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Monet Bridge

Kansas State Standard VA:Basic:1.3.3

Standard 1: Understanding & Applying Media, Techniques, & Processes. Benchmark 3: The student experiments with various media, techniques, & process to develop manipulative skills. Indicator 3: Correctly follows the steps of a process.

Objectives

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Students will learn about the history behind Monet and Impressionism.

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Students will use watercolor resist & wet-on-wet technique to create an artwork inspired by Monet’s paintings.

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Students will learn how the altering proportion of objects can create space.

Art Production

1 Hour – Monet Information & Crayon Drawing 30 Minutes – Add Watercolor & Salt

1 Hour – Anticipatory Set: (10 Minutes) Claude Monet: Inventing Impressionism Video

State Objective: Today we’re going to look at one of Monet’s Japanese Footbridge painting. Then we’ll make our own bridge and water lily pond painting inspired by Monet.

Input: (10minutes) ClaudeMonet.PPT Impressionism is a style of painting that began in Paris, France in the mid-1800s. Unlike artists before them, the impressionists painted most of their paintings outdoors and liked to portray natural subjects like trees, fields, and oceans. Impressionists would often take their materials outdoors and paint what they saw. This is called painting “en plein air.” The style was called impressionism because the artists were not as exacting about painting a realistic picture. They used many short brush strokes, applying paint thickly, to create the idea, or impression, of a subject. --Review the Elements and Principles we talked about in our previous projects (Emphasis with Creepy Carrots! Line, Texture, Color with Ish) Talk to students about the Element of Art: Space in relation to the Principle of Design: Proportion. When we’re looking at a big space, like a landscape, the proportion or size of objects to each other change. If it’s further back in space it’s smaller, if it’s closer to us in space it’s bigger.

Demonstrate: Before you begin write your name on the paper (first name, space, last name, class name underneath) Turn the paper in portrait orientation (vertical).

Grades: 2 nd & 3 rd Medium: Watercolor Resist Durations: 1Hour & 30 Minutes

Materials

10x16” 60# Paper Crayons/Oil Pastels Watercolors Paintbrushes Painting Mats Sea Salt

Elements of Art

Color, Line, Texture, Space

Principles of Design

Emphasis, Proportion

Vocabulary

Watercolor Resist – wax is used to prevent paint from getting onto an area.

Wet-on-wet Technique – wet paint applied to wet paper.

Impressionism – a style or movement in painting originating in France in the 1860s, characterized by a concern with depicting the visual impression of the moment, especially in terms of the shifting effect of light and color.

En Plein Air – French for “open (in full) air”. Artist painted outside.

Art History/Resources

http://safeshare.tv/w/ss563e4002f0c38

ClaudeMonet.ppt (Google Drive)

Claude Monet, Water Lily Pond, Water Irises, 1990

This is one of the few paintings Monet ever painted in portrait. Show students how to use the crayons to create a bridge across the middle of their paper. Three thick curved horizontal lines with five vertical bars. (place the first bar in the middle and work out from there). Your bridge can be whatever color you want. Then use a purple (Monet never used black) to add some shadow to the underside of the bars and bridge. Only add purple to the inside of the boxes created by the bridge, not across the whole thing (Two sides, on the bottom of the lines and on the left or right but not both). Refer to example if you have questions. Then demonstrate making rough dots of color in yellow to create the bright lily pads. Tell students that the lily pads in the front (at the bottom of the paper) should be bigger than the ones further back in space (at the top of the paper). The yellow lily pad dots should become more like squished ovals as they go back in space. After they’ve added their yellow lily pads they will add a couple spots of white, pink or peach for the lily blossoms. Remember the ones further away (higher on the paper) will be smaller than the ones up front. All of them should be smaller than the lily pads. Then students should also add some darker green around half the edge of their lily pads, but don’t color them in, it is just to add some shadow.

Claude Monet, Water-Lily Pond, 1899

Modifications/Notes

Lesson Inspiration Credit goes to:

Elementary-Art-Rocks.blogspot.com

Check for Understanding: (2minutes) What should you do first when you get your paper? Write your name (First name, Last name, Class name) and flip it over. Next you have to draw your bridge, how many horizontal lines should you make? Three. Should they be straight lines? No, Curved. Then how many vertical lines should you make? Five. Next what do you do? Add shadows using purple. Then what should you do? Draw yellow dots to make lily pads. Are the dots towards the bottom and the top of the paper going to be the same size and shape? NO. Which lily pads should be bigger? The ones at the bottom. After our lily pads are done what should you draw next? Lily blossoms with white, peach, or pink. What’s the last think that you draw? Green shadows around the lily pads.

