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General teaching tips for Kid’s Box posters

The posters for Kid’s Box are designed to be a stimulating visual complement to each unit of the course, covering both the unit vocabulary and grammar. Please refer to each unit in the poster teaching tips for specific suggestions. Below are some ideas that can be used with all the posters:

• As the poster will be a constant visual reminder of the unit language, use it as a quick warmer, or at the end of class to reinforce the target grammar or vocabulary.

• Use the additional images on the posters to extend pupils’ vocabulary and grammar. Label these with sticky notes.

• Encourage pupils to play the teacher role in any of the activities you do with the posters.

• Play the unit songs and chants as you point to the corresponding images on the posters.

• Exploit the topic in the poster to open up a class discussion. Encourage pupils to point to images on the poster to illustrate their ideas.

• Use recurring characters to revise vocabulary and grammar from earlier units.

• Encourage pupils to create imaginary dialogues between the characters in the posters.

• Nominate one of the characters the ‘expert’ and ask pupils to think of five questions to ask him/her, e.g. the time travelling scientist from Level 5 – What food did they eat in Medieval times?

• Give pupils ten seconds to look at the written words on the poster, and then cover the words with sticky notes. Ask pupils to remember the correct spellings and write them down. Remove the sticky notes to reveal the words as pupils check their work.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

• Cover parts of the poster with pieces of paper. Divide pupils into teams and ask them to remember and describe the covered pictures. Award points to those who remember the most.

• Turn the poster round, and play a memory game. Ask pupils what they can remember about the poster. They can also try and reproduce the poster in a drawing, which they then label. Display their pictures on the classroom walls.

• Cover the vocabulary words on the poster. Call out things from the poster and ask pupils to run up (if appropriate) and touch the corresponding image on the poster.

• Ask pupils to work in teams to create a static reproduction of the poster. Suggest that one pupil in each team ‘directs’ the others.

• Invent a story using the characters and vocabulary from the poster. Before telling the story, give pupils a ‘secret’ word. This should be one of the key vocabulary words from the unit. Every time pupils hear this word in the story, they clap their hands. The first pupil to clap wins a point.

• Encourage pupils to make their own posters. This could be used as a revision tool before end of year exams.

Kid’s Box Starter poster teaching tips

1

Hello!

Point to the number balloons on the poster and call out the number on each. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Count the number of candles on each cake starting at 1. Encourage pupils to join in.

Point to two cakes and help pupils to work out the total number of candles, e.g. if you point to 2 and 4, the answer is 6. Remember pupils have only learnt the numbers from 1 to 6.

Point to one of the balloons. Give a pupil a die and ask him/her to throw it. Pupils take it in turns to throw the die until someone throws the number you had pointed to.

Ask pupils to bring in photos of themselves blowing out the candles on their birthday cake and display them grouped by numbers.

2

My class

Point to the object characters on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Ask pupils to find and count the objects.

Point to one of the pictograms and encourage pupils to do the corresponding actions.

Point to one of the objects and ask, What’s this?

Elicit what is happening in the poster, using actions and gestures to help tell the story: it is night and when there are no children, the objects come to life. The pencil is playing teacher and the objects have to represent the action in the chosen pictogram. One of the bags has lost this round of the game.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

3

My colours

Point to the balloons on the poster and call out the colours. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the items of clothing worn by the animals and elicit the colours.

Count the number of balloons held by each animal.

Ask What’s your favourite colour?

Point to one of the colours. Pupils whose favourite colour it is stand up.

Count to six by adding the number of balloons held by the animals and the number held by the balloon- seller.

Elicit what is happening in the poster, using actions and gestures to help tell the story: at the park, six of the animals have bought balloons and are now floating above the park.

4

My toys

Point to the toys on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Ask pupils the positions of the toys, e.g. Where’s the kite? They point to the kite in the picture.

Name a toy and elicit how many there are.

Elicit what is happening in the poster, using actions and gestures to help tell the story: some children have landed on the moon and met some aliens. They are showing each other and sharing their favourite toys.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of sharing.

Kid’s Box Starter poster teaching tips

5

My house

Point to the rooms on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point out the furniture in the house, e.g. tables, chairs, beds, doors.

Ask pupils to tell you how many seahorses are hiding in each room and where.

Elicit what is happening in the poster, using actions and gestures to help tell the story: in an underwater palace, the different members of the household are busy playing, cooking and one little dolphin is playing hide-and-seek with his pet seahorses.

6

My body

Point to the body parts on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Name a body part and ask pupils to tell you how many there are.

Point to the assistant’s puppet and elicit first the name of what the assistant has used and then the name of the body part that should be there.

