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Imperialism (Lesson 1 in the EdTPA learning segment)

August 31st, 2015


90 minutes
Central Focus: Driving Questions: To what extent did imperialism cause World War One?
How do we use and analyze sources using origin, purpose, values, and limitations?
Standards Assessed:
(AERO 2012):
Standard 2: Students will understand causes and effects of interaction among societies,
including trade, systems of international exchange, war, and diplomacy.
Learning Objectives:
Students will be able to identify the origin, purpose, values, and limitations of a source given a
speech by Kaiser Wilhelm.
Students will be able to visually represent the concept of imperialism given a definition.
Students will be able to answer questions about the Morocco
Crises and how they contributed to imperialism causing World War One given sources such as
the GCSE textbook and political cartoons along with teacher-created questions.
Students will be able to identify the claim, evidence, and analysis of a paragraph given a
random student example, in a group using highlighting tools on their laptops.
Students will be able to analyze their textbook by identifying the origin, purpose, values, and
limitations.
Students will be able to make a claim regarding to what extent imperialism caused World War
One. Additionally, students will be able to support their claims with evidence and analysis of
specific evidence.
Assessments:
Formal: Homework on Google Form: 1) Using the section titled "Morocco, 1905 and
1911 from page 10 of your GCSE textbook, write a paragraph focusing on the Moroccan Crisis
to support the thesis: "Imperialism was a significant cause of tension in Europe in the years
leading up to World War I." Follow the claim-evidence-analysis format 2) In one sentence,
describe the origin of the textbook section used above 3) In one sentence, describe the purpose
of the textbook section used above 4) With regard to the origins, purpose, and content, what are
the values and limitations of the sections of your GCSE textbook titled "Morocco, 1905 and
1911" for a historian studying the causes of World War I? You should have two values and two
limitations
Informal: Highlighting paragraph going over claim, evidence, and analysis, visual
representation of imperialism, questioning during origin, purpose, values, and limitations
instruction. Creating a visual representation of imperialism. Questioning with the whole class.
Questioning in small groups. Check for understanding during tasks.
Materials Needed: Blank sheets of paper, markers, pens, pencils, student laptops, teacher
laptop, t.v. to project materials with proper cords, internet access.
Procedures:

1) Hook/Anticipatory Set: Review Homework Due for today. (15 Minutes)


a) Students will be asked to open their laptops so, as a group, we can review the ClaimEvidence-Analysis Paragraphs they created the previous class.
b) Once all students are ready to do this, I will ask them to tip their computers so they are
not shut, just not distracting them from the next activity.
c) I will show them a student example of a good claim-evidence-analysis paragraph. I will
use this model to show the distinct parts of the paragraph.
i) Opportunity for language function: Analysis. Students have heard this word before,
however, it was not clearly scaffolded in previous lessons. Formative data shows that
most students do not know how to do a historical analysis of sources properly.
d) Students will then be asked to open their computers and highlight the three distinct parts
of their paragraphs. Teacher will check for understanding with struggling students (based
on formative data).
e) Once theyre done highlighting, they will share with their table partner.
Procedures Contd:
2) Answer the Driving Question from the previous lesson (To what extent did Militarism Cause
WW1) (5 Minutes)
a) Students will participate in a large group discussion using evidence from the previous
lesson to support their statement. For example, a student may say that militarism played
a huge role in causing WWI because of the attitude Germany had when creating the
Schlieflan plan.
3) Introducing Imperialism: Transition into the next cause by telling students that there are two
more causes of WWI they have yet to explore. Today, we will explore Imperialism(1 minute)
4) Visual Representation of Imperialism (10 Minutes): I will put up a slide on the t.v. that has
the definition of imperialism: "An unequal human and territorial relationship, usually in the
form of an empire, based on ideas of superiority and practices of dominance, and involving
the extension of authority and control of one state or people over another." (Dictionary of
Human Geography)
a) Students will be asked to re-create the definition in their own words.
b) Students will have 5 minutes, individually, to create a visual representation of
imperialism based off of their prior knowledge of the word and the definition.
c) After their representation is created, they will share their picture with their table group.
5) Transition: British Imperialism
a) I will explain that land that Great Britain ruled in the 18th and 19th Century was a great
amount. Refer back to the map in the GCSE textbook, page 6.
i) I will ask students how they feel the rest of the world may feel based off of this.
ii) I will then show the quote, The sun never sets on the British Empire.
6) Two Views of German Imperialism with OPVL (35 Minutes)
a) I will tell student that the British werent the only empire that was looking to take parts of
the world. Germany was determined to grow their empire as well.
i) I will tell students that on their Interactive Journals, there are 2 different sources on
German imperialism and questions to answer below them. They will have 10 minutes
to answer the questions. While students are answering the questions, I will walk
around the classroom and check that students are answering the questions.
(1) 1. Explain the message the source 1 is trying to communicate, 2. Explain the
message the source 2 is trying to communicate, 3. How might the different

