Sei sulla pagina 1di 6

Rowan McCloskey s4526447

LITERARY REQUIREMENTS TEACHING METHOD AREA:


HUMANITIES
Element
ACELA17
64

Understanding of
Element
Compare and contrast
how different people
would view a visual text
i.e. advertisement,
animation, bill poster.
Investigate what the
reasons for this might
be, for example, socioeconomic status,
political affiliation,
religious or ethnic
background and the
techniques the creators
of the visual texts have
used to target certain
groups.

ACELT16
21

Examine different types


of text and identify
techniques used to
establish character as
well as to influence the
opinion of the reader in
regards to the subject
matter. Techniques
include, emotive
language, hyperbole,
stereotypes. Exploration
of the moral and ethical
issues surrounding these
techniques.

ACELY17
65

Analyse texts from


different periods,
particularly media texts,
ranging from historical
to modern day. Look at
how technological
advances have
influenced and changed
these texts and explain
why.

Evidence of
Competence
In history, a way for
implementing this
element would be to
analyse propaganda
posters from WW1
or WW2. Have a
look at the purpose
of different posters
and who they are
targeted at.
Examine all the
elements of the
posters including
images, the words
used, structure etc.
and identify what
elements would
attract different
people.
In Geography, while
studying migration,
look at articles and
letters to the
newspaper with
strong opinions
either for or against
the issue. Examine
the language used,
why the person
might have that
opinion and
compare it to the
facts of the situation
to see if the claims
stack up.
Looking at
communication and
journalism in
wartime throughout
the 20th and 21st
Century, compare
the differences
between how stories
were reported. From
journalists that
reported stories that
1

Further
Development

Rowan McCloskey s4526447

ACELA17
63

Examine some lengthy


or complex texts and
explore the techniques
used to make it readerfriendly, more digestible
and greatly increase
coherence. These
techniques include,
paragraphs,
introductions,
conclusions, indexes and
table of contents etc.

ACELA18
05

Looking at how
language and text
structure can be
manipulated to create a
literary construct, style
or genre. These could be
things like how the text
is positioned on the
page, rhyming, what
perspective the text is
written in, different
emotions being
expressed using
different colour ink,
incorporation of images
etc.

were often days old


by the time they
were published
compared to today
where stories are
updated in real time
by amateur
witnesses through
technology like
Twitter. Also how
subversive elements
communicated in
pre-internet days
compared to the
world of social
media and
electronic
communication.
While looking at
texts for any
humanities subject,
always take note of
these techniques
and ask students to
identify them. Could
include a list on the
board and remind
students that they
will have to use
these structures
when it comes time
to write their
assessments.
While investigating
an Asian society in
History, if the class
was concentrating
on Japan, the Haiku
could be used as an
example of
Japanese culture.
The class could
examine the literary
features of the
Haiku then create
one themselves
either from their
own perspective or
from a Japanese
person in the era of
the Shogunate.
2

Rowan McCloskey s4526447


ACELY17
27

While much work today


is completed on a
computer using wordprocessing and other
software it is important
for students to develop
handwriting that easy to
understand,
comfortable, able to be
done as second nature
and for long periods of
time if necessary.

ACELA15
28

Student look at the


evolution of language as
the world changes. New
words are created as
other words have their
meaning changed or
become obsolete. This
transpires due to
improvements in
technology, particularly
in the area of
communication, as well
as the greater
interaction between
cultures and societies.