Ask pupils to describe their favourite puppet (saying which colours have been used).

Elicit what is happening in the poster, using actions and gestures to help tell the story: a puppeteer is in his workshop putting puppets together. His assistant is less successful.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

7

My animals

Point to the animals on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Name an animal and elicit the number.

Ask pupils to tell you which animals are swimming and which are jumping.

Elicit what is happening in the poster, using actions and gestures to help tell the story: two tigers have gone to the garden pond. One is about to jump into the water, though there is very little space and the duck is about to pull the air out of the lilo.

8

My food

Point to the food items on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit what each animal likes eating, e.g. The elephant likes egg and chips.

Elicit what the penguin doesn’t like. The penguin doesn’t like fruit.

Ask the pupils if they like the food, e.g. Do you like milk?

Elicit what is happening in the poster, using actions and gestures to help tell the story: the animals have come together to have a picnic and each has its favourite food. The penguin and the tiger aren’t very lucky.

Value: Remind pupils of the importance of eating fruit.

Kid’s Box 1 poster teaching tips

1

Numbers

Point to the numbers on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Count the number of pictures that go with each number as a class. Encourage pupils to join in.

Elicit the colours and objects that pupils know. Pupils call out the corresponding number.

2

My school

Point to the objects on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the objects and elicit their colours.

Ask pupils to find and count the objects.

Point out other objects in the poster e.g. board, crayons, bag, glue.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the children are all at school. The girl has arrived late, bumped into the boy and dropped her bag on the floor. Suggest what the characters in the poster might be saying, e.g. I’m sorry.

3

Toys

Point to the toys on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Ask pupils the positions of the toys, e.g. Where’s the doll? In the bag.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the girl has got caught up in the computer lead and knocked the ball off the table. Show how the ball has bounced around the room, knocking into the boy’s train. Suggest what the characters in the poster might be saying, e.g. Be careful.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of playing carefully.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

4

My family

Point to the family members on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: mother and father are getting ready to go out. The rest of the family is watching TV. Grandfather is sleeping. The brother is afraid of the ugly monster.

Elicit adjectives, e.g. Is the sister old? No, she’s young. Alternatively, point to a family member and elicit information about them, e.g. He’s happy / She’s beautiful.

Revise prepositions by asking where the family members are, e.g. Is the grandfather next to the brother?

5

Our pets

Point to the pets on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point out other pets in the poster, e.g. snake, tortoise, frog, rabbit and ask pupils to find and count them.

Revise adjectives by eliciting information about the animals, e.g. point to the cat’s tail and ask Is it long?

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the pets have escaped and are having fun in the pet shop. The owner is not happy. The mouse is showing the boy where his family lives.

6

My face

Point to the face parts on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the characters and elicit descriptions, e.g. He’s got big ears.

Point out other parts of the body on the poster, e.g. arms, hands, legs, foot/feet.

Invent a name for each potato head and ask pupils to guess which one you are describing, e.g. Big nose Mr Potato Head, Small ears Miss Potato Head.

Ask one of the pupils to choose a character, and encourage the class to guess which one it is by asking questions e.g. Have you got yellow hair?

Kid’s Box 1 poster teaching tips

7

Wild animals

Point to the animals on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe the animals and ask pupils to guess which one is being described, e.g. It’s orange and black. It’s got a long tail and big teeth. Ask pupils to do the same.

Point to and describe your favourite animal, e.g. My favourite animals are elephants. They’re big and grey. They’ve got long noses. Encourage pupils to come to the poster and do the same.

Extend the unit language by eliciting or explaining what the animals are doing, e.g. It’s sleeping / eating

a

banana.

Tell the story of how the elephant got its long nose:

One day in the jungle, a crocodile thought the elephant

wanted to eat the crocodile’s fish, so the crocodile pulled and pulled at the elephants nose to get the fish. Luckily

a

hippo came and saved the elephant, and the crocodile

ran away, but from that day on the elephant always had

a

long nose.

8

My clothes

Point to the clothes on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the characters and elicit descriptions, e.g. He’s got a green T-shirt.

Point out other things of interest, e.g. boat, sandcastle, bucket and spade.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the people are at the beach. The boy has bought some ice cream and is falling over a bucket. The ice cream is falling on the girl.

9

Fun time!

Point to the activities on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit whether the children in the poster can or can’t do the activities, e.g. They can play basketball. He can’t play basketball.

Ask pupils to come to the poster, point to the characters and ask the class questions, e.g. Can she play tennis?

Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out activities that they can/can’t do from the poster. The class guess the activity, e.g. You can’t swim.

