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Design for Learning

Instructor: Rebecca Hastings


Lesson Title: Illustration Station
Curriculum Area: Language Arts

Grade Level/Cooperating Teacher: 1st/ Ms. Gartman


Date: October 21, 2015
Estimated Time: 30 minutes

Standards Connection:
Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events. [RL.1.7]
Learning Objective(s):
After observing illustrations from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me and describing what is
taking place in each image, students will correctly perceive and create their own illustration of a
short story.
Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language:
Today, we are going to look at the book Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me, and describe each
pages illustrations. Then we are going to read another short story and you will draw your own
illustration for the event.
Evaluation of Learning Objective(s):
Students will be read a short story from The Rabbit and the Turtle at the end of the lesson. They
will accurately illustrate the event that is taking place in the story. The teacher will walk around to
each table and observe the students description. She will then assess if the student has understood
the lesson of using illustrations to describe what is happening in the story.
Engagement:
The teacher will show the class two pictures and have them describe what event is happening in
each. Boys and girls, I need everyone to come join me on the carpet. Today we are going to learn
how to use illustrations to describe what is happening in a story. Do any of you like to take a
book and just look at the pictures to imagine what is happening, rather than reading the words?
Allow for student response. I want you to look at this picture and raise your hand to tell me what
you believe is occurring in the picture. The teacher will hold up a picture of The Lion and the
Mouse from The Rabbit and the Turtle. She will call on 3 students to share what they think is
happening in the story. Great job! Those were all good possibilities of what was happening in this
picture. The mouse was actually untying the lion from the tree after the wolves threw the heavy
rope around him. Now I want you to look at this next picture and tell me what is taking place. The
teacher will show the picture of The Monkey and the Fox from The Rabbit and the Turtle. She
will call on different students to share what they think is happening in the story. Allow for student
response. Great job! Those were all good possibilities of what was happening in this picture. The
fox locked the monkey in the cage, and the monkey was trying to tell the fox to let him out! You
guys did a great job interpreting these pictures. Now, lets look through the pictures in a book and
describe what we think is happening on each page.
Learning Design:

I. Teaching:
The teacher will explain the objective again to the students. She will explain to them what
illustrations are and how important they are to a story. Then she will discuss with the
students the meaning of the words illustrations, details, and events. The teacher will do a
picture walk with the book Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. We are going to learn
how to describe events taking place based on the pictures that we look at. First, can
anyone tell me what an event is? Thats right! An event is something that happens. An
event that is happening at our school this week is Read for the Record! Now, can anyone
tell me what the word illustration means? Good job! An illustration is a picture that helps
describe what is happening in a story. The words tell us what is actually taking place, but
the illustration helps us imagine what it looks like or gives us a better understanding of

