92,231

35,447

18,337

17,110

 

Urban

0.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0003

Bhachau

Total

1,892.80

32,746

146,503

76,236

70,267

25,056

13,027

12,029

 

Rural

1,892.80

32,746

146,503

76,236

70,267

25,056

13,027

12,029

 

Urban

0.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0004

Anjar

Total

1,102.09

33,032

148,354

78,229

70,125

23,589

12,343

11,246

 

Rural

1,102.09

33,032

148,354

78,229

70,125

23,589

12,343

11,246

 

Urban

0.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0005

Bhuj

Total

2,442.43

64,496

299,983

152,222

147,761

49,376

25,562

23,814

 

Rural

2,372.51

48,568

229,755

116,990

112,765

40,492

20,961

19,531

 

Urban

69.92

15,928

70,228

35,232

34,996

8,884

4,601

4,283

802445

Bhuj (Haripar) (OG) WARD NO.-0015 (Rural MDDS

Urban

NA

1,252

5,548

2,899

2,649

688

380

308

CODE:506924)

506920

Madhapar (CT)

Urban

28.43

7,630

32,293

16,276

16,017

3,818

1,963

1,855

506921

Mirjhapar (CT)

Urban

11.17

1,565

7,109

3,626

3,483

987

516

471

506922

Sukhpar (CT)

Urban

10.76

3,005

13,303

6,442

6,861

1,801

919

882

506923

Mankuva (CT)

Urban

19.56

2,476

11,975

5,989

5,986

1,590

823

767

0006

Nakhatrana

Total

1,984.67

28,608

146,367

74,380

71,987

21,786

11,337

10,449

 

Rural

1,984.67

28,608

146,367

74,380

71,987

21,786

11,337

10,449

 

Urban

0.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0007

Abdasa

Total

2,398.26

24,070

117,538

61,387

56,151

18,602

9,737

8,865

 

Rural

2,398.26

24,070

117,538

61,387

56,151

18,602

9,737

8,865

 

Urban

0.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0008

Mandvi

Total

1,391.29

31,508

151,997

77,908

74,089

21,075

10,917

10,158

 

Rural

1,391.29

31,508

151,997

77,908

74,089

21,075

10,917

10,158

 

Urban

0.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0009

Mundra

Total

888.15

35,192

153,219

89,871

63,348

21,623

11,206

10,417

 

Rural

867.40

30,454

132,881

78,986

53,895

18,776

9,704

9,072

 

Urban

20.75

4,738

20,338

10,885

9,453

2,847

1,502

1,345

507349

Mundra (CT)

Urban

20.75

4,738

20,338

10,885

9,453

2,847

1,502

1,345

0010

Gandhidham

Total

144.82

16,882

79,174

42,859

36,315

12,776

6,800

5,976

 

Rural

124.41

8,230

38,981

20,457

18,524

6,754

3,516

3,238

 

Urban

20.41

8,652

40,193

22,402

17,791

6,022

3,284

2,738

507356

Galpadar (CT)

Urban

7.80

2,652

13,155

7,483

5,672

1,875

1,011

864

507357

Antarjal (CT)

Urban

9.64

2,426

11,256

5,891

5,365

1,725

950

775

507358

Kandla (CT)

Urban

2.97

3,574

15,782

9,028

6,754

2,422

1,323

1,099

 

URBAN

802442

Rapar (M)

Urban

51.83

5,739

28,407

14,388

14,019

4,627

2,419

2,208

802443

Bhachau (M)

Urban

27.08

8,647

39,532

21,661

17,871

6,236

3,270

2,966

802444

Anjar (M)

Urban

17.81

18,906

87,183

45,172

42,011

11,723

6,089

5,634

802445

Bhuj (M + OG)

Urban

39.79

33,402

148,834

78,813

70,021

17,280

9,089

8,191

506920

Madhapar (CT)

Urban

28.43

7,630

32,293

16,276

16,017

3,818

1,963

1,855

506921

Mirjhapar (CT)

Urban

11.17

1,565

7,109

3,626

3,483

987

516

471

506922

Sukhpar (CT)

Urban

10.76

3,005

13,303

6,442

6,861

1,801

919

882

506923

Mankuva (CT)

Urban

19.56

2,476

11,975

5,989

5,986

1,590

823

767

802446

Mandvi (M)

Urban

14.89

10,346

51,376

26,075

25,301

6,181

3,197

2,984

507349

Mundra (CT)

Urban

20.75

4,738

20,338

10,885

9,453

2,847

1,502

1,345

802447

Gandhidham (M)

Urban

29.58

54,565

247,992

131,484

116,508

32,757

17,135

15,622

36

PRIMARY CENSUS ABSTRACT

 

CENSUS ABSTRACT

 
 

Total/

Scheduled Castes population

Scheduled Tribes population

 

Literates

Rural/

District/ CD Block/ Town

Persons

Males

Females

Persons

Males

Females

Persons

Males

Females

Urban

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

3

2

258,859

133,224

125,635

24,228

12,825

11,403

1,252,319

739,239

513,080

Total

Kachchh - District

170,304

87,247

83,057

14,287

7,629

6,658

740,922

449,185

291,737

Rural

88,555

45,977

42,578

9,941

5,196

4,745

511,397

290,054

221,343

Urban

6,379

3,305

3,074

508

260

248

32,029

19,324

12,705

Total

Lakhpat

6,379

3,305

3,074

508

260

248

32,029

19,324

12,705

Rural

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Urban

21,005

10,834

10,171

417

228

189

80,891

51,229

29,662

Total

Rapar

21,005

10,834

10,171

417

228

189

80,891

51,229

29,662

Rural

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Urban

14,434

7,464

6,970

1,601

836

765

69,053

43,437

25,616

Total

Bhachau