Point out the other activities, e.g. run, ride a horse, sing, draw, fish.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of staying safe.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

10 Transport

• Point to the activities on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Elicit what the people in the vehicles are doing, e.g. She’s flying a plane.

• Point out the other vehicles, e.g. car, submarine, balloon, train.

• Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out driving/ flying the vehicles in the poster. The class guess the vehicle, e.g. You’re flying a plane.

• Elicit what is happening in the poster: the doors of the lorry have opened and the bananas are falling onto the road, so the car, bus and motorbikes need to stop.

• Point to the characters in the bus and encourage pupils to sing and act out the song The wheels on the bus go round and round.

11 Our house

• Point to the rooms on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Elicit which rooms the various animals are in, e.g. Where are the tigers?

• Elicit what the animals in each room are doing, e.g. What’s the hippo doing?

• Point out the furniture in the rooms, e.g. sofa, bath, bed, stairs, cooker.

• Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out a typical activity they do in each of the rooms in the poster. The class guess which room they are in, e.g. You’re in the kitchen.

12 Party time

• Point to the food items on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Elicit what each family member likes eating, e.g. The grandmother likes oranges.

• Ask the pupils if they like the food, e.g. Do you like apples?

• Elicit what is happening in the poster: it’s baby mouse’s 1st birthday. He is celebrating it with his family. He has got a very big cake, which he is looking forward to eating. All the other members of the family have their favourite food and are very happy, except the brother who has only got a small piece of chocolate.

Kid’s Box 2 poster teaching tips

1

Alphabet

Point to the letters on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Call out the letters on the poster and encourage pupils to respond with the objects, e.g. A−Apple.

Call out the objects for pupils to respond with the letters, e.g. Dog–D.

Use the poster along with the alphabet chant from the unit.

Encourage pupils to come to the poster and spell out their names by indicating the letters and repeating them out loud.

Play I Spy. Think of an object you can see in the classroom, point to the letter on the poster and say, e.g. I spy with my little eye, something beginning with C. The pupils guess the object.

2

Back to school

Point to the classroom objects on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Revise numbers 1−20. Call out an object on the poster and encourage pupils to find and count the quantity of each one.

Elicit the position of various objects by asking pupils to correct you, e.g. The teacher’s on the chair. No, she’s next to the board.

Use the poster to practise classroom language. Elicit what the teacher might be saying, e.g. Sit down on your chair. / Open your book. Also elicit the language the pupils might use, e.g. I’m sorry I’m late. / Can I have a pencil please?

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the animals are at school. Some of them are behaving well and others badly.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of behaving well in class, e.g. listening to the teacher / sitting properly on your chair.

3

Play time!

Point to the toys on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit who each object belongs to, e.g. Whose camera is this? It’s the dad’s.

Point out other objects in the poster e.g. tent, suitcase, socks.

Call out a colour and encourage pupils to find and name all the objects of that colour.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the family has been camping and it is time to leave. Tom and Kim have not packed their bags, so their parents are angry. Tom is busy playing his computer game. Kim is trying to put her kite into her suitcase. The robot has already packed and is ready to go.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of taking responsibility for your belongings.

4

At home

Point to the things in the home on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit where each family member is and what they are doing, e.g. Is the sister reading a book in the living room?

Point out other furniture items in the poster, e.g. bath, table, bed, door.

Elicit what is happening in the poster. Focus on Grandma Mouse. She is in the hall wondering who the various objects belong to. Point to the items to elicit what Grandma Mouse might be saying, e.g. Whose toy is this? It’s the baby’s.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of tidying up.

5

Meet my family

Point to the family members on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit what each family member is doing, e.g. What’s the daddy doing? / Is the cousin sleeping?

Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out activities from the poster. The class guess the activity, e.g. You’re flying a kite.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: Kim and Tom are playing in the park with their family. They are also with their grandpa and grandma, their uncle, cousin and baby cousin. Kim has got a problem with her kite strings, and her uncle and mummy are caught in them.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of having fun, but playing carefully.

Kid’s Box 2 poster teaching tips

6

Dinner time

Point to the food items on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit other food items not included in the poster. Ask pupils to work in pairs to practise asking about their favourite food, e.g. What’s your favourite lunch?

Use the poster on the café wall to elicit what the customers ask, e.g. Can I have some milk, please? Then ask pupils to find that food item in the kitchen and elicit the reply, e.g. Sorry, there isn’t any milk.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: some hungry customers have arrived in a café to order food. Behind the scenes, however, the kitchen is a total disaster.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of cooking safely and cleaning up afterwards.

7

The farm

Point to the animals on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe an animal and ask pupils to guess which one it is, e.g. It’s small and green. It’s got long legs. Encourage pupils to take it in turns to describe and guess the animals.

