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Dampol 1st National High School

Plaridel, Bulacan
A Detailed Lesson Plan in English
for Grade 8 - Narra
I.

II.

Objectives
At the end of the 60-minute lesson, at least 85 percent of the students are expected to:
A. determine the rules on the degrees of comparison of adjectives;
B. share their observation using the adjectives that compare; and
C. create meaningful sentences by writing the appropriate degree of comparison of
adjectives.
Subject Matter
A. Topic: Degrees of Comparison of Adjectives
B. References: Learners Material for English Grade 8, page 20.
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/grammar/partsofspeech/adjectives/compar
atives.shtml
C. Materials: Visuals (cartolina, chalk, board, and pictures)

III.

Procedure
Teachers Activities
A. Preparation
1. Prayer
Good afternoon, class!

Students Activities

All: Good afternoon, sir.


Before we start with our lesson for today, let us
first stand to ask for the guidance of our dear
Lord. Jonathan, would you please lead the
prayer?
Jonathan: Let us bow our heads and feel the
presence of the Lord. In the name of the
Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.
Amen.
Dear Lord, make us mentally alert.
Oh God, inspire us as we start our classes
today. Increase our wisdom and develop our
character according to what is good and
acceptable before thee and our fellowmen
We ask this in Jesus name.
Amen.
2. Greetings
Good afternoon, class!
Its nice to see you, too.
Before you sit, please pick up the pieces of
paper under your chairs.
You may now take your seats.
3. Checking of Attendance
Is everybody wearing their proper and
complete uniforms?
(The teacher inspects the students if they are
wearing proper and complete uniforms.)

All: Good afternoon, sir. Its nice to see you.

(The students pick up the pieces of paper


under their chairs.)
All: Thank you sir.

Now, let me check your attendance.


Elsie, do we have absentees for today?
Wow! Its nice to know that everybody is
present today. You deserve an angel clap. Here
is how you are going to do that.
(The teacher demonstrates the angel clap)
Are you ready?

Elsie: Sir, nobody is absent today.

Okay lets do it all together.

All: Yes sir.

4. Checking of Assignments
Last time, I gave you an assignment to be
written on crosswise. Kindly pass your paper
to the center and then forward.

(The class does the angel clap.)

B. Review
Before we proceed with our lesson for today,
will somebody recall what topic was discussed
yesterday?
Yes, Faye.

(The students pass their paper.)

Faye: Sir, our topic yesterday was about the


number of nouns.
Very good, Faye. How will you differentiate
singular nouns to plural nouns?
Whats your answer, Hannah?
Hannah: Sir, when we say singular noun, we
are referring to only one person, place, or
thing. When we say plural noun, we are
referring to two or more persons, places, or
things.
Very well said, Hannah. To continue with,
Bryan, will you give me some examples.

That is awesome, Bryan! It was good example.


It seems that you fully understand our lesson
yesterday. So, I think its a good sign to move
on with our new topic.

Bryan: For example sir, the word child it is


singular in form. Then, when we change it to
plural form, it will become children.

C. Motivation
Before we begin, lets have a game. We will
play charades. Do you know how to play it?
All: Yes/No sir.
Some of you said yes and some of you said no.
So, to make everyone familiar with the game,
here are the mechanics; first, you will be
divided into two, one group for boys, the other,
for girls. Each group will have their
representative. Then, he/she will pick a paper
in my container with a word written on it. Each
representative is given twenty seconds to act
out the word picked. Then, the remaining
members of the group will guess the word.
After twenty seconds, it will be the next
groups turn. Whoever gets the highest score
will receive a special prize.
Have I made myself clear?
Lets start the game.

All: Yes sir.

(Some of the girls raise their hands)

Anyone who wants to be the representative for


the girls?

.
(Some of the boys raise their hands)

Alright, lets have Shiela as your


representative. How about for the boys?
Okay, lets have Bryan as your representative.
Now that we have our representative from
each group, lets decide who will be the first
player by playing rock, paper, scissors.
Whoever wins will decide who will go first.