what is going on. The word illustration is another word for picture. Now the teacher will
use an anchor chart to visually show students what makes a good illustration. She will ask
them what do they need to use when drawing an illustration. Now, I want you to raise
your hand to tell me what makes a good illustration. What is needed in the picture for it
to make sense and describe what is happening? Have students give examples. Some
examples include: using every crayon, adding words, coloring inside the lines, drawing
clothes, matching the picture to the writing, drawing the setting, drawing the event,
drawing characters, and adding details. You did a great job brainstorming what makes a
good illustration! Lets take a look at the book Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me, and
use the illustrations to tell the story. The teacher will go through each page and allow the
students to talk through what they think is happening in this story. What do you think is
taking place in this picture? Do you think the girl is looking out her window at the cat or
the moon? Those are all great thoughts! Lets see what is on the next page. What do you
think the girl is doing in this picture? I dont knowlets see if the next picture can tell us
anything else! Wow, what do you think the man is carrying or doing? You are right! That
is a very long ladder. Flip the page. What do you think is he about to do with the ladder?
Where do you think he is going on the ladder? Those are all great ideas! Turn the page.
Wow! Where do you think he made it in this picture? Is that the moon is has climbed to?
Do you think he is talking to the moon? Turn the page. What do you notice about these
two moons? Are they different sizes? Turn the page. Oh my! This moon has gotten a lot
smaller than the original one! What is the man now doing with the moon? What do you
think the girl is doing in each of these pictures? Point to each one and have the students
describe what she is doing. You are right! She seems to be playing with the moon! How
did the moon get back into the sky? What do you think is happening now? Thats right!
She does seem to be sleeping. What is happening to the moon? You did a great job
describing what you thought was taking place in this story. The teacher will now describe
what the words event and details mean. Each of these pictures described what was taking
place in the story. Can anyone tell me what the word event means? Thats right! An event
is something that is happening; it is something that is going on. Can anyone tell me of an
event that has happened to them within the last week? Wow! Those are all great events.
Do you know what makes an event so special? The details. Can anyone tell me what a
detail is? You are correct. A detail is something specific that happens. When you play
superheroes during recess, you may describe what your outfit look like or what exactly
you are going to do to save someone. Those are all details. Details make up events. After
answering these questions, the teacher will read the book to the class to see what was
actually happening in each picture. Would you like to find out what event each illustration
in this book is actually describing? Lets see what happened! Great listening everyone.
Now, I am going to read a short story to you, and I want you to close your eyes and
imagine what is happening looks like. Then, you are going to go to your seat and draw
what you imagined. You are going to illustrate this story! Is everyone ready to try this on
their own? Great!
II. Opportunity for Practice:
The teacher will give each student the visualizing worksheet and tell them to wait for
further instructions. She will then explain to them that she is going to read a short story,
and after listening, they will go back to their seats and draw an illustration for what they
imagined. Students will be assessed on accuracy of the picture to the details in the story. I
am going to give each of you a worksheet. Once you get the paper, I want you to wait
quietly for me to give you further instructions. Hand out papers. I am going to read you a
short story, and after listening to the story, you will go back to your seat and draw an
illustration for what you think happened in the story. I need everyone to pay close
attention to this story so you can know what is happening! Everyone, close your eyes and
turn on your listening ears while I read this story. The teacher will then read The
Grasshopper and the Ants from The Rabbit and the Turtle. Everyone can open their eyes

now! Did you get a good mental image of what you thought happened in this story? I
want you to go back to your seat and draw the picture of what you think the illustrator
drew. The teacher will then walk around the room, observing what students are drawing.
She will ask them questions about their picture and see what they remembered from the
story. She will see if they can connect the details of the events to the illustration.
III. Assessment
The teacher will observe the illustrations of each student and determine if they
recognized the key details from the story. If they correctly identify the main details and
portray that through their picture, the teacher will know they have grasped the importance
of illustrations to a story. If they incorrectly illustrate the picture, the teacher will know
this topic needs to be revisited. Ok, boys and girls, now that you have an idea of the
importance of illustrations and how to create them, you will draw what you think are the
main details of this story. Work hard and do not be afraid to draw details!
IV. Closure:
When the students have completed their illustration, the teacher will call them back to the
carpet. She will revisit the importance of an illustration and how the key details can
explain an event. Ok boys and girls, I want everyone to quietly go find their spot on the
carpet. The teacher will wait for students to join her on the carpet. Can anyone tell me
what an illustration is? What about the details found in the story? How are events
formed? Allow students to respond to the questions. Great listening and drawing today!
Materials and Resources:
The Lion and the Mouse illustration
The Monkey and the Fox illustration
Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me book by Eric Carle
Visualizing worksheet
The Rabbit and the Turtle book by Eric Carle
Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners):
Students that need additional practice will be given more short stories to illustrate on their own.
They will also be given pictures to describe what is taking place.
Students that need reteaching will be pulled to the side when appropriate and allowed to verbally
describe pictures. Once that is accomplished, students will be given another chance to illustrate
on their own.
Data Analysis:
Before teaching this lesson, I thought the students had more background knowledge on
illustrations than what was observed throughout the teaching. Whenever I asked questions,
students did not know an answer. I am sure a part of the uncertainty had to do with how I asked
the questions, but I believe another part of the hesitation had to do with not knowing what I
thought they knew. When describing the basics of what was taking place in a picture, the students
were able to describe the basic information/story line. All students except three participated in
this discussion. While trying to have students understand what an actual illustration consisted of,
only two students contributed to the thinking. The other students did not have the background
knowledge or know what to add to the illustration chart. This showed me that giving a better
definition, examples, and non-examples for the students to see are key to learning about
illustrations. The next part of the lesson was the picture walk. The majority of the students
contributed to the discussion of what was taking place. They tended to feed off of each others
ideas and add onto what they believed was happening on each page. I recognized the time some
students wanted to take to think about the illustration, while other students knew immediately
what they thought was taking place. Three students waited longer to give an answer and the rest
of the class jumped at the opportunity to describe what they were observing. I observed that most
students were able to describe the basic parts of each illustration, but conveying the details is
something that needs to be discussed and practiced more.