Point to each animal and elicit what they might be saying, e.g. I like jumping. Encourage pupils to respond, e.g. So do I / I don’t.

Ask pupils to find and count the lizards.

8

My town

Point to the buildings on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Ask pupils to find and count different people and objects, e.g. How many children/cars/pineapples are there?

Elicit where different people are and what they are doing, e.g. The women in front of the café are drinking.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: a dog has taken a lime from the fruit shop and is running away, knocking over the table with all the fruit on it. The fruit has fallen onto the road. This has caused a girl to fall off her bike and traffic chaos.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of road safety, e.g. wearing a helmet / looking both ways before crossing the road. You can also use the poster to teach the importance of keeping calm in a crisis.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

9 Our clothes

• Point to the items of clothing on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Ask what each child in the poster is wearing, e.g. She’s wearing a purple dress and a red hat.

• Elicit other items of clothing and then encourage pupils to work in pairs and ask their partner what he/she is wearing.

• Elicit what is happening in the poster: the children are performing Little Red Riding Hood. Unfortunately, the children have got their clothes mixed up, e.g. She’s got a dress, but she hasn’t got a basket.

10 Our hobbies

• Point to the hobbies on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Choose a group of animals and describe what they are doing, e.g. The ants are playing table tennis. Elicit what the other animals are doing.

• Point to an animal and ask whether it likes the activity, e.g. Does this frog like playing basketball?

• Encourage pupils to take it in turns to ask another pupil if he/she likes an activity, e.g. Do you like playing badminton?

11 My birthday

• Point to the food items on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Ask pupils to count the quantity of food items and objects, e.g. How many sausages are there?

• Choose an item and ask pupils if they would like to eat it. Encourage pupils to practise asking for things they would like to eat, e.g. Can I have some lemonade, please?

• Elicit what is happening in the poster: it is the boy’s birthday party and a magician has made the food magic. All the children are really happy with the magic food except one boy who is a little scared and doesn’t want to eat any of it.

12 At the beach

• Point to the beach words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Point to a person in the poster and ask what they are doing, e.g. What’s the girl in the purple T-shirt doing?

• Encourage pupils to imagine what the people in the poster want to do, e.g. He wants to catch a fish.

• Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out activities from the poster. The class guess the activity, e.g. You’re collecting shells.

Kid’s Box 3 poster teaching tips

1

Family matters

Point to the family members on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Revise other family members, e.g. cousin, sister, brother, mother, father. Elicit what each person in the poster loves doing, e.g. The daughter loves playing football.

Suggest a name for the son, e.g. Matt. Point to the family members and elicit their relationship to Matt, e.g. She’s Matt’s aunt.

Encourage pupils to work in pairs and ask whether they like doing the activities in the poster, e.g Do you like taking photos?

Elicit what’s happening in the poster: there are two families. One family likes a more relaxing lifestyle. The other family is very sporty, with the exception of the son. The father and daughter from the sporty family want to go and play football, and are asking if anyone wants to join them. The son doesn’t want to go.

2

Home sweet home

Point to the home words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Revise numbers 11–20. Point to the numbered doors on the poster and elicit the correct numbers.

Point to other rooms and furniture items in the poster. Elicit a description of the house in the poster, e.g. It’s got a kitchen, basement, bedroom and four balconies.

Encourage pupils to describe their homes, e.g. I live in a flat. It’s got a big living room and three bedrooms.

Using the street sign and house number, elicit where the children in the poster live, e.g. They live at 11 Tree street. Encourage pupils to work in pairs and ask each other where they live.

Using the poster, elicit the difference between the country and the town.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

3

A day in the life

Point to the actions on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to each clock and elicit what the boy does at that time, e.g. He wakes up at 7 o’clock.

Cover the clocks and check if pupils can remember the times, e.g. What time does he go to bed?

Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out actions from the poster. The class guess the activity, e.g. You’re getting dressed.

Elicit what’s happening in the poster: the boy in the poster is the same as the boy in poster 1, who doesn’t like doing energetic things. At the beginning of the day he doesn’t want to get up, but at the end of the day he doesn’t want to go to bed!

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of going to bed on time.

4

In the city

Point to the buildings on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit what you do in each building, e.g. You go to the cinema to watch a film.

Encourage pupils to identify the positions of buildings, e.g. The library is opposite the swimming pool.

Point to some people in the poster and elicit what they might be saying, e.g. Must we go to the supermarket? Yes, we must. Encourage pupils to practise these dialogues in pairs.