(Shiela and Bryan play the rock, paper,


scissors. Then, Shiela wins the game and she
chooses to be the first to play the game.)

Since Shiela decided to play the game, the


girls will play first.

(Shiela picks the paper and the word written


on it is courageous. She acts the word using
her body language but unfortunately her
group mates fail to guess the word.)

Im sorry, you missed the word heavy. Try your


luck on your next turn.
Okay, lets see if the boys can guess the next
word. Yes, Bryan please pick your paper and
find out whats written on it.

(Bryan picks the paper and act out the word


heavy using his body language and his group
mates successfully guess the word.)

Very good, you got one point. Now, its the girls
turn again. Let see if they can make it this
time. I would like to have another
representative? How about you Faith? Can you
be your groups representative?
Oh! I like your confidence. Please pick your
word.

Faith: Yes, sir.


(Faith picks the word hot and act it out in front
of her classmate and they get the word
correctly.)

(Aldrei raises his hand.)


Congratulations! You have now one point. I
have one word left in my container, let see if
the boys can break the tie. Who wants to be
the representative?
Yes Aldrei. Your groups hope lies on your
hands. Do you think he can break the tie?

All: Yes/No, sir.


(Aldrei act out the last word which is strong
and they get it correctly.)

Lets see and play the game.


Good job, Aldrei! Boys have two points now
and that means they are the winners.
Congratulations boys. Here are your prizes.

All: It was fun!

How, did you find the activity?


(The students do the wow clap.)
Well, obviously, you had a great time and you
played the game fairly. So, give yourselves a
wow clap.

(The teacher demonstrates the wow clap)


Lets do it together.
Chona: They are examples of adjectives.
Class, what did you notice from the words that
you have just acted out?
Those words are examples of what?
Yes, Chona.
That is correct.
D. Lesson Proper
We did that activity because this afternoon our
topic has something to do with adjectives, we
will be dealing with the degrees of comparison
of adjectives.
(The teacher posts the title of the topic on the
board.)
To be enlightened about these degrees of
comparison of adjectives, may I call on
Leanard, Jonathan, and Clarence to stand here
in front?

(Leanard, Jonathan and Clarence will stand I


front of the class.)
(The class observes their classmates.)
Joyce: Lenard is tall

Class, I want you to have an observation about


these boys.
Jenica: Leanard is taller than Jonathan.
Can you describe the height of Leanard?
Yes, Joyce.
Very good, Joyce.
If you will compare the height of Leanard to
Jonathan, what can you say?
How about you, Jenica?

Cindy: Lenard is the tallest among the boys.

Thats a nice observation, Jenica.


If you will compare the height of Leanard from
Jonathan and Clarence, how will you describe
it?
Yes, Cindy.
Thats great Cindy! You are a good observant.
Thank you boys. You may now take your seats.
The words that you used are adjectives that
show degrees of comparison.
We have three degrees of comparison of
adjectives. Those are Positive, Comparative,
and Superlative degree.
(The teacher posts on the board the positive,
comparative and superlative degrees.)
Lets study the sentences written on the board.
On our first sentence, the adjective that we
used to describe Lenard is in the positive
degree.

Ryan: I have no idea sir.


Ryan: We describe only one person.

Ryan: We use the positive degree of an


adjective when we describe a single person.

Why do you think it is in the positive degree?


Any idea, Ryan?
Let me help you figure it out. How many
person do we describe in the first sentence?
Therefore Ryan, when do we use the positive
degree of an adjective?

Good, you got it right, Ryan.


(The teacher posts on the board the rule in
using the positive degree.)

Sherry Rose: We use comparative degree of


an adjective when we compare two persons or
things

Now, take a look at our second sentence. The


adjective that we used to compare Lenard and
Jonathan is in the Comparative Degree.
How did it happen?
When do we use the comparative degree?
What are your thoughts on this, Sherry Rose?