messages represented by the two sources affect international relations in Europe


pre-1914?
ii) Next, I will have a whole class debrief on the questions and address any
misconceptions.
iii) I will tell the students that, based on this idea of German Imperialism, we are going to
learn a new skill, analyzing sources using Origin, Purpose, Values, and Limitations
(OPVL).
iv) I will then, doing a think-aloud, model how to identify the OPVL of a source using
the British political cartoon, A British postcard created soon after Kaiser Wilhelms
speech to the North German Regatta Association
(1) I will introduce the OPVL Cheat Sheet as a tool
v) Next, students will use the Place in the Sun speech by Kaiser Wilhelm to determine
OPVL. I will give students 5 minutes to identify the OPVL.
vi) I will then ask the whole group to identify the OPVL. I will put them on the whiteboard and address any misconceptions.
7) Whats happening in Africa? (5 minutes)
a) In the beginning of the unit, there were many questions about Africa and what was
happening in that continent during this time. I will show a cartoon of Africa being pulled
at by many different countries and ask students to tell me what they see, think, and
wonder.
8) Imperialism Test Case: The Two Moroccan Crises (15 minutes- Into homework)
a) Individually students should look at Morocco Source 1 (Harpers magazine cover-define tete-a-tete?) (This and the other directions in this section are on their Interactive
Journal Google Doc)
b) Using the first paragraph in the Morocco section (pg. 10 of GCSE Textbook) students
identify ways the source supports the information in the text.
c) Again using the first paragraph, students identify information from the text not supported
by the source.
Homework: Google Form:
In your Grade 10 Social Studies Google Drive folder, respond to the google form for today:
1) Using the section titled "Morocco, 1905 and 1911 from page 10 of your GCSE textbook, write
a paragraph focusing on the Moroccan Crisis to support the thesis: "Imperialism was a
significant cause of tension in Europe in the years leading up to World War I." Follow the claimevidence-analysis format
2) With regard to the origins, purpose, and content, analyze the the GCSE textbook titled
"Morocco, 1905 and 1911" for a historian studying the causes of World War by finding values
and limitations. You should have two values and two limitations
EAL Accommodations: Students will have a summarized version of sources. Students will also
have a vocabulary list that was given to them the beginning of the unit. Students will also have
the EAL instructor in the classroom as push-in to help with discussions.
Sources:
Scramble for Africa Slide: Saindroff, David. "The Mad Scramble for Africa" Digital image. The
Scramble for Africa. Morgan Heritage/ Our Afrikan Heritage Group, 30 Sept. 2015. Web.

A Guide to Doing OPVL on Documents Tests Keel. "Origins, Values, Purposes, Limitations."
Web log post. IBSurvival. IB Survival, Nov. 2011. Web. Aug. 2015. Revisions made.
<http://www.ibsurvival.com/topic/13466-origins-purpose-value-and-limitations/>.
Kaiser Wilhelm II, Speech to the North German Regatta Association, 1901. Found digitally:
Clare, John D. "GCSE Modern World History." GCSE Modern World History. John Clare,
2002. Web. 21 Oct. 2015. <http://johndclare.net/>.
British Postcard 1914, This British postcard shows what would happen if the Kaiser took the
'place in the sun' that he wanted. Found digitally: Clare, John D. "GCSE Modern World
History." GCSE Modern World History. John Clare, 2002. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.
<http://johndclare.net/>.
GCSE Modern World History 2nd Edn Student's Book (History In Focus), Hodder Education;
2nd edition (23 May 2001).
Rogers, William A. "An Interrupted Tete-a-Tete." Harpweek Cartoons. New York, 01 July 1905,
Web. 01 Aug. 2015. <http://www.harpweek.com/09Cartoon/BrowseByDateCartoon.asp?
Month=July&Date=1>.
Rubric for Homework:
4 (Exemplify)

3 (Meets)

2 (Approaching)

1 (Does Not Meet)

The student makes a


clear and relevant
claim. The student
supports the claim
with sufficient
relevant evidence
that uses quotes and
pulls in extra relevant
resources not
discussed class. The
student analyzes the
sources to relate to a
high level using
higher order thinking
skills. The student
identifies the origin,
purpose, values, and
limitations of the
source and connects
the values and
limitations to the
origin and purpose.