Elicit what’s happening in the poster: a robber has robbed the bank and is running away. Money is falling out of a hole in his bag. He is being chased by two detectives.

5

At the doctor’s

Point to the health words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to an animal and ask pupils to identify its illness, e.g. What’s the matter? He’s got a cough.

Point to each animal and elicit suggestions as to what the animal must and mustn’t do, e.g. The hippo mustn’t eat cake. He must eat fruit.

Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out illnesses from the poster. The class guess the illness, e.g. You’ve got a toothache. Encourage pupils to suggest what the pupil should do, e.g. You mustn’t eat sweets.

Kid’s Box 3 poster teaching tips

6

A day in the country

Point to the countryside words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to each person in the poster and elicit how they are feeling and/or what they want to do, e.g. She’s thirsty. She wants to drink some lemonade.

Ask pupils to think of five things you cannot find in the country, e.g. You can’t find a supermarket in the country.

Elicit what’s happening in the poster: a family is having a picnic in the country. The robber is trying to escape, but is being chased by a bull and followed by the two detectives. The female detective wants to continue following him, but the other detective is very tired and wants to stop.

Ask pupils what they think will happen to the robber and detectives.

7

World of animals

Point to the animals on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Make false statements about the animals on the poster and encourage pupils to correct you, e.g. Pandas are red and blue. No, pandas are black and white.

Describe an animal from the poster and ask pupils to guess which one is being described, e.g. It’s grey or blue. It lives in the sea. It’s very big and very long. It eats fish. Encourage pupils to choose an animal and make similar descriptions to tell the class.

Choose two animals and elicit the difference between them, e.g. This kangaroo is stronger than that kangaroo. Encourage pupils to identify other differences and make comparative sentences.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

8 Weather report

• Point to the weather words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

• Point to different parts of the poster and elicit the correct words to describe the weather, e.g. What’s the weather like here? It’s cloudy.

• Elicit the difference between the weather today and yesterday, e.g. Today it’s hot and sunny. Yesterday it was wet and raining. It was snowing in the mountains.

• Cover the words on the poster. Encourage pupils to work in pairs and describe the weather, e.g. What was the weather like yesterday? It was wet and windy. What’s the weather like today? It’s hot and sunny.

• Elicit what’s happening in the poster: the robber escaped in a boat from the countryside. The detectives were following him in another boat, but the weather was very bad. The robber arrived at an island but only one of the detectives managed to reach it. Today it is sunny, and the detective is thinking back to yesterday.

• Ask pupils what they think will happen to the robber and the detective who is still on the boat.

Kid’s Box 4 poster teaching tips

1

Back to school

Point to the adjectives on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the people in the poster and elicit what they are doing, e.g. She’s painting.

Ask pupils to invent names for the school children. Describe what each of them is doing and encourage pupils to call out the name of the child, e.g. She’s the girl who’s painting – Lily.

Point to other people in the poster and make a statement about them using the key vocabulary. Encourage pupils to say whether it’s true or false, e.g. He’s being careful (the boy dropping the books) – false.

Use the alphabet poster on the classroom wall to spell words. Call out a letter and pupils respond with the colour, or call out colours and pupils respond with the letters.

See if the pupils can do the difficult maths sum!

Value: Use the poster to introduce the topic of appropriate classroom behaviour.

2

Good sports

Point to the activities on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to various detectives and elicit what they are doing, e.g. He’s learning to sail. / He’s fishing.

Point to the two detectives that are climbing and elicit the manner in which they are doing it, e.g. She’s climbing well. / He’s climbing badly. Ask pupils to describe the way other detectives are doing their activities.

Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out activities from the poster in a particular manner, e.g. badly, quickly, slowly. The class guess the activity and the manner in which it is being done, e.g. You’re skating well.

Encourage pupils to work in pairs and ask each other about the activities at the school for detectives, e.g. What do you want to learn to do? / What can I learn to do inside?

Elicit what is happening in the poster: it is a detective training school and the detectives are learning to do some activities inside and outside. Point to the trophy room in the building and elicit that some trophies have been stolen. Let pupils find the robber, who had disguised himself as a detective, and is now skating away.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

3

Last week

Point to the verbs on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Make statements about what happened on each day and ask pupils to correct you, e.g. On Monday, the detectives were at the beach. No, they were at the bus station.

Call out the past forms of the verbs and encourage pupils to give you the infinitive form.

Cover sections of the story and ask pupils questions, e.g. Did he eat a sandwich? No, he didn’t. / Did they see a film? Yes, they did. Encourage pupils to work in pairs and continue asking questions about the poster.

Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out what happened on different days. The class guesses the day and uses the past forms of the verbs to re-tell the story.