ACELT16
19

When researching
events and ideas, take a
step back and look at
the actual resources
that we are learning
from. Are they primary
or secondary sources?
What was the persons
status in society that
created them and would

When studying
Gallipoli for
example, have
students write
letters from the
perspective as
soldiers on the
frontline. Obviously
computers werent
around then and all
correspondence was
done with
handwriting. Show
examples of old
letters and
encourage kids to
take handwritten
notes when viewing
movies or listening
to a speaker.
While looking at
Australias place in
the region in
Geography,
examine the
differences in
peoples and culture
through South-East
Asia, the South
Pacific and Papua
New Guinea.
Analyse similarities
and differences in
language
historically, and the
reasons for this. As
well as presently,
any cross-culture
communication and
how/why this is
occurring.
While looking at the
European
colonisation of
Australia look at
texts that were
written by the
British, both those
in command as well
as by the convicts.
Contrast and
3

Rowan McCloskey s4526447


that affect the point of
view they were
prosecuting? Compare
to other texts regarding
the same issue and
investigate why they
differ/agree.

ACELY17
20

Have students plan,


rehearse and deliver
presentations that
incorporate different
elements such as visual,
audio and print content.
This should be done to
communicate a
perspective that is
different to the student
or to explore new ideas.

compare these to
the literature or
spoken histories
recorded by the
indigenous
population of
Australia to get a
more rounded
perspective of the
event. Get the
students to explain
why the different
parties would have
these perspectives.
While investigating
an ancient culture in
History, have the
students create a
multimedia
presentation that
communicates what
life would be like
from the
perspective of an
Egyptian slave for
example. They could
incorporate the
music they wouldve
listened to, show
images of the
pyramids they are
building and give
examples of
hieroglyphics while
they explain what
day-to-day life
would be like.

NUMERACY REQUIREMENTS
Element
ACMNA18
0

Understanding of
Element
Using graphs as a
representation of data
to make the data more
readable and accessible.
Have the students

Evidence of
Competence
In Geography, while
exploring the
importance of water
as a resource, use a
graph showing the
4

Further
Development

Rowan McCloskey s4526447


investigate the
relationship between
the graph and the data
it represents and how it
is interpreted by the
viewer.

ACMMG1
59

Establish the formulas


that are used to find the
area of the following
shapes: triangles,
rectangles and
parallelograms. Once
this has been done
explore the relationships
between the shapes and
how it is possible to use
limited information to
problem-solve once this
has been identified.

ACSMP16
9

Using numerical data


that has either been
collected by the
students themselves or
obtained by another
party (primary or
secondary sources). The
students can identify,

levels of water in
the dams of a major
Australian city over
the last 100 years.
Have the students
break the
information down
and reveal what the
graph is saying
about the issue i.e.
increased water
scarcity.
I require further
development in
order to
incorporate this
element into my
teaching method
area. I would
explore teaching
resources such as
the text books
Oxford Big Ideas
Geography/Histor
y 7, and Oxford
Big Ideas
Mathematics 7.
See if theres
ideas in either for
a possible crossover. I would also
talk to other
teachers, see
what techniques
they have used
and recommend.
My first priority
though would be
to learn the
material myself
and then create a
link with my
method.
In Geography,
students can look at
a table of countries
with their liveability
scores across
different categories
e.g. Literacy rates,
healthcare, crime
5

Rowan McCloskey s4526447


and explore issues that
the data brings up.

rates etc.
Comparisons can
then be made
between countries
that score high to
those that score low
and the students
can investigate the
reasons for these
disparities.

LEARNING ACTIVITY
The learning activity Im describing is a numeracy task that should develop the
students skills in the strands of Number and Algebra and also, Statistics and
Probability.
-

As part of the Year 7 geography, Unit 2: Place and Liveability, the students
learn about what makes a place liveable.
The class will have a discussion about what makes a place liveable and we
will construct a list of maybe five factors, including for example:
transportation infrastructure, access to services, culture, social and family
connections and the feeling of safety.
The students will create a survey with these five factors and have a
system where they will be able to ask people on a scale of 1-5 how they
rate each factor in their local area.
Each student will need to survey 10 people, probably family and friends.
When they return to class, students will work out the average (either mean
or median) for each category.
The students will then create a bar graph of their data to present their
findings.
A further discussion can be held regarding the local area and what
categories are doing well and what categories need to be improved.