The student makes a


claim. The student
uses more than one
piece evidence from
class to support the
claim, possibly using
quotes or summaries

The student attempts


to make a claim but
lacks clarity. The
student attempts to
use evidence from
previous class, but
may not be using
enough evidence or
relevant evidence.
The student does
little to no analysis on
the sources.

The student makes


no clear claim. The
student does not use
evidence. The
student does not
analyze the sources.

The student identifies


the origin, purpose,
values and limitations
of the source.

The student attempts


to identify the origin
and purpose.

The student does


not identify origins or
purposes of any
sources.

Nationalism Pt. 1 (Lesson 2 in the EdTPA Learning Segment)


September 2nd, 2015
Shortened Period for school event (60 minutes)
Central Focus: Driving Questions:
1) To what extent did nationalism play in starting European conflict leading up to World
War I?
2) What role does nationalism play in current conflicts?
Standards Assessed:
AERO: Grade 10/World Hist. 2
Connections and Conflict Standard 2: Students will understand causes and effects of interaction
among societies, including trade, systems of international exchange, war, and diplomacy.
Learning Objectives:
Students will be able to decide to what extent imperialism caused World War One given
a review exercise where students need to move to one end of the room depending on their
stance (1-5) and support their decision.
Students will be able to describe the concept of nationalism in small groups given the
definition of the word along with an example written by George Orwell.
Students will be able to compare nationalism in the Balkan Wars with nationalism within
ISIS given a mini-lecture on the Balkan Wars and a website with information about ISIS
Assessments:
Formal: Homework: Outside of ISIS, find an example today of nationalism causing
conflict in the world (Note: This can include hot or cold conflicts - there could be fighting or
just tension.) Use the Vox and Guardian Website: http://www.vox.com/cards/things-about-isisyou-need-to-know/what-is-isis , http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/07/who-yazidi-isisiraq-religion-ethnicity-mountains,
Informal: Stand-up activity, class discussions, small group discussions, questioning,
notes check during direct instruction of Balkan Wars, discussion debrief of Balkan Wars.
Materials Needed: Student laptops, teacher laptop, internet access, web versions of all articles
(Guardian, Vox, Orwell),
Procedures:
1) Review Yesterdays Imperialism Driving Question (5 minutes)
a. To what extent activity: Students will be asked to decide, from 1-5 (1 being not at
all, 5 being a great amount), how much they feel that imperialism played a role in
causing World War One. I will point at which part of the room represents 1, 3, and
5. Students will need to be ready to justify their decision if asked to share. I will
call on one student in the 1 area, one from the 3 area, and one from the 5
area.
2) Review: Claim-Evidence-Analysis

a. Based on formative data, review how to create a paragraph, using claimevidence-analysis. Use a student example to model.
3) Transition into the next topic: Nationalism. Show the definition on the t.v: -Spirit or
aspirations common of a whole nation, Loyalty and devotion to ones country,
Extreme Patriotism.
4) Example of Nationalism: George Orwell article.
a. Tell students that George Orwell wrote an article about how sports fans can be
seen as representing the idea of nationalism. They will now read it and answer a
few questions, in their table partners, about this article:
i. What feelings do sports bring up in fans, according to Orwell?
ii. Based upon your own experience, do you agree with his assessment?
(Could tie in the world cup--Germany destroying Brazil, or the
Netherlands beating Spain)
iii. Why do fans cheer and boo at sporting events? Are sports about the
athletes or the fans competing?
iv. Describe the feeling you experience when your side wins and loses. Why
do you care about your team? (You can even examine the concept of
having a team at all; considering fans are only ideologically connected
to teams.) (Fun fact--the origin of the word fan is fanatic.)
5) Transition into lecture on The Balkan Wars: See Think Wonder
a. Put up a political cartoon from 1888 of the Balkans. Tell students to raise their
hands to tell me what they see, then what they think and then what they
wonder about the picture. I will have 3 boxes on the white board to fill in each of
the 3 observations.
b. Tell students to keep a list of their lingering questions or wonderings on their
google doc for this class.
6) Tell students that this picture will help us understand the tensions between the
Balkans area that led to tension in all of Europe that caused World War One.
7) Short Direct Instruction on the Balk Wars. Make sure to hit these points (using maps)
a. Slide 1:
i. 1911 map-Pre-war.
ii. What are the Balkans?:
iii. (Map),The name comes from the mountains that run through the area.
iv. Who are the Serbs?
v. Serbs=ethnic group of South Slavic Nation. Group of Slavic people
basically
b. Slide 2: The First Balkan War 1912
i. Everyone versus Turkey
ii.