4

After school

Point to the verbs on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the verbs again, and elicit sentences, e.g. The lift stopped. The boy and girl carried some food.

Point to flat one’s door and call out first floor. Point to the other doors and elicit the other ordinal numbers, e.g. Second floor. Write these out in their full form on sticky notes, and use them to label the poster.

Point to and revise parts of the building and furniture. Make sentences about other people in the building and encourage pupils to correct you, e.g. The girl in the first floor danced. No, she shouted.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: last night, some children, who live in tree house flats, had a party. As the lift was out of order, the children carried the food up the stairs. The girl helped the boy. The children played music and danced on the balcony. They were very noisy.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of helping one another and being considerate of other people.

Kid’s Box 4 poster teaching tips

5

Last weekend

Point to the verbs on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the verbs again, and elicit sentences, e.g. The boy lost his monkey.

Practise the use of so by eliciting the reasons why the family did these actions, e.g. They took tents so they could sleep.

Call out the past forms of the verbs and encourage pupils to give you the infinitive form.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and ask questions about what happened, e.g. Did the sister get some water? Yes, she did. / Did the mother find the monkey? No, she didn’t.

Encourage students to make comparative sentences about the actions in the poster, e.g. I think making a fire is more difficult than catching fish.

6

Modern life

Point to the technology words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Ask pupils which of these objects different members of their family have, e.g. Has your grandpa got an MP3 player? / Has your grandma got a computer?

Encourage pupils to work in pairs and ask questions about the items in the poster, e.g. Have you got a computer? Can you use a video camera? Ask pupils to tell the class about their partner, e.g. He’s got a computer, but he hasn’t got an MP3 player. He can use a video camera.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the two detectives are in the office working. The female detective is working well, but the male detective

is

listening to music on his MP3 player, his desk is

mess, and his computer is broken. The robber is now in prison.

a

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of tidying up and taking care of your belongings.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

7

The best animal

Point to the adjectives and superlatives on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the animals and elicit sentences, e.g. This dolphin is exciting, but this dolphin is the most exciting.

Use the poster to elicit more adjectives and their comparatives and superlatives, e.g. This parrot is beautiful, and this parrot is more beautiful, but this is the most beautiful.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and ask questions about the animals in the poster, e.g. Which animal is the most dangerous? / Which animal is the heaviest? Encourage pupils to tell the class about their partner’s answers, e.g. She thinks bears are the most dangerous. She thinks giraffes are the heaviest.

Describe an animal and ask a pupil to come to the poster and point to the correct one, e.g. This animal is brown, it’s the youngest and it’s eating. Encourage pupils to continue describing and guessing the animals.

Value: Use the poster to teach that it does not matter if you are not the best at something; it is the taking part that counts.

8

Let’s party!

Point to the food words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to and call out the container words and encourage pupils to put them with a food or drink item, e.g. A bowl of soup.

Point to each of the octopus’ arms and elicit what he is doing, e.g. He’s cooking.

Encourage pupils to practise asking for food items on the poster, e.g. Can I have a bowl of pasta, please?

Ask pupils to work in pairs and invent a dialogue between a waiter and some restaurant customers. Encourage pupils to tell the class what the customers want, e.g. She wants the waiter to bring her a glass of water. He wants the waiter to give him a cheese sandwich.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: it is an underwater restaurant. The octopus waiter has too many things to do and the customers are angry.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of not trying to do too many things at the same time.

Kid’s Box 5 poster teaching tips

1

Time for TV

Point to the TV words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Call out a time, and ask pupils to say the type of programme. Then call out a programme and ask the pupils to say the time.

Ask questions for pupils to identify each type of programme, e.g. Which programme is funny?

Ask pupils to work in pairs and give their opinions about each type of programme, e.g. I think documentaries are more interesting than weather reports.

2

People at work

Point to the job words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to each child on the poster and elicit sentences, e.g. She’s going to be a writer.

Describe a child on the poster and ask pupils to guess which one you are describing, e.g. She’s wearing a coat, socks and shoes. She’s holding a microphone – the journalist. Ask pupils to continue describing and guessing.

Use both the scene in the poster and the pupils’ imaginations to elicit more going to sentences, e.g. The vase is going to fall. / He’s going to play for Manchester United.

Ask pupils to take it in turns to act out their future job, for the class to guess, e.g. You’re going to be a pilot.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: it is a child’s fancy dress birthday party. The children are dressed up in the clothes they would wear in their future jobs. The mother and father have come into the room to find out why it is so noisy.