Reflection:
After teaching my first lesson to an entire class, I now know some things that I want to do
differently whenever I teach again. I did not value and emphasize my expectations of the
students, and I know that this is something that holds a lot of importance. Without communicating
to the students how they are to behave and what I expect them to learn by the end of the lesson,
they will not hold the right focus. I need to tell students how I expect them to sit, how I expect
them to answer questions, and where I expect their focus to be. If they are not following through
with these expectations during the lesson, I need to address it. I would need to address it so the
students know that I mean what I say, but I would also need to address the issue so students are
paying attention and not distracted. I also need to make sure I clearly state the objective of the
lesson. By clearly stating the objective, students would know what we are trying to learn and
have a better focus at learning that specific thing. I could write this objective in kid friendly terms
on the board, or I could have a poster or card with the objective written or printed on it. The
actual teaching of my lesson could have gone differently because of the content that was being
taught. I needed to clearly define what an illustration is to the class and give them examples. I
expected that simply asking what an illustration was and asking for examples would be portrayed
okay for the students. I have learned that with younger students, I must be clear and direct with
what I am asking. I need to give them examples first, and then I can ask them to answer. They
needed to be told examples of an illustration first before I asked them questions about it. Not only
should I give them correct examples, but I should also include non-examples. This establishes a
definite definition through examples in their minds. Not only should I tell them this information,
but I should have them repeat the information as well. Repeating the statements will appeal to
different learners. If someone is a visual learner, then I need to write the definitions on the board
or on an anchor chart so they can see it visually. Having them repeat the information engages the
students more and adapts to the listening aspect of learning. Going into this lesson I myself did
not have a good understanding of what an illustration is in words. Because I did not have a good
idea of what that looks like to a first grader, I did a poor job of communicating that to the
students. I should have had better descriptions and examples to guide the students conversations
and ideas. I needed to direct the students attention to color choices in the picture, the type of art
that was used, and why that art may have been chosen. By pointing out these features the students
could determine how those aspects of the illustration supported the illustration. When teaching
the students these aspects of a picture, I needed to spend a longer time breaking it down. I should
have projected the images more and spent longer dissecting the images. I could have looked at the
image and broke down each aspect with the students observing. This would be the I do. Then I
should project another image and guide the students in dissecting the parts of it. This would be
the we do. Once we have practiced this, they could then describe the different aspects of an
illustration on their own. This would be the you do. By this point, the students should have a
good idea of what an illustration is and what to look for in a picture. After this teaching, we could
go through the book as a class and picture walk the book. We could focus on the pictures and
discuss it more as a class using the skills we had just learned. This would allow for good
discussion of the images and what to look for in an illustration. The rest of the lesson could go as
planned, and the students should be prepared for what is expected when visualizing and
interpreting an illustration.

Samford University
Design for Learning