Russia and Austria-Hungary were competing over the Balkans.

iii. Russia organized the independent Balkan countries into the Balkan

League in order to attack and push Turkey out of Europe. (Ottoman


Empire. Huge force in the past)
c. Slide 3: Show map after the first Balkan War
d. Partner Check Up: 3 minutes to check with your tale partner on which notes they
have taken. Academic Support and ELL teachers can check with their students
during this time if they can attend for push-in
e. Slide 4: Results of 1912 War
i. The whole thing only took about six weeks to defeat Turkey.
ii. Turkey had little to no land (map) and Serbia had doubled
iii. Causing tensionagain
f.

Slide 5: Show map after first Balkan War again.

g. Slide 6: What Caused the 1913 War


i. In almost all cases-War results in new division of land
ii. Conference in London to divide Turkey
iii.

Bulgaria not too happy about how much land they ended up with vs. how
much land Serbia got.

iv. Bulgaria decided to attack Serbia easily defeatedSerbia is EVEN bigger


now.
h. Slide 7: Show map after second Balkan War, 1913
i.

Partner Checkup: 3 minutes to see what your partner has for notes.

j.

Slide 8: So What?
i. Austria-Hungary is upset with how huge Serbia is because tons of Slavs
in A-H may want to be part of Serbia
ii. Serbia is on a mission to create a Greater Serbia. Geographically this is
smart. Bosnians are ethnically Serbs as well. Why not take it?

k. Slide 9: Show ethnicity map


l.

Slide 10: Show Balkans 1913 Map next to ethnicity in 1914 Europe map

8) Discussion on Balkan Wars in Groups:


a. In table groups, students will discuss and answer the following questions:
i. What do you notice about Western Europe v. Eastern Europe?
ii. What would be concerning to you as a leader of Austria-Hungary?
iii. In what way would you address this?
iv. Think about the alliance systems at this time. How do the Balkan wars
help lead to conflict?
9) Homework:
a. Read cards 1-3 from Vox on ISIS
b. Read about what ISIS is doing to the Yazidis

c. Facebook Discussion Post: Outside of ISIS, find an example today of nationalism


causing conflict in the world (Note: This can include hot or cold conflicts there could be fighting or just tension.)

EAL Accommodations: ELL students will be given a vocabulary list for words discussed today,
students will have a different version of the Orwell article, they will also be given the talking
points during the direct instruction digitally so they can easily translate the discussion.
Sources:
Orwell Piece:
Orwell, George. "Sporting Spirit" Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays, (1950): Secker and
Warburg.
Cartoon:
Serio-comic War Map for 1877. Digital image. Library of Congress. Library of Congress,
Usa.gov, n.d. Web. Aug. 2015. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2003677957/>.
Maps:
The Trustees of Boston College. "A Selection of Maps for WWII." Welcome to WW2.
Boston College, Feb. 2010. Web. Aug. 2015.
<https://www2.bc.edu/~heineman/hs144maps.html>.
Ethnicities Map, GCSE Modern World History 2nd Edn Student's Book (History In
Focus), Hodder Education; 2nd edition (23 May 2001). Page 7.
Homework: Beauchamp, Zack, "ISIS Used to Be Al-Qaeda in Iraq." Vox, 17 June 2014. Web. 22
Aug. 2015. <http://www.vox.com/cards/things-about-isis-you-need-to-know/what-is-isis>.