Value: Use the poster to teach the importance of treating people’s homes with respect.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

3

The city

Point to the city words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe what people do in each building and ask pupils to guess which one you are describing, e.g. It’s a place where you go to send a letter – post office. Pay particular attention to the airport, as pupils will not have seen an airport like this before!

Make incorrect statements about where the different buildings are and encourage pupils to correct you, e.g. The hotel is next to the post office. No, it’s next to the airport.

Encourage pupils to work in pairs and ask where the different buildings are, e.g. Where’s the theatre? It’s opposite the post office.

Ask pupils to find five differences between modern cities and those in medieval times, e.g. They didn’t have planes or cars, they had horses.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: a scientist has travelled back in time to a medieval city.

4

Disaster!

Point to the disaster weather words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe what generally happens in each of the natural disasters and ask pupils to guess which one you are describing, e.g. Liquid rock and hot gas come out of this – volcano.

Encourage pupils to use their imaginations to explain what happened in the pictures, e.g. Lightning hit a tree. Write some of these ideas on sticky notes and put them next to their corresponding image.

Elicit what the girl was doing when each of the disasters struck, e.g. When the lightning hit the tree, she was cycling.

Ask pupils to work in pairs to make true and false sentences about what happened in each game, e.g. She was flying a helicopter when the volcano erupted. The other pupils then correct the sentences, e.g. She wasn’t flying a helicopter, she was climbing.

Explain that the poster is a series of covers for video games all featuring the same character. Ask the pupils which video games they play, how long they spend playing them and which their favourites are.

Kid’s Box 5 poster teaching tips

5

Material things

Point to the material words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit the names of various objects on the poster and encourage pupils to say what they are made of, e.g. The door is made of wood.

Ask pupils to identify as many things as possible in their classroom that are made of the materials on the poster.

Encourage pupils to invent ways for the girl to escape from the room using the materials and objects on the poster, e.g. She can use the wool to make a rope.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the main character from the video games in poster 4 is in a scene from a video game, wondering how she should escape from the room.

Ask pupils what they think might happen next in the video game.

6

Senses

Point to the kitchen words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Call out the kitchen words again and elicit sentences about them, using sense words, e.g. The plate looks clean. / The flour feels soft.

Ask pupils to take it in turns to describe things in the poster and ask the other pupils to guess what they are describing, e.g. It tastes hot pepper.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the scientist from poster 3 has travelled to the future. He is in a futuristic pizza restaurant but the pizza making machine is not working properly.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

7

Natural world

Point to the nature words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe what each child in the poster is doing and ask pupils to guess which child you are describing, e.g. She’s reading a book about dinosaurs the girl who’s going to be a writer.

Describe the people and things in the poster. Ask pupils to come to the poster and point at what you are describing, e.g. It’s got wings, and it’s purple and white.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and make true and false sentences about the people and things in the poster, e.g. He’s wearing spotted trousers – true. / The red insect has got black stripes – false.

Ask pupils to find five things we should and shouldn’t do in the country.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the children from the party in poster 2 are out in the country, still dressed up in their costumes.

8

Seasons

Point to the season and sports words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them. Ask pupils to identify the odd word out – hill.

Point to a person in the poster and elicit what they have done, e.g. She’s won an athletics competition.

Ask pupils to describe other sports you can do in each season. The other pupils guess which sport they are describing, e.g. You can do this sport outdoors in the summer, but in the winter it’s better to do it indoors – swimming.

Point to and talk about two sports you have done / never done, e.g. I’ve been hill climbing, but I’ve never been snowboarding. Encourage pupils to come to the poster and do the same.

Ask pupils to work in pairs to ask questions and talk about what sports they like doing in different seasons, e.g. Have you ever done athletics in winter? No, I haven’t. It’s too cold. I like doing athletics in spring.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the reporter wants to interview a famous star, who is busy doing other things.

Kid’s Box 6 poster teaching tips

1

Beastly tales

Point to the mythical words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to the characters in the poster and elicit descriptions, e.g. This eagle’s got golden feathers, big wings and sharp claws.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: this is a scene from a video game. Ask pupils what they think the girl on the boat has to do to get to the next level, e.g. She’s going to get a golden feather from the eagle and give it to the mermaid. She’s going to take the mirror and egg, return the egg to the eagles and use the mirror to reflect the dragon’s fire. She’s going to climb the mountain and get to the tower.

Ask pupils to draw, talk about and describe what mythological creatures appear in the video games they play.

2

Tomorrow’s world

Point to the transport and space words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to different characters on the poster and elicit what they are doing, e.g. The astronaut’s taking her dog for a walk.