Very good answer, Sherry.


(The teacher posts on the board the rule in
using the comparative degree.)

Ednico: We use superlative degree of an


adjective to compare more than two persons
or things.

Now, lets go to the third sentence. The


adjective we used to compare the three is in
the superlative degree.
When do we use the superlative degree of an
adjective?
What do you think Ednico?

Great answer, Ednico.


(The teacher posts on the board the rule in
using the superlative degree.)
Now, please observe the adjective used in the
given sentences. Lets try to analyze and find
out the rules in forming the degrees of
comparison of adjective.
Lets have the adjective tall from the first
sentence. How many syllables are there in the
word tall?
Yes, Rachelle.

Rachelle: Sir, the word tall has one syllable.

Faith: Sir, the word tall became taller.

Luigi: We add er at the end of one syllable


adjectives to change it to comparative degree.

Very good!
What happened to the word tall when we
compare Lenards height to Jonathans?
Yes, Faith.
Thats right, Faith.
What suffix did we add to the word tall to
change it to comparative degree?

Stephanie: The word large will become larger.

Your turn, Luigi.

We just add r to change it to comparative


degree.

Very well said, Luigi.


Now, class what if the adjective already ends
with e. For example, the word large, if we
are going to change it to comparative degree.
It will become what?
Yes, Stephanie.

Very good answer, Stephanie.


(The teacher posts on the board the rules in
forming one syllable adjective to comparative
degree.)

Ednico: hard

Crissanne: harder

I have here a picture of a metal and I want you


to tell me your description about it.?
Yes, Ednico.

Louisse: Sir, the word tall became tallest.

Good job Ednico. What if you are going to


change that adjective into comparative
degree?
What is your idea, Crissanne?

Dianne: We addest at the end of the word tall


to change it to superlative degree.

Very good, Crissrane.


Lets go back to our example. What happened
to the word tall when we use it to compare the
height of Lenard, Jonathan and Clarence?
Yes, Louisse.

Aj: Sir, the word will be largest.

You got it right Louisse. What did we add to the


word tall to change it to superlative degree?
Dianne?
All: No, sir.
How about for the word large, if we are going
to change it to superlative degree. It will
become what?
Yes, Aj.
Very good.
(The teacher posts on the board the rules in
forming one syllable adjective to superlative
degree.)

Cassandra: The answer is more intelligent.

Jorry: She added the word more before the


adjective.

Class, if the rule is we will just add er/ -est at


the end of an adjective with only one syllable.
How about if the adjective has two or more
syllables? For example, the adjective is
intelligent. What will be its comparative
degree? Is it right to say intelligenter?
Then, what will it be?
Yes, Cassandra.

Zyrille: For adjectives with two or more


syllables, we add more before the word to
change it to comparative degree.

Very good. What an intelligent answer! Based


on Cassandras answer, what word did she add
before the adjective to form the comparative
degree?
May I hear from you, Jorry?

All: Yes, sir.

Greg: Its beautiful.


You are an attentive listener, Jorry.
Therefore class, what is the rule in forming the
comparative degree of adjective with two or
more syllables?
Yes, Zyrille.

Rafaela: It will be more beautiful.

Very good Zyrille.


Did you understand?
(The teacher shows a picture of Liza
Soberano)
Look at this picture, How can you best describe
it?
Any idea Greg?

All: No, it is not sir.


Dianne: The answer is most beautiful.

That is correct, Greg.


If we will change the word beautiful to its
comparative degree, what will be the answer?
Rafaela, what do you think is the answer?
Youre so brilliant Rafaela that makes you more
beautiful.
(The teacher posts the rule in forming the
comparative degree of adjective with two or
more syllables)
How about the superlative degree of the word
beautiful? Is it right for me to say Ronnie is the
beautifulest among the girls?

Angel: For adjectives with two or more


syllables, we form their superlative degree by
adding the word most before the adjective.