Nationalism Pt. 2 (Lesson 3 in EdTPA Learning Segment)


September 4th, 2015
90 minutes
Central Focus: What events directly led to the start of WWI? To what extent did nationalism
cause WWI?
Standards Assessed:
1. AERO: Grade 10/World Hist. 2
Connections and Conflict Standard 2: Students will understand causes and effects of interaction
among societies, including trade, systems of international exchange, war, and diplomacy.
.
Learning Objectives:
Students will be able to select and classify by MAIN cause relevant short term causes of World
War One given a timeline resource and instructions to create posters with color in small
collaborative groups.
Students will be able to connect the assassination of Franz Ferdinand to global conflict in 1914
given videos describing the event and guiding questions
Assessments:
Informal: Headline activity, notes on interactive journal, discussion questions
Formal: Poster created in collaborative groups,
Materials Needed: 5 poster sized papers, markers, rulers, student computers, teacher computer,
t.v. to project slides, and internet access.
Procedures:
1) Review Last Class- Headline Activity (10 Minutes)
a. With your table/elbow partner, create a headline about the Balkan Wars in
relation to the idea of nationalism. Give example-Ms/r. (name) summer equals
heavy couch time and quality Netflix time. Put them on a white board closest to
you.
b. Teacher will say them all out loud and ask for elaboration if needed.
2) Video on the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. (30 Minutes)
a. Explain to students that many historians equate this one event to being the straw
that broke the camels back to cause global conflict. Students should be thinking
about these questions while watching the video- Also do a few turn and talk
partner checks to make sure students are taking notes and thinking about the
questions:
i. How did nationalism play a part in the assassination?
ii. How did planning and luck play a part in the assassination?
iii. Did the Black Hand achieve its goals?
iv. The movie suggests that one bullet started the war. How is this both
accurate and inaccurate? (Should get to the idea that the long term
causes needed to be in place for the assassination to mean anything.)
b. Video links:
i. Part 1: 10 minutes

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Assassin-of-ArchdukeFranz-Ferdinand-Gavrilo-Princip
ii. Part 2: 10 minutes
https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Assassination-of-ArchdukeFranz-Ferdinand0
iii. Part 3: Only watch until 3:50 (it jumps from WWI to Hitler)
https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Assassination-of-FranzFerdinand-A-Cause-of-WWI
3) To What Extent activity (10 Minutes)
a. Students will be given a minute do think, on a scale of one to five, how important
nationalism was to causing World War One. The question projected will be To
what extent did nationalism play a role in causing World War One.
b. One end of the room will represent the one, meaning nationalism did not play a
large role in causing World War One, and the other end of the room will be five,
meaning nationalism played a huge role in causing World War One.
c. Students will need to physically move to which end they feel best represents their
feelings. They will also need to be ready to justify their place in the room (one to
five).
4) Identification of Short term Causes (40 Minutes)
a. In new table groups, students will use online resources to determine what they
feel were the important events leading up to World War I, from June 28, 1914 to
August 4, 1914 (inclusive)
b. http://www.johndclare.net/causes_WWI4.htm
c. http://spartacus-educational.com/FWWchronology.htm
d. Students will create a visual representation (some type of organized system) to
represent these events
e. They will be asked to color code/organize them in a way the represents all four
causes of World War One (Militarism, Alliances, Imperialism, Nationalism)
f. Once all groups are done, do a gallery walk of all the posters to discuss their
posters and share them out to the class.
Homework: None
Sources:
Videos:
Bos, Carole "Assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand - Gavrilo Princip" AwesomeStories.com.
Oct 07, 2013. Aug 22, 2015.
<http://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Assassin-of-Archduke-Franz-FerdinandGavrilo-Princip>.
Bos, Carole "Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand" AwesomeStories.com. Sep 19, 2014.
Aug 22, 2015.
<http://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Assassination-of-Archduke-FranzFerdinand0>.

Bos, Carole "Assassination of Franz Ferdinand - A Cause of WWI" AwesomeStories.com. Oct


07, 2013. Aug 22, 2015.
<http://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Assassination-of-Franz-Ferdinand-A-Causeof-WWI>.

Websites:
Simkin, John. "Spartacus Educational." Spartacus Educational. Spartacus Educational
Publishers Ltd., Aug. 2015. Web. 22 Aug. 2015. http://spartacuseducational.com/FWWchronology.htm
Clare, John D. "GCSE Modern World History." GCSE Modern World History. John Clare, 2002.
Web. 21 Oct. 2015. <http://johndclare.net/>.