Describe various characters. Ask pupils to come to the poster and point to the one you are describing, e.g. She’s wearing a pink coat. She’s got a blue suitcase.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and invent a dialogue between the man selling space rocket tickets and a person wanting to travel. Encourage them to use constructions with will, e.g. When will the rocket leave? / How many people will travel on the rocket?

Ask pupils take it in turns to say what the world will be like in 2070. Encourage pupils to say if they agree or disagree, e.g. People will travel to space on their holiday. I disagree. I think people will travel underwater to submarine stations.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: a scientist has travelled to the future in his time machine.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

3

The great outdoors

Point to the outdoors words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe the objects on the poster and ask pupils to guess what you are describing, e.g. You use this to see at night – torch.

Elicit the past continuous verbs by establishing what the children were doing, e.g. exploring, sleeping, playing in the water. Label these with sticky notes.

Elicit things that happened in the poster, e.g. He saw a monster. / He fell in the water. / A snake bit him.

Point to children in the poster and call out incorrect sentences. Ask pupils to correct you, e.g. He was drinking water when the snake bit him. No he wasn’t, he was eating.

Label one of the walls of your classroom north and then call out compass directions for pupils to point to.

4

Food, glorious food!

Point to the food words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Point to each of the food items and elicit the quantity e.g. There aren’t enough biscuits. / There’s too much jam.

Ask pupils to come to the poster, point to the various items and ask questions, e.g. Is there enough bread?

Elicit other food pupils like eating.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and find out how often they eat various food items, e.g. How often do you eat popcorn? Encourage pupils to tell the class about their partners, e.g. He eats too many biscuits. He doesn’t eat enough fruit.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the children are staying in to watch a film on the television and eat some snacks. They haven’t got the right quantities, e.g. there is too much butter and not enough sauce.

Kid’s Box 6 poster teaching tips

5

Under the ocean

Point to the sea words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe each sea creature and ask pupils to guess which one you are describing, e.g. It hasn’t got a brain, a shell, bones or claws – jellyfish.

Remind pupils that the girl in the poster is completing various levels of a video game. Elicit what she has done so far, including what she might have done in the level shown on this poster e.g. She has climbed the mountain. She has been to the tower. She has climbed down the rope and given the seals some fish. She has swum past the octopus, opened the treasure chest and taken out a rope.

Ask pupils to think of five things the girl still needs to do, to complete the level / video game. Encourage pupils to use still and the present perfect form, e.g. She still hasn’t got out of the water / gone past the crab / climbed over the sand / got past the lobster / gone into the mouth of the stone dragon.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and talk about the video games they are currently playing. Encourage them to talk about the challenges they have completed, and what things they still need to do to finish the game.

6

Free time

Point to the free time words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Describe an activity and ask pupils to guess which one you are describing, e.g. It’s something you play with a board and black and white pieces. Encourage pupils to take it in turns to describe the activities for the class to guess.

Elicit sentences about the poster using determiners and pronouns, e.g. Everyone’s playing. / No-one’s eating. / Someone’s sitting under a tree. / The boys that want to skateboard should wear something to protect themselves. / The dog hasn’t got anyone to play with.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and talk about the activities on the poster. Encourage them to tell the class about their partners, e.g. She likes riding her mountain bike in her free time. She doesn’t like playing board games; she thinks they’re boring. This summer she’s going to try skateboarding.

© Cambridge University Press 2014

7

Dress sense

Point to the clothes words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Elicit descriptions of the different clothes items, e.g. It’s a black and yellow spotted glove.

Cover parts of the objects and clothes on the poster and ask pupils to guess what they are. Encourage pupils to use may and might e.g. It might be a lamp. / They may be tights.

Ask pupils to find at least five differences between the two bedrooms.

Encourage pupils to imagine what the girl might be saying, e.g. I might not wear the black and white striped tights, I may wear the green tights with the red flowers.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: the girl and boy have decided to go out one evening. The boy is ready but the girl is still deciding what clothes to wear.

8

Around the world

Point to the country and nationality words on the poster and call them out. Encourage pupils to repeat them.

Cover the nationality words. Call out the countries and elicit the nationalities.

Point to the flags on the reporter’s backpack and elicit sentences about which countries he has already visited. Encourage pupils to use already/yet and the present perfect, e.g. Has he travelled to Brazil yet? Yes, he’s already been to Brazil.

Ask pupils to work in pairs and talk about which countries on the poster they have visited. Encourage pupils to tell the class about their partners, e.g. She’s been to France and Portugal, but she hasn’t been to Spain yet. She’s going to India this summer.

Elicit what is happening in the poster: a news reporter is backpacking around the world trying to get an interview with some famous people. The footprints show his planned route. So far, as we can see from his backpack, he has only travelled to four of the countries.