All: Yes, sir.


All: None.

Then what is the correct answer?


Yes, Dianne.
Thank you miss beautiful, that is correct!
Based on that answer, how do we form the
superlative degree of adjectives with two or
more syllables?
Yes, Angel.

Very well said Angel.


(The teacher posts the rule in forming the
superlative degree of adjective with two or
more syllables.)
Is it clear?
Do you have any question?

All: Yes, sir.

E. Application
To deepen your understanding about our
lesson, I want you to identify the degrees of
comparison used in the given sentences. Then,
you have to justify your answer. However, we
will add some twists. You are going to identify
the degree of comparison of adjectives by
spelling the first letter of the word using your
butt. For example, if it is in the positive degree
you have to spell letter P using your butt. If it
is in the comparative degree, you have to spell
letter C using your butt. And if it is in the
superlative degree you have to spell letter S
using your butt.
Is the instruction clear?

(Manny butt spells letter C)


Manny: Sir, it is Comparative degree because
the adjective ends with er.

(Joyce butt spells letter S)


Joyce: Superlative degree because the
adjective end with est.

I know that some of you will be shy to answer


because you are going to use your butt. Thats
why, I prepared a name box here where I will
pick the name of the person who will answer
my question.

(Clarence butt spells letter S)


Clarence: It is superlative degree because the
adjective begins with the word most.

Lets start.
(The teacher posts the sentences on the
board.)
1. I guess Id rather buy this pair of shoes; Its
cheaper than the other.
I got Manny.
Show us your answer Manny.

(Allyssa butt spells letter P)


Allyssa: Sir, my answer is positive degree
because it is just a simple description of an
animal.

Very good. Now, let us have the second


sentence, and we will pick from the girls. Okay,
Joyce you are the lucky one.
2. Baguio City is the coldest city in the country.

Very good answer, Joyce. Next is the third


sentence. Again from the boys. Lets have
Clarence.
3. My mother prepares the most delicious
afritada in town.

That is correct. Youre so cute as you butt spell!


Okay, lets proceed with number four. Another
one from the girls, and we have here Allyssa
4. The lion is a wild animal.

Nice one Allyssa. Now, the last sentence is for


the boys and the floor is yours Aj.
5. Owl is more active at night.

(Aj butt spells letter C)


Aj; Comparative degree because the adjective
begins with the word more.

All:Yes sir.
Allaine: The degrees of comparison of
adjectives are Positive, comparative and
superlative degree.

Jonathan: For adjectives with only one


syllable, we add er/-est to form their
comparative and superlative degree.
While, for adjectives with two or more
syllables we add more/ most to form their
comparative and superlative degree.

F. Generalization
Have you learn something?
Can you state the degrees of comparison of
adjectives?
Yes, Allaine.

Wonderful! How can we form the degrees of


comparison of adjectives?
What letters do we add?
Yes, Jonathan.
IV.

Evaluation:
Direction: On crosswise, complete the sentence with the appropriate degrees of
comparison of the adjective to make it meaningful.
(powerful) 1. This rocket is __________ than that one.
(obedient) 2. Julian is an __________ boy.
(long)
3. My essay is __________ than Jeremys.
(courageous)
4. Rob is the ___________ among the boys.
(high)
5. Mount Everest is the __________ mountain in the world.

V.

Assignment:
1. Have an advance reading of the story The Countrys Good Son by Minn New Thein.
2. On your notebook, answer the following questions:
a. Who are the main characters of the story?
b. Where did the story happen?
c. What is the problem in the story?
d. How did the character solve the problem?
e. What is the theme of the story?
f. If you are the main character, would you do the same? Why?
Reference: Learners Material for English Grade 8, pages 353-354.

Prepared by:
Jess Amiel D. Tapang
Student Teacher BSED 4H

Checked by:
Ms. Jinky B. Aldaba
Cooperating Teacher

Noted by:

Joselito C. Roldan, Ph.D.


Principal