Guided Practice: Before you begin write your name on the paper (first name, last name, class name underneath) Turn the paper in portrait orientation (vertical).

1. Use the crayons to create a bridge across the middle of their paper. Three thick

curved horizontal lines with five vertical bars. (Place the first bar in the middle and

work out from there).

2. Then use a purple (Monet never used black) to add some shadow to the

underside of the bars and bridge. Only add purple to the inside of the boxes created

by the bridge, not across the whole thing (Two sides, on the bottom of the lines and on the left or right but not both). Refer to example if you have questions.

3. Make rough dots of color in yellow to create the bright lily pads. The lily pads in

the front (at the bottom of the paper) should be bigger than the ones further back in space (at the top of the paper). The yellow lily pad dots should become more like squished ovals as they go back in space.

4. Add a couple spots of white, pink or peach for the lily blossoms. Remember the

ones further away (higher on the paper) will be smaller than the ones up front. All

of them should be smaller than the lily pads.

5. Add some darker green around half the edge of their lily pads, but don’t color

them in; it is just to add some shadow.

Closure: When students are finished they should raise their hand. Collect their drawings. Then they can go sit at the front of the room. Before students leave, review what Impressionism is. Ask students what the name of the artist we talked about was. Monet. What Element of Art did we talk about? Space. What Principle of design did we talk about? Proportion. Next time you come in we’ll paint our

Japanese Footbridge & Water Lily Ponds to finish them.

30 Minutes – Anticipatory Set: Who was the artist we talked about last time you were here? Monet. What art movement did Monet start? Impressionism.

State Objective: Today we get to add paint to our Japanese bridge drawings. The paint won’t stick to the wax of the crayon, that’s called a “water-color resist”. We’re also going to experiment with adding salt to our wet paintings; it has some very interesting effects.

Demonstrate: Quickly demonstrate the wet-on-wet technique for painting their Monet inspired bridge. Using a wet brush lightly dampen the entire paper. Using watercolors, brush one color lightly over an area. Rinse paintbrush and pick up a second color. Paint on paper again, if you touch another color it might bleed a little, that is okay! Be gentle when painting, when the paper is wet, it will tear easily. Keep painting until you’ve filled the whole space with color. You can paint over the crayons because the wax will “resist” the paint and it won’t stick. While your paint is still wet, we’ll take a pinch of sea salt and sprinkle it over the paper. This will create an interesting texture for the background.

Check for Understanding: What do we do first? Wet Paper – Add Color– Rinse Paintbrush and Repeat – Once Your Painting Is Complete Raise your hand – Mrs. Anderson Will Add a Sprinkle of Salt – Now It’s Finished! – Place It On The Drying Rack.

Guided Practice:

1. Using a wet brush lightly dampen the entire paper.

2. Using watercolors, brush one color lightly over an area.

3. Rinse paintbrush and pick up a second color. Paint on paper again, if you touch

another color it might bleed a little, that is okay! Be gentle when painting, when the paper is wet, it will tear easily. Keep painting until you’ve filled the whole space

with color.

4. When you’re finished painting raise your hand.

5. Mrs. Anderson will add a pinch of sea salt and sprinkle it over the paper. This

will create an interesting texture for the background.

6. Place your finished Japanese Bridge & Water Lily Pond on the drying rack.

Closure: When students are finished, they can go sit at the front of the room. Before students leave, review what Impressionism is. Ask students what the name of the artist we talked about was. Monet. What Element of Art did we talk about? Space. What Principle of design did we talk about? Proportion. How can we see our bridge even though we painted over it? Because the paint won’t stick to the crayons, that’s called Watercolor Resist.

Aesthetic Questions

Could an Impressionist painting be considered an “Ish” painting? (Refer to Lesson about Ish by Peter H. Reynolds)

Art Criticism/Analysis Questions

Did Monet paint his water lily paintings like we did our? Could it be “inspired” by Monet even though we didn’t do it the same way?